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Encyclopedia > Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II
in hieroglyphs
praenomen or throne name
Image:Hiero_Ca1.png

Image:Hiero_Ca2.png
nomen or birth name
Image:Hiero_Ca1.png



Image:Hiero_Ca2.png

Nebhotepre Mentuhotep II (2046-1995 BCE) was a Pharaoh of the 11th dynasty, the son of Intef III of Egypt and a minor queen called Iah. His own wife was the 'king's mother' Tem. Other wives were Neferu (his sister) and five women buried in his funerary complex. The only known son is Mentuhotep III. It has been suggested that Hieroglyph (French Wiki article) be merged into this article or section. ... copied from http://fi. ... copied from http://fi. ... copied from http://fi. ... copied from http://fi. ... Pharaoh (Arabic فرعون ) (Hebrew פַּרְעֹה ); is a title used to refer to the kings (of godly status) in ancient Egypt. ... Manethos statement that the Eleventh dynasty consisted of 16 kings who reigned 43 years is contradicted by contemporary inscriptions and the evidence of the Turin King List, whose combined testimony proves that it consisted of seven kings who ruled about 160 years. ... Intef III was a Pharaoh in Egypt of the Eleventh Dynasty during the First Intermediate Period. ...


The king changed in his reign several times his name, perhaps reflecting important political events. His throne name was Nebhepetra, and he was the first ruler of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt. He is known to have ruled 51 years. The Middle Kingdom is a period in the history of ancient Egypt stretching from the establishment of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Fourteenth Dynasty, roughly between 1991 BC and 1648 BC. The Eleventh Dynasty The Middle Kingdom has been usually dated to the time when Pharaoh Mentuhotep...


In the 14th year of his reign, Mentuhotep won a decisive victory over the rival 10th dynasty at Herakleopolis Magna. Little is known of this battle. Categories: Articles to be expanded ... Herakleopolis Magna is the Greek name of the capital of the Twentieth nome of ancient Egypt. ...


To reunite the lands of Egypt, Mentuhotep II combined the gods of Lower and Upper Egypt, creating a new national god: Amun-Re Amun (also spelt Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imenand, and spelt in Greek as Ammon, and Hammon) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important deities, before fading into obscurity. ...


The ruler at Herakleopolis at the time, Merykara, died soon after this battle, and Mentuhotep is believed to have quickly put an end to the rival dynasty, reuniting ancient Egypt for the first time since the 6th dynasty. The Teaching for King Merykara is a literary composition in Middle Egyptian, the classical phase of the Egyptian language, probably of Middle Kingdom date (2025 BC-1700 BC). ... Ancient Egypt was an African civilization located along the upper Nile, reaching from the Nile Delta in the north to as far south as Jebel Barkal at the Fourth Cataract of the Nile at the time of its greatest extension (15th century BC). ... The Sixth Dynasty of Egypt is considered by many authorities as the last dynasty of the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, although The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt (ed. ...


He is also known for commanding military campaigns south into Nubia, which had gained its independence during the First Intermediate Period. There is also evidence for military actions agaist Palestine. Today Nubia is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan, but in ancient times it was an independent kingdom. ... The First Intermediate Period is the name conventionally given by Egyptologists to that period in Ancient Egyptian history between the end of the Old Kingdom and the advent of the Middle Kingdom. ...


The king reorganised the country and placed a vizier at the head of the administration. The viziers of his reign were Bebi and Dagi. Treasurer was Khety who was involved in the sed festival of the king. He was followed by Meketre. General was a certain Intef known from his Theban tomb. A Vizier (وزير, sometimes also spelled Vizir, Wasir, Wazir, Wesir, Wezir - grammatical vowel changes are common in many oriental languages) is an oriental, originally Persian, term for a high-ranking political (and sometimes religious) advisor or Minister, often to a Muslim monarch such as a Caliph, Amir, Malik (king) or Sultan. ...


He was buried in a tomb he had erected at Deir el-Bahri. Mentuhotep II built temples and chapels at several places in Upper Egypt. Djeser-Djeseru – the focal point of the complex Deir el-Bahri (Arabic دير البحري dayr al-baḥrī, literally meaning, “The Northern Monastery”) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, Egypt. ...


Further reading

  • W. Grajetzki, The Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt: History,Archaeology and Society, Duckworth, London 2006 ISBN 0715634356, 18-23
  • Labib Habachi: King Nebhepetre Menthuhotep: his monuments, place in history, deification and unusual representations in form of gods. Annales du Service des Antiquités de l'Égypte 19 (1963), S. 16-52

External links

  • "The Mortuary Temple of Mentuhotep II on the West Bank at Luxor", Tour Egypt, accessed December 1, 2005
Preceded by:
Intef III
Pharaoh of Egypt
Eleventh Dynasty
Succeeded by:
Mentuhotep III


Intef III was a Pharaoh in Egypt of the Eleventh Dynasty during the First Intermediate Period. ... Pharaoh (Arabic فرعون ) (Hebrew פַּרְעֹה ); is a title used to refer to the kings (of godly status) in ancient Egypt. ... Manethos statement that the Eleventh dynasty consisted of 16 kings who reigned 43 years is contradicted by contemporary inscriptions and the evidence of the Turin King List, whose combined testimony proves that it consisted of seven kings who ruled about 160 years. ... nomen or birth name Sankhara Mentuhotep III of the Eleventh dynasty was Pharaoh of Egypt during the Middle Kingdom. ...

Ankh Notable Ancient Egyptians edit Ankh
Old Kingdom Rulers: Narmer | Hor-Aha | Djoser | Sneferu | Khufu | Khafra | Menkaura | Pepi II
Middle Kingdom Rulers: Mentuhotep II | Mentuhotep IV | Senusret III | Amenemhat III | Sobekneferu
New Kingdom Rulers: Hatshepsut | Thutmose III | Amenhotep III | Akhenaten | Tutankhamun | Ramesses I | Seti I | Ramesses II
Other Rulers: Shoshenq I | Piye | Taharqa | Psammetichus I | Ptolemy I | Cleopatra VII
Consorts: Tetisheri | Ahmose-Nefertari | Ahmose | Tiy | Nefertiti | Ankhesenpaaten | Nefertari | Mark Antony
Court officials: Imhotep | Weni | Ahmose, son of Ebana | Ineni | Senemut | Yuya | Maya | Yuny | Manetho | Pothinus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Egypt: The Mortuary Temple of Mentuhotep II on the West Bank at Luxor (2224 words)
The 11th Dynasty terraced tomb of Mentuhotep II, the ruler who united Egypt at the end of the First Intermediate Period, on the West Bank at Luxor (ancient Thebes) is an anomaly.
Mentuhotep II selected a site on a rocky hillside at modern Deir el-Bahari where some of his predecessors of the First Intermediate Period built their saff tombs.
Ground Plan of the Mortuary Temple Complex of Mentuhotep II While not much is known of the Valley Temple, the causeway, unlike most of its counterparts in the Old Kingdom, was open, and had Osirian statues of the king located along its sides at irregular intervals.
Egyptian Pharaohs : Middle Kingdom : Dynasty 11 : Montuhotep III (436 words)
Mentuhotep IV is credited with founding the city of Kuser on the shore of the Red Sea as a harbor for shipbuilding -- all in preparation for his journeys to Punt.
The fact that Mentuhotep IV is missing from some king lists and that his vizier came to the throne as Amenemhet I leads to the idea that his vizier may have usurped the throne.
This means, possibly, that Mentuhotep was considered illegitimate, or that the pharaohs of the 12th Dynasty decided to rewrite history to better support their claim to the throne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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