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Encyclopedia > Mesoamerican pyramids

Mesoamerican pyramids, pyramid-shaped structures, are an important part of Ancient Mesoamerican architecture. These structures were usually step pyramids with temples on top – more akin to the ziggurats of Mesopotamia than to the pyramids of Ancient Egypt. The Mesoamerican region's largest pyramid by volume – indeed, the largest in the world by volume – is the Great Pyramid of Cholula, in the Mexican state of Puebla. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Mesoamerican architecture is the set of architectural traditions produced by pre-Columbian cultures and civilizations of Mesoamerica, traditions which are best known in the form of public, ceremonial and urban monumental buildings and structures. ... The Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacan, is one example of an enormous step pyramid. ... Dur-Untash, or Choqa Zanbil, built in 13th century BC by Untash Napirisha and located near Susa, Iran is one of the worlds best-preserved ziggurats. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... The pyramids of Egypt, some of which are amongst the largest man-made constructions ever conceived, constitute one of the most potent and enduring symbols of Ancient Egyptian civilization. ... This article is about the culture area. ... For other meanings, see pyramid (disambiguation). ... The Great Pyramid of Cholula, the worlds largest monument and largest Pre-Columbian pyramid by volume, is a huge complex located in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico. ... The United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos or Mexico) comprises 31 states (estados) and one federal district (Distrito Federal), which contains the capital, Mexico City. ... The Mexican state of Puebla is located in the center of the country, to the east of Mexico City. ...

Cholula
Cholula

Contents

Image File history File links Great Pyramid of Cholula, Puebla, Mexico; exposed detail, staircase. ... Image File history File links Great Pyramid of Cholula, Puebla, Mexico; exposed detail, staircase. ...

Aztecs

Xochicalco
Xochicalco

The Aztecs, a people with a rich mythology and cultural heritage, dominated central Mexico in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries.[1] Their capital was Tenochtitlan on the shore of Lake Texcoco – the site of modern-day Mexico City. They were linguistically related to the preceding cultures in the basin of Mexico such as the Aztecs and the culture of Teotihuacan whose building styles they adopted and adapted. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 577 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Xochicalco Mesoamerican pyramids Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 577 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Xochicalco Mesoamerican pyramids Metadata This file... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Lake Texcoco is a lake in Mexico. ... Mexico City (in Spanish: Ciudad de México, México, D.F. or simply México) is the capital city of Mexico. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ...

Uxmal

The Great Pyramid or Templo Mayor was the main temple of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan (modern Mexico City). ... View over Malinalco Malinalco is a city in México State, Mexico. ... The Great Pyramid or Templo Mayor was the main temple of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan (modern Mexico City). ... uxmal adivino, from ground level (the overall shot I got of it is no good). ... uxmal adivino, from ground level (the overall shot I got of it is no good). ...

Maya

The Maya are a people of southern Mexico and northern Central America (Guatemala, Belize, western Honduras, and El Salvador) with some 3,000 years of history. Archaeological evidence shows the Maya started to build ceremonial architecture approximately 3,000 years ago. The earliest monuments consisted of simple burial mounds, the precursors to the spectacular stepped pyramids from the Terminal Pre-classic period and beyond. These pyramids relied on intricate carved stone in order to create a stair-stepped design. Many of these structures featured a top platform upon which a smaller dedicatory building was constructed, associated with a particular Maya deity. Maya pyramid-like structures were also erected to serve as a place of interment for powerful rulers. Maya pyramidic structures occur in a great variety of forms and functions, bounded by regional and periodical differences. This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... A tumulus (plural tumuli, from the Latin word for mound or small hill, from the root to bulge, swell also found in ) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ... Mesoamerican chronology The chronology of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica is usually divided into the following eras: Paleo-Indian Period c. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Altun Ha is the name given ruins of an ancient Maya city in Belize, located in the Belize District about 30 miles (50 km) north of Belize City and about 6 miles (10 km) west of the shore of the Caribbean Sea. ... Calakmul is the name of both a municipality and a major archeological site in the Mexican state of Campeche, in the central part of the Yucatán Peninsula. ... Caracol or El Caracol is the name given to a large ancient Maya site located in the Cayo District of the nation of Belize. ... The pyramids of Comalcalco Comalcalco is a city and a site of the Pre-Columbian Maya civilization about 45 miles (60 km) northeast of Villahermosa in the mexican state of Tabasco. ... The Pre-Columbian city of Cop n is a locale in extreme western Honduras, in the Cop Department, near to the Guatemalan border. ... Temple of the Warriors Chichen Itza is the largest of the Pre-Columbian archaeological sites in Yucat n, Mexico. ... El Mirador is a large pre-Columbian site of the Maya civilization, located in the north of the modern department of El Petén, Guatemala. ... The Palace, Ruins of Palenque Palenque is a Maya archeological site near the Usumacinta River in the Mexican state of Chiapas, located at about 130 km south of Ciudad del Carmen (see map). ... For other uses, see Tikal (disambiguation). ... Panorama of Uxmal Uxmal (, ) is a large Pre-Columbian ruined city of the Maya civilization in the state of Yucatán, Mexico. ...

Tarascans

The Tarascan state was a precolumbian culture located in the modern day Mexican state of Michoacán. The region is currently inhabited by the modern descendents of the P'urhépecha. Tarascan architecture is noted for "T"-shaped step pyramids known as yácatas. The Tarascan state was a state in precolumbian Mesoamerica roughly covering the geographic area of the present day mexican state of Michoacan. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 113 Government  - Governor Lázaro Cárdenas Batel (PRD)  - Federal Deputies PAN:12  - Federal Senators Jesús Mendez Arroyo García (PAN) Juan Humberto Vasquez ( (PRI) Marko A. Cortés (PAN) Area Ranked 16th  - State 59,928 km²  (23,138. ... Purhépecha men reeling cord for nets and making nets, 1899. ... The Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacan, is one example of an enormous step pyramid. ...

Teotihuacan
Teotihuacan

Tzintzuntzán is a ruined Pre-Columbian city, capital of the Native American Tarascan or Purépecha nation. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2810x1668, 1670 KB) Summary Licensing If you use this image outside of projects of the Wikimedia Foundation please attribute it to Wikimedia Commons or another project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2810x1668, 1670 KB) Summary Licensing If you use this image outside of projects of the Wikimedia Foundation please attribute it to Wikimedia Commons or another project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

Teotihuacanos

The Teotihuacano civilization, which flourished from around 300 BCE to 500 CE, at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. Teotihuacano culture collapsed around 550 and was followed by several large citystates such as Xochicalco (Whose inhabitants were probably of matlatzinca ethnicity), Cholula (whose inhabitants were probably Oto-Manguean) and later the ceremonial site of Tula (which has traditionally been claimed to have been built by Toltecs but which now is thought to have been founded by the Huastec culture). Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ... Matlatzinca is a name used to refer to different indigenous ethnic groups in the Toluca Valley in the state of Edo. ... Oto-Manguean languages (also Otomanguean) are a large family comprised of several families of Native American languages. ... The Toltecs (or Toltec or Tolteca) were a Pre-Columbian Native American people who dominated much of central Mexico between the 10th and 12th century AD. Their language, Nahuatl, was also spoken by the Aztecs. ... This article is about the Huastec people, whose native language Wastek (Huastec) is a Mayan language. ...

El Tajín

Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ... Xochicalco is a pre-Columbian archeological site in the western part of the Morelos, Mexico. ... Tula is a town of about 10,000 in Hidalgo State, central Mexico, some 57 miles to the north north-west of Mexico City. ... Pyramid of the Nitches, El Tajín, from February 1913 National Geographic magazine. ... Pyramid of the Nitches, El Tajín, from February 1913 National Geographic magazine. ...

Totonacs

The Totonac people controlled a sizeable portion of the Gulf coast from the 1st century through to the 13th. The best known Totonaca pyramid, in their capital El Tajín, is smaller than those of their neighbours and successors but more intricate. Although Tajín has been regarded as a Totonac site - mostly because it has had Totonac inhabitants in historic times some scholars now beelieve that it was built originally by Huastecs and lateer conquered by the Totonacs. The Totonac people resided in the eastern coastal and mountainous regions of Mexico at the time of the Spanish arrival in 1519. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... El Tajín is a Pre-Columbian archaeological site near the city of Papantla, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. ... Huastec statue from the Tampico Region, 14th–16th centuries The Huastec, also rendered as Huaxtec, Wastek and Huastecos, are an indigenous people of Mexico, historically based in the states of Hidalgo, Veracruz, San Luis Potosí and Tamaulipas concentrated along the route of the Panuco River and along the coast of...

El Tajín is a Pre-Columbian archaeological site near the city of Papantla, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. ...

Zapotecs

The Zapotecas were one of the earliest Mesoamerican cultures and held sway over the Oaxaca valley from 900 BC to about AD 1300. Extent of the Zapotec civilization The Zapotec civilization was an indigenous pre-Columbian civilization that flourished in the Valley of Oaxaca of southern Mesoamerica. ... For current news on the Oaxaca Teachers Strike of 2006 see: 2006 Oaxaca protests Oaxaca is the name of both a state in Mexico and that states capital city. ...

Monte Albán is a large pre-Columbian archaeological site in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca. ... Mitla is a town in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, famous for its pre-Columbian Mesoamerican buildings. ...

Others

The followng sites are from northern Mesoamerica, built by cultures whose ethnic affiliations are unknown:

Chalchihuites
Chalchihuites

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Altavista

This astronomical and ceremonial center was the product of the Chalchihuite culture. Its occupation and development had a period of approximately 800 years (200-1000 a.c.). This zone is considered an important archaeological center because of the astonishing, accurate functions of the edifications. The ones that stand out the most are: The Moon Plaza, The Votive Pyramid, the Ladder of Gamio and The labyrinth. In The Labyrinth you can appreciate with precision and accuracy, the respective equinoxes and the seasons.


La Quemada

You can appreciate the great quantity of buildings constructed above artificial terraces in the slopes of a hill. The materials used here include stone slab and clay. The most important structures are: The Hall of Columns, The Ball Game, The Votive Pyramid, and The Palace and the Barrack. In the most elevated part of the hill is The Fortress. This is composed of a small pyramid and a platform, encircled by a wall thats more than 800 mts. long and up to six feet high. La Quemada was occupied from 800 to 1200 a.d. Their founders and occupants have not been identified with certitude.


See also

Pyramids of Other Cultures Editor: The name of the first andean civilization is Caral, and not Norte Chico. Caral civilization was defined for the first time by Ruth Shady in 1997, after the Sacred City of Caral. ... Look up mound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ...

Xian, area of the majority of Chinese pyramids. ... A view of the pyramids at Giza from the plateau to the south of the complex. ... // The Falicons pyramid The Falicons pyramid was build above the karstic Cave of the Bats (Occitan: Bauma des Ratapignata) on the surrounds of Nice, on the French Riviera. ... Aerial view of the pyramids at Meroe. ... Pyramid of Cestius engraved by Giovanni Battista Piranesi The pyramid was included in the Aurelian Walls, and is close to Porta San Paolo (on the right). ...

Notes

  1. ^ The Aztecs/Mexicas. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ...

External links

  • Meso-American pyramids
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mesoamerican pyramids
  • PyramidPlan – instructions for building a scale-model Aztec temple

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Mystery of the Mesoamerican Pyramids (2682 words)
Whereas Egyptian pyramids were situated away from the villages and were ultimately inaccessible to the people, the Mesoamerican pyramids were located at the heart of the city and the community.
Unlike the limestone pyramids in Egypt which were built over a long span of thirty to forty years, and left closed to stand impervious to time, Mesoamerican pyramids where built up by consecutive generations who continuously maintained and added to the structures constructed by their forefathers.
Furthermore, the Mesoamerican pyramid stands as a representation of the strong connection the people had with both their gods and the universe, and reflects their belief in the necessity of human participation in the maintenance of the cosmos (Brainerd, pg 21).
Mesoamerican Photo Archives: Teotihuacan (467 words)
The Feathered Serpent Pyramid is one of the few buildings at this Classic Period city which still retains its original three dimensional sculpted adornments.
The Pyramid of the Sun is the largest stone pyramid in all of Precolumbian America.
The Pyramid of the Moon is located at the Northern terminus of the Avenue of the Dead.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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