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Encyclopedia > Meniscus (anatomy)
Meniscus (anatomy)
Head of right tibia seen from above, showing menisci and attachments of ligaments
Left knee-joint from behind, showing interior ligaments
Dorlands/Elsevier m_09/12524685

In anatomy, a meniscus is a moon-shaped figure.[1] It usually refers to either of two specific parts of cartilage of the knee. The knee contains a lateral meniscus and a medial meniscus. Both are cartilaginous tissues that provide structural integrity to the knee when it undergoes tension and torsion. The menisci are also known as 'semi-lunar' cartilages - referring to their half-moon "C" shape - a term which has been largely dropped by the medical profession, but which led to the menisci being called knee 'cartilages' by the lay public. Image File history File links Gray349. ... Image File history File links Gray348. ... Elseviers logo. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... For other uses, see Knee (disambiguation). ... The lateral meniscus, also called the external semilunar fibrocartilage is a fibrocartilaginous band that spans the lateral knee. ... The medial meniscus is a fibrocartilage band that spans the medial knee, and lies on the head of the tibia. ... Cartilage is type of dense connective tissue. ... Tension is a reaction force applied by a stretched string (rope or a similar object) on the objects which stretch it. ... Look up torsion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Although menisci are largely associated with the knee, they are similar in function to structures called articular disks in other parts of the body.[2] Diagrammatic section of a diarthrodial joint, with an articular disk. ...

Contents

Anatomy

The menisci are two pads of cartilaginous tissue which serve to disperse friction in the knee joint between the lower leg (tibia) and the thigh (femur). They are shaped concave on the top and flat on the bottom, articulating the tibia. They are attached to the small depressions (fossae) between the condyles of the tibia (intercondyloid fossa), and towards the center they are unattached and their shape narrows to a thin shelf.[3] Cartilage is type of dense connective tissue. ... For other uses, see Knee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the vertebrate bone. ... The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of the mammalian bodies. ... Fossa is the Latin word for ditch or trench. ...


Function

The menisci act to disperse the weight of the body and reduce friction during movement. Since the condyles of the femur and tibia meet at one point (which changes during flexion and extension), the menisci spread the load of the body's weight.[4] This differs from sesamoid bones, which are made of osseous tissue and whose function primarily is to protect the nearby tendon and to increase its mechanical effect. In anatomy, Flexion is movement whereby bones or other objects are brought closer together. ... Human anatomical terms make up a distinct nomenclature to describe areas of the body, to provide orientation when describing parts of human anatomy,[1] and to distinguish different movements of the body. ... In anatomy, a sesamoid bone is a bone embedded within a tendon. ... Osseous tissue, or bone tissue is the major structural and supportive connective tissue of the body. ...


Injury

Main article: Tear of meniscus

In sports and orthopedics, people will sometimes speak of "torn cartilage" and actually be referring to an injury to one of the menisci. This fracture of the lower cervical vertebrae, known as a teardrop fracture is one of the conditions treated by orthopaedic surgeons. ...


The Unhappy Triad is a set of commonly co-occurring knee injuries which includes injury to the medial meniscus. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


References

  1. ^ eMedicine/Stedman Medical Dictionary Lookup!. Stedman's Medical Dictionary, 27th edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (2003). Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  2. ^ Module - Introduction to joints. University of Michigan (2002). Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  3. ^ Gray, Henry (1918). 7b. The Knee-joint. Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body. Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  4. ^ Cluett, Jonathan (February 10, 2008). Meniscus Tear - Torn Cartilage. About.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-20.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of fibrocartilage located at the peripheral aspect of the knee joint that offers lubrication and nutrition to the joint. ... The anterior cruciate ligament (or ACL) is one of the four major ligaments of the knee. ...

External links

The interphalangeal articulations of the foot (articulations of the phalanges) are ginglymoid joints, and each has a plantar and two collateral ligaments. ... In order to allow it to support the weight of the body in the erect posture with the least expenditure of material, the foot is constructed of a series of arches formed by the tarsal and metatarsal bones, and strengthened by the ligaments and tendons of the foot. ... The Longitudinal arch of the foot can be broken down into several smaller arches: // The main arches are the antero-posterior arches, which may, for descriptive purposes, be regarded as divisible into two types—a medial and a lateral. ... In addition to the longitudinal arches the foot presents a series of transverse arches. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Meniscus (anatomy) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (162 words)
In anatomy, a meniscus is either of two parts of the human knee.
The knee contains a lateral meniscus and a medial meniscus, and both are cartilaginous tissues that provide structural integrity to the knee when it undergoes tension and torsion.
In sports and orthopedics, people will sometimes speak of "meniscus surgery," or a "torn meniscus," and be referring to an injury to one of these two pads.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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