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Encyclopedia > Meriwether Lewis
Meriwether Lewis
Born August 18, 1774
Charlottesville, Virginia
Died October 11, 1809 (aged 35)
Grinder's Stand, Hohenwald, Tennessee

Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition also known as the Corps of Discovery, with William Clark, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase. Image File history File links Meriwether_Lewis. ... Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827), self-portrait from 1822 Charles Willson Peale (April 15, 1741 – February 22, 1827) was an American painter, soldier and naturalist. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Grinders Stand was the tavern located on the historic Natchez Trace where Meriwether Lewis died. ... Hohenwald is a city in Lewis County, Tennessee. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... This article is about a military rank. ... Lewis and Clark redirects here. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ... William Clark William Clark (August 1, 1770 - September 1, 1838) was an American explorer who accompanied Meriwether Lewis on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ...

Contents

Biography

Lewis was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, to Captain George Lewis (1712 – 1781) who was of Welsh ancestry, and Lucy Meriwether (1751 – 1837). He moved with his family to Georgia when he was ten. At thirteen, he was sent back to Virginia for education by private tutors. One of these was Parson Matthew Maury, an uncle of Matthew Fontaine Maury. Parson Maury was a son of James Maury who was Thomas Jefferson's teacher for two years. In the 1790s, Lewis graduated from Liberty Hall Academy in Lexington, Virginia (now Washington and Lee University), joined the Virginia militia, and in 1794 was sent as part of a detachment involved in putting down the Whiskey Rebellion. In 1795, he joined the regular Army, in which he served until 1801, at one point in the detachment of William Clark. He achieved the rank of Captain. This article is about the U.S. state. ... George Lewis is the name of more than one person of note. ... The Welsh are, according to Hastings (1997), an ethnic group and nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ... Official language(s) English Capital Atlanta Largest city Atlanta Largest metro area Atlanta metro area Area  Ranked 24th  - Total 59,411 sq mi (154,077 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 2. ... Matthew Fontaine Maury Matthew Fontaine Maury (January 14, 1806 – February 1, 1873), USN - American astronomer, astrophysicist, historian, oceanographer, meteorologist, cartographer, author, geologist, educator. ... James Maury was Thomas Jeffersons early teacher. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... Washington leads his troops to western Pennsylvania (Metropolitan Museum of Art) The Whiskey Rebellion, less commonly known as the Whiskey Insurrection, was a popular uprising that had its beginnings in 1791 and culminated in an insurrection in 1794 in the locality of Washington, Pennsylvania, in the Monongahela Valley. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... For other persons named William Clark, see William Clark (disambiguation). ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ...


Lewis was appointed private secretary to President Thomas Jefferson in 1801. Originally, he was to provide information on the politics of the United States Army, which had seen an influx of Federalist officers as a result of John Adams's "midnight appointments." He later became intimately involved in the planning of the expedition and was sent by Jefferson to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for instruction in cartography and other skills necessary for making scientific observations. Lewis departed Pittsburgh for St. Louis—the capital of the new Louisiana Territory—via the Ohio River in the summer of 1803, gathering supplies, equipment, and personnel along the way. Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The term federalist refers to several sets of political beliefs around the world. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Between 1804 and 1806, the Corps of Discovery explored thousands of miles of the Missouri and Columbia River watersheds, searching for an all-water route to the Pacific Ocean. Generally sharing leadership responsibilities with William Clark, although technically the leader, Lewis led the expedition safely across the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific and back, with the loss of just one man, Charles Floyd, who died of apparent appendicitis. In the course of the journey, Lewis observed, collected, and described hundreds of plants and animal species previously unknown to science. The expedition was the first point of Euro-American contact for several Native American tribes; through translators and sign language, Lewis conducted rudimentary ethnographic studies of the peoples he encountered, even as he laid the groundwork for a trade economy to ensure American hegemony over its vast new interior territory.[1] For other persons named William Clark, see William Clark (disambiguation). ... Charles Floyd (1782 - August 20, 1804) was a United States explorer, an officer and quartermaster in the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ...


On August 11, 1806, near the end of the expedition, Lewis was shot in the hip by Pierre Cruzatte, a near-blind man under his command, while both were hunting for elk. His wound hampered him for the rest of the journey.[2] is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Private Pierre Cruzatte was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ...


After returning from the expedition, Lewis received a reward of 1,400 acres (5.7 km²) of land. In 1807, Jefferson appointed him governor of the Louisiana Territory; he settled in St. Louis. Lewis was a poor administrator, often quarreling with local political leaders and failing to keep in touch with his superiors in Washington.[3] An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... “km” redirects here. ... The United States in 1810, following the Louisiana Purchase. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...


Lewis was a Freemason, initiated, passed and raised in Door To Virtue Lodge No. 44 in Albemarle, VA between 1796 and 1797.[4] On August 2, 1808, Lewis and several of his acquaintances submitted a petition to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in which they requested a dispensation to establish a lodge in St. Louis. Lewis was nominated and recommended to serve as the first Master of the proposed Lodge, which was warranted as Lodge No. 111 on September 16, 1808. Here his heavy drinking persisted.[5] Freemasons redirects here. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Lewis died under mysterious circumstances of two gunshot wounds in 1809 at a tavern called Grinder's Stand, about 70 miles (110 km) from Nashville, Tennessee, on the Natchez Trace, while in route to Washington to answer complaints about his actions as governor. Whether Lewis committed suicide or was murdered remains a mystery to this day.[6] Jefferson believed the farmer, while his family continually maintained the latter. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Grinders Stand was the tavern located on the historic Natchez Trace where Meriwether Lewis died. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Nashville redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Natchez Trace was a 440-mile-long path extending from Natchez, Mississippi to Nashville, Tennessee, linking the Cumberland, the Tennessee and Mississippi rivers. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


The explorer was buried not far from where he died. He is honored today by a memorial along the Natchez Trace Parkway. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444 mile (715 km) long parkway, in the form of a limited-access two-lane road, in the southeastern United States. ...


Legacy

Due to his shy personality, Lewis never married. Although he died without legitimate heirs, he does have the putative DNA model haplotype for his paternal ancestors lineage, which was that of the Warner Hal. He was also related to Robert E Lee and Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom, among others.[7] He was related to George Washington by marriage: his great-uncle was Fielding Lewis, Washington's brother-in-law. He was also a second cousin once removed of Washington's on his father's side. For the author of Inherit the Wind and other works, see Robert Edwin Lee. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Fielding Lewis was married to Elizabeth Betty Washington, the sister of the American President and Revolutionary War General George Washington. ...


For many years, Lewis's legacy was overlooked, inaccurately assessed, and even tarnished by his alleged suicide. Yet his contributions to science, the exploration of the Western U.S., and the lore of great world explorers, are considered incalculable.[8] A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ...


Several years after Lewis's death, Thomas Jefferson wrote:

Of courage undaunted, possessing a firmness and perseverance of purpose which nothing but impossibilities could divert from its direction, ... honest, disinterested, liberal, of sound understanding and a fidelity to truth so scrupulous that whatever he should report would be as certain as if seen by ourselves, with all these qualifications as if selected and implanted by nature in one body for this express purpose, I could have no hesitation in confiding the enterprise to him.[9]

Jefferson also stated that Lewis had a "luminous and discriminating intellect."


The alpine plant Lewisia (family Portulacaceae), popular in rock gardens, is named after Lewis, as is Lewis's Woodpecker. Geographic names that honor him include Lewis County, Tennessee; Lewisburg, Tennessee; Lewiston, Idaho; Lewis County, Washington; and the U.S. Army installation Fort Lewis, Washington. Alp redirects here. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... The plant genus Lewisia was named for Meriwether Lewis. ... Genera See text Portulacaceae is a family of flowering plants, comprising about 20 genera with about 500 species, ranging from herbaceous plants to shrubs. ... A rock garden, also known as a rockery or an alpine garden, is a type of garden that features extensive use of rocks or stones, along with plants native to rocky or alpine environments. ... Binomial name Melanerpes lewis (Gray, 1849) The Lewis Woodpecker, Melanerpes lewis, is a large North American species of woodpecker which was named for Meriwether Lewis, one of the explorers who surveyed the areas bought by the United States of America during the Louisiana Purchase. ... Lewis County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Lewisburg is a city in Marshall County, Tennessee, United States. ... Lewiston is the county seat and largest city in Nez Perce County, Idaho. ... Lewis County is a county located in the state of Washington. ... Fort Lewis is a census-designated place and U.S. Army post located in Pierce County, Washington. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ Ambrose, Stephen. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. Simon & Schuster: 15 February 1996. ISBN 0-684-81107-3.
  2. ^ Undaunted Courage, Stephen Ambrose, pg.385
  3. ^ http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/people/i_r/lewis.htm
  4. ^ Dunslow's 10,000 Famous Freemasons Missouri Lodge of Research, 1959.
  5. ^ http://www.pagrandlodge.org/freemason/0503/tot.html
  6. ^ Who Was Who in America, p. 314
  7. ^ Moses, Grace McLean. The Welsh Lineage of John Lewis (1592-1657), Emigrant to Gloucester, Virginia. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2002
  8. ^ Ambrose, Stephen. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. Simon & Schuster: 15 February 1996. ISBN 0-684-81107-3.
  9. ^ Jefferson, Thomas, Paul Allen, 18 August 1813, in Letters of the Lewis and Clark Expedition with Related Documents: 1783–1854, edited by Donald Dean Jackson. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1962, pp. 589–590.

Stephen Ambrose, at the 2001 premiere of Band of Brothers Stephen Edward Ambrose (January 10, 1936 – October 13, 2002) was an American historian and biographer of U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon. ... Stephen Ambrose, at the 2001 premiere of Band of Brothers Stephen Edward Ambrose (January 10, 1936 – October 13, 2002) was an American historian and biographer of U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon. ...

External links

Preceded by
James Wilkinson
Governor of Louisiana Territory
1807-1809
Succeeded by
Benjamin Howard

why do you type this much stuff when nobody reads it? Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... General James Wilkinson James Wilkinson (1757 – December 28, 1825) was a U.S. soldier and statesman, who was associated with several scandals and controversies. ... The Governors of Missouri since its statehood in 1820 are: Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Missouri ... Benjamin Howard (1760 - September 18, 1814) was a Congressman from Kentucky, governor of Missouri Territory and a brigadier general in the War of 1812. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
PBS - THE WEST - Meriwether Lewis (739 words)
The official leader of the epic Lewis and Clark Expedition, Meriwether Lewis has been called "undoubtedly the greatest pathfinder this country has ever known." Lewis was born to a Virginia planter family in 1774.
To accompany him as co-leader of the expedition, Lewis selected William Clark, a fellow Virginian with whom he had served on the frontier in 1795.
The Lewis and Clark expedition was as widely hailed upon its return as it is remembered in our own time, and as its official leader, Meriwether Lewis reaped the benefits of this acclaim.
Meriwether Lewis - MSN Encarta (707 words)
Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), American explorer who served as co-leader, with William Clark, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806), the first American overland exploration of the West and Pacific Northwest.
Lewis proved to be a keen observer of the natural world, an attribute he put to use during the expedition.
Lewis joined the Virginia militia as a private soldier during the Whiskey Rebellion, a series of disturbances in 1794 aimed against the imposition of a federal excise tax on whiskey.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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