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Encyclopedia > Menachem Mendel Schneerson
Menachem Mendel Schneerson
Lubavitcher Rebbe
The Rebbe
The Rebbe
Term 1951-01-171994-06-12
Full name Menachem Mendel Schneerson
Main work Likkutei Sichos
Born 1902-04-05 OS (11 Nissan 5662)
Mykolaiv
Died 1994-06-12 NS (3 Tammuz 5754)
Brooklyn, New York
Buried Queens, New York
Dynasty Chabad Lubavitch
Predecessor Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn
Father Levi Yitzchak Schneerson
Mother Chanah, née Yanovski
Wife Chaya Mushka Schneerson

Menachem Mendel Schneerson (April 18, 1902June 12, 1994), known as The Rebbe[1], was a prominent Hasidic[2] rabbi who was the seventh and last Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement. He was fifth in a direct paternal line to the third Chabad-Lubavitch Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneersohn. Deceased Lubavitcher Rebbe Menachem Mendel Schneerson File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Likkutei Sichos, lit. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... Location Map of Ukraine with Mykolaiv highlighted. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... It has been suggested that Hasidic philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneerson, (1878-1944), was a Hasidic rabbi in Russia. ... Chaya Mushka (Moussia) Schneerson (March 16, 1901-February 10, 1988) referred to by Lubavitchers as The Rebbetzin was the wife of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson the seventh and last Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch branch of Hasidic Judaism. ... For the tanna, see Judah HaNasi. ... It has been suggested that Hasidic philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... Menachem Mendel Schneersohn (or Menachem Mendel or Tzemach Tzedek) (1789 - 1866) was an Orthodox Jewish rabbi of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic Judaism movement that was based in the town of Lubavitch in present-day Belarus. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... This article is about the Hasidic movement originating in Poland and Russia. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... For the tanna, see Judah HaNasi. ... Chabad Lubavitch, or Lubavich, is one of the largest branch of Hasidic Judaism founded by Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi . ... Menachem Mendel Schneersohn (or Menachem Mendel or Tzemach Tzedek) (1789 - 1866) was an Orthodox Jewish rabbi of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic Judaism movement that was based in the town of Lubavitch in present-day Belarus. ...


In 1950, upon the passing of his predecessor, his father-in-law, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn, Menachem Mendel assumed the leadership of Chabad-Lubavitch. He led the movement until his passing in 1994, greatly expanding its worldwide activities and founding a network of institutions, as of 2006 in 70 countries, to promote Jewish unity[3] and outreach to as-yet unaffiliated Jews through encouraging them to increase in Torah study and Mitzvah observance. Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... This article is about commandments in Judaism. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Part of a series on
770
Chabad Hasidism

Rebbes of Chabad-Lubavitch
1. Shneur Zalman of Liadi
2. Dovber Schneuri
3. Menachem Mendel Schneersohn
4. Shmuel Schneersohn
5. Sholom Dovber Schneersohn
6. Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn
7. Menachem Mendel Schneerson
Chabad history
770 Eastern Parkway · 19 Kislev · Ohel
Chabad library · Crown Heights Riot
Brooklyn Bridge Shooting
Organisations
Agudas Chasidei Chabad · Chabad on Campus
Chabad.org · Kehot Publication Society
Gan Israel · Sheloh · Jewish Relief Agency
Children's Museum · Ohr Avner · Colel Chabad
Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch · Kinus Hashluchim
Notable figures
Hillel Paritcher · Yehuda Chitrik · C. M. A. Hodakov
Itche Der Masmid · Manis Friedman · Yoel Kahn
Leib Groner · C. M. Schneerson· Shemaryahu Gurary ·
Levi Yitzchak Schneerson · S. D. Wolpo · Berel Lazar
Yehuda Krinsky · Z. M. HaYitzchaki · Nissan Neminov
Herman Branover · Zalman Serebryanski
Chabad communities
Crown Heights · Kfar Chabad
Chabad texts
Hayom Yom · Igrot Kodesh · Tanya · Likkutei Sichos
Tehillat HaShem · Shulchan Aruch HaRav
Chabad schools
Bais Rivka · Hadar Hatorah · Yeshivah College
Oholei Torah · Tomchei Temimim · Ohel Chana
Yeshivah Gedolah Zal · Beth Rivkah Ladies College
Rabbinical College · Ohr Avner · Mayanot
Chabad outreach
Mitzvah Campaigns · Chabad house · Tefillin
Noahide laws · Shliach · Mitzvah tank
Chabad terminology
Chitas · Mashpia · Meiniach · Farbrengen
Nusach Ari · Choizer · Chabadnitze
See also
Messianism · Strashelye · Controversies · Malachim
v  d  e

Born in Nikolaiev, Ukraine, Schneerson received mostly Jewish private education. He studied for a short while with Rabbi Zalman Vilenkin. When Schneerson was age 4-1/2, Vilenkin informed the boy's father that he had nothing more to teach his eldest son.[4] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Chabad (disambiguation). ... Shneur Zalman of Liadi (‎) (September 4, 1745 – December 15, 1812 O.S.), was an Orthodox Rabbi, and the founder and first Rebbe of Chabad, a branch of Hasidic Judaism, then based in Liadi, Imperial Russia. ... Dovber Schneuri (1773-11-13 - 1827-11-16 OS) was an Orthodox rabbi and the second Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... Menachem Mendel Schneersohn (or Menachem Mendel or Tzemach Tzedek) (1789 - 1866) was an Orthodox Jewish rabbi of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic Judaism movement that was based in the town of Lubavitch in present-day Belarus. ... Shmuel Schneersohn (or Rabbi Shmuel or Maharash) (1834–1882), was an Orthodox rabbi. ... Rabbi Sholom Dovber Schneersohn Sholom Dovber Schneersohn (or Sholom Dovber or Rashab) (1860 - 1920) was an Orthodox rabbi and the fifth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic Judaism movement. ... Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... Lubavitch world headquarters, 770 Eastern Parkway 770 Eastern Parkway, commonly abbreviated to 770 or Seven-seventy is the street address of the central headquarters of the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement, located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York in the United States of America. ... Portrait of Shneur Zalman of Liadi 19 Kislev refers to the 19th day of the Jewish month of Kislev. ... Ohel (Chabad) is the name of a religious shrine in Queens, New York, to which thousands of people make a pilgrimage each year. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Agudas Chasidei Chabad. ... The Crown Heights Riot was a three-day riot in the Crown Heights neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... The Brookly Bridge Shooting was an incident that took place on March 1, 1994, when Lebanese-born Rashid Baz, armed with a Glock 9-millimeter semi-automatic pistol and a 9-millimeter Cobray machine gun, shot on a van carrying members of the Chabad-Lubavitch Orthodox Jewish sect on the... Agudas Chasidei Chabad is the umbrella organization for the Chabad-Lubavitch movement. ... -1... Chabad. ... The logo of Kehot Publication Society. ... GAN ISRAEL CAMPING NETWORK There are hundreds of them around the world, with tens of thousands of campers. ... Logo of the Sheloh organization Jewish Released Time, also known as Sheloh (an abbreviation for Shiurei Limud Hados (Classes for Learning the Religion)), is an organization promoting released time for the Jewish education of Jewish children learning in public schools. ... A Project of Guideline Services, Lubavitch House 125 Montgomery Avenue, Suite A3 Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 610-660-0190 Donate Online Who are we? The Jewish Relief Agency is an organization whose aim is to identify and feed needy Jewish families. ... The Jewish childrens Museum in Brooklyn The Jewish Childrens Museum is a brand-new museum open to the public all about jewish life, its history and averything associated with orthodox judaism. ... Official logo of the Ohr Avner Foundation Ohr Avner Foundation is a philanthropic foundation that was established in 1992 by the Israeli billionaire and emigre from the former Soviet Union, Lev Leviev, to be run by rabbis of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement to which Lev Leviev belongs. ... Colel Chabad is the oldest continuously operating charity of its kind in Israel. ... Merkos LInyonei Chinuch (lit. ... The Kinus Hashluchim is the annual gathering of Chabad Shluchim held in the fall, each year. ... Rabbi Hillel HaLevi Malisov of Paritch, commonly known as Reb Hillel Paritcher (1795-1864) was a famous Orthodox Jewish Rabbi in Russia. ... Rabbi Yehuda Chitrik (1899-2006) was a leading scholar, author, and Mashpia in the Chabad community. ... Rabbi Chaim Mordechai Aizik Hodakov (1902-1993) was the chief of staff of the secretariat of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson for more than 40 years. ... Biography of Reb Itche der Masmid Yitzchok Horowitz, more commonly known as Reb Itche der Masmid, was a famous Orthodox Jewish Rabbi in pre-war Europe. ... R Manis Friedman at the wedding of his niece in March 2007 Rabbi Manis Friedman (born 1946) is a Chabad Lubavitch Hassid. ... Rabbi Yoel Kahn Rabbi Yoel Kahn (or Kahan) is a senior, Chabad rabbi, Mashpia, and community leader. ... Rabbi Yehuda Leib Groner Rabbi Leib Yehuda Groner (born 1932) was the secretary to the late Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson for over 40 years. ... Chaya Mushka (Moussia) Schneerson (March 16, 1901-February 10, 1988) referred to by Lubavitchers as The Rebbetzin was the wife of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson the seventh and last Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch branch of Hasidic Judaism. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneerson, (1878-1944), was a Hasidic rabbi in Russia. ... Rabbi Shalom Dov Wolpo adressing a crowd Rabbi Shalom Dov Wolpo, also Sholom Ber Wolpe[1], (born 1948) is a senior Chabad-Lubavitch rabbi and community leader in Israel. ... Rabbi Berel Lazar is the Chief Rabbi of Russia, and is the chairman of the rabbinical alliance of the CIS. Education A native of Milan, Italy, Rabbi Lazar was born in 1964 to parents who were among the first emissaries of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson. ... Rabbi Chaim Yehuda (Yudel) Krinsky (born 1933) is a Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic rabbi. ... Shneur Zalman Moishe HaYitzchaki, usually known familiarly as Reb Zalman Moishe, (c. ... Rabbi Nissan Neminov, known familiarly as Reb Nissan, was a famous Orthodox Jewish Rabbi. ... Professor Herman Branover is known in the Jewish communities of Israel, Russia, and the West as an inspiring author, translator, publisher, and educator. ... Rabbi Yehoshua Shneur Zalman Serebryanski, known familiarly as Reb Zalman, (Dec 1904-1991-06-15) was an Orthodox rabbi and Mashpia belonging to the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement. ... Crown Heights is a neighborhood in the central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Kfar Chabad is a Chabad-Lubavitch community of about 400 families located near Tel Aviv. ... Hayom Yom (Hebrew: היום יום, Today is day . ... Igrot Kodesh (literally Holy Epistles but more commonly known as Letters of the Rebbe} is a collection of the seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch, Menachem Mendel Schneersons correspondence and responsa. ... Note: Tanya Rabbati, a 16th century Italian code of Jewish law, is an unrelated work with a similar name. ... Likkutei Sichos, lit. ... A popular Sidur (prayer-book) in the Chabad-Lubavitch community. ... Shulchan Aruch HaRav, or Shulkhan Arukh HaRav, (Code of Jewish Law by the Rabbi) is a codification of halakha by Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, known during his lifetime as HaRav (The Rabbi). At a young age, Rabbi Shneur Zalman was asked by his teacher, Rabbi Dovber of Mezeritch to... Bais Rivka (or Beth Rivkah) is the name used for the Bais Yaakov-type private girls schools of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic movement. ... Rabbi Yisroel Jacobson giving a class in Hadar Hatorah in 1962 Yeshiva Hadar Hatorah is the worlds first Baal Teshuva Yeshiva For men rediscovering their Jewish roots. ... Yeshivah College is a Jewish school on Hotham Street in Melbourne, Australia run by the Chabad-Lubavitch movements Yeshivah Centre. ... Oholei Torah is the common name of the Lubavitch schools Educational Institute Oholei Menachem and Talmudical Seminary Oholei Torah. ... Tomchei Temimim is the central Yeshiva (Talmudical school) of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic movement. ... Dormitory Ohel Chana is an Orthodox Jewish girls seminary on Balaclava Road in Melbourne, Australia run by the Chabad-Lubavitch movements Yeshivah Centre. ... Yeshiva Gedolah Zal, Yeshiva Gedolah, or colloquially, YG is a yeshiva, an academy for young Orthodox Jews to devote themselves to full-time rabbinical studies. ... Beth Rivkah Ladies College is an Orthodox Jewish day-school on Balaclava Road in Melbourne, Australia run by the Chabad-Lubavitch movements Yeshivah Centre. ... The Rabbinical College of America is one of the largest Chabad Lubavitch Chasidic Yeshivas in the world. ... Ohr Avner Chabad Day School refers to a network of Jewish day schools founded and supported by Israeli billionaire Lev Leviev, under the auspices of the Chabad Lubavitch movement, located in the areas of the former Soviet Union Ohr Avner Chabad Day School (Tashkent) Ohr Avner Chabad Day School (Volgograd... Mayanot Institute of Jewish Studies is a Chabad-Lubavitch yeshiva for men located in Makor Baruch, Jerusalem, Israel. ... For other uses, see Orthodox Judaism outreach (disambiguation). ... Mitzvah Campaigns, or Mitvtzoim (Heb. ... A Chabad House is a centre for disseminating Orthodox Judaism by the Chabad movement. ... The Tefillin Campaign refers to a campaign by Orthodox Jews to influence all male Jews, regardless of their level of religious observance, to don the Tefillin (phylacteries) daily. ... The Noahide Campaign refers to a campaign by Orthodox Jews to influence all non-Jews to follow the Noahide Laws. ... Shaliach (Hebrew: שָלִיחַ; plural שְלִיחִים, shlichim or Shliach plural Shluchim), in Judaism, is the concept of an emissary. ... A Chabad Lubavitch Mitzvah tank A Mitzvah tank is a large vehicle, usually a big van, travel trailer, recreational vehicle or campervan, sometimes even a pickup truck with a Sukkah on it, that is utilized by the Orthodox Jewish practitioners of Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidism as portable educational and outreach centers... ChiTaS is a Hebrew acronym for Chumash (The five books of Moses), Tehillim (Psalms) and Tanya (Kabbalistic work by Schnuer Zalman of Liadi, the Alter Rebbe). ... Mashpia (Heb. ... Meiniach (Heb. ... A Farbrengen (from the Yiddish פארברענגען, meaning joyous gathering) is a Hasidic gathering. ... Nusach Ari means, in a general sense, any prayer rite following the usages of Rabbi Isaac Luria, the AriZal, in the 16th century, and, more particularly, the version of it used by Chabad Chasidim. ... Choizer (Heb. ... A Chabadnitze (Yiddish: ) is a small side room required for a Chabad synagogue. ... In Jewish messianism and eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during... Strashelye, is a branch of the Chabad school of Hasidic Judaism, named after the town Strashelye in the Mohilev Province of present-day Belarus, where its leader lived. ... Main article: Chabad Chabad-Lubavitch is a branch of Hasidism. ... The Malachim are a barely extant quasi-Hasidic group with strong Miami and Williamsburg connections. ... Location Map of Ukraine with Mykolaiv highlighted. ...


He later studied independently under his father, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneerson, an authority on Kabbalah and Jewish law[5] who served as the Rabbi of Yekaterinoslav from 1907 to 1939. He was his primary teacher. He studied Talmud and rabbinic literature, as well as the chasidic view of Jewish mysticism and Kabbalah. Schneerson's mother related that her son never attended any Soviet school, however he had taken the exams as an external student and he had done well on them[6] According to Avrum Ehrlich, at the same time that he studied extensively Jewish studies, he completed his Russian secondary school matriculation.[7] Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneerson, (1878-1944), was a Hasidic rabbi in Russia. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halocho and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions. ... Dnipropetrovsk (Ukrainian: Дніпропетровськ, Dnipropetrovs’k; Russian: Днепропетро́вск, Dnepropetrovsk, formerly Екатериносла́в, Yekaterinoslav) is Ukraines third largest city with 1. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of Judaisms rabbinic writing/s throughout history. ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ...


Schneerson was involved in communal affairs of his father's office throughout his upbringing, where his secular education and knowledge of the Russian language made him a useful aid in assisting his father's public administrative work. He was also said to be an interpretor between the Jewish community and the Russian authorities on a number of occasions.[7]


He had two younger brothers, Dovber and Yisroel Aryeh Leib, both of whom were reported to be of unusual character.[7] Schneerson’s younger brother, DovBer, was mentally disturbed from childhood and spent his years in an institution for the mentally disabled near Nikolaiev. He died in 1944 at the hands of Nazi collaborators.[8]


His youngest brother Yisrael Aryeh Leib Schneerson was close to his brother, often traveling with him. He was widely viewed as a genius and studied science. In the late 1920's he became a Communist, later becoming a Trotskyite. After he left the Soviet union he stopped being an observant Jew.[9] He changed his name to Mark Gourary and moved to Israel where he became a businessman, but later moved to England where he began doctoral studies at Liverpool University but died in 1951 before he completed them. His wife died in 1996 and his children—Schneerson's closest living relatives—currently reside in Israel.[7] This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Trotskyism is the theory of Marxism as advocated by Leon Trotsky. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool in the United Kingdom. ...


He received his rabbinical ordination from the Rogatchover Gaon, Rabbi Yosef Rosen.[10] Semicha (Hebrew: ‎, leaning [of the hands]), also semichut (Hebrew: ‎, ordination), or semicha lerabbanut (Hebrew: ‎, rabbinical ordination) is derived from a Hebrew word which means to rely on or to be authorized. It generally refers to the ordination of a rabbi within Judaism. ... The Rogatchover Gaon (Rabbi Yosef Rosen, 1858-3 March 1936), also known by the name of his main work Tzafnath Paneach, was one of prominent Talmudic scholars of the early 20th century. ...


In 1923, Schneerson visited his second cousin twice removed, Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn for the first time. It was presumably at that time that he met Schneersohn's daughter Chaya Mushka Schneerson. It was another five years before they were able to marry.[7] Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... Chaya Mushka (Moussia) Schneerson (March 16, 1901-February 10, 1988) referred to by Lubavitchers as The Rebbetzin was the wife of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson the seventh and last Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch branch of Hasidic Judaism. ...


He became engaged to her in Riga in 1923 and married her five years later in 1928, after being away in Berlin. He returned to Warsaw for his wedding, and in the announcement of his marriage in a Warsaw newspaper,"a number of academic degrees" were attributed to him. Following the marriage, the newlyweds went to live in Berlin. For other uses, see Riga (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...


Berlin

Schneerson reputedly "was known to have received several advanced degrees in Berlin, and then later in Paris," but Professor Menachem Friedman was only able to uncover records for one and a half semesters in Berlin and Schneerson's attendance was in a "record of the students who audited courses at the university without receiving academic credit." Menachem Friedman is an Israeli anthropologist and sociologist at Bar Ilan University, Ramat-Gan. ...


In 1931 Schneerson's younger brother, Yisroel Aryeh Leib, joined him in Berlin, traveling under false papers with the name Mark Gurari to escape the Soviets. He arrived and was cared for by the family as he was seriously ill with typhoid fever. He attended classes at the University of Berlin from 1931 to 1933. In 1933, after Adolf Hitler took over Germany and began instituting anti-Semitic policies, Schneerson helped Gurari escape from Berlin together with Regina Milgram. Gurari escaped to Mandate Palestine in 1939 with Milgram where they married.[11] Despite his secularism, the two brothers maintained a relationship there and after his move to England, and arranged for his burial in Israel on his passing in 1952. For a similar disease with a similar name, see typhus. ... Hitler redirects here. ... The British Mandate of Palestine was a swathe of territory in the Middle East, formerly belonging to the Ottoman Empire, which the League of Nations entrusted to the United Kingdom to administer in the aftermath of World War I as a Mandate Territory. ...


Rabbi Soloveitchik

Rabbi Sholem Kowalsky, a close colleague of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, a former vice president of Agudas Harabonim of America, and an active member of the Rabbinical Council of America;[12] Rabbi Herschel Schacter, a former chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations;[13] Rabbi Julius Berman, the current Chairman of the RIETS Board of Trustees; Rabbi Menachem Genack, Rabbinic Administrator of the Kashrus Division of the Orthodox Union; and Rabbi Fabian Schoenfeld, former head of the Rabbinical Council of America (all students of Rabbi Soloveitchik) have all asserted that Schneerson and Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik met for the first time while they both studied in Berlin.[14] They met many times at the home of Rabbi Chaim Heller. It was in the course of these meetings that a strong friendship developed and in the words of Soloveitchik to Rabbi Sholem Kowalsky he "was a great admirer of the Rebbe."[12][14] Rabbi Soloveitchik related that: Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... The Rabbinical Council of America (RCA) is one of the worlds largest organizations of Orthodox Jewish rabbis; it is affiliated with The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, more commonly known as the Orthodox Union, or OU. History The roots of the organization go back to 1923 when... Herschel Schacter is a former chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations[1][2], and a prominent student of the Rav, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik[3]. He is also the father of Rabbi Jacob J. Schacter, the former director of the Soloveitchik Institute. ... Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary or RIETS (Yeshivat Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan) is the most important yeshiva component of Yeshiva University. ... Rabbi Menachem Genack is the CEO of the Orthodox Union Kosher Division. ... The Rabbinical Council of America (RCA) is one of the worlds largest organizations of Orthodox Jewish rabbis; it is affiliated with The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, more commonly known as the Orthodox Union, or OU. History The roots of the organization go back to 1923 when... Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ...

Schneerson always carried the key to the mikvah with him when he attended lectures at the university. "At about two or three o'clock every afternoon when he left the university he would go straight to the mikvah. No one was aware of this custom and I only learnt about it by chance. On another occasion, I offered him a drink. He refused, but when I pressured him I understood that he was fasting that day. It was Monday and the Rebbe was fasting. Imagine a Berlin University student immersed in secular studies maintains this custom of mikvah and fasting.[15]

Rabbi Zvi Kaplan states that Rabbi Yitzchok Hutner recalled sitting with Schneerson and Soloveitchik at a lecture on Maimonides at the University and when the speaker asked Schneerson for his opinion on something, Schneerson deferred to Soloveitchik. Soloveitchik's daughter Dr. Atarah Twersky recalls Soloveitchik saying that Schneerson visited her father in his apartment and the former asked the latter why he was studying in Berlin if his father-in-law was opposed to it. According to Soloveitchik's son Rabbi Dr. Haym Soloveitchik, Rabbi Soloveitchik only saw Schneerson pass by in Berlin and they did not meet while there. [16] The two would become more acquainted in New York. Mikvah (or mikveh) (Hebrew: מִקְוָה, Standard Tiberian  ; plural: mikvaot or mikvot) is a specially constructed pool of water used for total immersion in a purification ceremony within Judaism. ... Yitzchok (Isaac) Hutner (1906 - 1980) was an Orthodox rabbi born in Warsaw, Poland, to a family with both Ger Hasidim and non-Hasidic Lithuanian Jews in their origins. ... Rabbi Dr. Haym Soloveitchik is the only son of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik. ...


France

In 1933 Schneerson moved to Paris, France. He studied mechanics and electrical engineering at the École spéciale des travaux publics, du bâtiment et de l'industrie, a Technical College in the Montparnasse district. In July 1937 he graduated, and received a licence to practice as an electrical engineer. In November 1937 he enrolled at the Sorbonne, where he studied mathematics until World War II broke out in 1939.[17] This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Mechanic (disambiguation). ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... École spéciale des travaux publics, du bâtiment et de lindustrie (ESTP) in a technical college in Paris, founded in 1891 by Léon Eyrolles, the institution was officially recognized by the State in 1921. ... A technical college focuses on teaching work skills. ... The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Schneerson lived for most of his time in Paris at 9 Rue de Boulard in the cosmopolitan 14th arrondissement in the same building as his wife's sister Shaina and her husband Mendel Hornstein, who was also studying at ESTP. Mendel Hornstein failed the final exams and he and his wife returned to Poland; they were killed at Treblinka, together with their infant son, on 23 September 1941. In June 1940, after Paris fell, the Schneersons fled to Vichy, and later to Nice, where they stayed until their final escape from Europe. The 14th arrondissement, located on the Left Bank is one of the 20 arrondissements of Paris. ... Treblinka is a small village in the Mazowieckie voivodship (province) of Poland. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Vichy (Occitan: Vichèi) is a French commune, situated in the département of Allier and the région of Auvergne. ... Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Alpes-Maritimes (06) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration Nice Côte dAzur Mayor Jacques Peyrat (UMP) (since 1995) Statistics Land area¹ 71. ...


Schneerson learned to speak French, which he put to use in establishing his movement there after the war. The Chabad movement in France was later to attract many Jewish immigrants from Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia.


America and leadership

In 1941 Schneerson escaped from France on the Serpa Pinto, one of the last boats to cross the Atlantic before the U-boat blockade began,[18] and joined his father-in-law, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn, in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. He spent some time working in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.[19] U-boat is also a nickname for some diesel locomotives built by GE; see List of GE locomotives October 1939. ... Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... Crown Heights is a neighborhood in Brooklyn in New York City. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... The New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard , the New York Navy Yard and United States Navy Yard, New York, is located 1. ...


In 1942, his father-in-law appointed him director of the movement's central organizations, placing him at the helm of a building a Jewish educational network across the United States, but he kept a low public religious leadership profile within the movement, emerging only once a month to deliver public talks to his father-in-law's followers.[7]


Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn died in 1950. Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ...


The two candidates for leadership were: Schneerson and Rabbi Shemaryahu Gurary, Schneersohn's elder son-in-law. Schneerson actively refused to accept leadership of the movement for the entire year after Schneersohn's passing. Schneerson had a larger following and seemed more sincere than Gurary. Schneerson was eventually cajoled into accepting the post by his wife and followers.[20] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


On the anniversary of his father-in-law's passing, on the tenth of Shevat 1951, he delivered a Chassidic discourse (Ma'amar) and formally became the Rebbe.[21] In the story of Xenogears, Shevat is the name of a country, named after the Hebrew month. ...


Schneerson believed that the American public was seeking to learn more about their Jewish heritage. He stated, "America is not lost, you are not different from. You Americans sincerely crave to know, to learn. Americans are inquisitive. It is the Chabad's point of view that the American mind is simple, honest, direct-good, tillable soil for Hassidism, or just plain Judaism".[22] Schneerson believed that Jews need not to be on the defensive, rather the Jews need to be on the ground building Jewish institutions, day schools and synagogues. Schneerson said that we need "to discharge ourselves of our duty and we must take the initiative".[23]


Schneerson placed a tremendous emphasis on outreach. Schneerson made great efforts to intensify this program of the movement, bringing Jews from all walks of life to adopt Orthodox Judaism, and aggressively sought the expansion of the baal teshuva movement. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Activities

The most famous part of Schneerson's work included the training of thousands of young Chabad rabbis and their wives, who were sent all over the world by him as shluchim (English: "emissaries") to further Jewish observance. For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Shaliach (שליח) is Hebrew for emissary. ...


Schneerson oversaw the building of schools, community centers, youth camps, college campus centers (known as "Chabad houses"), and build connections to the most powerful Jewish lay leaders and non-Jewish government leaders wherever they found themselves.


Schneerson instituted a system of "mitzvah campaigns" called mivtzoim; these encourage Jews to increase their level of Jewish religious practice, and gives the opportunity for another Jew to do a mitzvah. They commonly centered on practices such as keeping kosher, lighting Shabbat candles, studying Torah, the laying of tefillin, helping write Torah scrolls and teaching women to observe the niddah laws of Jewish family purity (laws pertaining to menstruation and ritual immersion afterwards in a pool of water known as a mikveh). Lubavitchers went to street-corners, and rode in "Mitzvah tanks", mobile outreach centers, encouraging Jews to increase their religious observance. He also launched a global Noahide campaign to promote observance of the Noahide Laws among gentiles, saying that involvement in this campaign is an obligation for every Jew.[24] This article is about commandments in Judaism. ... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... Tefillin (Hebrew: תפלין), also called phylacteries, are two boxes containing Biblical verses and the leather straps attached to them which are used in traditional Jewish prayer. ... Sefer Torah being read during weekday service. ... Niddah (or nidah, nidda, nida; Hebrew:נִדָּה) is a Hebrew term which literally means separation, generally considered to refer to separation from ritual impurity[1]; Ibn Ezra argues that it is related to the term menaddekem, meaning cast you out[2]. The term niddah appears in the biblical description of the... Not to be confused with Mensuration. ... A Mikvah (or Mikveh, מקוה) is a Jewish ritual bath used for immersion in a purification ceremony. ... A Chabad Lubavitch Mitzvah tank A Mitzvah tank is a large vehicle, usually a big van, travel trailer, recreational vehicle or campervan, sometimes even a pickup truck with a Sukkah on it, that is utilized by the Orthodox Jewish practitioners of Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidism as portable educational and outreach centers... The Noahide Campaign refers to a campaign by Orthodox Jews to influence all non-Jews to follow the Noahide Laws. ... The Rainbow is the ancient symbol of the Noahide Movement reminiscing the seven coloured rainbow that appeared after the Great Flood of the Bible. ... The word gentile is an anglicised version of the Latin word gentilis, meaning of or belonging to a clan or tribe. ...


Schneerson's activities spread to many far-flung areas of the world. Since the time of the fifth Rebbe of Chabad, Sholom Dovber Schneersohn, who sent an emissary to the Mountain Jews, Chabad had been involved with the Sephardic world. Many senior rabbis visited him in Brooklyn or maintained a correspondence with him. In the late 1970s, Rabbi Schneerson joined with other organizations to orchestrate an exodus of Jews from countries such as Iran. For the tanna, see Judah HaNasi. ... Rabbi Sholom Dovber Schneersohn Sholom Dovber Schneersohn (or Sholom Dovber or Rashab) (1860 - 1920) was an Orthodox rabbi and the fifth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic Judaism movement. ... Mountain Jews, or Juhuro, are Jews of the eastern Caucasus, mainly of Azerbaijan and Dagestan. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Scientists who met with him, such as Herman Branover, professor of physics at Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheva, Israel, noted that he had a keen understanding of scientific issues.[citation needed] Professor Herman Branover is known in the Jewish communities of Israel, Russia, and the West as an inspiring author, translator, publisher, and educator. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (אוניברסיטת בן-גוריון בנגב) was founded in 1969, in Beer Sheva, Israel. ... Beersheba or Beer Sheva (Hebrew באר שבע; Arabic بئر السبع Biʾr as-Sabʿ) is a city in Israel. ...


Schneerson rarely chose to involve himself with questions of halakha (Jewish law). Some notable exceptions were with regard to the use of electrical appliances on the Sabbath, sailing on Israeli boats staffed by Jews, and halakhic dilemmas created when crossing the International Date Line. Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halocho and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... “Date line” redirects here. ...


Schneerson rarely left Crown Heights in Brooklyn, except for frequent lengthy visits to his father-in-law's grave-site in Queens, New York. A year after the passing of his wife in 1988, when the traditional year of Jewish mourning had passed, he moved into his study above the central Lubavitch synagogue at 770 Eastern Parkway. Crown Heights is a neighborhood in Brooklyn in New York City. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... Lubavitch world headquarters, 770 Eastern Parkway 770 Eastern Parkway, commonly abbreviated to 770 or Seven-seventy is the street address of the central headquarters of the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement, located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York in the United States of America. ...


It was from this synagogue that Rabbi Schneerson directed his emissaries' work. He would involve himself in details of his far-flung movement's developments. The highlight of his public role was displayed during special celebrations called farbrengens ("gatherings") on Sabbaths, Jewish holy days, and special days on the Chabad calendar, when he would give lengthy sermons to crowds. They would often be broadcast via satellite and cable television to Lubavitch branches all over the world. A Farbrengen (from the Yiddish פארברענגען, meaning joyous gathering) is a Hasidic gathering. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ...


Schneerson's devotion to his work was unceasing: "He had never taken even a single day's vacation. Aside from three day trips in the late 1950s to visit a Chabad children's camp in the Catskill mountains, he had not once left the New York City vicinity since 1951. Nor had he the slightest predilection for acquiring material possessions. He and Chaya lived modestly in their house near Eastern Parkway."[25]


Later life

In 1977 Schneerson suffered a massive heart attack while celebrating the hakafot ("circling" [in the synagogue]) ceremony on Shmini Atzeret. Despite the best efforts of his doctors to convince him to change his mind, he refused to be hospitalized.[26] This necessitated building a mini-hospital in "770." Although he did not appear in public for many weeks, he continued to deliver talks and discourses from his study via intercom. On Rosh Chodesh Kislev, the first day of the Hebrew month of Kislev, he left his study for the first time in over a month to go home. His followers celebrate this day as a holiday each year. Heart attack redirects here. ... Sukkot (סוכות or סֻכּוֹת sukkōt, booths) or Succoth is an 8-day Biblical pilgrimage festival, also known as the Feast of Booths, the Feast of Tabernacles, or Tabernacles. ... Rosh Chodesh (Hebrew: Head/Beginning [of the Hebrew] Month) is the name for the first day of every month in the [[Hebrew calendar]]. Although Rosh Chodesh is not considered a religious holiday, it is observed with additional [[Jewish prayer]]s, including the Psalms of Hallel (praise) in all Orthodox and... Kislev (or Chisleu) (Hebrew: כִּסְלֵו, Standard Kislev Tiberian  ; from Akkadian kislimu) is the third month of the ecclesiastical year and the ninth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ...


In 1983, on the occasion of his 80th birthday the U.S. Congress proclaimed Rabbi Schneerson's birthday Education Day, USA, and awarded him the National Scroll of honor.


As the movement grew and more demands were placed on Schneerson's time he limited the practice of meeting followers individually in his office. In 1986 Rabbi Schneerson replaced these personal meetings, known as Yechidut, with a weekly receiving line in "770". Almost every Sunday thousands of people would line up to meet briefly with Schneerson and receive a dollar, which was to be donated to charity. People filing past Schneerson would often take this opportunity to ask him for advice or to request a blessing. This event is usually referred to as "Sunday Dollars."[27]


Following the death of Schneerson's wife in 1988 he withdrew from some public functions; for example, he stopped delivering addresses during weekdays, instead holding gatherings every Shabbat.[28] He later edited these addresses and they have since been released in the Sefer HaSichos set. For other uses, see Sabbath. ...


In 1991, he declared to his followers: "I have done everything I can (to bring Moshiach (the Jewish Messiah)), now I am handing over to you (the mission); do everything you can to bring Moshiach!" A campaign was then started to bring the messianic age through "acts of goodness and kindness," and some of his followers placed advertising in the mass media, such as many full-page ads in the New York Times urging everyone to prepare for and hasten the messiah's imminent arrival by increasing in their good deeds. The concept of the messiah in Judaism is briefly discussed in the Jewish eschatology entry. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


In 1991, Schneerson faced a riot with anti-Semitic overtones in his neighborhood of Crown Heights which became known as the Crown Heights Riot of 1991. The riot began when a car accompanying his motorcade returning from one of his regular cemetery visits to his father-in-law's grave accidentally struck two African American seven-year-old children, killing one boy. In the rioting, Australian Jewish graduate student Yankel Rosenbaum was murdered, many Lubavitchers were badly beaten, and much property was destroyed; also, blacks hurled rocks and bottles at the Jews over police lines.[29] The Crown Heights Riot was a three-day riot in the Crown Heights neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Crown Heights Riot was a three-day riot in the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York starting on August 19, 1991. ...


In 1992 Schneerson was felled by a serious stroke while praying at the Ohel, the grave of his father-in-law. The stroke left him unable to speak and paralyzed on the right side of his body. Nonetheless, he continued to respond daily to thousands of queries and requests for blessings from around the world. His secretaries would read the letters to him and he would indicate his response with head and hand motions. For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... Ohel (name meaning a house, tent) is the fourth son of Zerubbabel in the Bible. ...


Despite his deteriorating health, Schneerson once again refused to leave 770. Several months into his illness, a small room with tinted glass windows with an attached balcony was built overlooking the main synagogue. This allowed him to pray with his followers, beginning with the Rosh Hashana services and after services, to appear before them by either having the window opened or by being carried onto the balcony. This article is about the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. ...


He died in 1994 at the Beth Israel Medical Center,[30] having finally agreed to hospitalization, unable to verbalize and say anything to confirm or deny his followers' longed-for dream that he be the actual long-promised Jewish Messiah. However, some believe that he will be the Messiah, and that he will lead the Jewish people to redemption, though this opinion is not shared by the vast majority of his followers (see Chabad messianism.) Beth Israel Medical Center is a hospital in New York. ... Chabad messianism[1] is a term used to describe the beliefs of many followers of Chabad who believe that their late leader Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson will be the Messiah. ...


Schneerson was laid to rest on the 3rd of Tammuz 5754 (June 12, 1994), next to his father-in-law, the sixth Rebbe, at Montefiore Cemetery in Queens, NY.[31] The Ohel is built over their graves. When entering the Ohel, the sixth Rebbe is buried to the right, and the seventh Rebbe is buried to the left. Established by philanthropist Rabbi Joseph Gutnick of Melbourne (Australia), the Ohel Chabad-Lubavitch Center on Francis Lewis Boulevard, Queens, NY is located adjacent to the Rebbes' Ohel. is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Ohel (name meaning a house, tent) is the fourth son of Zerubbabel in the Bible. ... Joseph Gutnick (sometimes referred to as Diamond Joe) is an Australian businessman. ...


The United States Congress and President issue annual proclamations declaring that Schneerson's birthday, usually a day in March or April that coincides with his Hebrew calendar birth-date of 11 Nisan (a Hebrew month), be observed as Education and Sharing Day in the United States[32] Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... The Hebrew calendar (‎) or Jewish calendar is the calendar used by Jews for religious purposes. ... Nisan (Hebrew: נִיסָן, Standard Nisan Tiberian Nîsān ; from Akkadian , from Sumerian nisag First fruits) is the first month of the civil year and the seventh month (eighth, in leap year) of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Education and Sharing day is a day made by the United States Congress in honor of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneersons (1902-1994) efforts for education and sharing for Jews and non-Jews alike. ...


Congressional Gold Medal

After his death, a bill was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives sponsored by Congressmen Chuck Schumer, and cosponsored by John Lewis, Newt Gingrich, and Jerry Lewis, as well as 220 other Congressmen, to bestow on Rabbi Schneerson the Congressional Gold Medal. On November 2, 1994, the bill passed both Houses by unanimous consent, honoring Rabbi Schneerson for his "outstanding and enduring contributions toward world education, morality, and acts of charity".[33] Bill Clinton spoke these words at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. ... For other persons named John Lewis, see John Lewis (disambiguation). ... Newton Leroy Gingrich, (born June 17, 1943), served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... Charles Jeremy Jerry Lewis (born October 21, 1934), an American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1979, representing the 41st District of California. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

The late Rebbe's eminence as a moral leader for our country was recognized by every president since Richard Nixon. For over two decades the Rabbi's movement now has some 2000 institutions; educational, social, medical, all across the globe. We, (The United States Government) recognize the profound role that Rabbi Schneerson had in the expansion of those institutions.

Wills

There is considerable controversy within Chabad about Schneerson's will. Some speculate that two wills exist. Family and supporters of Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky claim that there exists a will signed by Schneerson which transfers stewardship of all the major Chabad institutions to Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky.[34] Others argue that there is no proof of such a will, and request that this will be made public if it is to be accepted. The second will, the rumor goes, gave the bulk of control to three senior Chabad rabbis, Rabbis Mindel, Piekarski, and Hodakov (contemporary and secretary of Schneerson) and gave Krinsky only a minor role. The only copy of this will, that was drafted by others, is unsigned. Rabbi Chaim Yehuda (Yudel) Krinsky (born 1933) is a Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic rabbi. ... Rabbi Chaim Mordechai Aizik Hodakov (1902-1993) was the chief of staff of the secretariat of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson for more than 40 years. ...


The first will, signed and dated February 14, 1988, transferred power over all Schneerson’s property and personal affects to Agudas Chasidei Chabad (AGUCH), naming Krinsky as sole executor.[34] Avrum Erlich, a Chabad chronicler and scholar summarises the dispute: Agudas Chasidei Chabad is the umbrella organization for the Chabad-Lubavitch movement. ...

After the [second] will was prepared, Schneerson said he would look it over before signing it, and that is apparently the last that was seen of it. Some Habad members believe that Schneerson never signed this will. . . others believe that even if the will was not signed, it is nevertheless indicative of his general view. There are still others who believe that a signed copy of the will exists, but was stolen from Schneerson’s drawer and hidden by an interested party who hopes to gain by its destruction.[34]

Succession

Chabad Hasidim believe that there is no successor to Schneerson and all the suggested successors declined the mantle of leadership in the days after his death. Chabad hasidim believe that he is still their leader, guiding them from beyond the grave through prayer and signs. There are those who believe that he will return as the Messiah; this view has led to controversy with other Orthodox groups and within Chabad itself. Some, quoting Talmudic passages and statements that Schneerson himself made, refuse to put the typical honorifics that Jews normally use for the dead after his name. Schneerson's messianism or divinity is not advocated in any of Chabad's official literature,[35][36] but such literature is published and distributed by people who hold that belief. Chabad-Lubavitch leaders have repeatedly condemned the Meshichists in the strongest possible terms.[37][38]


Followers believe that he is able to influence the decisions of his followers even after death and this is made most clear by the practice known as "iggerot kodesh", by which answers to questions are derived through mystical consultation of the published collections of Schneerson’s letters known as the Igrot Kodesh. [39] Igrot Kodesh (literally Holy Epistles but more commonly known as Letters of the Rebbe} is a collection of the seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch, Menachem Mendel Schneersons correspondence and responsa. ...


Political activities

Generally, Lubavitch tends to support more conservative politicians such as those who back school prayer, are anti-abortion, pro-Israel, and are generally supportive of Bible values, about which Schneerson was publicly vocal. School prayer in its most common usage refers to state sanctioned prayer by students in state schools. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


Israel

Schneerson never visited the State of Israel, where he had many admirers and critics. He held a view that according to Jewish law, it was uncertain if a Jewish person who was in the land of Israel was allowed to leave.[citation needed] One of Israel's presidents, Zalman Shazar, who was of Chabad ancestry, and his visits to Rabbi Schneerson were cordial. Menachem Begin, Ariel Sharon, and later Benjamin Netanyahu also paid visits and sought advice, along with other less famous politicians, diplomats, military officials, and media producers. In the elections that brought Yitzhak Shamir to power, Schneerson publicly lobbied his followers and the Orthodox members in the Knesset to vote against the Labor alignment. It attracted the media's attention and led to articles in Time, Newsweek, and many newspapers and TV programs, and led to considerable controversy within Israeli politics. Zalman Shazar (Shneiur Zalman Robshov) (24 November 1889 - October 5, 1974) was an author, poet and the third president of Israel (1963 - 1973). ...   (‎, August 16, 1913 – March 9, 1992) was a Jewish-Polish head of the Zionist underground group the Irgun, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and the first Likud Prime Minister of Israel. ...   (Hebrew: , also known by his diminutive Arik אָרִיק) (born February 27, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and general. ...   (Hebrew: בִּנְיָמִין נְתַנְיָהוּ (without niqqud: בנימין נתניהו), Hebrew transliteration written in English: Binyamin Netanyahu, nicknamed Bibi) (born October 21, 1949, Tel Aviv) was the 9th Prime Minister of Israel and is a leading figure in the Likud party. ...   (Hebrew יִצְחָק שָׁמִיר) (born October 15, 1915) was Prime Minister of Israel from 1983 to 1984 and again from 1986 to 1992. ... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... TV redirects here. ...


During the Six Day War in 1967 and the Yom Kippur War of 1973, Schneerson publicly called for Israel Defence Forces (IDF) to capture Damascus, Syria and Cairo, Egypt. He was vehemently opposed to any IDF withdrawals from captured territories and opposed any concessions to Arabs.[citation needed] He lobbied Israeli politicians to pass legislation in accordance with Jewish religious law on the question Who is a Jew and declare that "only one who is born of a Jewish mother or converted according to Halakha is Jewish." This caused a furor in the United States. Some American Jewish philanthropies stopped financially supporting Chabad-Lubavitch since most of their members were connected to Reform and Conservative Judaism. These unpopular ideas were toned down by his aides according to Avrum Erlich. "The issue was eventually quietened so as to protect Habad fundraising interests. Controversial issues such as territorial compromise in Israel that might have estranged benefactors from giving much-needed funds to Habad, were often moderated, particularly by. . . Krinsky."[40] Rabbi Immanuel Jakobovits argued that Habad moderated its presentation of anti-Zionist ideology and right-wing politics in England and downplayed its messianic fervor so as not to antagonize large parts of the English Jewish community.[40] The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... Combatants  Israel  Egypt,  Syria,  Iraq Commanders Moshe Dayan, David Elazar, Ariel Sharon, Shmuel Gonen, Benjamin Peled, Israel Tal, Rehavam Zeevi, Aharon Yariv, Yitzhak Hofi, Rafael Eitan, Abraham Adan, Yanush Ben Gal Saad El Shazly, Ahmad Ismail Ali, Hosni Mubarak, Mohammed Aly Fahmy, Anwar Sadat, Abdel Ghani el-Gammasy, Abdul Munim... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... Judaism is the Jewish religion, but Jews, religious or not, also form an ethnic group or nation. ... Reform Judaism can refer to (1) the largest denomination of American Jews and its sibling movements in other countries, (2) a branch of Judaism in the United Kingdom, and (3) the historical predecessor of the American movement that originated in 19th-century Germany. ... This article is about Conservative (Masorti) Judaism in the United States. ... Immanuel Jakobovits, Baron Jakobovits, KBE (8 February 1921–31 October 1999) was the Orthodox Judaism Chief Rabbi of Great Britain and the Commonwealth from 1967 to 1991. ...


Scholarship

Schneerson is known for delivering regular lengthy addresses at packed public gatherings touching on all areas of Torah, without using any notes. These talks usually centered around the weekly Torah portion, and were then transcribed and distributed widely. Many of them were later edited by him and distributed worldwide in small booklets later to be compiled in the monumental Likkutei Sichot set. (See choizer, meiniach.) He also authored a voluminous collection of replies to requests and questions both from followers and from non-followers. They touch on a wide array of topics. The majority of his correspondence is printed in Igrot Kodesh (Hebrew and Yiddish) and Letters from the Rebbe (English). His commentaries fill more than two hundred published volumes.[19] In Jewish services, the Torah is read over the course of a year, with one major portion read each week in the Sabbath morning service. ... Likkutei Sichos, lit. ... Choizer (Heb. ... Meiniach (Heb. ... Igrot Kodesh (literally Holy Epistles but more commonly known as Letters of the Rebbe} is a collection of the seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch, Menachem Mendel Schneersons correspondence and responsa. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


In biblical scholarship he was known for his achievements on the study of Rashi. He frequently used Rashi's commentary in his discourses.[41] In halachic matters he normally deferred to members of the Crown Heights Beit Din headed by Rabbi Zalman Shimon Dvorkin, and advised the movement to do likewise in the event of his death.[42] A 16th-century depiction of Rashi Note: For the astrological concept, see Rashi - the signs. ... Halakha (הלכה in Hebrew or Halakhah, Halacha, Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish law, custom and tradition regulating all aspects of behavior. ... Crown Heights is a neighborhood in Brooklyn in New York City. ... A Beit Din is a Jewish court of law comprised of three Jews. ...


References

  1. ^ Encyclopedia Judaica, Second Edition, Volume 18 page 149
  2. ^ About Chabad-Lubavitch
  3. ^ National Geographic Magazine February 2006
  4. ^ Chana Vilenkin, Zalman's daughter on "The Early Years Vol I". Jewish Educational Media 2006, segment Nikolaev, Russia 1902. (UPC 874780 000525)
  5. ^ Introduction Lekutei Levi Yitzchak Kehot Publications 1970
  6. ^ Schneerson, Chana, A Mother in Israel Kehot Publications 1983 (ISBN 08266-00999)page 13.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Ehrlich 2004, Chapter 4
  8. ^ Larger Than Life, Deutsch, S. S., vol. 2, pp. 125–145.
  9. ^ Larger Than Life, Deutsch, S. S., vol. 1, pp. 101–103, and vol. 2, p. 118
  10. ^ Selegson, Michoel A. Introduction to From Day to Day, English translation of the Hayom Yom (ISBN 08266-06695), Page A20.
  11. ^ (ISBN 0-9647243-0-8) Vol. II, p.134)
  12. ^ a b Kowalsky, Sholem B.. The Rebbe and the Rav. Chabad.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  13. ^ A Relationship from Berlin to New York (Windows Media Video) [Documentary]. Brooklyn, NY: Chabad.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  14. ^ a b The Rebbe in Berlin, Germany (Windows Media Video) [Documentary]. Brooklyn, NY: Chabad.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  15. ^ Kowalsky, Sholem B. From My Zaidy's House. Israel Book Shop, 2003 (ISBN 097023600X) page 274.
  16. ^ "Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik and Abraham Joshua Heschel on Jewish-Christian Relations" by Rabbi Reuven Kimelman
  17. ^ My Encounter with the Rebbe: The Early Years III (1938-1940), Jewish Educational Media, 2007
  18. ^ Last Sea Route From Lisbon to U.S. Stops Ticket Sale to Refugees, New York Times, March 15, 1941
  19. ^ a b Fishkoff, Sue. The Rebbe's Army, Schoken, 2003 (08052 11381). Page 73. Milton Fechtor, Wiring the Missouri, Jewish Educational Media.
  20. ^ Leadership in the HaBaD Movement, Avrum M. Ehrlich, Jason Aronson, January 6, 2000, ISBN 076576055X
  21. ^ Shevat 10: A Day of Two Rebbes
  22. ^ Raddock, Charles, The Jewish Forum, April, 1951
  23. ^ Kranzler, Gershon, Jewish Life, Sept.-Oct. 1951.
  24. ^ http://www.sichosinenglish.org/essays/01.htm
  25. ^ Hoffman 1991, p. 45
  26. ^ Hoffman 1991, p. 46
  27. ^ Hoffman 1991, p. 47
  28. ^ Cheshbono Shel Olam, Binyomin Lipkin (Machon HaSefer, Israel, 2000) p. 79
  29. ^ Hasid Dies in Stabbing; Black Protests Flare 2d Night in a Row By JOHN KIFNER New York Times (1857-Current file); Aug 21, 1991; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2003)pg. B1
  30. ^ The New York Times, June 13, 1994, p. A1
  31. ^ http://www.findagrave.com/php/famous.php?page=cem&FScemeteryid=65292
  32. ^ http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2003/04/20030411-2.html "Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A., 2003" by George W. Bush
  33. ^ Public Law 103-457
  34. ^ Cite error 8; No text given.
  35. ^ Chabad Gathering: No Jew Left Behind, The Jewish Week by Jonathan Mark 11/14/2007
  36. ^ Chabad's Global Warming The Jewish Week, December, 2005 by Mark, Jonathan. An online version of this article can be found at [1]
  37. ^ http://web.archive.org/web/20070216051535/http://www.thejewishweek.com/news/newscontent.php3?artid=9558
  38. ^ Chabad's Global Warming The Jewish Week, December, 2005 by Mark, Jonathan. An online version of this article can be found at [2]
  39. ^ The Messiah of Brooklyn: Understanding Lubavitch Hasidim Past and Present, M. Avrum Ehrlich, ch.18, note 14, KTAV Publishing, ISBN 0881258369
  40. ^ a b Ehrlich 2004, Chapter 14 notes
  41. ^ Ehrlich 2004, Chapter 8
  42. ^ Ehrlich 2004, Chapter 15 (also see note 10 Ibid.)

Hayom Yom (Hebrew: היום יום, Today is day . ... Chabad. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Windows Media Video (WMV) is a generic name for the set of video codec technologies developed by Microsoft. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Chabad. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Windows Media Video (WMV) is a generic name for the set of video codec technologies developed by Microsoft. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Chabad. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The skyline of Jersey City, as seen from Lower New York Bay. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ...

Books by Schneerson

Rabbi Schneerson himself wrote and published only three books:

  • Hayom Yom - An anthology of Chabad aphorisms and customs arranged according to the days of the year.
  • Haggadah Im Likkutei Taamim Uminhagim - The Haggadah with a commentary written by Schneerson.
  • Sefer HaToldot - Admur Moharash - Biography of the fourth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Shmuel Schneersohn.

His personal notes and writings: Hayom Yom (Hebrew: היום יום, Today is day . ... It has been suggested that Hasidic philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... Haggadah for Passover, 14th century Haggadah in Hebrew means Telling. ... Shmuel Schneersohn (or Rabbi Shmuel or Maharash) (1834–1882), was an Orthodox rabbi. ...

  • Reshimot - 10 volume set of Schneerson's personal journal discovered after his passing. Includes notes for his public talks before 1950, letters to Jewish scholars, notes on the Tanya, and thoughts on a wide range of Jewish subjects.(2,190pp)

His talks and letters, transcribed by others and then edited by him:

  • Likkutei Sichos - 39 volume set of Schneerson's discourses on the weekly Torah portions, Jewish Holidays, and other issues. (16,867pp)
  • Igrot Kodesh - 28 volume set of Schneerson's Hebrew and Yiddish letters. (11,948pp)
  • Hadran al HaRambam - Commentary on Mishneh Torah.
  • Sefer HaSichot - 10 volume set of the Schneerson's talks from 1987-1992. (4,136pp)
  • Sefer HaMa'amarim Melukot - 6 volumes of edited chassidic discourses.
  • Letters from the Rebbe - 5 volume set of Schneerson's English letters.
  • Chidushim UBiurim B'Shas - 3 volumes of novellae on the Talmud.

Unedited compilations of his talks and writings: Likkutei Sichos, lit. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... Jewish holiday, (or Yom Tom or chag or taanit in Hebrew) is a day that is holy to the Jewish people according to Judaism and is usually derived from the Hebrew Bible, specifically the Torah, and in some cases established by the rabbis in later eras. ... Igrot Kodesh (literally Holy Epistles but more commonly known as Letters of the Rebbe} is a collection of the seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch, Menachem Mendel Schneersons correspondence and responsa. ... Hadran al HaRambam is Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneersons commentary on Mishneh Torah. ... The Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazaka is a code of Jewish law by one of the most important Jewish authorities, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, better known as Maimonides or by the Hebrew abbreviation RaMBaM (usually written Rambam in English). ...

  • Sefer HaShlichut - 2 volume set of Schneerson's advice and guidelines to the shluchim he sent.
  • Torat Menachem - 34 volume Hebrew set of unedited Maamarim and Sichos currently spanning 1950-1962 (Approximately 4 new volumes a year). Planned to encompass 1950-1981.
  • Sichot Kodesh - 60 some volume Yiddish set of unedited Sichos from 1950-1981.
  • Torat Menachem Hitva'aduyot - 43 volume set of Sichos and Maamarim from 1982-1992. (Based on participants' recollections and notes, not proofread by Rabbi Schneerson.)
  • Sefer HaMa'amarim (unedited) chassidic discourses - Approx. 24 vols. including 1951-1962, 1969-1977 with plans to fill the rest.
  • Biurim LePirush Rashi - 5 volume set summarizing his talks on the commentary of Rashi to Torah.
  • Heichal Menachem - Shaarei - 34 volumes of a continuing series of his talks arranged by topic and holiday.
  • Toras Menachem - Tiferes Levi Yitzchok - 3 volumes of elucidations drawn from his talks on cryptic notes of his father.
  • Biurim LePirkei Avot - 2 volumes summarizing his talks on the Tractate of the Mishna "Ethics of our Fathers".
  • Yein Malchut - 2 volumes of talks on the Mishneh Torah.
  • Kol Ba'ei Olam - Discources and letters concerning the Noahide Campaign.
  • Hilchot Beit Habechira L`haRambam Im Chiddushim U`Beurim - Talks on the Laws of the Chosen House (The Holy Temple) of the Mishneh Torah.
  • HaMelech B'Msibo - 2 volumes of his discussions at the semi-public Holiday meals.
  • Toras Menachem - Menachem Tzion - 2 volumes of talks on mourning.

Collections and esoterica: Shaliach (שליח) is Hebrew for emissary. ... The Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazaka is a code of Jewish law by one of the most important Jewish authorities, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, better known as Maimonides or by the Hebrew abbreviation RaMBaM (usually written Rambam in English). ... The Noahide Campaign refers to a campaign by Orthodox Jews to influence all non-Jews to follow the Noahide Laws. ... The Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazaka is a code of Jewish law by one of the most important Jewish authorities, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, better known as Maimonides or by the Hebrew abbreviation RaMBaM (usually written Rambam in English). ...

  • Heichal Menachem - 3 volumes.
  • Mikdash Melech - 4 volumes.
  • Nelcha B'Orchosov
  • Mekadesh Yisrael - Talks and pictures from his officiating at weddings.
  • Yemei B'Reshit - Diary of the first year of his leadership, 1950-1951.
  • Bine'os Deshe - Diary of his visit and talks to Camp Gan Israel in upstate New York.

Esoterica continues to be released by individual families for family occasions such as weddings.


See also

Education and Sharing day is a day made by the United States Congress in honor of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneersons (1902-1994) efforts for education and sharing for Jews and non-Jews alike. ... For other uses, see Chabad (disambiguation). ...

External links

The Ohel
Works available online
Biography
Historical sites
Preceded by
Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn
Rebbe of Lubavitch
19511994
Succeeded by
N/A

OU logo. ... Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok (Joseph Isaac)[1] Schneersohn (1880 - 1950) was an Orthodox rabbi and the sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad Lubavitch chasidic movement. ... For the tanna, see Judah HaNasi. ... It has been suggested that Hasidic philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chabad-Lubavitch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4760 words)
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902-1994) the seventh Rebbe of Chabad Lubavitch.
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902-1994) was the seventh leader and the son-in-law of Rabbi Joseph Isaac Schneersohn (1880-1950).
On the Essence of Chasidus: A Chasidic Discourse by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson of Chabad-Lubavitch.
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