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Encyclopedia > Menelaus
Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. 450 BC–440 BC, found in Gnathia (now Egnazia, Italy).
Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. 450 BC–440 BC, found in Gnathia (now Egnazia, Italy).

In Greek mythology, Menelaus (ancient Greek Μενέλαος) was a king of Ancient Sparta, the husband of Helen, and a central figure in the Trojan War. He was the son of Atreus and Aerope. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1985x1830, 2202 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Menelaus Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1985x1830, 2202 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Menelaus Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... This article covers the history of Sparta from its founding to the present, concentrating primarily on the Spartan state during the height of its power from the 6th to the 4th century BCE. // Tradition relates that Sparta was founded by Lacedaemon, son of Zeus and Taygete, who called the city... Helen. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from... In Greek mythology, King Atreus (Greek: Ατρεύς, Atreús) (fearless) of Mycenae was the son of Pelops and Hippodamia and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. ... In Greek mythology, Aerope was the wife of King Atreus of Mycenae. ...

Contents

Early life

Atreus was murdered by his nephew, Aegisthus, who took possession of the throne of Mycenae and ruled jointly with his father Thyestes. During this period, Menelaus and his brother, Agamemnon, took refuge with Tyndareus, king of Sparta, whose daughters Helen and Clytemnestra, respectively, they married. Helen and Menelaus had one daughter, Hermione and one son, Lysander. In Greek mythology, Aegisthus (goat strength, also transliterated as Aegisthos or Aigísthos) was the son of Thyestes and his daughter, Pelopia. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... In Greek mythology, Thyestes was the son of Pelops, King of Mycenae, and Hippodamia and father of Pelopia and Aegisthus. ... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ... Helen. ... Murder of Agamemnon, Painting by Pierre-Narcisse Guérin. ... In Greek mythology, Hermione was a daughter of Menelaus and Helen. ... Lysander (d. ...


Menelaus succeeded Tyndareus (whose only sons, Castor and Polydeuces became gods), and Agamemnon, with his brother's assistance, drove out Aegisthus and Thyestes , and recovered his father's kingdom. He extended his dominion by conquest and became the most powerful prince in Greece. In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ...


When it was time for Helen, Tyndareus's daughter, to marry, many Greek kings and princes came to seek her hand, or sent emissaries to do so on their behalf. Among the contenders were Odysseus, Menestheus, Ajax the great, Patroclus, and Idomeneus, but Menelaus was the favourite, though, according to some sources, he did not come in person but was represented by his brother Agamemnon. All but Odysseus brought many rich gifts with them. Helen. ... The word emissary (Latin emissarium, from ex and mittere, to send out) applies to: a person sent on a mission as a representative of another person. ... Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus or Ulysses (Greek Odysseys; Latin: Ulixes or, less commonly, Ulysses), pronounced /oʊˈdɪs. ... Menestheus, the son of Peteus, son of Orneus, son of Erechtheus, was a legendary King of Athens during the Trojan War. ... Ajax, or Aias (Greek: ), was a king of Salamis, and a legendary hero of ancient Greece. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... In Greek mythology, Idomeneus was a Cretan warrior, grandson of Minos. ...


Ascension and reign

Tyndareus would accept none of the gifts, nor would he send any of the suitors away for fear of offending them and giving grounds for a quarrel. Odysseus promised to solve the problem in a satisfactory manner if Tyndareus would support him in his courting of Penelope, the daughter of Icarius. Tyndareus readily agreed, and Odysseus proposed that, before the decision was made, all the suitors should swear a most solemn oath to defend the chosen husband against whoever should quarrel with the chosen one. This stratagem succeeded, and Helen and Menelaus were married. Following Tyndareus's death, Menelaus became king of Sparta because the only male heirs, Castor and Polydeuces, had died when they had ascended Mount Olympus. Penelope represented as a statue in the Vatican, Rome For other uses, see Penelope (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, there were two people named Icarius, or Ikários (and one named Icarus) Icarius was the son of Oebalus and Gorgophone and, by Periboea, father of Penelope and Perilaus. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... This article is about the Greek mountain. ...


Trojan War

Some years later, Paris, a Trojan prince, came to Sparta to marry Helen, whom he had been promised by Aphrodite. Paris returned to Troy with Helen, though accounts differ whether or not Helen's flight was willing, blinded as she was by Aphrodite's power. This issue is the source of much of the dramatic tension in Book IV of Homer's book Odyssey. Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ...


Menelaus called upon all the other suitors to fulfill their oaths, thus beginning the Trojan War. Virtually all of Greece took part, either attacking Troy with Menelaus or defending it from them. The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from...


In the Iliad, Menelaus fights bravely and well, even when wounded, and distinguishes himself particularly by recovering the body of Patroclus after the latter is killed by Hector. Although Menelaus is depicted as a reasonably wise and just leader, he has a tendency to rattle off fatuous bromides in the most inappropriate circumstances. It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... Hector brought back to Troy. ... A bromide is a phrase, or person who uses phrases, which have been used and repeated so many times as to become either insincere in their meaning, or seem like an attempt at trying to explain the obvious. ...


During the war, Menelaus' weapon-carrier was Eteoneus. (Odyssey IV, 22, 31.) In Greek mythology, Eteóneus was King Menelaus of Spartas weapon-carrier during the Trojan War. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ...


After the Greeks won the Trojan War, Helen returned to Sparta with Menelaus (though she had married Paris' brother, Deiphobus, after Paris' death, Menelaus killed in a horrible way Deiphobus, removing all of his body parts one by one, spending special time on his eyes). According to some versions, Menelaus stayed in the court of King Polybus of Thebes for a time after the war. In Greek mythology, Deiphobus was a son of Priam and Hecuba. ... Polybus was a famous physician. ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ...


According to the Odyssey, Menelaus' homebound fleet was blown by storms to Crete and Egypt, [1] where they were unable to sail away because the wind was calm. Menelaus had to capture Proteus, a shape-shifting sea god, until Proteus told what sacrifices to which gods he would have to make to guarantee safe passage.[1] Proteus also told Menelaus that he was destined for Elysium (Heaven) after his death. Menelaus returned to Sparta with Helen, settling in Lacedaemon.[1] Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... A water deity is a deity in mythology associated with water or various bodies of water. ... Elysian redirects here. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: Spártē) is a city in southern Greece. ... Helen. ... Lacedaemon, or Lakedaimon, Grk. ...


According to non-Homeric sources, after Menelaus' death his illegitimate son Megapenthes sent Helen into exile. In Greek mythology, Megapénthês was a son of Proetus. ...


Alternative parentage

In alternative traditions Menelaus is said to be the son of Pleisthenes (son of Atreus) and Aerope, or of Pleisthenes and Cleolla, daughter of Dias, making him the grandson, rather than the son, of Atreus. [1] In Greek mythology, Pleisthenes was the a son of Pelops. ... Dias may mean: Direct Internet Access System Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Detaşamentul de Intervenţii şi Acţiuni Speciale, a Romanian police rapid response unit Destruction in Art Symposium Transparency slides, sometimes known as dias film Dias (meaning Days) is also a common surname in the Portuguese language...


In other media

Menelaus appears in the 2004 film Troy. He duels Paris and wins, but Paris runs off to his brother, Hector. When Menelaus wants to strike the finishing blow, Hector kills him to protect his brother. (Menelaus also wins the duel in the Iliad, but Paris is spirited away behind Troy's walls by an interfering Aphrodite.) Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Menelaus

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The USS Menelaus (ARL-13) was one of 39 Achelous-class landing craft repair ships built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Menelaus (in Greek mythology, a son of Atreus, king of Ancient Sparta, husband of Helen and younger brother to Agamemnon), she was the... Menelaus is a young lunar impact crater located on the south shore of Mare Serenitatis near the eastern end of the Montes Hæmus mountain range. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c "Menelaus" (overview), Encyclopedia Mythica, Pantheon.org, 2004, webpage: Pantheon-Menelaus-overview.

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Menelaus (261 words)
Menelaus was the son of Atreus and the brother of Agamemnon.
Helen's abduction by Paris, the son of King Priam of Troy, was the cause of the Trojan War.
Menelaus fought bravely at Troy, although he did not occupy as important a position as his brother Agamemnon, who was the commander-in-chief of the Greek forces.
Menelaus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (834 words)
Menelaus (Μενελαος, also transliterated as Meneláos), in Greek mythology, was a king of Sparta and son of Atreus and Aerope.
Menelaus succeeded Tyndareus (whose only sons, Castor and Polydeuces became gods), and Agamemnon, with his brother's assistance, drove out Aegisthus and Thyestes, and recovered his father's kingdom.
Menelaus had to catch Proteus, a shape-shifting sea god to find out what sacrifices to which gods he would have to make to guarantee safe passage.
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