FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Merthyr Tydfil
Merthyr Tydfil county borough
Image:WalesMerthyrTydfil.png
Geography
Area
- Total
- % Water
Ranked 21st
111 km²
? %
Admin HQ Merthyr Tydfil
ISO 3166-2 GB-MTY
ONS code 00PH
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
 
Ranked 22nd
55,500
Ranked 9th
500 / km²
Ethnicity 98.6% White.
Welsh language
- Any skills
Ranked 15th
17.7%
Politics
Arms of Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council
Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council
http://www.merthyr.gov.uk/
Control Labour
MP

Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: Merthyr Tudful) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. It lies within the historic county of Glamorgan. Image File history File links one of the subdivisions of Wales File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of principal areas of Wales ordered by area. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... This is a list of principal areas of Wales ordered by population. ... This is a List of Welsh principal areas by population density in the 2001 UK census. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... This is a List of Welsh principal areas by the percentage of those professing some skills in the Welsh language in the 2001 UK census. ... Image File history File links Merthyr_Tydfil_arms. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... David Stuart Havard known as Dai Havard (born February 7, 1950, Quakers Yard, Merthyr Tydfil) is a Welsh politician, and Labour Party member of Parliament for Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... This article is about the country. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ...

Contents

Pre-history

Various peoples, migrants from Europe, had lived in the area for more than three thousand years, dating back to the Bronze Age. They were followed from about 1000BCE by the Celts, and from their language, the Welsh language developed. Hillforts were built during the Iron Age and the tribes who lived in them were called Silures by the Roman invaders. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Celts, normally pronounced // (see article on pronunciation), is widely used to refer to the members of any of the peoples in Europe using the Celtic languages or descended from those who did. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Silures were a powerful and warlike tribe of ancient Britain, occupying approximately the counties of Monmouth, Brecon and Glamorgan. ... Roman invasion of Britain: Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ...


The Roman invasion

The Romans had arrived in Wales by about 47-53CE and established a network of forts, with roads to link them. They had to fight hard to consolidate their conquests, and in 74 CE they built an auxiliary fortress at Penydarren, overlooking the River Taff (Taf). It covered an area of about 3 hectares, and formed part of the network of roads and fortifications. Remains of this fortress were found underneath the football ground where Merthyr Tydfil FC play. A road ran north-south through the area, linking the southern coast with mid-Wales via Brecon. Parts of this and other roads, including one known as Sarn Helen, can still be traced and walked on. The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ...


The local tribe, known as the Silures, resisted this invasion fiercely from their mountain strongholds, but the Roman armies eventually prevailed. In time, relative peace was established. The Silures were a powerful and warlike tribe of ancient Britain, occupying approximately the counties of Monmouth, Brecon and Glamorgan. ... The Roman army was a set of land-based military forces employed by the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and later Roman Empire as part of the Roman military. ...


The Roman empire eventually disintegrated, and the Penydarren fortress was abandoned by about 120CE. By 402 CE, the army in Britain comprised mostly Germanic troops and local recruits, and the cream of the army had been withdrawn across to the continent of Europe. By about 408CE, the armies of the Saxons were landing and the locals were left to their own devices to fight off the new invaders. For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ...


The coming of Christianity

The Latin language and some Roman customs and culture became established before the withdrawal of the Roman army. The Christian religion was introduced throughout much of Wales by the Romans, but locally, it may have been introduced later by monks from Ireland and France who made their way into the region following rivers and valleys. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Romano-British is a term used to refer to the Romanized Britons under the Roman Empire (and later the Western Roman Empire) and in the years after the Roman departure exposed to Roman culture and Christian religion. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


Local legends

After the departure of the Romans, minor kingdoms slowly developed in the area. Welsh legend describes a Romano-British leader who repelled Saxon invaders, and through conquest and diplomacy, united several small kingdoms to create a sizable kingdom that included South Wales and much of western Britain. This grew into the legend of King Arthur. More legend than fact is known about this man. Some scholars suggest that he may have been Ambrosius Aurelianus. If so, he would have spoken Latin and maintained some aspects of Roman culture, possibly including at least nominal devotion to Christianity, the official religion of the Romans at the time. Aurelianus may have been of Roman birth, and there are some implications that he may have been related to a Roman Emperor. For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... Ambrosius Aurelianus, called Aurelius Ambrosius in the Historia Regum Britanniae and elsewhere, was a war leader of the Romano-British who won an important battle against the Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century, according to Gildas. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


Another local tradition holds that a girl called Tydfil, daughter of a local chieftain named Brychan, was an early local convert to Christianity, and was pursued and murdered by a band of marauding Picts and Saxons while traveling to Hafod Tanglwys in Aberfan, a local farm that is still occupied to this day. The girl was considered a martyr after her death in approximately 480CE. “Merthyr” translates to “Martyr” in English, and tradition holds that, when the town was founded, the name was chosen in her honour. A church was eventually built on the traditional site of her burial. Images of that church can be found on the Merthyr History website. For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... Tydfil (Tudful), was a Welsh woman Saint, patron of Merthyr Tydfil (Mid Glamorgan), where she was buried. ... A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... Aberfan (in Welsh, the f is pronounced like the v in English) is a small village 5 miles (8 km) south of Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ...


The Normans arrive

The valley through which the River Taff flowed was heavily wooded, with a few scattered farms on the mountain slopes, and this situation persisted for several hundred years. The Norman Barons moved in, after conquering England, but by 1093, they only occupied the lowlands and the uplands remained in the hands of the Welsh rulers. The effect on the locals was probably minimal. There were conflicts between the Barons and the families descended from the Welsh princes, and control of the land see-sawed to and fro. During this time Morlais Castle was built. Norman conquests in red. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Morlais Castle is a 12th Century castle located above the Taff Gorge near the town of Merthyr Tydfil. ...


Early Modern Merthyr

No permanent settlement was formed until well into the Middle Ages. People continued to be self-sufficient, living by farming and later by trading. Merthyr Tydfil was little more than a village. An ironworks existed in the parish in the Elizabethan period, but it did not survive beyond the early 1640s at the latest. In 1754, it was recorded that the valley was almost entirely populated by shepherds, and the markets and fairs at which farm produce were traded were many, bringing prosperity to some, and starvation to others. Ironworks at Coalbrookdale, Shropshire, England An ironworks or iron works is a building or site where iron is smelted and where heavy iron and/or steel products are made. ... Events and Trends The personal union of the crowns of Spain and Portugal ends due to a revolution in the latter (1640). ...


The Industrial Revolution

Influence and growth of iron industry

Merthyr was situated close to reserves of iron ore, coal, limestone and water, making it an ideal site for ironworks. Small-scale iron working and coal mining had been carried out at some places in South Wales since the Tudor period, but in the wake of the Industrial revolution the demand for iron led to the rapid expansion of Merthyr's iron operations. The Dowlais Ironworks was founded by what would become the Dowlais Iron Company in 1759, making it the first major works in the area. It was followed in 1765 by the Cyfarthfa Ironworks. The Plymouth ironworks were initially in the same ownership as Cyfarthfa, but passed after the death of Anthony Bacon to Richard Hill in 1788. The fourth ironworks was Penydarren built by members of the Homfray family in 1784. As these works were established, along with their associated iron ore and coal mines, Merthyr grew from a village of some 700 inhabitants to an industrial town of 80,000 people. This heap of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Ironworks at Coalbrookdale, Shropshire, England An ironworks or iron works is a building or site where iron is smelted and where heavy iron and/or steel products are made. ... Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... The Dowlais Ironworks was a major 19-century ironworks located near Merthyr Tydfil, in Wales. ... The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks. ... Anthony Bacon (1718 – January 21, 1786), was an English-born industrialist who was largely responsible for the emergence of Merthyr Tydfil as the iron-smelting centre of Britain. ... Penydarren was the fourth of the great ironworks established at Merthyr Tydfil. ...

The Cefn Coed Viaduct was built to carry the Merthyr to Brecon line.
The Cefn Coed Viaduct was built to carry the Merthyr to Brecon line.

The demand for iron was fuelled by the Royal Navy, who needed cannons for their ships and later by the railways. In 1802, Admiral Lord Nelson visited Merthyr to witness cannon being made. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 3024 KB) Summary The Cefn Coed Viaduct in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 3024 KB) Summary The Cefn Coed Viaduct in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ...


Several railway companies established routes that linked Merthyr with coastal ports or other parts of Britain. They included the Brecon and Merthyr Railway, Vale of Neath Railway, Taff Vale Railway and Great Western Railway. They often shared routes to enable access to coal mines and ironworks through rugged country, which presented great enegineering challenges. In 1804, the world’s first railway steam locomotive, "The Iron Horse", developed by the Cornish engineer Richard Trevithick, pulled 10 tons of iron on the newly constructed Merthyr tramway from Penydarren to Abercynon. [1] [2] A replica of this now resides in the National Waterfront Museum in Swansea. The tramway passed through what is arguably the oldest railway tunnel in the world, part of which can still be seen along side Pentrebach Road at the lower end of the town. BRECON and MERTHYR RAILWAY // The Routes The Brecon and Merthyr Junction Railway was one of several railways that served the industrial areas of South Wales and Monmouthshire. ... The Vale of Neath Railway was a broad gauge railway line from Neath to Merthyr Tydfil, in Glamorgan, Wales, and also operated the Swansea and Neath Railway which gave it access to the docks at Swansea. ... The Taff Vale Railway (TVR) is a railway in Glamorgan, South Wales, and is one of the oldest in Wales. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... One of the last mainline steam locomotives built in the UK: British Railways Standard Class 9F 2-10-0 no. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Richard Trevithick Richard Trevithick (April 13, 1771 – April 22, 1833) was a British inventor, engineer and builder of the first working railway steam locomotive. ... railroads redirects here. ... Penydarren was the fourth of the great ironworks established at Merthyr Tydfil. ... Thorn Hotel, Abercynon Abercynon is a small village in the Cynon Valley, in Rhondda Cynon Taff, Wales. ... The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea or NWMS (Welsh:Amgueddfa genedlaethol y glannau) is a museum situated in Swansea, Wales, forming part of the National Museums and Galleries of Wales (NMGW). ...


During the first few decades of the 1800s, the ironworks at Dowlais and Cyfarthfa continued to expand and at their peak were the most productive ironworks in the world. 50,000 tons of rails left just one ironworks in 1844, to enable expansion of railways across Russia to Siberia. At its peak, the Dowlais Iron Company operated 18 blast furnaces and employed 7,300 people, and by 1857 had constructed the world's most powerful rolling mill. The companies were mainly owned by two dynasties, the Guest and Crawshay families. One of the famous members of the Guest family was Lady Charlotte Guest who translated the Mabinogion into English from its original Welsh. The families also supported the establishment of schools for their workers. The Dowlais Ironworks was a major 19-century ironworks located near Merthyr Tydfil, in Wales. ... The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks. ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ... Blast furnace in Sestao, Spain. ... Guest family tree The Guest family were a British family of the eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth centuries who, among other things built a huge industrial business in the Dowlais Iron Company and later in Guest, Keen and Nettlefolds. ... Richard Crawshay (1739-1810) was a South Wales ironmaster. ... Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Guest, (nee Bertie) (May 19, 1812 – January 15, 1895), was an important figure in the history of the study of Welsh literature and language. ... The Mabinogion is a collection of prose stories from medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


The Merthyr Rising

The Cyfarthfa Castle, commissioned in 1824 by the ironmaster William Crawshay II
The Cyfarthfa Castle, commissioned in 1824 by the ironmaster William Crawshay II

The Merthyr Rising of 1831 were precipitated by a combination of the ruthless collection of debts, frequent wage reductions when the value of iron periodically fell, and the imposition of truck shops. Instead of using normal coin of the realm, some ironmasters paid their workers in specially-minted coins or credit notes, known as "truck". These could only be exchanged at shops owned by the ironmasters. Many of the workers objected to both the price and quality of the goods sold in these company-owned shops. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 3888 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 3888 pixel, file size: 4. ... The Cyfarthfa Castle, commissioned in 1819 by the ironmaster William Crawshay. ... William Crawshay II (1788-1867) was the son of William Crawshay I, the owner of Cyfarthfa Ironworks in Merthyr Tydfil, south Wales. ... The Merthyr Rising of 1831 was the violent climax to many years of simmering unrest among the large working class population of Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales and the surrounding area. ... Events September 22 - UK House of Commons passes the Reform Bill - it is later defeated in the House of Lords October 26 – Cholera epidemic begins in Sunderland, England October 31 - Rioters burn down 100 houses in Bristol, UK - intervention by 14th Dragoons leads to death of hundreds December 27 - Charles... A truck system is an exploitative form of employment — or, more specifically, unfree labour — under which workers are: paid in a form of limited direct credit or tokens, which may only be used at a company store, owned by their employers, or; paid in unexchangeable goods and/or services. ...


There is still controversy over what actually happened and who was to blame. It was probably more of an armed rebellion than an isolated riot. The initiators of the unrest were most probably the skilled workers; men who were much prized by the owners and often on friendly social terms with them. They also valued their loyalty to the owners and looked aghast at the idea of forming trade unions to demand higher wages. But events overtook them, and the community was tipped into rebellion. Look up rebellion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Teamsters, armed with pipes, riot in a clash with riot police in the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


The owners took fright at the challenge to their authority, and called on the military for assistance. Soldiers were sent from the garrison at Brecon. They clashed with the rioters, and several on both sides were killed. Despite the hope that they could negotiate with the owners, the skilled workers lost control of the movement. The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ...


Some 7,000 to 10,000 workers marched under a red flag, which was later adopted internationally as the symbol of the working classes. For four days, they effectively controlled Merthyr. Historically, and most generally, the red flag is an international symbol for the blood of angry workers. ...


Even with their numbers and captured weapons, they were unable to effectively oppose disciplined soldiers for very long, and several of the supposed leaders of the riots were arrested. Some were transported as convicts to the penal colonies of Australia. One of them, Richard Lewis, popularly known as Dic Penderyn, was hanged for the crime of stabbing soldier Donald Black in the leg, creating the first local working-class martyr. Alexander Cordell's novel The Fire People is set in this period. A serious political history of these events, The Merthyr Rising was written by the Merthyr-born Marxist and writer Professor Gwyn Alf Williams in 1978. Dic Penderyn the name by which the working-class hero Richard Lewis (1808-1831) is better known. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... Alexander Cordell was the pen-name of George Alexander Graber (1914-1997), a prolific novelist and author of thirty acclaimed works including Rape of the Fair Country, The Hosts of Rebecca and Song of the Earth. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ...


The first trade unions, which were illegal and savagely suppressed, were formed shortly after the riots. The rising also helped create the momentum that led to the Reform Act. The Chartism movement, which did not consider these reforms extensive enough, was subsequently active in Merthyr. The Representation of the People Act 1832, commonly known as the Reform Act 1832, was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of the United Kingdom. ... Chartism was a movement for political and social reform in the United Kingdom during the mid-19th century between 1838 and 1848. ...


Many families had had enough of the strife, and they left Wales to utilise their skills elsewhere. Numerous people set out by ship to America, where the steelworks of Pittsburgh were booming. It only cost about five pounds to travel steerage. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ...


The decline of coal and iron

The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks blast furnaces
The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks blast furnaces

The steel and coal industries began to decline after World War One, and by the 1930’s, they had all closed. In 1987, the iron foundry, all that remained of the former Dowlais ironworks, closed, marking the end of 228 years continuous production on one site. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1757 KB) Summary Merthyr Tydfils abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1757 KB) Summary Merthyr Tydfils abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks. ... The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... A foundry is a factory which produces castings of metal, both ferrous and non-ferrous. ...


The fortunes of Merthyr revived during World War II, as war-related industry was established in the area. Many refugees from Europe settled in the town. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Post-world war II

Immediately following World War Two, several large companies set up in Merthyr. In October 1948, the American-owned Hoover Company opened a large washing machine factory and depot in the village of Pentrebach, a few miles south of Merthyr Tydfil. The factory was purpose-built to manufacture the Hoover Electric Washing Machine, and at one point, Hoover was the largest employer in the borough. At the Hoover factory the Sinclair C5 was built. Hoover Company logo, originally designed by Henry Dreyfuss The Hoover Company started out as an American floor care manufacturer based in North Canton, Ohio. ... Pentrebach (sometimes written Pentre-Bach) is located in the County Borough of Merthyr Tydfil and lies on the east side of the river Taff opposite Abercanaid, South of Merthyr and North of Troedyrhiw. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sinclair C5 Launched in Britain on 10 January 1985, the Sinclair C5 was a three-wheeled personal transport battery electric vehicle invented by Sir Clive Sinclair. ...


Several other companies built factories, including an aviation components company, Teddington Aircraft Controls, which opened in 1946. The Teddington factory closed in the early 1970s. Flying machine redirects here. ...


The Gurnos housing estate was, at the time of its construction, the largest housing project in the world.


Cyfarthfa, the former home of the ironmaster Richard Crawshay, an opulent mock-castle, is now a museum. It houses a number of paintings of the town, a large collection of artefacts from the town's Industrial Revolution period, and a notable collection of Egyptian tomb artefacts, including several sarcophagi.


In 1966 a colliery tip slid down a mountain covering a school causing the Aberfan disaster. Aberfan (in Welsh, the f is pronounced like the v in English) is a small village 5 miles (8 km) south of Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. ...


While testing a new angina treatment, researchers in Merthyr Tydfil discovered (purely by accident) that the new drug had erection-stimulating side effects. This discovery would go on to form the basis for Viagra. [3] The inventor Howard Stapleton, based in Merthyr Tydfil, developed the technology that has given rise to the recent mosquitotone or Teen Buzz phenomenon.[4] angina tonsillaris see tonsillitis. ... // ... Listen to the ringtone Teen Buzz (or Mosquito Ringtone) is a popular ringtone that was hijacked from a technology that was originally used to repel loitering teenagers from shops in the United Kingdom. ...


Merthyr Tydfil today

Modern-day Merthyr relies on a combination of public sector and manufacturing/service companies to provide employment. The Welsh Assembly Government has recently opened a major office in the town[5] near a large telecommunications call centre. Hoover (now part of the Candy Group) has its Registered Office in the town and remains a major employer. The town is located in a valley environment just south of the Brecon Beacons National Park and this, along with the town's rich history means it has huge potential for tourism. Improving public transport links to Cardiff[6] along with road improvements mean the town is increasingly a commuter location and has shown some of the highest house price growth in the UK. [7] [8] Official logo of the Welsh Assembly Government The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: , LlCC) was firstly an executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet from 1999 to 2007. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons, looking from the highest point Pen y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Cribyn, 795 m (2608 feet) The Brecon Beacons (Welsh: Bannau Brycheiniog) are a mountain range located in the south-east of Wales. ...


In Britain today, Merthyr:

  • Ranks fifth worst for education, with just 38.2% of students achieving GCSE results between A* and C.
  • Ranks 13th worst for economic activity.
  • Ranks 13th worst for life expectancy: women live on average 73.8 years, and men 78.1.
  • Has 30% of the population suffering from a limiting long-term illness.

A controversial [9] [10] Channel 4 programme rated Merthyr Tydfil as the third worst place to live in Britain in 2006 following areas of London.[11]
However, in the 2007 edition of the same programme, Merthyr had `improved` to fifth worst place to live.[1]


On a lighter note, in recent years the town has held many cultural events. Local poets and writers hold numerous poetry evenings in the town, and music festivals are oganised at Cyfarthfa Park. With this in mind, Merthyr's Welsh Language and Initiative Centre are working on a new project to transform the Zoar Chapel and the adjacent vestry building in Pontmorlais into a community arts venue. The project, if successful, will provide a focal point for the arts in Merthyr Tydfil.


The town has also developed schemes to encourage young people to take an active part in society and develop the town in which they live. Merthyr Youth Forum was established for those between the ages of 11 - 25 wanting to make a difference to their community.


In 2006, a large open cast coal mine, which will extract 10 million tonnes of coal over 15 years, was authorised just east of Merthyr Tydfil as part of the Ffos-y-fran Land Reclamation Scheme. El Chino, located near Silver City, New Mexico, is an open-pit copper mine Open-pit mining, or opencast mining, refers to a method of extracting rock or minerals from the earth by their removal from an open pit or borrow. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ... Ffos-y-fran is a district of Merthyr Tydfil, Wales ( SO0605). ...


Local and National government

The current borough boundaries date back to 1974, when the former county borough of Merthyr Tydfil expanded slightly to cover Vaynor in Breconshire and Bedlinog in Glamorgan, it becoming a local government district in the administrative county of Mid Glamorgan at the time. The district became a county borough again on April 1, 1996. The area is governed by Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council. Merthyr Tydfil is controlled mainly by the Welsh Labour Party with the MP being Dai Harvard, and the Assembly representative being Huw Lewis Vaynor (or Faenor) is a village and community in the Merthyr Tydfil county borough in Wales. ... Brecknockshire, also known as Breconshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Frycheiniog is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by Radnorshire, E. by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, S. by Monmouthshire and Glamorgan, and W. by Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... In 1974 Wales was divided for local government purposes into districts. ... An administrative county is an administrative area in the British Isles. ... Mid Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council (Welsh: ) is the governing body for Merthyr Tydfil, one of the Principal Areas of Wales. ... Huw Lewis (born 1964) is the Labour Co-operative National Assembly for Wales member for Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney. ...


Sports and leisure

Sculpture of boxer Eddie Thomas

The football club, Merthyr Tydfil F.C., or 'The Martyrs', play in the Southern Football League. The town was once home to a fully-professional Football League club, Merthyr Town F.C., but it folded in the 1930s. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 3888 pixel, file size: 592 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Merthyr Tydfil F.C. is a Welsh football team from Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan. ... The Southern League is an English football league for semi-professional and amateur teams. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales, and is the oldest such competition in world football. ... Merthyr Town were a Welsh football club that played in the English Football League during the 1920s, but apparently folded in 1934. ...


The rugby club, Merthyr RFC, is known as the Ironmen. Merthyr RFC was one of the twelve founding clubs of the Welsh Rugby Union in 1881. Merthyr are a Welsh rugby union club based in Merthyr in South Wales. ... The Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) (Welsh: ) is the governing body of rugby union in Wales, recognised by the International Rugby Board. ...


Merthyr Tydfil hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1881 and 1901 and the national Urdd Eisteddfod in 1987. Until recently it was twinned with Clichy-la-Garenne, France. The Eisteddfod (literally sitting) is a Welsh festival of literature, music, and song. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Clichy, also called non officially Clichy-la-Garenne or Clichy-sur-Seine, is a city in France, in the northwestern suburbs of Paris, on the left bank of the Seine. ...


Merthyr Tydfil's Central Library, which is in a prominent position in the centre of the town, is a Carnegie library. A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ...


Penydarren Country XI Cricket Club were founded in 1971 and currently play at the ICI Rifle Fields Ground. Penydarren was the fourth of the great ironworks established at Merthyr Tydfil. ...


Merthyr Tydfil also hosts regular wrestling events at the town centre's Studio Bar, run by Wales` premier professional wrestling promotion Celtic Wrestling.


Merthyr, being one of the roughest towns around, is, unsurprisingly perhaps, particularly known for its boxers, both amateur and professional. Some famous professional pugilists from the town include: Johnny Owen, Howard Winstone, and Eddie Thomas. Johnny Owen (January 7, 1956 - November 4, 1980) was a successful professional boxer from Wales. ... Howard Winstone was born on 15th April 1939 in Merthyr Tydfil and died on 30th September 2000. ...


Schools and colleges

Colleges

  • Merthyr Tydfil College of Further Education

Vocational training providers

  • Tydfil Training Consortium Limited

Secondary schools

Afon Taf High School is a comprehensive high school for pupils aged 11 to 18 (plus students aged 19 to reach their A level Grades), based in the village of Troed-y-rhiw in the borough of Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. ... Bishop Hedley High School is a Roman Catholic secondary school, established in 1967, and located in Penydarren, Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales. ... Cyfarthfa High School was established in 1970 following the amalgamation of Cyfarthfa Castle Grammar School and Georgetown Secondary Modern School. ...

Primary schools/nurseries

  • Caedraw Primary School
  • Ynysowen Primary School
  • Gellifaelog Primary School
  • Gwaunfarren Junior School
  • Heolgerrig Junior School
  • Ysgol Gynradd Gymraeg Santes Tudful
  • St. Illtyd's R.C. Primary School
  • St. Mary's R.C. Primary School
  • Edwardsville Primary School - a school keen to promote environmentally friendly attitudes and make a fun and creative environment for all our pupils
  • Troedyrhiw Junior School
  • Abercanaid Junior School
  • Ysgol Rhyd y Grug - website soon
  • St. Aloysius R.C. Primary School
  • Goetre Primary School

Ysgol Rhyd y Grug is a primary school located in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. ...

Natives of Merthyr Tydfil

Among those born in Merthyr Tydfil are:

Other notable residents included Esther Isaacs, mother of "Chariots of Fire" athlete Harold Abrahams; the grandfather of Rolf Harris also came from Merthyr. One of the first two Labour MPs to be elected to parliament, the Scot Keir Hardie, was elected by the Merthyr Tydfil constituency. The Osmonds are of Welsh descent and have traced their ancestry to Merthyr. [12] Sam, Samantha or Samuel Jones can refer to a number of different people. ... Laura Ashley CBE, (7 September 1925–17 September 1985) was a Welsh designer. ... Sir William Ewart Berry (1879-1954) was the second of three brothers from Merthyr Tydfil in Wales, who founded a long-running press dynasty. ... Sir James Gomer Berry (1883-1968) was a Welsh newspaper publisher. ... Richard Davies (born 25 January 1926) is a British actor, from Dowlais, Merthyr Tydfil, Wales whose film and TV work covered many years but is probably best known for his performance as the exasperated schoolmaster Mr Price in situation comedy Please Sir!. Davies uses a broad Welsh accent for much... Sir Samuel Griffith Sir Samuel Walker Griffith (June 21, 1845 - August 9, 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the principal author of the Constitution of Australia. ... Craig Handley (born July 6, 1977) is a British film director. ... // b. ... Julien MacDonald (born March 19, 1972) is a Welsh fashion designer. ... Philip Madoc (born 5 July 1934 in Merthyr Tydfil) is a Welsh actor who has had many television and film roles. ... George Leslie Norris (May 21, 1921, Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales–April 6, 2006, Provo, Utah) was a prize-winning Welsh poet and short story writer. ... Johnny Owen (January 7, 1956 - November 4, 1980) was a successful professional boxer from Wales. ... Joseph Parry (1841 — February 17, 1903) was a Welsh composer and musician. ... For other uses, see Dalek (disambiguation). ... Robert Sidoli (born 21 June 1979) is a Welsh rugby union player who plays for Cardiff Blues and has won 25 caps for Wales as a lock. ... Sean Smith was a fictional character in the UK soap Opera Brookside. ... Alabama 3 is a British acid house, blues, country and gospel music band founded in Brixton, London, in 1989. ... Johnny Owen (January 7, 1956 - November 4, 1980) was a successful professional boxer from Wales. ... Howard Winstone was born on 15th April 1939 in Merthyr Tydfil and died on 30th September 2000. ... Information Nickname(s) Eddie, , Thomas (from the Sigmas) Age 17 Date of birth June 8, 1990 Portrayed by Orlando Brown Edward Eddie Thomas (born on June 8, 1990) is a fictional character, played by Orlando Brown on the comedy television series Thats So Raven. ... Harold Maurice Abrahams (December 15, 1899 – January 14, 1978) was a Jewish British athlete. ... Rolf Harris, MBE (1968), OBE (1977), CBE (2006), AM (1989) (born 30 March 1930), is an Australian musician, composer, painter, and television host. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... James Keir Hardie (15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915) was a Scottish socialist and labour leader, and one of the first two Labour Party Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the UK Parliament after the establishment of the Labour Party. ... Merthyr Tydfil was a parliamentary constituency centred on the town of Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. ... The Osmonds are an American family pop group who achieved enormous worldwide success as teenybopper idols in the 1970s. ...


See also

This page provides a list of county borough wards in the county borough of Merthyr Tydfil. ...

References

  • A Brief History of Merthyr Tydfil by Joseph Gross. The Starling Press. 1980
  • The Merthyr Rising by Gwyn A Williams. University of Wales Press,
  • The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press,
  • People, Protest and Politics, case studies in C19 Wales By David Egan, Gomer 1987
  • Cyfres y Cymoedd: Merthyr a Thaf, edited by Hywel Teifi Edwards. Gomer, 2001
  • Civilizing the Urban: Popular culture and Urban Space in Merthyr, c. 1870-1914 by Andy Croll. University of Wales Press. 2000.

External links

Coordinates: 51°45′N, 3°23′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m