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Encyclopedia > Melody
Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

In music, a melody, also tune, voice, or line, is a series of linear events or a succession, not a simultaneity as in a chord (see harmony). However, this succession must contain change of some kind and be perceived as a single entity (possibly Gestalt) to be called a melody. Most specifically this includes patterns of changing pitches and durations, while most generally it includes any interacting patterns of changing events or quality. "Melody is said to result where there are interacting patterns of changing events occurring in time."[1] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Linear (disambiguation). ... Succession is the act or process of pooing or of following in order or sequence. ... Simultaneity is the property of two events happening at the same time in at least ONE Reference frame. ... Typical fingering for a second inversion C major chord on a guitar. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Look up gestalt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... A duration is an amount of time or a particular time interval. ... For the Talib Kweli album Quality (album) Quality can refer to a. ...


Change is necessary for events "to be understood as related or unrelated." Melodies often consist of one or more musical phrases, motifs, and are usually repeated throughout a song or piece in various forms. Melodies may also be described by their melodic motion or the pitches or the intervals between pitches (predominantly conjuct or disjunct or with further restrictions), pitch range, tension and release, continuity and coherence, cadence, and shape. "Many extant explanations [of melody] confine us [sic] to specific stylistic models, and they are too exclusive."[1] In music a phrase (Greek φράση, sentence, expression, see also strophe) is a section of music that is relatively self contained and coherent over a medium time scale. ... In music, a motif is a perceivable or salient reoccurring fragment or succession of notes that may used to construct the entirety or parts of complete melodies, themes. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... A musical piece is a composed work of music that is intended for performance or reproduction (for recorded works) and has a creator. ... Melodic motion is the nearness or farness of successive pitches or notes in a melody. ... In music theory, the term interval describes the difference in pitch between two notes. ... In music, tension is the perceived need for relaxation or release created by a listeners expectations. ... In Western musical theory a cadence (Latin cadentia, a falling) is a particular series of intervals or chords that ends a phrase, section, or piece of music. ...

Contents

What melody does

Since melody is mostly a part of the musical foreground, it is one of the easiest aspects of music to perceive and remember. Melody gives a piece of music richness and character. Melody also helps the listener remember and identify music. In most cases, it is the melody of a song that is the most memorable part. The aspects of music are any characteristic, dimension, or element taken as a part or component of music. ...


Elements

The melodies in most European music written before the 20th century features recurring "events, often periodic, at all structural levels" and "recurrence of durations and patterns of durations" are also important in 20th century music.[1]


While in the 20th century pitch includes "those aspects of sound that are classed as having highness or lowness" earlier music included almost exclusively sounds having "fixed and easily discernible frequency patterns" and composers have "utilized a greater variety of pitch resources than has been the custom in any other historical period of Western music." While materials from the diatonic scale are still used, the eight-tone scale became "widely employed."[1] In music theory, a diatonic scale (from the Greek diatonikos, to stretch out; also known as the heptatonia prima; set form 7-35) is a seven-note musical scale comprising five whole-tone and two half-tone steps, in which the half tones are maximally separated. ... The chromatic scale is a scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone or half step apart. ...


DeLone states "The essential elements of any melody are duration, pitch, and quality [timbre, texture, and loudness].".[1] However, quality is not an essential element of melody, as the same melody is recognizable when played with a wide variety of timbres, textures, and loudness. In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ...


Melodies in the 20th century where increasingly reliant "upon the qualitative dimensions" with those dimensions "in pre-twentieth century music were almost exclusively reserved for pitch and rhythm" such as being an "element of linear ordering" rather than a highlight to "the more predominant pitch and rhythmic aspects." See Klangfarbenmelodie and Musique concrète.[1] Klangfarbenmelodie (German for sound-color-melody) is a musical technique that involves breaking up a musical line or melody out from one instrument to between several instruments. ... Musique concrète (French; literally, concrete music), is a style of avant-garde music that relies on natural environmental sounds and other non-musical noises to create music. ...


Examples

Different musical styles use melody in different ways. For example: Musical genres are categories which contain music which share a certain style or which have certain elements in common. ...

  • Rock music, melodic death/power metal, melodic music, and other forms of popular music and folk music tend to pick one or two melodies (verse and chorus)stick with them; much variety may occur in the phrasing and lyrics. "Gino Stefani makes appropriation the chief criterion for his 'popular' definition of melody (Stefani 1987a). Melody, he argues, is music 'at hand'; it is that dimension which the common musical competence extracts (often with little respect for the integrity of the source), appropriates and uses for a variety of purposes: singing, whistling, dancing, and so on."[citation needed]
  • In western classical music, composers often introduce an initial melody, or theme, and then create variations. Classical music often has several melodic layers, called polyphony, such as those in a fugue, a type of counterpoint. Often melodies are constructed from motifs or short melodic fragments, such as the opening of Beethoven's Fifth. Richard Wagner popularized the concept of a leitmotif: a motif or melody associated with a certain idea, person or place.
Melody from Anton Webern's Variations for Orchestra, Op. 30 (pp. 23-24)
Melody from Anton Webern's Variations for Orchestra, Op. 30 (pp. 23-24)
  • Balinese gamelan music often uses complicated variations and alterations of a single melody played simultaneously, called heterophony.

For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Melodic death metal, (also referred to as Gothenburg metal, melodeath, and post-death) is a subgenre of death metal. ... Power metal is a style of heavy metal music typically with the aim of evoking an epic feel, combining characteristics of traditional metal with thrash metal or speed metal, often within symphonic context. ... Melodic music is a term that covers various genres of non-classical music which are primarily characterised by the dominance of a single strong melody line. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... Folk song redirects here. ... The structures or musical forms of songs in popular music are typically sectional forms, such as strophic form. ... A refrain (from the Old French refraindre to repeat, likely from Vulgar Latin refringere) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the chorus of a song. ... ... Look up lyrics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x186, 7 KB)Pop Goes the Weasel melody Created by Hyacinth using Sibelius and Paint. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x186, 7 KB)Pop Goes the Weasel melody Created by Hyacinth using Sibelius and Paint. ... This article is about the nursery rhyme. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... In music, a theme is the initial or primary melody. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... In music, a fugue (IPA: ) is a type of contrapuntal composition or technique of composition for a fixed number of parts, normally referred to as voices, irrespective of whether the work is vocal or instrumental. ... For other uses, see Counterpoint (disambiguation). ... In music, a motif is a perceivable or salient reoccurring fragment or succession of notes that may used to construct the entirety or parts of complete melodies, themes. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... A leitmotif (IPA pronunciation: ) (also leitmotiv; lit. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... In music the common practice period is a long period in western musical history spanning from before the classical era proper to today, dated, on the outside, as 1600-1900. ... In the broadest sense, contemporary music is any music being written in the present day. ... Musique concrète is the name given to a class of electronic music produced from editing together fragments of natural and industrial sounds. ... Klangfarbenmelodie (German for sound-color-melody) is a musical technique that involves breaking up a musical line or melody out from one instrument to between several instruments. ... Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. ... Ruth Crawford-Seeger (July 3, 1901 in East Liverpool, Ohio - November 18, 1953 in Chevy Chase, Maryland), born Ruth Porter Crawford, was a modernist composer. ... Ruth Crawfords String Quartet (1931) is regarded as one of the finest modernist works of the genre (Hisama 2001, p. ... Orchestration is the study or practice of writing music for orchestra (or, more loosely, for any musical ensemble) or of adapting for orchestra music composed for another medium. ... “Ligeti” redirects here. ... Phonetic (pho-NET-ic) is a nationwide voicemail-to-text messaging service available for most digital mobile phones in which a subscriber is provided a custom voice mailbox for the purpose of receiving all incoming voice messages as actual transcribed text for reading via short messaging (also known as SMS... For other uses, see Linear (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (866x141, 7 KB)Anton Weberns Variations for Orchestra, Op. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (866x141, 7 KB)Anton Weberns Variations for Orchestra, Op. ... Anton Webern (December 3, 1883 – September 15, 1945) was an Austrian composer and conductor. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Indian music is: The music of India or Native American music This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film). ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... This article is about the Indonesian island. ... Gamelan - Indonesian Embassy in Canberra A gamelan is a kind of musical ensemble of Indonesia typically featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones, xylophones, drums, and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked strings, and vocalists may also be included. ... Look up heterophony in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

See also

In music unified field is often used to refer to the unity of musical space created by the free use of melodic as harmonic and harmonic as melodic material. ... The Parsons code, formally named the Parsons Code for Melodic Contours, is a simple notation used to identify a piece of music through melodic motion—the motion of the pitch up and down. ... Melodic motion is the nearness or farness of successive pitches or notes in a melody. ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ...

Further reading

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Melody
  • Apel, Willi. Harvard Dictionary of Music, 2nd edition, p.517-19. Includes "a capsule definition of melody." (Delone et al 1975, p.270)
  • Edwards, Arthur C. The Art of Melody, p.xix-xxx. Includes "a catalog of sample definitions." (ibid)
  • Holst, Imogen. Tune, Faber and Faber, London, 1962.
  • Smits van Waesberghe, J. A Textbook of Melody. Includes "an attempt to formulate a theory of melody." (ibid)

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f *DeLone et al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music, chap. 4, p.270-301. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. ISBN 0-13-049346-5.

External links

  • Melodyhound: A Search Engine for Melodies
  • Tunespotting: Another Search Engine for Melodies
  • DoDoSoSo: Yet another Search Engine for Melodies
  • Carry A Tune Week List of Tunes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Melody Assistant (446 words)
Melody Assistant is dedicated to music writing, printing and rendering.
Melody Assistant comes with its own embedded software synthesizer (SoftSynth), which provides high quality output on basic sound cards, even without any external MIDI device, and includes hundreds of different instruments.
Melody Assistant is a shareware program, which means you can use it for free, with no limit in time, and pay a fee (US$ 20 or 20 euros), only if it matches your expectations.
NVIDIA Melody (130 words)
NVIDIA Melody creates high quality normal maps that make a low-poly model look like a high-poly model.
A command line version is provided to help you integrate Melody in your content creation pipeline.
This allows Melody to generate normal maps for significantly larger models.
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