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Encyclopedia > Menander
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Menander (342291 BC) (Greek Μένανδρος), Greek dramatist, the chief representative of the New Comedy, was born in Athens. He was the son of well-to-do parents; his father Diopeithes is identified by some with the Athenian general and governor of the Thracian Chersonese known from the speech of Demosthenes De Chersoneso. He presumably derived his taste for the comic drama from his uncle Alexis. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (985x1579, 515 KB) Bust of the ancient Greek playwright Menander from the Royal Ontario Museum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (985x1579, 515 KB) Bust of the ancient Greek playwright Menander from the Royal Ontario Museum. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 390s BC - 380s BC - 370s BC - 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC _ 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC - 300s BC - 290s BC 347 BC 346 BC 345 BC 344 BC 343 BC 342 BC 341 BC 340 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 296 BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290 BC 289 BC 288... Greek comedy is the name given to a wide genre of theatrical plays written, and performed, in Ancient Greece. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα, Athína IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Greece and the birthplace of democracy. ... Diopeithes (in Greek Διoπείθης; lived 4th century BC) was an Athenian general, probably father of the poet Menander, who was sent out to the Thracian Chersonese about 343 BC, at the head of a body of Athenian settlers or κληρoυχoι.1 Disputes having arisen about their boundaries between these... Map of the Thracian Chersonese The Thracian Chersonese (in Greek ΧερσoνησoÏ‚ Θραικια) was the ancient name of the Gallipoli peninsula, in the part of historic Thrace that is now part of modern Turkey. ... Demosthenes (384–322 BC, Greek: Δημοσθένης) was a prominent Greek statesman and orator of ancient Athens. ... Alexis (ca. ...


He was the friend, associate, and perhaps pupil of Theophrastus, and was on intimate terms with Demetrius of Phalerum. He also enjoyed the patronage of Ptolemy Soter, the son of Lagus, who invited him to his court. But Menander, preferring the independence of his villa in the Peiraeus and the company of his mistress Glycera, refused. According to the note of a scholiast on the Ibis of Ovid, he was drowned while bathing, and his countrymen built him a tomb on the road leading to Athens, where it was seen by Pausanias. A well-known statue in the Vatican, formerly thought to represent Marius, is now generally supposed to be Menander, although some archaeologists dispute this, and it has also been identified with his statue in the theatre at Athens, also mentioned by Pausanias. Statue of Theophrastus Theophrastus, a native of Eressos in Lesbos born c. ... Demetrius Phalereus ( - died approximately 280 BC) was an Athenian orator and one of the first Peripatetics. ... Ptolemy I Soter (367 BC–283 BC) was the ruler of Egypt (323 BC - 283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. ... Lagus (in Greek ΛαγoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was the father, or reputed father, of Ptolemy, the founder of the Egyptian monarchy. ... Piraeus, or Peiraeus (Modern Greek: Πειραιά(ς) Pireá(s), Ancient Greek / Katharevousa: Πειραιεύς Pireéfs) is a city in the prefecture of Attica, Greece, located south of Athens. ... Species Examples: Glycera americana Glycera dibranchiata The genus Glycera is a group of polychaetes (bristle worms) commonly known as blood worms. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... Pausanias was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N)¹ (157 BC - January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician elected Consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. ...


Menander was the author of more than a hundred comedies, but only won the prize at Lenaia eight times. His rival in dramatic art (and in the affections of Glycera) was Philemon, who appears to have been more popular. Menander, however, believed himself to be the better dramatist, and, according to Aulus Gellius, used to ask Philemon: "Don't you feel ashamed whenever you gain a victory over me?" According to Caecilius of Calacte (Porphyry in Eusebius, Praeparatio evangelica) Menander was guilty of plagiarism, his The Superstitious Man being taken from The Augur of Antiphanes. But, although he attained only moderate success during his lifetime, he subsequently became the favorite writer of antiquity. Copies of his plays were known to Suidas and Eustathius (10th and 11th centuries), and twenty-three of them, with commentary by Michael Psellus, were said to have existed at Constantinople in the 16th century. He is praised by Plutarch (Comparison of Menander and Aristophanes) and Quintilian (Institutio Oratoria), who accepted the tradition that he was the author of the speeches published under the name of the Attic orator Charisius. Philemon (c. ... Aulus Gellius (c. ... Caecilius, of Calacte in Sicily, Greek rhetorician, flourished at Rome during the reign of Augustus. ... Porphyry (c. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Antiphanes, the most important writer of the Middle Attic comedy with the exception of Alexis, lived from about 408 to 334 BC. He was apparently a foreigner who settled in Athens, where he began to write about 387. ... Suda (Σουδα or alternatively Suidas) is the name of a massive medieval lexicon, not an author as was formerly supposed. ... Eustathius(or Eumathius) surnamed Macrembolites (living near the long bazaar), the last of the Greek romance writers, flourished in the second half of the 12th century AD. His title Protonobilissimus shows him to have been a person of distinction, and if he is also correctly described in the manuscripts, as... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Michael Psellus is the name of two writers of the Byzantine Empire: Michael Psellus the Elder, a theologian Michael Psellus the Younger, a historian. ... Map of Constantinople. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (c. ... Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. ... Flavius Sosipater Charisius (fl. ...


A great admirer and imitator of Euripides, Menander resembles him in his keen observation of practical life, his analysis of the emotions, and his fondness for moral maxims, many of which became proverbial: "The property of friends is common," "Whom the gods love die young," "Evil communications corrupt good manners" (from the Thaïs, quoted in 1 Corinthians 15:33). These maxims (chiefly monostichs) were afterwards collected, and, with additions from other sources, were edited as Menander's One-Verse Maxims, a kind of moral textbook for the use of schools. A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


Menander found many Roman imitators. The Eunuchus, Andria, Heautontimoroumenos (The Self-Tormentor) and Adelphi of Terence (called by Caesar "dimidiatus Menander") were avowedly taken from Menander, but some of them appear to be adaptations and combinations of more than one play; thus, in the Andria were combined Menander's The Woman from Andros) and The Woman from Perinthos), in the Eunuchus, The Eunuch and The Flatterer, while the Adelphi was compiled partly from Menander and partly from Diphilus. The original of Terence's Hecyra (as of the Phormio) is generally supposed to be, not by Menander, but Apollodorus of Carystus. The Bacchides and Stichus of Plautus were probably based upon Menander's The Double Deceiver and Philadelphoi, The Brotherly-Loving Men, but the Poenulus, does not seem to be from The Carthaginian, nor the Mostellaria from The Apparition, in spite of the similarity of titles. Caecilius Statius, Luscius Lavinius, Turpilius and Atilius also imitated Menander. He was further credited with the authorship of some epigrams of doubtful authenticity; the letters addressed to Ptolemy Soter and the discourses in prose on various subjects mentioned by Suidas are probably spurious. Publius Terentius Afer, better known as Terence, was a comic playwright of the Roman Republic. ... Gāius JÅ«lius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Diphilus, of Sinope, poet of the new Attic comedy and contemporary of Menander (342-291 BC). ... Apollodorus of Carystus in Euboea was one of the most important writers of the Attic New Comedy, who flourished in Athens between 300 and 260 B.C. He is to be distinguished from the older Apollodorus of Gela (342—290), also a writer of comedy. ... Titus Maccius Plautus (born at Sarsina, Umbria in 254 B.C.) was a comic playwright in the time of the Roman Republic. ... Caecilius Statius, or Statius Caecilius (died 168 (or 166) BC) was a Roman comic poet. ... Atilius was the nomen of the gens Atilia of ancient Rome. ...


Until the end of the 19th century, all that was known of Menander were the fragments collected by Augustus Meineke (1855) and Theodor Kock, Comicorum Atticorum Fragmenta (1888). They consist of some 1650 verses or parts of verses, in addition to a considerable number of words quoted expressly as from Menander by the old lexicographers. From 1897 to 1907, papyri were discovered in different parts of Egypt containing fragments of considerable length amounting to some 1400 lines. In 1897, about eighty lines of The Farmer; in 1899, fifty lines of The Shorn Woman (Perikeiromene), and, in 1903, two hundred lines from the middle of the same play; five hundred lines from The Arbitrants, generally well preserved; sixty-three lines (the prologue, list of characters, and the first scene), from The Hero; three hundred and forty lines from The Woman from Samos; and twenty lines from an unknown comedy. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Albrecht Friedrich August Meineke (December 8, 1790 - December 12, German classical scholar, was born at Soest in Westphalia. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


The complete manuscript of Dyskolos (The Grouch) was published from a recovered papyrus manuscript in 1959. This play was first presented at the Lenaian festival in 317 BC, where it won Menander first prize. Dyskolos (Greek, the grouch) is the only complete play written by Menander, and in general of the whole New Comedy, arrived to present days The complete manuscript of Dyskolos was published from a recovered papyrus manuscript in 1957; the paryrus had been purchased by the Swiss bibliophile Martin Bodmer, and... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lenaia was a dramatic but one of the lesser festivals in Athens and Ionia in ancient Greece. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 322 BC 321 BC 320 BC 319 BC 318 BC 317 BC 316 BC 315 BC 314...


Works

  • Aspis
  • Georgos
  • Dis Exapaton
  • Dyskolos (the only play that survives in its entirety)
  • Encheiridion
  • Epitrepontes
  • Heros
  • Theophoroumene
  • Karchedonios
  • Kitharistes
  • Kolax
  • Koneiazomenai
  • Leukadia
  • Misoumenos
  • Perikeiromene
  • Perinthia
  • Samia
  • Sikyonioi
  • Synaristosai
  • Phasma

Dyskolos (Greek, the grouch) is the only complete play written by Menander, and in general of the whole New Comedy, arrived to present days The complete manuscript of Dyskolos was published from a recovered papyrus manuscript in 1957; the paryrus had been purchased by the Swiss bibliophile Martin Bodmer, and...

External links

An English translation of the Dyscolos. Dyskolos (Greek, the grouch) is the only complete play written by Menander, and in general of the whole New Comedy, arrived to present days The complete manuscript of Dyskolos was published from a recovered papyrus manuscript in 1957; the paryrus had been purchased by the Swiss bibliophile Martin Bodmer, and...

  • Menander: Monosticha / Sententiae / Einzelverse (greek, latin, german)
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Menander

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Menander (869 words)
Menander (342-291 BC), Greek dramatist, the chief representative of the New comedy, was born at Athens.
Menander, however, believed himself to be the better dramatist, and, according to Aulus Gellius, used to ask Philemon: "Don’t you feel ashamed whenever you gain a victory over me?" According to Caecilius of Calacte (Porphyry in Eusebius, Praep.
Till the end of the 19th century, all that was known of Menander were the fragments collected by A Meineke (1855) and T Kock, Comicorum atticorum fragmenta, iii.
Menander - Crystalinks (744 words)
Menander (342­291 BC), Greek dramatist, the chief representative of the New Comedy, was born in Athens.
Menander, however, believed himself to be the better dramatist, and, according to Aulus Gellius, used to ask Philemon: "Don't you feel ashamed whenever you gain a victory over me?" According to Caecilius of Calacte (Porphyry in Eusebius, Praeparatio evangelica) Menander was guilty of plagiarism, his The Superstitious Man being taken from The Augur of Antiphanes.
Menander's chief strengths seem to be the facility of language, accurate portrayal of manners, and naturalness of the sentiments which he puts into the mouth of his dramatis personae.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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