FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mensa International
Mensa International


Mensa Logo Image File history File links Mensa-logo. ...

Formation 1946-10-01
Type High IQ Society
Location Worldwide
Membership about 100,000
Key people Roland Berrill
Lancelot Ware
Victor Serebriakoff
Buckminster Fuller
Isaac Asimov
Website www.mensa.org

Mensa is the largest, oldest, and most famous high-IQ society in the world.[1][2][3] The non-profit organization restricts its membership to people with high testable IQs. Members must score at the 98th percentile or higher of a standardized, supervised intelligence test.[4][5] Mensa is formally composed of national groups and the umbrella organization Mensa International. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr Lancelot Lionel Ware OBE (5 June 1915 – 15 August 2000), British barrister and co-founder of Mensa. ... Victor Serebriakoff (17 October 1912 - 1 January 2000) was one of the early members and a leading light of Mensa International. ... Richard Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American visionary, designer, architect, poet, author, and inventor. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A high IQ society is an organization that limits membership to people who are within a certain high percentile of Intelligence quotient (IQ) test results, theoretically representing the most intelligent people in the world. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... IQ redirects here. ... A percentile is the value of a variable below which a certain percent of observations fall. ...


Mensa (pronounced /ˈmɛnsə/; IPA[ˈmensa] in Latin) means "table" in Latin as is symbolized in the organization's logo. A wooden dining table and chairs. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Background information

Roland Berrill, an Australian barrister, and Dr. Lancelot Ware, a British scientist and lawyer, founded Mensa in the United Kingdom in 1946. They had the idea of forming a society for bright people, the only qualification for membership being a high IQ.[4] For the musician, see Sikiru Ayinde Barrister. ... Dr Lancelot Lionel Ware OBE (5 June 1915 – 15 August 2000), British barrister and co-founder of Mensa. ...


The aims are to create a non-political society free from all social distinctions (racial, religious, etc.). The society welcomes all people, regardless of background, whose IQs meet the criteria, with the objective of members enjoying each other's company and participating in a wide range of social and cultural activities.


Mensa accepts individuals who score at or above the 98th percentile on certain standardized IQ tests, such as the Stanford-Binet. Because different tests are scaled differently, it is not meaningful to compare raw scores between tests, only percentiles. For example, the minimum accepted score on the Stanford-Binet is 132, while for the Cattell it is 148.[6] The modern field of intelligence testing began with the Stanford-Binet IQ test. ... The modern field of intelligence testing began with the Stanford-Binet IQ test. ... In seeking to develop a culture-fair intelligence or IQ test that separated environmental and genetic factors, Raymond B. Cattell created the CFIT or Culture Fair Intelligence Test. ...


In addition to encouraging social interaction among its members, the organization is also involved with programs for gifted children, literacy, and scholarships. The name comes from mensa, the Latin word for "table", and indicates that it is a round-table society of equals (although the logo can be seen as depicting a square table, or Parsons table with only three legs visible). Gifted children are those considered by educational systems to have significantly higher than normal levels of one or more forms of intelligence. ... Children reading. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... A wooden dining table and chairs. ... The Parsons table is a small, square table made in a simple, unadorned style with four, flush, square legs that are equal in thickness to the top. ...


Mensa's goals

Mensa's constitution lists three purposes: to identify and foster human intelligence for the benefit of humanity; to encourage research into the nature, characteristics, and uses of intelligence; and to provide a stimulating intellectual and social environment for its members.[7] Its constitution also states that "Mensa encompasses members representing many points of view. Consequently, Mensa as an organization shall not express an opinion as being that of Mensa, take any political action other than the publication of the results of its investigations, or have any ideological, philosophical, political, or religious affiliations."


Mensa has published a number of books, including Poetry Mensa (1966), an anthology of poems by Mensans from all over the world, in which languages other than English are represented. The Mensa Foundation, a separate charitable U.S. Corporation, edits and publishes its own Mensa Research Journal, in which both Mensans and non-Mensans are published on various topics surrounding the concept and measure of intelligence. The national groups also issue periodicals, such as Mensa Bulletin, the monthly publication of American Mensa,[8] and Mensa Magazine, the monthly publication of British Mensa.[9]


At Mensa's 50th Anniversary, Dr. Ware, one of the founders, addressed Mensans by stating that he hoped that “Mensa will have a role in society when it gets through the ages of infancy and adolescence.” He also said, “I do get disappointed that so many members spend so much time solving puzzles,” expressing his desire for Mensans instead to be solving some of the world's problems.[10] Dr Lancelot Lionel Ware OBE (5 June 1915 – 15 August 2000), British barrister and co-founder of Mensa. ... A puzzle undone, which forms a cube Puzzle cube; a type of puzzle For other uses, see Puzzle (disambiguation). ...


Organizational structure

Mensa International consists of more than 100,000 members in 50 national groups. Individuals who live in a country with a national group join the national group, while those living in countries without a recognised chapter may join Mensa International directly. The two largest national groups are American Mensa, with about 50,000 members, and British Mensa, with about 25,500 members.[5] Larger national groups are further subdivided into local groups. For example, American Mensa has over 135 local groups, with the largest having over 2,000 members and the smallest having fewer than 100.


Additionally, members may form Special Interest Groups (SIGs) at international, national, and local levels; these SIGs represent a wide variety of interests, both commonplace and obscure, ranging from motorcycle clubs to entrepreneurial cooperations, reflecting the wide diversity of members in occupation and social class. Some SIGs are associated with various geographic groups, whereas others act independently of official hierarchy. There are now quite a number of electronic SIGs (eSIGs), which operate primarily as e-mail lists, where members may or may not meet each other in person. This article belongs in one or more categories. ...


Gatherings

Mensa has many events for members, from the local to the international level. Several countries hold a large event called the Annual Gathering (AG). It is held in a different city every year, with speakers, dances, games (Carnelli, poker, Werewolves of Miller's Hollow, Scrabble, chess, double-deck cancellation hearts and many other games are popular at American Mensa gatherings) and other activities. The American and Canadian AGs are usually held during the 4th of July or Canada Day weekends respectively. Carnelli is a parlor game created by Jan Carnell, a member of the Metropolitan Washington chapter of Mensa. ... For the domestic fireplace tool, see fireplace poker. ... This article is about the party game. ... The verb to scrabble also means to scratch, scramble or scrape about: see Wiktionary:scrabble. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... For other uses, see Hearts (disambiguation). ... Fourth of July redirects here. ... Canada Day (French: Fête du Canada), formerly Dominion Day, is Canadas national holiday, marking the establishment of Canada as new federation with its own constitution on July 1, 1867. ...


There are also smaller gatherings called Regional Gatherings (RGs) held in various cities that attract members from large areas; the largest is held annually in Chicago around Halloween, and features a costume ball and a joke-telling competition. Many members will arrange their vacations to attend an RG in another part of the country (such as the one in Chicago) as an annual tradition. Some members will regularly attend as many as half a dozen RGs every year. For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article is about the holiday. ...


In 2006, The Mensa World Gathering was held from August 8 to August 13 in Orlando, Florida to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the founding of Mensa. An estimated 2,500 attendees from over 30 countries gathered for this celebration. The International Board of Directors also had a formal meeting there. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Orlando redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


The 2006 British AG was held in Nottingham between September 28 and October 2. This incorporated a birthday party to celebrate Mensa's 60th birthday on 1 October 2006 (1 October 1946 being the date that Berrill and Ware filed papers with Companies House for the society). For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Companies House is an Executive Agency of the United Kingdom Government Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). ...


Mensa demographics

Mensans come from all walks of life and almost every job and profession, representing almost every age group. There are many famous and prominent members.[11] Members pay annual membership dues that vary by country; some national groups offer a "Life Membership", but it is not transferable between groups. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


All national and local groups welcome children; many offer activities, resources and newsletters specifically geared toward gifted children and their parents. American Mensa, for instance, has 1,300 child members, ranging in age from 3 to 18.[12] The youngest people who have joined the organization were both aged 2 years and nine months; the first was Ben Woods in the 1990s, the second was Georgia Brown from Aldershot, Great Britain in 2007. She was six days older than Ben Woods was when he joined Mensa.[13] For other uses, see Aldershot (disambiguation). ...


At the other extreme the oldest member of American Mensa is listed as 102. According to the American Mensa site 41 percent of the membership is between the ages of 44 and 61 and just under 60 percent of the new members in 2004 were between the ages of 23 and 43. There are more than 1,500 families with two or more Mensa members.


See also

For other uses, see Intelligence (disambiguation). ... IQ redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Mensa Select is an award given by Mensa International to five board games yearly that are original, challenging and well designed. ... Cerebrals Society is an international society for people who have a documented IQ score of at least 144 sd16 from standardized, professional tests of intelligence only. ... Epimetheus Society is an international society for people who have a documented IQ score of at least 164 sd16 from standardized, professional tests of intelligence. ... The International High IQ Society is an Internet-based high IQ society founded in 2000 by Nathan Haselbauer. ... The Prometheus Society is a high IQ society. ... The Triple Nine Society (TNS) is a voluntary association of individuals who have scored at or above the 99. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

References

  1. ^ Percival, Matt (2006-09-08). The Quest for Genius. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-10-30.
  2. ^ Moore, Hilary. American Mensa and Activepackets Team to Provide Mobile Users With Mensa Genius Challenge. American Mensa. Retrieved on 2007-10-30.
  3. ^ Sharma, Mukul. "IQ tests are about innate intelligence", The Times of India, January 30, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-11-03. 
  4. ^ a b Mensa Information. Mensa International.
  5. ^ a b What is Mensa?. British Mensa.
  6. ^ Qualifying test scores. American Mensa.
  7. ^ Mensa Constitution. Mensa International. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  8. ^ Mensa Bulletin. American Mensa. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  9. ^ Welcome to British Mensa - The High IQ Society. British Mensa. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  10. ^ Miyaguchi, Darryl (January 19, 2000). A Short (and Bloody) History of the High I.Q. Societies. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  11. ^ Prominent Mensans. Mensa International. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  12. ^ Gifted Children. American Mensa. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  13. ^ Girl, 2, becomes member of Mensa. BBC News (2007-06-21). Retrieved on 2007-06-21.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times of India (TOI) is a leading English-language broadsheet daily newspaper in India. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mensa (78 words)
Mensa is an international society free from all racial, political or religious distinctions.
Mensa is a round table society where race, beliefs, gender, age, sexual orientation, wealth, national origin or social and educational background are irrelevant.
Membership in Mensa is open to people who have attained a score within the top 2% percent of the population on an approved IQ test that has been properly administered and supervised.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m