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Encyclopedia > Merovingian
Merovingian Kings
Kings of All the Franks
Kings of Neustria
Kings of Austrasia
Chlodio
Merovech
Childeric I ? -481
Clovis I 481 - 511
Childebert I 511-558
Chlothar I 511-561
Chlodomer 511-524
  Theuderic I 511-534
    Theudebert I 534-548
    Theudebald 548-555
Chlothar I 558-561
  Charibert I 561-567
  Chilperic I 561-584
    Chlothar II 584-629
  Guntram 561-592
    Childebert II 592-595
    Theuderic II 595-613
    Sigebert II 613
  Sigebert I 561-575
    Childebert II 575-595
    Theudebert II 595-612
    Theuderic II 612-613
    Sigebert II 613
Chlothar II 613-629
  Dagobert I 623-629
Dagobert I 629-639
  Charibert II 629-632
    Chilperic 632
  Clovis II 639-658
    Chlothar III 658-673
    Theuderic III 673
    Childeric II 673-675
    Theuderic III 675-691
  Sigebert III 634-656
     Childebert the Adopted      656-661
    Chlothar III 661-662
     Childeric II 662-675
     Clovis III 675-676
     Dagobert II 676-679
Theuderic III 679-691
Clovis IV 691-695
Childebert III 695-711
Dagobert III 711-715
Chilperic II 715-720
  Chlothar IV 717-720
Theuderic IV 721-737
Childeric III 743-751

The Merovingians were a Salian Frankish dynasty that came to rule the Franks in a region largely corresponding to ancient Gaul from the mid fifth to the mid eighth century. Their politics involved frequent civil warfare between branches of the family. During the final century of the Merovingian rule, the dynasty was increasingly pushed into a ceremonial role. The Merovingian rule was ended by a palace coup in 751 when Pippin the Short formally deposed Childeric III, beginning the Carolingian monarchy. Chlodio1, was a king of the Salian Franks from the Merovingian dynasty. ... Merowig (fl. ... Childeric I (c. ... Events Clovis I becomes king of the Franks upon the death of Childeric I (or 482) Baekje, Silla, and Daegaya form an alliance against Goguryeo. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Events Clovis I becomes king of the Franks upon the death of Childeric I (or 482) Baekje, Silla, and Daegaya form an alliance against Goguryeo. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Childebert I (Rheims, c. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer, born around 495, was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Events Childebert I annexes Orléans and Chartres after the death of Chlodomer. ... Theuderic I (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) (died 533 or 534) was the Merovingian king of Metz, Rheims, or Austrasia—as its variously called—from 511 to 533 or 534. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Events January 1 - Decimus Theodorius Paulinus appointed consul, the last to hold this office in the West. ... Theodebert I (French Thibert Ier or Théodebert Ier), (circa 500 - 547 or 548), Merovingian king of Austrasia from 533 - 548, residence: Reims, now in northeast France. ... Events January 1 - Decimus Theodorius Paulinus appointed consul, the last to hold this office in the West. ... Events Belisarius is relieved of command over the Byzantine forces in Italy and replaced with Narses. ... Théodebald (French Thibaud or Théodebald), (d. ... Events Belisarius is relieved of command over the Byzantine forces in Italy and replaced with Narses. ... For other uses, see number 555. ... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Charibert I (c. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events Livva I succeeds Athanagild as king of the Visigoths. ... Chilpéric I was born c. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Guntram I(c. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events After the great slaughter at Woddesbeorg, Ceawlin is deposed as both king of Wessex and Bretwalda. ... Childebert II (570-595) was the king of Austrasia from 575 until his death in 595, the eldest and succeeding son of Sigebert I, and the king of Burgundy from 592 to his death, as the adopted and succeeding son of his uncle Guntram. ... Events After the great slaughter at Woddesbeorg, Ceawlin is deposed as both king of Wessex and Bretwalda. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Theuderic II (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) (587-613), king of Burgundy (595-613) and Austrasia (612-613), was the second son of Childebert II. At his fathers death in 595, he received the kingdoms of Orleans and Burgundy. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Sigebert II can refer to: Sigebert II of the East Saxons, a seventh century ruler of Essex Sigebert II of Austrasia and Burgundy, an early seventh century Frankish ruler This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Sigebert I (535-575) was a Frankish King, one of the sons of Clotaire I and Ingund. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events June 2 - Benedict succeeds John III as Pope The Kingdom of East Anglia founded by the Angle groups North Folk and South Folk, naming the places of Norfolk and Suffolk, respectively. ... Childebert II (570-595) was the king of Austrasia from 575 until his death in 595, the eldest and succeeding son of Sigebert I, and the king of Burgundy from 592 to his death, as the adopted and succeeding son of his uncle Guntram. ... Events June 2 - Benedict succeeds John III as Pope The Kingdom of East Anglia founded by the Angle groups North Folk and South Folk, naming the places of Norfolk and Suffolk, respectively. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Theudebert II (586-612), king of Austrasia (595-612), was the son and heir of Childebert II. He received the kingdom of Austrasia at the death of his father in 595, but was dominated by his grandmother Brunhilda, whom he succeeded in driving away in 599. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Events Saint Columbanus moves to Italy to establish the monastery of Bobbio (approximate date). ... Theuderic II (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) (587-613), king of Burgundy (595-613) and Austrasia (612-613), was the second son of Childebert II. At his fathers death in 595, he received the kingdoms of Orleans and Burgundy. ... Events Saint Columbanus moves to Italy to establish the monastery of Bobbio (approximate date). ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Sigebert II can refer to: Sigebert II of the East Saxons, a seventh century ruler of Essex Sigebert II of Austrasia and Burgundy, an early seventh century Frankish ruler This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Dagobert I (c. ... Events Clotaire II, king of the Franks, makes his son Dagobert I king of Austrasia Samo, reputedly a Frankish merchant, governs in Moravia, Slovakia and Lower Austria. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Dagobert I (c. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... Charibert II (after 618 – April 8, 632), a son of Clotaire II and his second wife Sichilde, of the Merovingian dynasty, was briefly king in Aquitaine, 629-631/2, with his capital at Toulouse. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Chilperic (sometimes Childeric in the chronicles of the time) was the infant son of Charibert II, and briefly king of Aquitaine in 632. ... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Clovis II (or Chlodowech or Chlodwig, modern French Louis, modern German Ludwig) (637-November 27, 655) succeeded his father Dagobert I in 639 as King of Neustria and Burgundy. ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... Events The union of Slavic tribes falls apart after Samos death Births Deaths King Samo of the Slavs Categories: 658 ... Chlothar III (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 652 – 673) was the eldest son of Clovis II, king of Neustria and Burgundy, and his queen Balthild. ... Events The union of Slavic tribes falls apart after Samos death Births Deaths King Samo of the Slavs Categories: 658 ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu... Theuderic III was a King of the Franks in the 7th century, one of the Merovingian line. ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu... Childeric II (c. ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Theuderic III was a King of the Franks in the 7th century, one of the Merovingian line. ... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ... Sigebert III (c. ... Events The Arabs invade Palestine. ... Events Ali succeeds Uthman as Caliph Battle of Basrah (also known as Battle of the Camel) Oswiu of Northumbria annexes Mercia Births Deaths Uthman ibn Affan, Caliph (murdered) Peada, king of Mercia (murdered) Categories: 656 ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... Events Ali succeeds Uthman as Caliph Battle of Basrah (also known as Battle of the Camel) Oswiu of Northumbria annexes Mercia Births Deaths Uthman ibn Affan, Caliph (murdered) Peada, king of Mercia (murdered) Categories: 656 ... Events Caliph Ali Ben Abu Talib is assassinated. ... Chlothar III (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 652 – 673) was the eldest son of Clovis II, king of Neustria and Burgundy, and his queen Balthild. ... Events Caliph Ali Ben Abu Talib is assassinated. ... Events The regent Grimuald usurps the kingship of the Lombards, driving Perctarit into exile and killing Godepert Births Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, Japanese poet (approximate date) Deaths Maximus the Confessor, Byzantine theologian Godepert, king of the Lombards Categories: 662 ... Childeric II (c. ... Events The regent Grimuald usurps the kingship of the Lombards, driving Perctarit into exile and killing Godepert Births Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, Japanese poet (approximate date) Deaths Maximus the Confessor, Byzantine theologian Godepert, king of the Lombards Categories: 662 ... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Clovis III, son of Theuderic III, was born in 682 AD and died in 695. ... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Events November 2 - Donus becomes Pope. ... Dagobert II (c. ... Events November 2 - Donus becomes Pope. ... Events Adamnan becomes abbot of the monastery on Iona. ... Theuderic III was a King of the Franks in the 7th century, one of the Merovingian line. ... Events Adamnan becomes abbot of the monastery on Iona. ... Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ... Clovis IV (sometimes Clovis III if the other Clovis III is considered a usurper) (682-695) , son of Theuderic III, was the sole king of the Franks from 691 until his death. ... Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ... Events People of Byzantium revolt against Justinian II. Leontius II made emperor, Justinian II is banished. ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... Events People of Byzantium revolt against Justinian II. Leontius II made emperor, Justinian II is banished. ... See also: phone number 711. ... Dagobert III (c. ... See also: phone number 711. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... Chilperic II refers to either: Chilperic II of Neustria and I of Austrasia Chilperic II of the Franks This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... Events Umayyad caliph Umar ibn Abd al-Aziz succeeded by Yazid II ibn Abd al-Malik The Nihonshoki (日本書紀), one of the oldest history books in Japan, is completed Births Bertrada, wife of Pippin III (d. ... Chlothar IV (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; died ca 719), king of Austrasia (717-718), was installed by the mayor of the palace, Charles Martel, as an ally during the civil war that was then raging. ... March 21 - Battle of Vincy between Charles Martel and Ragenfrid. ... Events Umayyad caliph Umar ibn Abd al-Aziz succeeded by Yazid II ibn Abd al-Malik The Nihonshoki (日本書紀), one of the oldest history books in Japan, is completed Births Bertrada, wife of Pippin III (d. ... Theuderic IV (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) was the Merovingian King of the Franks from 721 until his death in 737. ... Former Byzantine emperor Anastasius II leads a revolt against emperor Leo III Theuderic IV succeeds Chilperic II Battle of Toulouse - Al-Samh ibn Malik al-Khawlani, the governor Muslim Spain (al-Andalus) is defeated by Duke Odo of Aquitaine preventing an Arab invasion of Gaul. ... Events Favila becomes king of Asturias after Pelayos death Births Emperor Kammu of Japan (d. ... Childeric III (died about 754), called either the Idiot or the Phantom King, king of the Franks, was the fourteenth and last king of the Merovingian dynasty. ... Events Umayyad caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik (724-743) succeeded by al-Walid II ibn Abd al-Malik (743-744). ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ... The term Merovingian has several uses: The Merovingian dynasty of Frankish kings ruled an area of modern France and Germany from the 5th to 8th century AD. Merovingian script was a type of script used in the Merovingian kingdom. ... The Salian Franks were a subgroup of the Franks. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given,in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... A coup détat (pronounced /ku de ta/), or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... The following list of Frankish Kings is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ...


They were sometimes referred to as the "long-haired kings" (Latin reges criniti) by contemporaries, for their symbolically unshorn hair (traditionally the tribal leader of the Franks wore his hair long, as distinct from the Romans and the tonsured clergy). The term Merovingian is drawn directly from Low Franconian, akin to their dynasty's Old English name Merewīowing. A man with long hair. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Tonsure is the practice of some Christian churches of cutting the hair from the scalp of clerics as a symbol of their renunciation of worldly fashion and esteem. ... Low Franconian is any of several West Germanic languages spoken in the Netherlands, northern Belgium, and South Africa. ...

Contents

Origins

The Merovingian dynasty owes its name to the semi-legendary Merovech, (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius), leader of the Salian Franks, and emerges into wider history with the victories of his son Childeric I (reigned c.457 – 481) against the Visigoths, Saxons, and Alemanni. Childeric's son Clovis I went on to unite most of Gaul north of the Loire under his control around 486, when he defeated Syagrius, the Roman ruler in those parts. He won the Battle of Tolbiac against the Alemanni in 496, on which occasion he adopted his wife's Nicene Christian faith, and decisively defeated the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse in the Battle of Vouillé in 507. After Clovis' death, his kingdom was partitioned among his four sons, according to Frankish custom. Over the next century, this tradition of partition would continue. Even when multiple Merovingian kings ruled, the kingdom — not unlike the late Roman Empire — was conceived of as a single entity ruled collectively by several kings (in their own realms) and the turn of events could result in the reunification of the whole kingdom under a single king. Leadership among the early Merovingians was probably based on mythical descent and alleged divine patronage, expressed in terms of continued military success. Merowig (fl. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Salian Franks were a subgroup of the Franks. ... Childeric I (c. ... Events Clovis I becomes king of the Franks upon the death of Childeric I (or 482) Baekje, Silla, and Daegaya form an alliance against Goguryeo. ... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Alamanni, Allemanni or Alemanni, are a Germanic tribe, first mentioned by Dio Cassius, under the year 213. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given,in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... This article is about the French department. ... For the processor, see Intel 80486. ... The captured Syagrius is brought before Alaric II who orders him sent to Clovis I Afranius Syagrius (born 430, died 486 or 487) was the son of Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias, who had preserved a rump state around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Tolbiac was fought between the Franks under Clovis I and the Alamanni, traditionally in 496. ... Events Battle of Tolbiac; Clovis I defeats the Alamanni accepts Catholic baptism at Reims. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... The Battle of Vouillé or Campus Vogladensis was fought in the northern marches of Visigothic territory, at a small place near Poitiers, (Gaul) in the spring 507. ... Events Battle of Vouillé: Clovis I defeats the Visigoths near Poitiers, ends Visigothic power in Gaul. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


History

Upon Clovis' death in 511, the Merovingian kingdom included all the Franks and all of Gaul but Burgundy. To the outside, the kingdom, even when divided under different kings, maintained unity and conquered Burgundy in 534. After the fall of the Ostrogoths, the Franks also conquered Provence. After this their borders with Italy (ruled by the Lombards since 568) and Visigothic Septimania remained fairly stable.[1] Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given,in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Map of Ostrogothic Kingdom The Ostrogoths (Greuthung, Gleaming Goths or Eastern Goths), along with the Visigoths (Noble Goths or Western Goths) were branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe that played a major role in the political events of the late Roman Empire. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) was a Roman province and now is a region of southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Italy. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Septimania was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis that passed under the control of the Visigothic kingdom in 462, when Septimania was ceded to Theodoric II, king of the Visigoths. ...


Internally, the kingdom was divided among Clovis' sons and later among his grandsons and frequently saw war between the different kings, who quickly allied among themselves and against one another. The death of one king would create conflict between the surviving brothers and the deceased's sons, with differing outcomes. Later, conflicts were intensified by the personal feud around Brunhilda. However, yearly warfare often did not constitute general devastation but took on an almost ritual character, with established 'rules' and norms.[2] Philippoteaux and Girardet, Die Folterung von Brunhilde. ...


Eventually, Clotaire II in 613 reunited the entire Frankish realm under one ruler. Later divisions produced the stable units of Austrasia, Neustria, Burgundy and Aquitania. Clotaire II (584-629), King of Neustria, and from 613-629 King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in 584. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Austrasia & Neustria Austrasia formed the north-eastern portion of the Kingdom of the Merovingian Franks, comprising parts of the territory of present-day eastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. ... Neustria & Austrasia The territory of Neustria originated in A.D. 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. ...


The frequent wars had weakened royal power, while the aristocracy had made great gains and procured enormous concessions from the kings in return for their support. These concessions saw the very considerable power of the king parcelled out and retained by leading comites and duces (counts and dukes). Very little is in fact known about the course of the seventh century due to a scarcity of sources, but Merovingians remained in power until the eighth century. ( 6th century - 7th century - 8th century - other centuries) Events Islam starts in Arabia, the Quran is written, and Arabs subjugate Syria, Iraq, Persia, Egypt, North Africa and Central Asia to Islam. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ...


Clotaire's son Dagobert I (died 639), who had sent troops to Spain and pagan Slavic territories in the east, is commonly seen the last powerful Merovingian King. Later kings are known as rois fainéants ("do-nothing kings"), despite the fact only the last two kings did nothing. The kings, even strong-willed men like Dagobert II and Chilperic II, were not the main agents of political conflicts, leaving this role to their mayors of the palace, who increasingly substituted their own interest for their king's. Many kings came to the throne at a young age and died in the prime of life, weakening royal power further. Dagobert I (c. ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... Dagobert II (c. ... Chilperic II refers to either: Chilperic II of Neustria and I of Austrasia Chilperic II of the Franks This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The conflict between mayors was ended when the Austrasians under the Pepin the Middle triumphed in 687 in the Battle of Tertry. After this, Pepin, though not a king, was the political ruler of the Frankish kingdom and left this position as a heritage to his sons. It was now the sons of the mayor that divided the realm among each other under the rule of a single king. Pippin of Herstal ( Pépin), also known as Pippin the Middle, (b. ... Events: December 15 - Sergius succeeds Conon as Pope King Theuderic III of Neustria is defeated by Pepin of Herstal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia. ... The Battle of Tertry was an important engagement in Merovingian Gaul between the forces of Austrasia on one side and those of Neustria and Burgundy on the other. ...


After Pepin's long rule, his son Charles Martel assumed power, fighting against nobles and his own step-mother. His reputation for ruthlessness further undermined the king's position. During the last years of his life he even ruled without a king, though he did not assume royal dignity. His sons Carloman and Pepin again appointed a Merovingian figure-head to stem rebellion on the kingdom's periphery, but in 751, Pepin finally displaced the last Merovingian and, with the support of the nobility and the blessing of Pope Zachary, himself assumed the title of a King of the Franks. The deposed Merovingian was sent into a monastery, bereft of his symbolic long hair. With Pepin, the Carolingians ruled the Franks as Kings. Charles Martel (or, in modern English, Charles the Hammer) (23 August 686 – 22 October 741) was proclaimed Mayor of the Palace, ruling the Franks in the name of a titular King, and proclaimed himself Duke of the Franks (the last four years of his reign he did not even bother... Carloman (between 706 and 716[1] – 17 August[2] 754) was the son of Charles Martel, major domo or mayor of the palace and duke of the Franks, and his wife Chrotrud. ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... Childeric III (died about 754), called either the Idiot or the Phantom King, king of the Franks, was the fourteenth and last king of the Merovingian dynasty. ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Pope Zachary (in Greek : Zacharias), pope (741-752), from a Greek family of Calabria, appears to have been on intimate terms with Gregory III, whom he succeeded (November 741). ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ...


Government and law

The Merovingian king was the master of the booty of war, both movable and in lands and their folk, and he was in charge of the redistribution of conquered wealth among his followers, though these powers were not absolute. "When he died his property was divided equally among his heirs as though it were private property: the kingdom was a form of patrimony" (Rouche 1987 p 420). Some scholars have attributed this to the Merovingians lacking a sense of res publica, but other historians have criticized this view as an oversimplification. Res publica is a Latin phrase, made of res + publica, literally meaning public thing or public matter. It is the origin of the word Republic. // The word publica is the feminine singular of the 1st- and 2nd-declension adjective publicus, publica, publicum, which is itself derived from an earlier form...


The kings appointed magnates to be comites (counts), charging them with defense, administration, and the judgement of disputes. This happened against the backdrop of a newly isolated Europe without its Roman systems of taxation and bureaucracy, the Franks having taken over administration as they gradually penetrated into the thoroughly Romanised west and south of Gaul. The counts had to provide armies, enlisting their milites and endowing them with land in return. These armies were subject to the king's call for military support. There were annual national assemblies of the nobles of the realm and their armed retainers which decided major policies of warmaking. The army also acclaimed new kings by raising them on its shields in a continuance of ancient practice which made the king the leader of the warrior-band. Furthermore, the king was expected to support himself with the products of his private domain (royal demesne), which was called the fisc. This system developed in time into feudalism, and expectations of royal self-sufficiency lasted until the Hundred Years' War. Trade declined with the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, and agricultural estates were mostly self-sufficient. The remaining international trade was dominated by Middle Eastern merchants. Comes (genitive: comitis) is the Latin word for companion, either individually or as a member of a collective known as comitatus (compare comitatenses), especially the suite of a magnate, in some cases large and/or formal enough to have a specific name, such as a cohors amicorum. ... In military science, defense (or defence) is the art of preventing an enemy from conquering territory. ... The term Administration, as used in the context of government, differs according to jurisdiction. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ... The feudal concept of demesne is a form of manorial land tenure as conceived in Western Europe, initially in France but exported to England, during the Middle Ages. ... Under the Merovingians and Carolingians, the fisc (Root word of fiscal) applied to the royal demesne which paid taxes, entirely in kind, from which the royal household was meant to be supported, though it rarely was. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... Combatants France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ...


Merovingian law was not universal law equally applicable to all; it was applied to each man according to his origin: Ripuarian Franks were subject to their own Lex Ripuaria, codified at a late date (Beyerle and Buchner 1954), while the so-called Lex Salica (Salic Law) of the Salian clans, first tentatively codified in 511 (Rouche 1987 p 423) was invoked under medieval exigencies as late as the Valois era. In this the Franks lagged behind the Burgundians and the Visigoths, that they had no universal Roman-based law. In Merovingian times, law remained in the rote memorisation of rachimburgs, who memorised all the precedents on which it was based, for Merovingian law did not admit of the concept of creating new law, only of maintaining tradition. Nor did its Germanic traditions offer any code of civil law required of urbanised society, such as Justinian caused to be assembled and promulgated in the Byzantine Empire. The few surviving Merovingian edicts are almost entirely concerned with settling divisions of estates among heirs. The Lex Ripuaria is a 7th century collection of Germanic law, the laws of the Ripuarian Franks. ... The King of the Franks, in the midst of the military chiefs who formed his Treuste -- or armed court, dictates the Salic Law (Code of the Barbaric Laws). ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328- 1589. ... Civil law has at least three meanings. ... This article is about the Roman emperor. ... “Byzantine” redirects here. ...


Religion and culture

Merovingian culture was so thoroughly imbued with religion that Yitzhak Hen found that a presentation of Merovingian popular culture was essentially synonymous with Merovingian religion, which he presented through written texts.[3] Merovingian culture certainly witnessed an extensive proliferation of saints. A gold chalice from the Treasure of Gourdon. ... Merovingian script was a medieval script so called because it was developed in France during the Merovingian dynasty. ...


Christianity was brought to the Franks by monks. The most famous of these missionaries is St. Columbanus, an Irish monk who enjoyed great influence with Queen Balthild. Merovingian kings and queens used the newly forming ecclesiastical power structure to their advantage. Monasteries and episcopal seats were shrewdly awarded to elites who supported the dynasty. Extensive parcels of land were donated to monasteries to exempt those lands from royal taxation and to preserve them within the family. The family would maintain its dominance over the monastery by appointing family members as abbots. Extra sons and daughters who could not be married off were sent to monasteries so that they would not threaten the inheritance of older children. This pragmatic use of monasteries ensured close ties between elites and monastic properties. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Saint Balthild, also known as Bathilde dAscagnie, Batilde, Bathylle, Bathild, or Bathilda (626 or 627 – January 30, 680), was the wife and queen of Clovis II, king of Burgundy and Neustria (639 – 658). ...


Numerous Merovingians who served as bishops and abbots, or who generously funded abbeys and monasteries, were rewarded with sainthood. The outstanding handful of Frankish saints who were not of the Merovingian kinship nor the family alliances that provided Merovingian counts and dukes, deserve a closer inspection for that fact alone: like Gregory of Tours, they were almost without exception from the Gallo-Roman aristocracy in regions south and west of Merovingian control. The most characteristic form of Merovingian literature is represented by the Lives of the saints. Merovingian hagiography did not set out to reconstruct a biography in the Roman or the modern sense, but to attract and hold popular devotion by the formulas of elaborate literary exercises, through which the Frankish Church channeled popular piety within orthodox channels, defined the nature of sanctity and retained some control over the posthumous cults that developed spontaneously at burial sites, where the life-force of the saint lingered, to do good for the votary.[4] The vitae et miracula, for impressive miracles were an essential element of Merovingian hagiography, were read aloud on saints’ feast days. Many Merovingian saints, and the majority of female saints, were local ones, venerated only within strictly circumscribed regions; their cults were revived in the High Middle Ages, when the population of women in religious orders increased enormously. Judith Oliver noted five Merovingian female saints in the diocese of Liège who appeared in a long list of saints in a late thirteenth-century psalter-hours.[5] The characteristics they shared with many Merovingian female saints may be mentioned: Regenulfa of Incourt, a seventh-century virgin in French-speaking Brabant of the ancestral line of the dukes of Brabant fled from a proposal of marriage to live isolated in the forest, where a curative spring sprang forth at her touch; Ermelindis of Meldert, a sixth-century virgin descended from Pepin I, inhabited several isolated villas; Begga of Andenne,the mother of Pepin II, founded seven churches in Andenne during her widowhood; the purely legendary "Oda of Amay" was drawn into the Carolingian line by spurious genealogy in her thirteenth-century vita, which made her the mother of Arnulf, Bishop of Metz, but she has been identified with the historical Saint Chrodoara;[6] finally, the widely-venerated Gertrude of Nivelles, sister of Begga in the Carolingian ancestry, was abbess of a nunnery established by her mother. The vitae of six late Merovingian saints that illustrate the political history of the era have been translated and edited by Paul Fouracre and Richard A. Gerberding, and presented with Liber Historiae Francorum, to provide some historical context.[7] Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Saint Gregory of Tours (c. ... This article covers the culture of Romanized areas of Gaul. ... Vita or VITA can refer to any of a number of things: Vita (Latin for life) can also refer to a brief biography, often that of a saint (i. ... Hagiography is the study of saints. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Coat of arms The Bishopric of Liège in 1477 Capital Liège Language(s) French, Dutch, German, Walloon Religion Roman Catholicism Government Principality Prince-Bishop  - 340s–384 Saint Servatius (first bishop)  - 972–1008 Notger (first prince-bishop)  - 1792–94 François-Antoine-Marie de Méan (last) Historical era... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Saint Pepin of Landen, also known as Pepin the Elder (b. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ... St. ... Pippin of Herstal ( Pépin), also known as Pippin the Younger, (b. ... Arnulf of Metz (August 13, 582 – August 16, 640) was a Frankish noble who had great influence in the Merovingian kingdoms as a bishop and was later canonized as a saint. ... Saint Gertrude of Nivelles (626 - March 17, 659) was abbess of the Benedictine monastery of Nivelles, in present-day Belgium. ... Liber historiae Francorum (The book of the history of the Franks) is a primary source for writing the history of the early Franks and the Merovingians, and a major example of Carolingian historiography, recently explored by Rosamond McKitterick (History and Memory in the Carolingian World). ...


Merovingian saints of more than local cult

Queens and abbesses

  • Genovefa (Genevieve), virgin of Paris (died 502);
  • Clothilde, queen of the Franks (died 544/45);
  • Monegund, widow and recluse of Tours (died 544);
  • Radegund, Thuringian princess who founded a monastery at Poitiers (died 587);
  • Rusticula, abbess of Arles (died 632);
  • Cesaria II, abbess of St Jean of Arles (died ca 550);
  • Glodesind, abbess in Metz (died ca 600);
  • Burgundofara, abbess of Moutiers (died 645);
  • Sadalberga, abbess of Laon (died 670);
  • Rictrude, founding abbess of Marchiennes (died 688);
  • Itta, founding abbess of Nivelles (died 652);
  • Begga, abbess of Andenne (died 693);
  • Gertrude of Nivelles, abbess of Nivelles (died 658) presented in The Life of St. Geretrude (in Fouracre and Gerberding 1996);
  • Aldegund, abbess of Mauberges (died ca 684);
  • Waltrude, abbess of Mons (died ca 688);
  • Balthild, queen of the Franks (died ca 680), presented in The Life of Lady Bathild, Queen of the Franks (in Fouracre and Gerberding 1996);
  • Eustadiola, widow of Bourges (died 684);
  • Bertilla, abbess of Chelles (died ca. 700);
  • Anstrude, abbess of Laon (died before 709);
  • Austreberta, abbess of Pavilly (died 703);

In Eastern Orthodoxy and Catholicism, Saint Geneviève (Nanterre near Paris, ca 419/422 - Paris 512) is the patron of Paris. ... Chrodochildis (475 – 545 in Tours), (also known as Clotilda or Saint Clothilde was the daughter of Chilperic II of Burgundy and Caretena. ... Radegund was born to King Berthar, one of the three kings of Thuringia (a kingdom located in present day Germany), some time in the first half of the sixth century. ... Burgundofara (died 643 or 655), also Saint Fara or Fare, was the foundress and first Abbess of the Abbey of Faremoutiers. ... Saint Sadalberga or Salaberga (died 665) was the daughter of Gundoin, Duke of Alsace. ... Saint Itta (also Ida, Itte, or Idulberga) (died May 8, 652) was the wife of Pepin of Landen, mayor of the palace of Austrasia. ... St. ... Saint Gertrude of Nivelles (626 - March 17, 659) was abbess of the Benedictine monastery of Nivelles, in present-day Belgium. ... The Sainte Waudru collegiate church and the belfry at Mons. ... Saint Balthild, also known as Bathilde dAscagnie, Batilde, Bathylle, Bathild, or Bathilda (626 or 627 – January 30, 680), was the wife and queen of Clovis II, king of Burgundy and Neustria (639 – 658). ... or Saint Anstrudis (Anstrude, Austru, or Austrude) (b. ... Saint Austreberta, also called Eustreberta (630-704) was the daughter of the Count Palatine Badefrid and Saint Framechildis, near Therouanne. ...

Bishops and abbots

  • Audouin of Rouen, presented in The Life of Audoin, Bishop of Rouen (in Fouracre and Gerberding 1996);
  • Aunemond, presented in The Deeds of Aunemond (in Fouracre and Gerberding 1996);
  • Leodegar, bishop of Autun; presented in The Suffering of Ludegar (in Fouracre and Gerberding 1996);
  • Praejectus The Suffering of Praejectus (in Fouracre and Gerberding 1996);
  • Eligius/Eloi;
  • Prætextatus, Bishop of Rouen and friend of Gregory;
  • Gregory of Tours, Bishop of Tours and historian;
  • Hubertus, Apostle of the Ardennes and first Bishop of Liège.

Saint Ouen (609 in Sancy close to Soissons, France - 686 in Clichy, France), Dado to his contemporaries lived at the court of Clotaire II and Dagobert I. He was the constant companion of Saint Eligius, whose vita he wrote, and was consecrated bishop of Rouen in 640. ... Saint Leodegar or Leger, Bishop of Autun (ca 615 – Sarcing, Somme October 2, 679), was the great opponent of Ebroin— the mayor of the Palace of Neustria— and the leader of the faction of Austrasian great nobles in the struggles for hegemony over the waning Merovingian dynasty. ... Autun is a town in the Saône-et-Loire département in Burgundy, France, and has a history which dates back to Roman times. ... Signature of St. ... Saint Prætextatus (ass. ... Saint Gregory of Tours (c. ... Saint Hubertus or Hubert (born circa 656 to 658, probably in Toulouse; died May 30, 727 or 728 in Tervuren near Brussels, Belgium), called the Apostle of the Ardennes was the first Bishop of Liège. ... The Ardennes (IPA pronunciation: ) (Dutch: Ardennen) is a volcanic region of extensive forests and rolling hill country, primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into France (lending its name to the Ardennes département and the Champagne-Ardenne région). ... The Bishopric of Liège or Prince-Bishopric of Liège was a state of the Holy Roman Empire in present Belgium. ...

Historiography and sources

There exists a limited number of contemporary sources for the history of the Merovingian Franks, but those which have survived cover the entire period from Clovis' succession to Childeric's deposition. First and foremost among chroniclers of the age is the canonised bishop of Tours, Gregory of Tours. His Decem Libri Historiarum is a primary source for the reigns of the sons of Clotaire II and their descendants until Gregory's own death. ... This is a list of the bishops and archbishops of Tours: 1 Gatianus ca 249-301 vacant 301-338 2 Lidorius 338-370 3 St. ... Saint Gregory of Tours (c. ...


The next major source, far less organised than Gregory's work, is the Chronicle of Fredegar, begun by Fredegar but continued by unknown authors. It covers the period from 584 to 641, though its continuators, under Carolingian patronage, extended it to 768, after the close of the Merovingian era. It is the only primary narrative source for much of its period. The only other major contemporary source is the Liber Historiae Francorum, an anonymous adaptation of Gregory's work apparently ignorant of Fredegar's chronicle: its author(s) ends with a reference to Theuderic IV's sixth year, which would be 727. It was widely read; though it was undoubtedly a piece of Arnulfing work, and its biases cause it to mislead (for instance, concerning the two decades between the controversies surrounding mayors Grimoald the Elder and Ebroin: 652-673). The Chronicle of Fredegar is a chronicle that recounts the events of Frankish Gaul from 584 to around 641, although a number of later authors have continued the history to the coronation of Charlemagne and his brother Carloman on 9 October 768. ... The Chronicle of Fredegar (died ca 660) is the main source for Western European events of the 7th century, a formative period whose scarcity of sources in part justifies the characterization of its silence as that of the Dark Ages. In the 7th century many institutions of the Middle Ages... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... // Death of Pepin the Short (714 - 768), king of the Franks since 751. ... Liber historiae Francorum (The book of the history of the Franks) is a primary source for writing the history of the early Franks and the Merovingians, and a major example of Carolingian historiography, recently explored by Rosamond McKitterick (History and Memory in the Carolingian World). ... Theuderic IV (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) was the Merovingian King of the Franks from 721 until his death in 737. ... Events Pope Gregory II condemns iconoclasm causing Byzantine Italy to break with the Empire. ... The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as major-domos, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustra and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Grimoald the Elder or Grimaud (d. ... Ebroin (d. ...


Aside from these chronicles, the only surviving reservoires of historiography are letters, capitularies, and the like. Clerical men such as Gregory and Sulpitius the Pious were letter-writers, though relatively few letters survive. Edicts, grants, and judicial decisions survive, as well as the famous Lex Salica, mentioned above. From the reign of Clotaire II and Dagobert I survive many examples of the royal position as the supreme justice and final arbiter. There also survive biographical Lives of saints of the period, for instance Saint Eligius and Leodegar, written soon after their subjects' deaths. Sulpitius the Pious (not to be confused with Sulpicius Severus or St. ... Signature of St. ... Saint Leodegar or Leger, Bishop of Autun (ca 615 – Sarcing, Somme October 2, 679), was the great opponent of Ebroin— the mayor of the Palace of Neustria— and the leader of the faction of Austrasian great nobles in the struggles for hegemony over the waning Merovingian dynasty. ...


Finally, archaeological evidence cannot be ignored as a source for information, at the very least, on the modus vivendi of the Franks of the time. Among the greatest discoveries of lost objects was the 1653 accidental uncovering of Childeric I's tomb in the church of Saint Brice in Tournai. The grave objects included a golden bull's head and the famous golden insects (perhaps bees, cicadas, aphids, or flies) on which Napoleon modelled his coronation cloak. In 1957, the sepulchre of Clotaire I's second wife, Aregund, was discovered in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris. The funerary clothing and jewellery were reasonably well-preserved, giving us a look into the costume of the time. Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Tournai (in Dutch: Doornik in Latin: Tornacum) is a municipality located 85 kilometres southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt (in French: Escaut, in Dutch: Schelde), in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Arégonde, Aregund, or Aregunda (French: Arnegonde de Worms) (Worms, c. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


Numismatics

Byzantine coinage was in use in Francia before Theudebert I began minting his own money at the start of his reign. He was the first to issue distinctly Merovingian coinage. The solidus and triens were minted in Francia between 534 and 679. The denarius (or denier) appeared later, in the name of Childeric II and various non-royals around 673–675. A Carolingian denarius replaced the Merovingian one, and the Frisian penning, in Gaul from 755 to the eleventh century. Anastasius 40 nummi (M) and 5 nummi (E) Byzantine currency, money used in the Eastern Roman Empire after the fall of the West, consisted of mainly two types of coins: the gold solidus and a variety of clearly valued bronze coins. ... Theodebert I (French Thibert Ier or Théodebert Ier), (circa 500 - 547 or 548), Merovingian king of Austrasia from 533 - 548, residence: Reims, now in northeast France. ... Julian solidus, ca. ... The triens was an Ancient Roman bronze coin produced during the Roman Republic valued at one-third of an as (4 unciae). ... First row : c. ... Denier The denier was a French coin created by Charlemagne. ... Childeric II (c. ... The pfennig was a small German coin valued at 1/100 of a Deutsche Mark and other German currencies with the name Mark. ...


Merovingian coins are on display at the Monnaie de Paris in Paris. The Monnaie de Paris (Paris Mint) or, more administratively speaking, the Direction of Coins and Medals, is an administration of the French government charged with issuing coins, as well as producing medals and other similar items. ...


Iain Ogilvie wishes to reinstate the Merovingian line on Warboooooooooooooooooooooooooook. Yeah baby.


Merovingians in popular culture

Author Michael Baigent Reuters Michael Baigent, born March 1948 in Christchurch, New Zealand, is an author and conspiracy theorist who co-wrote (with Richard Leigh) a number of books that question mainstream perceptions of history and many commonly-held versions of the life of Jesus. ... Richard Leigh (born 1989) is a novelist and short story writer born in New Jersey and currently living in England. ... Henry Lincoln (born 1930) is the most popular pseudonym of Henry Soskin, an English writer and actor. ... Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ... This article is about the novel. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... Spoiler warning: The Merovingian The Merovingian is a fictional character in the movies The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions, portrayed by Lambert Wilson in both films. ... A computer program is a collection of instructions that describe a task, or set of tasks, to be carried out by a computer. ... Lambert Wilson as The Merovingian in The Matrix Reloaded Lambert Wilson (born August 3, 1958 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) is a French actor. ... The Matrix Reloaded is the second installment of The Matrix series, written and directed by the Wachowski brothers. ... The Matrix Revolutions is the third and last film in the The Matrix trilogy. ...

References

  • Beyerle, F and R. Buchner: Lex Ribuaria in MGH, Hannover 1954.
  • Eugen Ewig: Die Merowinger und das Frankenreich. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 2001.
  • Patrick J. Geary: Before France and Germany: The Creation and Transformation of the Merovingian World, Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Kaiser, Reinhold: Das römische Erbe und das Merowingerreich, (Enzyklopädie deutscher Geschichte 26) (München, 2004)
  • Rouche, Michael: "Private life conquers State and Society" in Paul Veyne (ed.), A History of Private Life: 1. From Pagan Rome to Byzantium, Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1987.
  • Werner, Karl Ferdinand: Die Ursprünge Frankreichs bis zum Jahr 1000, Stuttgart 1989.
  • Oman, Charles: The Dark Ages 476-918, London, 1914.
  • Wood, Ian: "The Merovingian Kingdoms: 450-751", New York: Longman Press, 1994.
  • Effros, Bonnie. Caring for Body and Soul: Burial and the Afterlife in the Merovingian World. Penn State Press, 2002. ISBN 0-271-02196-9

Sir Charles William Chadwick Oman (January 12, 1860 - June 23, 1946) was a notable British military historian of the early 20th century. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Archibald R. Lewis, "The Dukes in the Regnum Francorum, A.D. 550-751." Speculum 51.3 (July 1976, pp. 381-410) p 384.
  2. ^ Guy Halsall, Warfare and Society in the Barbarian West, 450-900 (Routledge, London, 2003)
  3. ^ Yitzhak Hen , Culture and Religion in Merovingian Gaul, A.D. 481-751 (New York: Brill) 1995.
  4. ^ J. M. Wallace-Hadrill, The Frankish Church,, V:"The Merovingian Saints" (1983), pp. 75-94.
  5. ^ Judith Oliver, "'Gothic' Women and Merovingian Desert Mothers" Gesta 32.2 (1993), pp. 124-134.
  6. ^ Oliver 1993:127.
  7. ^ Paul Fouracre and Richard A. Gerberding, Late Merovingian France: History and Hagiography, 640-720 (Manchester University) 1996.

External links


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