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Encyclopedia > Mercer University

Mercer University

Established 1833
Type Private
President William D. Underwood
Staff 570
Undergraduates 5000
Postgraduates 2300
Location Macon, Georgia, USA
Campus Urban
Colors Orange and Black           
Nickname Bears
Mascot Toby (a Bear)
Athletics NCAA Division I
Affiliations Atlantic Sun
Website www.mercer.edu

Mercer University is a private, coeducational, faith-based university with a Baptist heritage, located in the U.S. state of Georgia. Image File history File links Mercer_seal. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... William D. Underwood is the eighteenth president of Mercer University, an independent, coeducational, church-related, private university, located in the U.S. state of Georgia with major campuses in Macon, Georgia and Atlanta, Georgia. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic Sun Conference is a college athletic conference which operates primarily on the east coast of the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the...


Mercer is the only university of its size in the United States that offers programs in eleven diversified fields of study: liberal arts, business, education, music, engineering, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, law, theology, and continuing and professional studies. Mercer enrolls approximately 2,500 undergraduate students, 2,300 graduate students, and 2,500 extended education students in its eleven colleges and schools. Students come from approximately 40 states and 40 countries; more than 80% are Georgia residents.


Mercer has major campuses in Macon and Atlanta; regional academic centers for extended education students in Henry County, Douglas County, and Eastman; teaching hospitals in Macon and Savannah; a university press in Macon; an engineering research center in Warner Robins; and a NCAA Division I athletic program. Mercer's annual economic impact on Georgia exceeds $500 million. In addition to its current locations throughout Georgia, Mercer will open a new four-year medical school in Savannah in 2008. Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country United States State Georgia Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... Henry County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Douglas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Eastman is a city in Dodge County, Georgia, United States. ... Coordinates: , County Chatham Government  - Mayor Otis S. Johnson Area  - City 202. ... Nickname: The International City Location in Georgia Coordinates: Counties Houston and Peach Founded September 1, 1942 Government  - Mayor Donald S. Walker Area  - City 59. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


Mercer was affiliated with the Georgia Baptist Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention until 2005-2006. Mercer is now an independent Baptist university. Mercer's School of Theology is affiliated with the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship. The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based cooperative ministry agency serving Baptist churches around the world. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Inc. ...

Contents

History

Founding

Mercer University was founded in 1833 in Penfield, Georgia, under the leadership of Baptist minister Adiel Sherwood. The school was named for Jesse Mercer, a prominent Baptist leader who provided a founding endowment and who served as the first chairman of the school's board of trustees. Initially a boys' preparatory school named "Mercer Institute", the Georgia legislature granted a college charter in 1837. The school adopted its present name in 1838 and was one of the few Southern universities and the only college or university in Georgia to remain open throughout the American Civil War. In 1871, the university moved to Macon, which was then becoming a center of transportation and commerce in Georgia. In 1972, the university opened a second campus in Atlanta. Penfield, Georgia, established shortly after 1829 in Greene County, Georgia, was named in honor of Josiah Penfield (c. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... Jesse Mercer, born in North Carolina Dec. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site... This article is 88 kilobytes or more in size. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Advancing the Vision Campaign

Mercer University is currently completing Phase III of the $350 million Advancing the Vision Campaign. Phases I and II were completed with more than $208 million received or pledged. For Phase II, Mercer received one of the largest gifts in the history of higher education when it received a large tract of developed real estate in Atlanta. The property, given to Mercer and to LaGrange College jointly, was valued at $124 million with Mercer's share being $62 million. As of November 2006, more than $300 million was received in Phases I, II, and III. The campaign has financed numerous projects including the construction and renovation of facilities and endowed scholarships for students. New facilities on the Macon campus include the University Center, a large multi-purpose facility that houses the university's athletics department, basketball arena, and student services; the Allan and Rosemary McCorkle Music Building that houses the School of Music; a new Science and Engineering Building; and the Greek Village with 18 fraternity and sorority houses. New facilities on the Atlanta campus include academic buildings for the College of Nursing, the College of Education, and the School of Theology and a large student housing complex. LaGrange College is the oldest private college in Georgia (it was founded in 1831), and is located in LaGrange. ... The University Center is a large multi-purpose facility on the campus of Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. ...


Georgia Baptist Convention

In November 2005, the Georgia Baptist Convention voted to end the affiliation between Mercer and the convention. Mercer had an independent board of trustees and was not directly controlled by the convention. The convention, however, provided financial support used to fund scholarships for Baptist students and other special projects. The lack of convention control caused friction in recent years with Mercer exercising its independence to embrace the moderate Cooperative Baptist Fellowship. The convention also saw Mercer as becoming secularized and not falling inline with its values. The relationship came to a head when Mercer allowed a gay-rights group on campus to hold a "Coming Out Day". An article about the group, Mercer Triangle Symposium, and the "Coming Out Day" was published two weeks before the annual convention meeting. At the meeting, university president Dr. R. Kirby Godsey asked the group of Georgia Baptists not to break ties with Mercer. He explained that Mercer does not endorse homosexuality, but allows discussion on the topic. Despite Godsey's assurances, the convention voted to break ties with Mercer. In April 2006, Mercer's board of trustees approved changes to the university charter ending Mercer's affiliation with the convention. Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Inc. ... LGBT social movements bisexual and transgender people, and their movements include the Gay and Lesbian Rights Movement, Gay Liberation, lesbian feminism, the queer movement and transgender activism. ... National Coming Out Day logo National Coming Out Day is observed on October 11 in the U.S. by members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities and their allies. ... Raleigh Kirby Godsey, better known as R. Kirby Godsey, served as the seventeenth president of Mercer University, an independent, coeducational, church-related, private university, located in the U.S. state of Georgia, from 1 July 1979 to 30 June 2006 -- 27 years -- longer than any of his predecessors. ...


Baptist affiliation

Mercer chose to remain Baptist when its affiliation with the Georgia Baptist Convention ended in 2006. Mercer has ties with individual churches in Georgia and provides scholarships to Baptist students through its Baptist Scholars Fund. Mercer's decision to become an independent Baptist university contrasts with other universities that became secular after severing ties with their state conventions. Such universities include Furman University, Stetson University, University of Richmond, and Wake Forest University. This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The Bell Tower Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian liberal arts university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. ... Stetson University is a private, co-educational, liberal arts university that consistently earns high rankings in national college guides. ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ...


President Godsey retires

Dr. R. Kirby Godsey retired on 30 June 2006 after 27 years as Mercer's President. During Godsey's tenure, Mercer established seven new colleges and schools, growing from four to eleven, expanded its annual budget to more than $175 million, and increased the endowment to almost $200 million with an additional $200+ million pledged in planned gifts. Both houses of the Georgia legislature honored Godsey for his long service and Mercer's historic Administration Building was named the R. Kirby Godsey Administration Building. Godsey remains at Mercer as Chancellor, professor, and special advisor to new President, William D. Underwood. Underwood, former interim President, Baylor University, was selected as Godsey's replacement in December 2005. Underwood took office on 1 July 2006. Raleigh Kirby Godsey, better known as R. Kirby Godsey, served as the seventeenth president of Mercer University, an independent, coeducational, church-related, private university, located in the U.S. state of Georgia, from 1 July 1979 to 30 June 2006 -- 27 years -- longer than any of his predecessors. ... William D. Underwood is the eighteenth president of Mercer University, an independent, coeducational, church-related, private university, located in the U.S. state of Georgia with major campuses in Macon, Georgia and Atlanta, Georgia. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ...


Presidents

Mercer's first President, Billington Sanders
Mercer's first President, Billington Sanders
  • Billington McCarthy Sanders (1833–1840)
  • Otis Smith (1840–1844)
  • John Leadley Dagg (1844–1854)
  • Nathaniel Macon Crawford(1854–1856)
  • Shelton Palmer Sanford (acting President; 1856–1858)
  • Nathaniel Macon Crawford (1858–1866)
  • Henry Holcombe Tucker (1866–1871)
  • Archibald John Battle (1872–1889)
  • Gustavus Alonzo Nunnally (1889–1893)
  • Joseph Edgerton Willet (acting President; 1893)
  • James Bruton Gambrell (1893–1896)
  • Pinckney Daniel Pollock (1896–1903)
  • Matthew Quinn Wetherington (acting President; 1903–1905)
  • Charles Lee Smith (1905–1906)
  • Samuel Young Jameson (1906–1913)
  • James Freeman Sellers (acting President; 1913–1914)
  • William Lowndes Pickard (1914–1918)
  • Rufus Washington Weaver (1918–1927)
  • Andrew Phillip Montague (acting President; 1927–1928)
  • Spright Dowell (1928–1953)
  • George Boyce Connell (1953–1959)
  • Spright Dowell (interim President; 1959–1960)
  • Rufus Carrollton Harris (1960–1979)
  • Raleigh Kirby Godsey (1979–2006)
  • William D. Underwood (2006– )

Mercer Universitys first president. ... Mercer Universitys first president. ... John Leadley Dagg (1794–1884) born in Loudoun County, Virginia, lived to be over 90 years old. ... Henry Holcombe Tucker was the chancellor of the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia from 1874 until his resignation in 1878. ... Raleigh Kirby Godsey, better known as R. Kirby Godsey, served as the seventeenth president of Mercer University, an independent, coeducational, church-related, private university, located in the U.S. state of Georgia, from 1 July 1979 to 30 June 2006 -- 27 years -- longer than any of his predecessors. ... William D. Underwood is the eighteenth president of Mercer University, an independent, coeducational, church-related, private university, located in the U.S. state of Georgia with major campuses in Macon, Georgia and Atlanta, Georgia. ...

Location

Macon Campus

Mercer's R. Kirby Godsey Administration Building
Mercer's R. Kirby Godsey Administration Building

The historic main campus of Mercer University is in Macon; approximately 75 miles south of Atlanta. The College of Liberal Arts, the Eugene W. Stetson School of Business and Economics, the Tift College of Education, the Townsend School of Music, the School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and programs of the College of Continuing and Professional Studies are located on the Macon campus. The R. Kirby Godsey Administration Building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Image File history File links Mercer_University_Administration. ... Image File history File links Mercer_University_Administration. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Law School

The Walter F. George School of Law is located on its own campus in Macon; one mile from the historic main campus. The Law School building is a three-story partial replica of Independence Hall in Philadelphia and is located on Coleman Hill overlooking downtown Macon. Adjacent to the Law School is the university-owned Woodruff House, also known as Overlook Mansion. The Law School building and the Woodruff House are two of Macon's most recognizable sites. The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ... Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. ...


Atlanta Campus

The Cecil B. Day Graduate and Professional Campus of Mercer University is in Atlanta. The Georgia Baptist College of Nursing, the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, the James and Carolyn McAfee School of Theology, the College of Continuing and Professional Studies, and programs of the Tift College of Education (Masters and PhD programs), the Stetson School of Business and Economics (BBA, MBA and Executive MBA programs), and the School of Medicine (Masters program) are located on the Atlanta campus. Mercer's Atlanta campus was formerly the home of Atlanta Baptist College until it merged with Mercer in 1972. In 2004, Mercer enlarged the campus by acquiring the former headquarters of the Georgia Baptist Convention, located adjacent to the campus. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Regional academic centers

In addition to its campuses in Macon and Atlanta, Mercer has regional academic centers in Henry County, Douglas County, and Eastman, Georgia. The regional academic centers cater to non-traditional extended education students and offer various programs through the university's colleges and schools.


Teaching hospitals

Additional off-campus sites include the Medical Center of Central Georgia in Macon, and Memorial Health University Medical Center in Savannah, which serve as the School of Medicine's teaching hospitals.


Savannah Campus

Mercer will open a new four-year medical school in Savannah in August 2008. The school, a branch of the School of Medicine in Macon, will be located at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Mercer's teaching hospital in Savannah. Mercer's strategic plan calls for construction of a new medical education building in a separate location, which will be the university's third major campus in addition to those in Macon and Atlanta.


Colleges and schools

Liberal Arts

The College of Liberal Arts, founded in 1833, is the heart of the university offering undergraduate degrees in the arts, humanities, communications, natural sciences, and social sciences. The college, with more than 100 full-time faculty members, offers dozens of majors, minors, and concentrations, and has a Great Books Program for students who wish to study Western civilization from ancient time to the present by examining major works of literature. The Great Books Program, an eight semester sequence of courses, may be completed in lieu of the college's general education curriculum. Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ...


Business

The Eugene W. Stetson School of Business and Economics, founded in 1984, has the highest level of accreditation for business schools from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The school, named for a Mercer alumnus who was a senior executive for The Coca-Cola Company, the Illinois Central Railroad, and JP Morgan, offers bachelor's degree (BBA) programs in Macon, Atlanta, and Douglas County; Evening MBA programs in Macon and Atlanta; Professional MBA programs in Henry County and Savannah; and an Executive MBA program in Atlanta. AACSB International--The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), founded in 1916, has granted specialized business school accreditation to more than 500 degree-granting institutions in 30 countries. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturer, distributor and marketer of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... The Illinois Central (AAR reporting mark IC), sometimes called the Main Line of Mid-America, was a railroad carrier in the central United States, with its primary routes connecting Chicago, Illinois with New Orleans, Louisiana and Birmingham, Alabama. ... John Pierpont Morgan John Pierpont Morgan I (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913) was an American financier and banker, who at the turn of the century (1901), was one of the wealthiest men in America. ...


The Mercer University Executive Forum, Georgia's premier business outreach program, is a part of the school. The program welcomes nationally known speakers who conduct management and leadership seminars in Macon and Atlanta. Speakers have included Lou Dobbs, Bob Dole, Steve Forbes, Lou Holtz, Jesse Jackson, Tom Ridge, George Tenet, George Will, Bob Woodward, and numerous other business, political, and social leaders. Lou Dobbs (born September 24, 1945) is the anchor and managing editor of CNNs Lou Dobbs Tonight, an editorial columnist, and host of a syndicated radio show. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Malcolm Stevenson Steve Forbes Jr. ... Louis Leo Holtz (born on January 6, 1937 in Follansbee, West Virginia) is a former NCAA football head coach, and is currently an author and a motivational speaker who has spoken to the likes of Fortune 500 companies on topics such as the importance of teamwork and goal setting. ... Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 27, 1945 near Pittsburgh, USA) is an American politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1983–1995), Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of Homeland... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University and was previously the Director of Central Intelligence for the United States Central Intelligence Agency. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ...


Education

The Tift College of Education, founded in 1995 as the School of Education, was named in honor of Tift College, a former Baptist women's college in Forsyth, Georgia, in 2001. Tift College, founded in 1847, merged with Mercer in 1986 and was closed. Mercer adopted Tift's alumnae and maintains their records. The Tift College of Education offers undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs and is the largest private provider of teachers in Georgia. Tift College was a private liberal arts womens college located in Forsyth, Georgia. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ... Forsyth is a city located in Monroe County, Georgia. ...


The Educational Leadership Program is the college's newest graduate offering; candidates earn a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in P-12 School Leadership (starting fall 2006) or Higher Education Leadership (starting fall 2007). The program is offered on the Macon and Atlanta campuses.


Music

The Townsend School of Music opened on 1 July 2006. Mercer trustee Carolyn McAfee, wife of James T. McAfee, Jr., former chairman of Mercer's board of trustees, and her son and daughter-in-law, Tom and Julie McAfee, provided the founding endowment. The school, named in honor of Mrs. McAfee's parents, Raymond and Sophia Townsend, is housed in the Allan and Rosemary McCorkle Music Building, a state-of-the-art facility that opened in 2001 on the Macon campus. The Townsend School of Music offers undergraduate and graduate music degrees formerly offered by the College of Liberal Arts.


The Townsend-McAfee Institute, established in 2005, is a collaboration between the Townsend School of Music and the McAfee School of Theology offering graduate programs in church music that prepare musical artists for the ministry. The institute, located on the Macon campus with the School of Music, is preparing a new hymnal for Baptists and other Christian fellowships. Slated for release in 2009, the 400th anniversary of Baptists, the project demonstrates Mercer’s commitment to its church-related heritage and connects with the university’s namesake, Jesse Mercer, who authored Cluster of Spiritual Songs; a hymnal first published circa 1800 with 11 subsequent editions. See also hymn - a program to decrypt iTunes music files. ...


The Robert McDuffie Center for Strings offers conservatory-quality music training in a comprehensive university setting. Under the leadership of internationally renowned violinist Robert McDuffie, who has served as Distinguished University Professor of Music since 2004, the center will accept up to 12 string students for the 2007-2008 academic year. Total future enrollment will be limited to 26 students: 12 violinists, 6 violists, 6 cellists and 2 double bassists. The focus of the center, housed in the Townsend School of Music on the Macon campus, is to provide highly talented string students the opportunity to learn with some of the nation's renowned string musicians. Robert McDuffie is an internationally-reknown violinist. ...


Engineering

The School of Engineering, founded in 1985, is the only private engineering school in Georgia and one of only two engineering schools in the state. The school offers undergraduate and graduate degrees and is the primary provider of engineers for Robins Air Force Base in Warner Robins, Georgia. The school is located on the Macon campus in a modern 62,000 square foot academic facility. In 2006, Mercer began construction of a $14 million Science and Engineering Building adjacent to the current school that will expand the school's laboratory and classroom resources. The Mercer Engineering and Research Center, an extension of the school located in a state-of-the-art facility in Warner Robins, directly supports Robins AFB and offers significant research opportunities for students. In addition, the school's National Engineering Advisory Board, comprised of some of the nation's most respected corporate leaders including Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, Boeing, and Georgia Pacific, provides premier research and career opportunities for students. The Mercer University School of Engineering (MUSE) is one of Mercer Universitys eleven colleges and schools. ... Robins Air Force Base (Robins AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force located in Houston County, Georgia. ... Nickname: The International City Location in Georgia Coordinates: Counties Houston and Peach Founded September 1, 1942 Government  - Mayor Donald S. Walker Area  - City 59. ... The Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) is an aerospace and defense conglomerate that is the result of a 1994 merger between Northrop and Grumman. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major United States military contractor based in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661 ) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Boeing. ... Georgia-Pacific LLC. is an American pulp and paper company based in Atlanta, Georgia, and is one of the worlds leading manufacturers and distributors of tissue, pulp, paper, packaging, building products and related chemicals. ...


The School of Engineering and Robins Air Force Base maintain an educational partnership that provides on-base internships and other learning opportunities for aerospace engineering students. The partnership is separate from the Mercer Engineering and Research Center, which is located near the base in Warner Robins. The educational partnership is one of two maintained by Mercer University; the other involves the College of Nursing and Piedmont Healthcare of Atlanta. Robins Air Force Base (Robins AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force located in Houston County, Georgia. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft, and related topics. ...


Medicine

The School of Medicine, founded in 1982, is partially state funded and accepts only Georgia residents into the Doctor of Medicine program. The school's core mission is to train primary care physicians and other health professionals for service in rural and medically underserved areas of Georgia. The school is consistently recognized for its focus on family medicine, and in 2005, US News and World Report ranked the school 17th out of 126 accredited medical schools in the family medicine category. In addition to the Doctor of Medicine, the school offers Masters programs in public health, family therapy, and anesthesia. The School of Medicine's teaching hospitals are the Medical Center of Central Georgia in Macon and Memorial Health University Medical Center in Savannah. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... Family therapy, also referred to as couple and family therapy and family systems therapy, and earlier generally referred to as marriage therapy, is a branch of psychotherapy that works with families and couples in intimate relationships to nurture change and development. ... Anesthesia or anaesthesia (see spelling differences) has traditionally meant the condition of having the perception of pain and other sensations blocked. ...


The School of Medicine received additional state funding in 2007 to expand its existing partnership with Memorial Health University Medical Center by establishing a four-year medical school in Savannah, the first medical school in southern Georgia. Third and fourth year Mercer students have completed clinical rotations at Memorial Health since 1996; approximately 100 residents are trained each year in a number of specialities. The expanded program is scheduled to begin in August 2008 with 30 first year students. The School of Medicine's Macon and Savannah campuses will be administered by Senior Associate Deans who will report to one Dean. The new medical program furthers Mercer's mission to train primary care physicians for service in rural and medically underserved areas of Georgia.


The Center for Health and Learning is an educational partnership between the College of Nursing and Piedmont Healthcare of Atlanta. The School of Medicine will join the partnership in September 2007 when it partners with Piedmont to offer a Masters in family therapy on the Atlanta campus. Piedmont is a not-for-profit organization with several hospitals, including Piedmont Hospital and Piedmont Fayette Hospital, both recognized as among the best in the nation; a primary care physician group with approximately 20 clinics; and a physician network with approximately 500 members. Family therapy students will be provided learning experiences at various facilities throughout the Piedmont system. Family therapy, also referred to as couple and family therapy and family systems therapy, and earlier generally referred to as marriage therapy, is a branch of psychotherapy that works with families and couples in intimate relationships to nurture change and development. ...


Nursing

The Georgia Baptist College of Nursing, founded in 1901, was initially an independent school in Atlanta. The college merged with Mercer in 2001 and moved from its downtown location to Mercer's Atlanta campus in 2002. The college offers undergraduate and graduate programs and provides clinical experiences at numerous Atlanta-area hospitals and at other community facilities.


The Center for Health and Learning is an educational partnership between the College of Nursing and Piedmont Healthcare of Atlanta. Piedmont is a not-for-profit organization with several hospitals, including Piedmont Hospital and Piedmont Fayette Hospital, both recognized as among the best in the nation; a primary care physician group with approximately 20 clinics; and a physician network with approximately 500 members. Nursing students are provided clinical experiences at various facilities throughout the Piedmont system.


Pharmacy

The College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, founded in 1903, was initially an independent school in Atlanta. The college merged with Mercer in 1959 and moved from its downtown location to Mercer's Atlanta campus in 1991. In 1981, the college became the first in the southeast and the fifth in the nation to offer the Doctor of Pharmacy, the highest level of pharmacy education, as its sole professional degree. The college, formerly named the Southern School of Pharmacy, adopted its current name on 1 July 2006. The name change reflects additional health science programs, including a physician assistant program, offered by the college.


Law

The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. The school is named for a Mercer alumnus; former United States Senator Walter F. George. Additional information is available on the school's Wikipedia entry. The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ... Walter Franklin George (January 29, 1878 – August 24, 1957) was an American politician from the state of Georgia. ...


Theology

The James and Carolyn McAfee School of Theology, founded in 1994, offers graduate theological programs and is affiliated with the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship. McAfee's curriculum is not directed by the Georgia Baptist Convention or Southern Baptist Convention. The school, located on the Atlanta campus, is named for James T. McAfee, Jr., former chairman of Mercer's board of trustees, and his wife Carolyn. The McAfees provided a founding endowment. Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Inc. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based cooperative ministry agency serving Baptist churches around the world. ...


The McAfee School of Theology and the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship are "identity partners"; announced in 2006, the CBF provides funding for operating costs, scholarships, and collaborative projects. The designation, which grants the highest level of CBF funding, is held by four theology schools; the McAfee School of Theology, the Truett Theological Seminary at Baylor University, the Divinity School at Campbell University, and the Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond. Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Inc. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Campbell University is a university in Buies Creek, North Carolina, US. Campbell is a coeducational, church-related (Baptist) university, and has an approximately equal number of male and female students. ... Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond (BTSR) is a seminary in Richmond, Virginia. ...


The American Baptist Historical Society, with the largest and most diverse collection of Baptist historical materials and archives in the world, has announced it will relocate to the Atlanta campus; announced in 2006, the ABHS will occupy the former Georgia Baptist Convention headquarters building. The ABHS, consolidating from facilities in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania and Rochester, New York, provides tremendous research opportunities for Baptist scholars and positions Mercer University and the McAfee School of Theology as a national center of Baptist scholarship. The Village of Valley Forge is an unincorporated settlement located just outside of Valley Forge National Historic Park in Schuylkill Township of Chester County, Pennsylvania. ... Nickname: Motto: Rochester: Made for Living Location of Rochester in New York State Country United States State New York County Monroe Government [1]  - Mayor Robert Duffy (D) Area  - City  37. ...


The Baptist History and Heritage Society, founded in 1938 as the Southern Baptist Historical Society, announced in 2007 that it will relocate from Brentwood, Tennessee to the Atlanta campus. The BHS, an independent organization with historic ties to the Southern Baptist Convention, will occupy the former Georgia Baptist Convention headquarters building along with the American Baptist Historical Society; the two societies will complement each other by providing resources on the American Baptist tradition and the Southern Baptist tradition. The move enhances Mercer's position as a national center of Baptist scholarship. Brentwood is a city in Williamson County, Tennessee, United States. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based cooperative ministry agency serving Baptist churches around the world. ... ABCUSA American Baptist Churches USA (ABCUSA) is a group of Baptist churches within the United States; headquartered in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States cooperative ministry agency serving missionary Baptist churches around the world. ...


Continuing and Professional Studies

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies offers undergraduate and graduate degrees and lifelong learning opportunities for adults and non-traditional students. Courses are offered at the Regional Academic Centers in Henry County, Douglas County, and Eastman.


The Public Safety Leadership Institute on the Atlanta campus offers educational programs for professional law enforcement and other public safety officials. The curriculum focuses on processes for decision-making, human behavior, and management of human resources within governmental organizations in the rapidly changing post 9/11 world. The institute has been endorsed by numerous law enforcement organizations. The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ...


Other university divisions

Mercer libraries

Mercer University has four libraries, which are organized as a separate division alongside the eleven colleges and schools. The Jack Tarver Library, located on the Macon campus, is the largest. The Medical Library and Peyton T. Anderson Resources Center, located in the School of Medicine, and the Furman Smith Law Library, located in the Walter F. George School of Law, are also in Macon. The Monroe F. Swilley, Jr. Library is on the Atlanta campus. Each library has a wide variety of print and non-print resources. The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ...


Opera House

The Grand Opera House is Mercer's Performing Arts Center. Located in downtown Macon and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Grand opened in 1884 with the largest stage in the southeastern United States. The Grand has hosted vaudeville performances, Broadway touring companies, community theatre, concerts, movies, and numerous other events. Mercer has operated the Grand since 1995 through a lease agreement with Bibb County. The Grand has undergone extensive renovation and regularly hosts special events that are open to the community. The Grand Opera House, often called The Grand, is a historic opera house located in Macon, Georgia. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Bibb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


University Press

The Mercer University Press (MUP), established in 1979, is the only Baptist-related university press in the nation. MUP has published more than 1,000 books generally in the areas of theology, religion, Southern culture, biography, history, literature and music. MUP's annual Authors Luncheon, a book-signing event in Atlanta, is Georgia's premier literary event. Former President Jimmy Carter is among MUP's published authors. James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ...


Engineering Research Center

The Mercer Engineering and Research Center (MERC) is in Warner Robins, Georgia. Established in 1987 as an extension of the School of Engineering, MERC has extensive research agreements with Robins Air Force Base and the U.S. Department of Defense, as well as with private concerns. Nickname: The International City Location in Georgia Coordinates: Counties Houston and Peach Founded September 1, 1942 Government  - Mayor Donald S. Walker Area  - City 59. ... Robins Air Force Base (Robins AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force located in Houston County, Georgia. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ...


Radio station

WMUM-FM, formerly WDCO-FM, is a partnership, established in 2006, between Mercer University and Georgia Public Broadcasting. The station provides local content to central Georgia public radio listeners from its broadcast studio on the Macon campus. The station's call letters were changed to WMUM-FM (Mercer University Macon) to identify the partnership with Mercer. The studio, constructed in 2006, offers various media-related educational opportunities for Mercer students. WMUM-FM 89. ... Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) is the public radio and television network in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ...


Student life

Religious life

Mercer, a faith-based university with a Baptist heritage, has an active religious life program for students seeking that experience. Religion, however, is not overly prominent; students are not required to attend religious services. Mercer has an independent board of trustees and is not controlled by the church. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging...


Student organizations

Mercer has over 100 undergraduate student organizations that provide learning experiences outside the classroom. Students may choose from academic, pre-professional, religious, special-interest, and social organizations including a campus newspaper, a student-operated internet radio station, and 18 Greek organizations. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Mercer's Greek social organizations are: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Fraternities: While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...

Sororities: This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Christian Knights. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... ΛΧΑ (Lambda Chi Alpha), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters (called Zetas) at more than 300 universities. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...

Traditional African-American Greek organizations: Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Alpha Gamma Delta (ΑΓΔ) Founded in 1904, Alpha Gamma Delta is an international fraternity for women dedicated to academic excellence, leadership development, high ideals and sisterhood. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...

Mercer's graduate and professional schools sponsor numerous student organizations as well including Phi Alpha Delta, a fraternity for law students. Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... ΦAΔ (Phi Alpha Delta), or PAD, is the largest co-ed professional law fraternity in the United States of America. ...


Mercer's Computer Science Programming Team earned an Honorable Mention in the 2007 ACM World Finals Programming Competition held in Tokyo, Japan. Mercer was one of 88 teams out of more than 6,000 teams from 75 countries that advanced to the championship round; the team qualified for Mercer's first appearance in the event after finishing second in the Southeast regional competition. The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ...


Athletics

The University Center
Mercer Bears logo
Mercer Bears logo

The Mercer University Bears are part of NCAA Division I and the Atlantic Sun Conference. Men's sports include air rifle (co-ed), baseball, basketball, cross-country, golf, soccer, and tennis. Women's sports include basketball, cross-country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball. Mercer teams have won 13 Atlantic Sun Conference championships: three baseball, three men's basketball, two women's basketball, and five men's soccer. Image File history File links MercerUniversity1. ... Image File history File links MercerUniversity1. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic Sun Conference is a college athletic conference which operates primarily on the east coast of the United States. ...


In 2004, Mercer opened the University Center on the Macon campus. The $40 million 230,000 square foot center houses Mercer's athletics department, a 3500-seat basketball arena, an indoor pool, work-out facilities, intramural basketball courts, an air rifle range, offices, a food court, and numerous meeting facilities. Mercer's baseball, softball, and intramural fields are next to the center along with the university's tennis complex. In 2006, Mercer began construction of a 101-room hotel adjacent to the University Center. The University Center is a large multi-purpose facility on the campus of Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. ... ARENA may refer to either: Nationalist Republican Alliance, a political party in El Salvador. ... The University Center is a large multi-purpose facility on the campus of Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. ...


Mark Slonaker, men's basketball head coach, was the 2002-03 Jim Phelan National Coach of the Year after leading Mercer to the best one season turnaround in NCAA history, improving from 6-23 to 23-6. The team won the Atlantic Sun regular season championship with a 14-2 conference record and made school history for number of wins (23); Mercer won 22 games in 1923-24 and 1984-85. The season ended with a loss in the Atlantic Sun tournament. Slonaker was the first National Coach of the Year to receive the award after it was named in honor of Jim Phelan. The four other finalists were Lute Olson (Arizona), Skip Prosser (Wake Forest), Bo Ryan (Wisconsin), and Tubby Smith (Kentucky). Mark Slonaker is the current head mens basketball coach at Mercer University. ... Jim Phelan (born March 19, 1929 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA) was a collegiate basketball coach. ... Robert Luther Lute Olson (born September 22, 1934 in Mayville, North Dakota) is the current mens basketball head coach at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... George Edward Skip Prosser (November 3, 1950 - July 26, 2007) was an American college basketball coach who was head basketball coach at Wake Forest University at the time of his death. ... William Bo Ryan (born December 20, 1947 in Chester, Pennsylvania, United States) is the current head coach of the University of Wisconsin-Madison mens basketball team. ... Orlando Tubby Smith (born June 30, 1951 in Scotland, Saint Marys County, Maryland) has served as head coach at the University of Tulsa and the University of Georgia, and is currently in his tenth season as the head basketball coach at the University of Kentucky. ...


Will Emerson, a forward on the men's basketball team, was the 2004-05 and 2005-06 Atlantic Sun Conference Male Student Athlete of the Year, only the third person to be selected twice for the award. Emerson was also named to ESPN the Magazine's Academic All-American first team in 2005 and 2006. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ...


Jannell Jones was named women's basketball head coach in April 2007. Jones is a two-time NAIA National Coach of the Year; she was recognized at Oklahoma City University where she was a part of four NAIA national championship teams (two as head coach and two as an assistant). Jones is also the winningest coach in OCU history. Jones came to Mercer from the University of California, San Diego where she was head coach from 2005 to 2007 including an appearance in the 2007 NCAA Division II Final Four. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ... Oklahoma City University is a small urban private university located in Oklahoma City, in the Midtown District. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a public, coeducational research university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ...


In the press

US News and World Report, in its college and university rankings, consistently ranks Mercer among the best universities in the United States; the 2008 edition ranks Mercer seventh in the Southern "Best Universities-Master's" category, marking the university's eighteenth consecutive year among the top 15 and ninth consecutive year in the top 10. Mercer is the only university in Georgia ranked in the top 30 in the Master's category. The 2008 edition also ranks Mercer among the "Great Schools, Great Prices" as the fifth best value in the South. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... This article is 88 kilobytes or more in size. ... This article is 88 kilobytes or more in size. ...


The Princeton Review, in its "Best 361 Colleges" guide, ranks Mercer in the top ten percent of all colleges and universities nationwide. The 2007 edition also ranks Mercer's campus as the fifth most beautiful in the nation. In addition, in its "America's Best Value Colleges" guide, the Princeton Review lists Mercer as a "Best Value", one of 165 colleges and universities in the nation that combine excellent academics, generous financial aid packages, and a relatively low cost of attendance; in the 2008 edition, Mercer is one of 75 private institutions among the 165 "Best Values." The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Mercer's professional programs are ranked favorably as well; US News and World Report ranks the School of Medicine in the top 20 of the nation's 126 accredited medical schools in the family medicine category, the school's primary focus, and ranks the Walter F. George School of Law among the nation's top 100 law schools. In the 2008 edition, the law school's legal writing program is ranked first in the nation. The legal writing program was ranked first in 2006 (tied with one other school) and second in 2007. The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ...


In 2007, Mercer was one of 141 colleges and universities in the nation selected for the first President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll; the honor roll is sponsored by several agencies including the United States Department of Education and the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development to recognize support for community service. In 2005, Mercer was one of 81 institutions of higher education named a “College with a Conscience” by the Princeton Review and College Compact, and in 2006, Mercer was ranked thirteenth in the nation in the first “Saviors of Our Cities” ranking by Evan Dobelle, president and CEO of the New England Board of Higher Education. The Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building[1]) , ED headquarters in Washington, DC A construction project to repair and update the building facade at the Department of Education Headquarters building in 2002 resulted in the installation of structures at all of the entrances to protect employees and visitors from... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... Evan Samuel Dobelle, President of the New England Board of Higher Education, is known for promoting higher-education investment in the Creative Economy, public-private partnerships, and the College Ready model that helps students graduate from high school and college. ...


Mercer received a record number of freshman applications in 2007; over 5,800 for 620 openings. Approximately 45% of applicants were offered admission; as of April 2007, more than 630 had accepted and provided a deposit to guarantee enrollment.


Alumni

Mercer has more than 60,000 alumni who live in all 50 states and in more than 70 countries. Notable Mercer alumni include:


Arts, media, and industry

The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterized by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... Harry Stillwell Edwards (1855–1938) was an American journalist, novelist, and poet, born at Macon, Georgia. ... The Telegraph is a Knight Ridder newspaper in Macon, Georgia, and is the primary print news organ in Middle Georgia. ... Nancy Ann Grace (born October 23, 1958) is an American talk show host and former prosecutor. ... For the Canadian channel, see CourtTV Canada The Courtroom Television Network, more commonly known as Court TV, is an American cable television network owned by Time Warner that launched on July 1, 1991. ... Larry King Live is a nightly CNN interview program hosted by broadcaster and writer Larry King. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The Radio and Television News Directors Association is a membership organization of radio, television and online news directors, producers, executives and educators with about 3,000 members. ... Malcolm Johnson (September 24, 1904 – June 18, 1976) was a noted investigative journalist of the 1940s and 1950s. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... J. Thomas McAfee is chairman and president of Hallmark Systems, Inc. ... The National Geographic Society, headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States, is one of the worlds largest not-for-profit educational and scientific organizations. ... The Baltimore Sun is the major newspaper in Baltimore, Maryland, with a daily press run of about 430,000 copies, and a Sunday run of 540,000 copies. ... The San Francisco Examiner is a daily newspaper in San Francisco, California, where it has been published continuously since the late 19th Century. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... Western Union (NYSE: WU) is a financial services and communications company based in the United States. ... A singing telegram is a message, transmitted by telegram or otherwise, that is delivered by an artist in a musical form. ... Lyman Ray Patterson (d. ... Emory University School of Law is a top-tier U.S. law school, part of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. ... James Rachels (1941-2003) was one of the leading philosophers of the 20th century. ... Euthanasia (from Ancient Greek: ευθανασία, good death) is the practice of ending the life of a terminally ill person in a painless or minimally painful way, for the purpose of limiting suffering. ... Congressional Quarterly (CQ) produces a number of publications that report primarily on the United States Congress. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Ellis Paul Torrance (born October 8, 1915 in Milledgeville, died July 12, 2003) was an American psychologist. ... Look up Creativity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Phil Walden (1940 - April 23, 2006), was the founder of the Macon, Georgia–based Capricorn Records. ... Capricorn Records is an independent record label which was launched by Phil Walden and Frank Fenter in 1969 in Macon, Georgia. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... The Allman Brothers Band is a pioneering and innovative Southern rock group from Macon, Georgia originally popular in the 1970s, described by Rolling Stones George Kimball in 1971 as the best . ...

Law

  • A. Harris Adams - Judge, Georgia Court of Appeals
  • Griffin B. Bell - Federal Appeals Court Judge, 1962-1976; 72nd Attorney General of the United States, 1977-1979
  • John S. Bell - Judge, Georgia Court of Appeals, 1960-1979; Chief Judge, Georgia Court of Appeals, 1969-1979
  • Reason C. Bell - Chief Justice, Georgia Supreme Court, 1943-1946; Associate Justice, 1932-1943 and 1946-1949; Judge, Georgia Court of Appeals, 1922-1932
  • William Augustus Bootle - Federal District Judge, 1954-2005; ordered the first admission of an African-American to the University of Georgia in 1961
  • Thomas Hoyt Davis - Senior Judge, Federal District Court for the Middle District of Georgia, 1945-1969
  • Beverly D. Evans, Jr. - Georgia Supreme Court Justice, 1904-1917; Federal District Judge for the Southern District of Georgia, 1917-1922
  • M. Yvette Miller - Judge, Georgia Court of Appeals; the first African-American woman to serve on the court
  • Carlton Mobley - Chief Justice, Georgia Supreme Court, 1972-1974; Associate Justice, 1954-1972; United States Representative, Georgia's 6th Congressional district, 1932-1933
  • W. Louis Sands - Chief Judge, Federal District Court for the Middle District of Georgia; the first African-American to serve on the court
  • Jay Sekulow - chief counsel, American Center for Law and Justice
  • Evett Simmons - former president, National Bar Association
  • Hugh Thompson - Georgia Supreme Court Justice
  • Additional Walter F. George School of Law alumni are listed on the school's Wikipedia entry

Griffin Boyette Bell (born October 31, 1918) is an American lawyer and former Presidential Cabinet member. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... William Augustus Gus Bootle (August 19, 1902–January 25, 2005) was an American attorney and jurist noted for helping oversee desegregation in the Southern United States. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... William Carlton Mobley was a noted jurist and politician from the State of Georgia. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Jay Alan Sekulow is Chief Counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), an international public interest law firm and educational organization. ... The American Center for Law and Justice was founded in 1990 by Christian televangelist Dr. Pat Robertson as a nonprofit public interest law firm composed of attorneys committed to defending what it sees as the Judeo-Christian values of religious liberty, the sanctity of human life, and the two-parent... The National Bar Association was established in 1925. ... The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ...

Politics

  • Doug Barnard - United States Representative, Georgia's 10th Congressional district, 1977-1993
  • Allen D. Candler - Governor of Georgia, 1898-1902; United States Representative, Georgia's 9th [[United States Congress|Congressional district, 1883-1891; namesake of Candler County, Georgia
  • Cathy Cox - Georgia Secretary of State, 1999-2007; first woman elected to this position
  • Edward E. Cox - United States Representative, Georgia's 2nd Congressional district, 1925-1952
  • Nathan Deal - United States Representative, Georgia's 10th Congressional district
  • Walter F. George - United States Senator from Georgia, 1922-1957, served as President pro tempore, 1955-1957; namesake of Mercer's Law School
  • Robert W. Everett - United States Representative, Georgia's 7th Congressional district, 1891-1893
  • Thomas W. Hardwick - United States Senator from Georgia, 1915-1919; Governor of Georgia, 1921-1923; as Governor, appointed Rebecca L. Felton as the first female United States Senator
  • Richard B. Hubbard - Governor of Texas, 1876-1879; US Ambassador to Japan, 1885-1889
  • William D. Jelks - Governor of Alabama, 1901-1907
  • Thomas G. Lawson - United States Representative, Georgia's 8th Congressional district, 1891-1897
  • Rufus E. Lester - United States Representative, Georgia's 1st Congressional district, 1889-1906
  • Henry Dickerson McDaniel - Governor of Georgia, 1883-1886
  • Charles L. Moses - United States Representative, Georgia's 4th Congressional district, 1891-1897
  • William J. Northen - Governor of Georgia, 1890-1894; served as a Mercer University trustee for over 40 years, 1869-1913
  • John Oxendine - Georgia Insurance Commissioner
  • Homer C. Parker - United States Representative, Georgia's 1st Congressional district, 1931-1935
  • John Peyton - Mayor, Jacksonville, Florida, the most populous city in Florida and the thirteenth most populous in the United States
  • Dwight L. Rogers - United States Representative, Florida's 6th Congressional district, 1945-1954
  • William J. Sears - United States Representative, Florida's 4th Congressional district, 1915-1929; United States Representative, an at-large Florida district, 1933-1937
  • Chauncey Sparks - Governor of Alabama, 1943-1947
  • Malcolm C. Tarver - United States Representative, Georgia's 7th Congressional district, 1927-1947
  • Sandra L. Thurman - Director, Office of National AIDS Policy, 1997-2001; the first Presidential Envoy for AIDS Cooperation, 2000-2001; referred to as the nation's "AIDS czar" in the administration of President Bill Clinton
  • Carl Vinson - United States Representative for over 50 years, 1914-1965; long-time Chairman, House Armed Services Committee; has been called the "patriarch of the armed services" and the "father of the two-ocean navy"; namesake of the USS Carl Vinson
  • William S. West - United States Senator from Georgia, 1914-1914
  • J. Mark Wilcox - United States Representative, Florida's 4th Congressional district, 1933-1939
  • John S. Woods - United States Representative, Georgia's 9th Congressional district, 1931-1935 and 1945-1953; Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 1949-1953
  • Ten Mercerians have served as governors - of the states of Alabama, Georgia, New Hampshire, and Texas and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
  • Additional Walter F. George School of Law alumni are listed on the school's Wikipedia entry

Druie Douglas Barnard, Jr. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Allen Daniel Candler, (4 November 1834 - 26 October 1910) was a Georgia state legislator, U.S. Representative and Georgia Governor. ... Candler County is a county located in the Georgia. ... Cathy Cox Lera Catharine Cathy Cox (born 1958) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and the former Secretary of State of Georgia. ... Edward Eugene Cox (April 3, 1880 - December 24, 1952) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... John Nathan Deal (born August 25, 1942) has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing the 10th District of Georgia (map), numbered the 9th District until 2003. ... Walter Franklin George (January 29, 1878 – August 24, 1957) was an American politician from the state of Georgia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Robert William Everett (March 3, 1839 - February 27, 1915) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... Thomas William Hardwick (December 9, 1872 – January 31, 1944) was an American politician from the state of Georgia. ... Rebecca Latimer Felton (June 10, 1835-January 24, 1930) was the first woman to serve in the United States Senate. ... Richard Bennett Hubbard, Jr. ... William Dorsey Jelks (November 7, 1855–December 14, 1931) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alabama from 1901 to 1907. ... Thomas Graves Lawson (May 2, 1835 - April 16, 1912) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... Rufus Ezekiel Lester (December 12, 1837 - June 16, 1906) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... Henry Dickerson McDaniel (September 4, 1836] - July 25, 1926) was governor of Georgia from 1883 to 1886. ... Charles Leavell Moses (May 2, 1856 - October 10, 1910) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... William Jonathan Northen, the two-term governor of Georgia from 1890 to 1894, was born in in Jones County, Georgia, on July 9th, 1835. ... John Oxendine is the current Commissioner of Insurance of the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Homer Cling Parker (September 25, 1885 - June 22, 1946) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... John Peyton John Peyton (born July 28, 1964) has been the mayor of Jacksonville, Florida since July 1, 2003. ... Nickname: Motto: Where Florida Begins Location in the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Duval Government  - Mayor John Peyton (R) Area  - City  885 sq mi (2,264. ... Dwight Laing Rogers (August 17, 1886 - December 1, 1954) was a U.S. Representative from Florida, father of Paul G. Rogers. ... William Joseph Sears (December 4, 1874 - March 30, 1944) was a U.S. Representative from Florida. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Chauncey Sparks (October 8, 1884–November 6, 1968), also known as George Chauncey Sparks, was a Democratic American politician who was Governor of Alabama from 1943 to 1947. ... Malcolm Connor Tarver (September 25, 1885 - March 5, 1960) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia. ... The Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP) coordinates the continuing domestic efforts to reduce the number of new infections in the United States. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Carl Vinson Carl Vinson (November 18, 1883 – June 1, 1981) was a Democratic United States Congressman from Georgia. ... The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... The 1,092-foot USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is a United States Navy Nimitz class supercarrier named for the Congressman from Georgia. ... William Stanley West (1849-1914) was a United States Senator from the state of Georgia in 1914. ... James Mark Wilcox (May 21, 1890 - February 3, 1956) was a U.S. Representative from Florida. ... John Stephens Wood (1885 - 1968) was a significant U.S. political figure. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ...

Military

A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The V Corps (Fifth Corps)—nicknamed the Victory Corps—is a corps of the United States Army. ... GEN Benjamin S. Griffin General Benjamin S. Griffin assumed the duties of Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command on November 5, 2004. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC) is an Army Major Command (MACOM) responsible for materiel readiness, to include technology, acquisition support, materiel development, logistics power projection, and sustainment. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... USS Hawes (FFG-53) is a later model Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided missile frigate. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Also known as USARPAC, the U.S. Army Pacific Command is the army component unit of the U.S. Pacific Command, except the units in Korea. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... Inspector General is a fact finding officer whose responsibility is to investigate charges of corruption, fraud, waste and abuse and other complaints regarding government officials. ... Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the U.S. First Army. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... George J. Walker served as a soldier in the U.S. Army. ... U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) is the Armys largest major command. ... The Military Intelligence Hall of Fame is a Hall of Fame established by the Military Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army to honor soldiers and civilians who have made exceptional contributions to Military Intelligence. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a grouping comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... Major General Blanton C. Winship (1869—1947) was a military lawyer and veteran of both the Spanish-American war and World War I. During his long career, he served both as Judge Advocate General of the United States Army and as the Governor of Puerto Rico. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Judge Advocate Generals Corps of the United States Army is composed of Army officers who are also lawyers and who provide legal services to the Army at all levels of command. ...

Other public service

John Birch (1918- August 1945) was an American intelligence officer and a Baptist missionary in World War 2 who was killed by armed supporters of the Communist Party of China. ... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... SPY may refer to: SPY (spiders), ticker symbol for Standard & Poors Depository Receipts SPY (magazine), a satirical monthly, trademarked all-caps SPY (Ivory Coast), airport code for San Pédro, Côte dIvoire SPY (Ship Planning Yard), a U.S. Navy acronym SPY, short for MOWAG SPY, a... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The John Birch Society is a conservative American exceptionalist organization founded in 1958 to fight what it saw as growing threats to the Constitution of the United States, especially a suspected communist infiltration of the United States government, and to support free enterprise. ... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... Seinan Gakuin University (Japanese: 西南学院大学 Seinan Gakuin Daigaku) is a Christian university in Fukuoka, Japan. ... The University System of Georgia (USG) is the organizational body that includes all public institutions of higher learning in Georgia. ... The University of West Georgia is a comprehensive, residential institution located in Carrollton, Georgia, approximately 50 miles (80 km) west of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Steadman Vincent Sanford (August 24, 1871 – September 15, 1945), was President of the University of Georgia (UGA) in Athens from 1932 until 1935. ... The University System of Georgia (USG) is the organizational body that includes all public institutions of higher learning in Georgia. ... Sanford Stadium is the on-campus playing venue for football at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ...

Athletics

James Wallace Wally Butts (February 7, 1905 – December 17, 1973) was the head football coach (seasons 1939 through 1960) and athletic director (1939 to 1963) at the University of Georgia. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Located in Macon, Georgia, the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame is the country’s largest state sports museum at 43,000 square feet. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... Wesley Duke (born June 21, 1981 in Grand Prairie, Texas) is a football player. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Samuel E. Mitchell (born September 2, 1963 in Columbus, Georgia) is a former professional basketball player and current head coach of the Toronto Raptors of the National Basketball Association. ... The Toronto Raptors are a professional basketball team based in Toronto, Ontario. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... William Bill Yoast (born 1924) is an American high school football coach best known for being featured in the 2000 film Remember the Titans. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Remember the Titans is an American drama film released in 2000. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mercer University School of Law (966 words)
Walter F. George School of Law of Mercer University presented Laura Watts Harper of Huntsville, Ala., the 2007 George Waldo Woodruff Award of Excellence during spring commencement in Macon.
Mercer President William D. Underwood and Law School Dean Daisy Floyd hooded Cox and presented the Mercer alumna with the framed degree.
She has served on the Board of Trustees of Mercer University and on the Board of Visitors of the Walter F. George School of Law.
Mercer University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4149 words)
Mercer has major campuses in Macon, Georgia and Atlanta, Georgia; regional academic centers for extended education students in Henry County, Georgia, Douglas County, Georgia, and Eastman, Georgia; teaching hospitals in Macon and Savannah, Georgia; a university press in Macon; an engineering research center in Warner Robins, Georgia; and a NCAA Division I athletic program.
Mercer University was founded in 1833 in Penfield, Georgia, under the leadership of Adiel Sherwood and was named after prominent Georgia Baptist leader Jesse Mercer.
Mercer University is the only university of its size in the United States that offers programs in eleven diversified fields of study; liberal arts, business, education, music, engineering, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, law, theology, and continuing and professional studies.
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