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Encyclopedia > Melville Fuller
Melville Weston Fuller
Melville Fuller

In office
October 8, 1888 – July 4, 1910
Nominated by Grover Cleveland
Preceded by Morrison Waite
Succeeded by Edward Douglass White

Born February 11, 1833
Augusta, Maine
Died July 4, 1910
Washington, DC

Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x1473, 85 KB) Copyright 1908, thus public domain. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For the film, see The American President (film). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Morrison Remick Waite (November 29, 1816 – March 23, 1888) was the Chief Justice of the United States from 1874 to 1888. ... Edward Douglass White (November 3, 1845 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States Senator, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Official website: www. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ...


Fuller was born in Augusta, Maine. He attended college at Harvard University for one year before graduating from Bowdoin College in 1853. Both his maternal grandfather, Nathan Weston and paternal grandfather, Henry Weld Fuller were judges. His father was a well-known lawyer. His parents divorced shortly after his birth, and he was raised by Nathan Weston. Nickname: Motto: Official website: www. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Bowdoin College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1794, located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ...


After finishing school, he studied law under the direction of an uncle. In 1855, he went into partnership with another uncle. He also became the editor of The Age, a leading Democratic newspaper in Maine. Soon he tired of Maine and moved to Chicago. In 1860, he managed Democrat Stephen Douglas' campaign for the Presidency of the United States This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Illinois largest city. ... Stephen A. Douglas Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 - June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ...


At the time, Chicago was becoming the gateway to the West. Railroads had just linked it to the east. Fuller built a law practice in Chicago. Within two years, he appeared before the Supreme Court of Illinois in the case of Beach v. Derby. He became a leading attorney in the city. He first appeared before the United States Supreme Court in the case of Traders' Bank v. Campbell. He also argued the case of Tappan v. the Merchants' National Bank of Chicago, which was the first case heard by Chief Justice Morrison Waite, whom he would later replace. This article is about Illinois largest city. ... Supreme Court of Illinois is the apex court of judicature of the state of Illinois, United States of America. ... Morrison Remick Waite (November 29, 1816 – March 23, 1888) was the Chief Justice of the United States from 1874 to 1888. ...


He was a minor figure in Illinois politics. He spent one term in the Illinois House of Representatives and was a delegate at the national Democratic Conventions of 1864, 1872, 1876, and 1880. In 1876, he made the nominating speech for Thomas Hendricks, for the Democratic electoral vote for President. After his inauguration as President, Grover Cleveland tried to make Fuller chairman of the Civil Service Commission, but he declined. President Grover Cleveland tried to persuade Fuller to be Solicitor General of the United States, but Fuller turned down the second offer for a government job. Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Illinois House of Representatives convenes at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual tasked with arguing for the United States Government in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, when the government is party to a case. ...


President Grover Cleveland nominated him for the Chief Justice position when Morrison Waite died in 1888. Fuller was not the first man to be mentioned as Chief Justice nominee, the former minister to Great Britain Edward J. Phelps was perceived as front-runner for the SCOTUS nomination. Fuller´s nomination was tepidly received in the Senate. However, he was eventually confirmed by a vote of 41 to 20, with nine Republicans voting with the Democrats to confirm. For the film, see The American President (film). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Morrison Remick Waite (November 29, 1816 – March 23, 1888) was the Chief Justice of the United States from 1874 to 1888. ...

Chief Justice Fuller administering the oath to William McKinley as president in 1897. Out going president, Grover Cleveland, stands to the right.
Chief Justice Fuller administering the oath to William McKinley as president in 1897. Out going president, Grover Cleveland, stands to the right.

On the bench, he oversaw a number of important opinions. He declared the income tax law unconstitutional. In Western Union Telegraph Company v. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania he ruled that states could not tax interstate telegraph messages. He struck a blow against government antitrust legislation with the 1895 case United States v. E. C. Knight Co.. In Fuller's majority decision, he found that the refining of sugar by a company within the boundaries of one state could not be held to be in restraint of interstate commerce under the terms of the 1890 Sherman Antitrust Act, regardless of the product's final market share. (E.C. Knight Company's owner, the American Sugar Refining Company, controlled more than 90% of sugar production at the time). He sided with the 8-man majority ruling in favor of "separate but equal" segregation in Plessy v. Ferguson. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (843x524, 35 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (843x524, 35 KB) http://hdl. ... William McKinley, Jr. ... For the film, see The American President (film). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income of persons, corporations or other legal entities. ... Antitrust laws, or competition laws, are laws which prohibit anti-competitive behavior and unfair business practices. ... Holding Manufacturing is not considered an area that can be regulated by Congress pursuant to the commerce clause. ... The Sherman Antitrust Act, formally known as the Act of July 2, 1890, ch. ... Separate but equal was a policy enacted into law throughout the U.S. Southern states during the period of segregation, in which African Americans and Americans of European descent would receive the same services (schools, hospitals, water fountains, bathrooms, etc. ... Holding The separate but equal provision of public accommodations by state governments is constitutional under the Equal Protection Clause. ...


In 1893, he turned down an offer from President-Elect Grover Cleveland to serve as Secretary of State; it was the third time he turned down a government job offer from Cleveland. Seal of the United States Department of State. ...


As Chief Justice, he inaugurated five Presidents (Benjamin Harrison, Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft) Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. ... William McKinley, Jr. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early twentieth century, a chaired professor at Yale Law...


He also served on the Arbitration Commission in Paris in 1899 to resolve a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...


He was said to closely resemble Mark Twain. Once, when the humorist was stopped on the street, a passerby demanded the Chief Justice's autograph. Twain supposedly wrote: Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ...

It is delicious to be full, but it is heavenly to be Fuller. I am cordially yours, Melville W. Fuller.

He was married twice. He married Calista Reynolds in 1858; she died in 1864. He married Mary Coolbaugh in 1866. He had six daughters.


See also

This is a chronological list of notable cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the tenures of Chief Justices John Jay, John Rutledge, Oliver Ellsworth, John Marshall, Roger Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Morrison Waite, Melville Fuller, Edward Douglass White, and William Howard Taft (October 19, 1789 through February...

Further reading

  • Melville Weston Fuller Chief Justice of the United States 1888-1910, by Willard L. King, (MacMillan, 1950) B0006ASCMC
  • The Chief Justiceship of Melville W. Fuller, 1888-1910 by James W. Ely (University of South Carolin Press, 1995).
Preceded by
Morrison Waite
Chief Justice of the United States
October 8, 1888July 4, 1910
Succeeded by
Edward Douglass White
The Fuller Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
1888–1889: S.F. Miller | S.J. Field | J.P. Bradley | J.M. Harlan | Th. S. Matthews | H. Gray | S. Blatchford | L.Q.C. Lamar II
1890–1891: S.J. Field | J.P. Bradley | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | S. Blatchford | L.Q.C. Lamar II | D.J. Brewer
1891–1892: S.J. Field | J.P. Bradley | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | S. Blatchford | L.Q.C. Lamar II | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown
1892–1893: S.J. Field | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | S. Blatchford | L.Q.C. Lamar II | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr.
1893: S.J. Field | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | S. Blatchford | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | H.E. Jackson
1894–1895: S.J. Field | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | H.E. Jackson | E.D. White
1896–1897: S.J. Field | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham
1898–1902: J. M. Harlan | H. Gray | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna
1902–1903: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes
1903–1906: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day
1906–1909: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody
January–March 1910: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | E.D. White | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody | H.H. Lurton
March–July 1910: J. M. Harlan | E.D. White | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody | H.H. Lurton

  Results from FactBites:
 
Melville Fuller - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (606 words)
Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910.
In Fuller's majority decision, he found that the refining of sugar by a company within the boundaries of one state could not be held to be in restraint of interstate commerce under the terms of the 1890 Sherman Antitrust Act, regardless of the product's final market share.
The Chief Justiceship of Melville W. Fuller, 1888-1910 by James W. Ely (University of South Carolin Press, 1995).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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