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Encyclopedia > Mellotron

The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. Image File history File links Mellotron. ... Polyphony is the property of an electronic musical instrument which describes how many notes it can sound at one time. ... This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...


The Mellotron supervenes the Chamberlin, which was the world's first sample-playback keyboard. The heart of the instrument is a bank of magnetic audio tapes (which are parallel linear, not looped as has sometimes been reported or presumed). Each tape has approximately eight seconds of playing time. Playback heads (underneath each key) enable the playing of pre-recorded sounds. The Chamberlin is an electro-mechanical keyboard instrument related to the Mellotron. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ...


The earlier MKI and MKII models contained two side-by-side keyboards: On the right keyboard were 18 selectable "lead/instrument" sounds (such as strings, flutes, and brass instruments). The left keyboard played pre-recorded musical rhythm tracks (in various styles). A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... â™  This article is about the family of musical instruments. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ...


The tape banks for the later, lighter-weight M400 models contain only 3 selectable sounds such as strings, cello, and the famous eight-voice choir. The sound on each individual tape piece was recorded at the pitch of the key to which it was assigned. To make up for the fewer sounds available, the M400 tapes came in a removable frame, which allowed for relatively quick changes to new racks of sounds. This article is about the stringed musical instrument. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Although tape samplers had been explored in research studios (e.g., Hugh LeCaine's 1955 keyboard-controlled "Special Purpose Tape Recorder", which he used when recording his classic "Dripsody"), the first commercially available keyboard-driven tape instruments were built and sold by California-based Harry Chamberlin from 1948 through the 1970s. Hugh LeCaine (1914 - 1977) was a Canadian inventor, scientist, and composer who was a pioneer in the design of electronic musical instruments, and is generally known as the father of Canadian electronic music. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Chamberlin is an electro-mechanical keyboard instrument related to the Mellotron. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Things really took off, however, when Chamberlin's sales agent, Bill Fransen, brought two of Chamberlin's instruments to England in 1962 to search for someone who could manufacture 70 matching tape heads for future Chamberlins. Initially, Harry Chamberlin was not happy with the fact that someone overseas was basically "copying" his idea, and that one of his own people (Bill Fransen) was the reason for this. He eventually founded a UK company that was skilled enough to develop the idea further and a deal was struck with Bill and Lesley Bradley of tape recorder company Bradmatic Ltd. This resulted in the formation of a subsidiary company named Mellotronics, which produced the first Mellotrons in Aston, Birmingham, England. Bradmatic later took on the name Streetly Electronics. Many years later, following financial and trademark troubles, the Mellotron name became unavailable and later instruments were sold under the name Novatron. A small number of the instruments were assembled and sold by EMI under license. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aston is an area of the City of Birmingham, in the West Midlands of England. ... This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ...


Through the late 1970s, the Mellotron had a major impact on rock music, particularly the 35 note (G-F) model M400. The M400 version was released in 1970 and sold over 1800 units, becoming a trademark sound of the era's progressive bands. The novel characteristics of the instrument attracted a number of celebrities, and among the early Mellotron owners were Princess Margaret, Peter Sellers, King Hussein of Jordan and Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard.[citation needed] Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... HRH The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret (Margaret Rose Armstrong-Jones, née Windsor; (August 21, 1930—February 9, 2002) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and sister of the... Peter Sellers, CBE (8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was a British comedian and actor best known for his three roles in Dr. Strangelove and as Inspector Clouseau in The Pink Panther films. ... Hussein bin Talal (Arabic: حسين بن طلال) (November 14, 1935 - February 7, 1999) was the King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan from 1952 to 1999. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was an American author in numerous pulp fiction genres[2][3][4][5] as well as a prolific writer of non-fiction[6][7] works, creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ...


Mellotrons were normally pre-loaded with string instrument and orchestral sounds, although the tape bank could be removed with relative ease by the owner and loaded with banks containing different sounds including percussion loops, sound effects, or synthesizer-generated sounds, to generate polyphonic electronically generated sounds in the days before polyphonic synthesizers. Sound effects or audio effects are artificially created or enhanced sounds, or sound processes used to emphasize artistic or other content of movies, video games, music, or other media. ... For other uses, see Synthesizer (disambiguation). ... In music, the word texture is often used in a rather vague way in reference to the overall sound of a piece of music. ...

Beneath every key is a disengaged tape head and roller.
Beneath every key is a disengaged tape head and roller.
Depressed key engages tape head and roller.
Depressed key engages tape head and roller.

The unique sound of the Mellotron is produced by a combination of characteristics: Among these are tape replay artifacts such as wow and flutter, the result being that each time a note is played, it is slightly different from the previous time it was played (a bit like a conventional instrument). The notes also interact with each other so that chords or even just pairs of notes have an extremely powerful sound. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 641 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (763 × 714 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image was (or all images in this article or category were) uploaded in the JPEG format. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 641 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (763 × 714 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image was (or all images in this article or category were) uploaded in the JPEG format. ... Image File history File links Mellotron2. ... Image File history File links Mellotron2. ... Wow is a relatively slow form of flutter (pitch variation) which can affect both gramophone records and audio cassettes. ... Flutter: In electronics, rapid variation of signal parameters, such as amplitude, phase, and frequency. ...


Another factor in the strangely haunting quality of the Mellotron's most frequently-heard sounds is that the individual notes were recorded in isolation. For a musician accustomed to playing in an orchestral setting, this was unusual, and meant that he/she had nothing against which to intonate. Thus, the temperament of the Mellotron is always somewhat questionable when it is used in the context of other instruments. Perhaps for this reason, and perhaps also to allow easy transposition of the instrument's limited range, the pitch control is placed closest to the keyboard on the M400 model.


This temperament issue has led to the Mellotron being regarded, rather unfairly, as a difficult instrument to tune. There certainly could be mechanical problems that would also contribute to this. The original varispeed servo design was poor, for instance, but later improved dramatically. The tapes would stick inside their frames and refuse to rewind if the frame became distorted due to careless handling of the machine. Properly maintained though, the machines behave a lot better than their reputation suggests.


Although they enabled many bands to perform string, brass and choir arrangements, which had been previously impossible to recreate live, Mellotrons were not without their disadvantages. Above all, they were very expensive. They sold for £1,000 in the mid-1960s, and the official Mellotron site gives the 1973 list price as US $5200. Like the Hammond organ, they were a roadie's nightmare: heavy, bulky and fragile. After years of touring with Mellotrons, Robert Fripp formulated a rule: "Tuning a mellotron doesn't." The tape banks were also notoriously prone to breakages & jams and those groups who could afford to (like Yes) typically took 2 Mellotrons on tour to cope with the inevitable breakdowns. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The road crew (or roadies) are the technicians who travel on tour, usually in sleeper buses, with musicians and who handle every part of the production except actually playing the music. ... Robert Fripp (born 16 May 1946 in Wimborne Minster, Dorset, England) is a guitarist, record producer and a composer, perhaps best known for being the guitarist for, and only constant member of King Crimson. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The original Mellotrons (MkI/MkII) were not intended to be portable (they often become misaligned when jostled even lightly), but later models such as the M300, M400 and MkV were designed for portability. All models, when installed permanently in a studio, provided a very realistic effect. An example of this can be found on Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road album. Despite these shortcomings, Mellotrons were prized for their unique sound, and they helped pave the way for the later sampler. Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is the seventh studio album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1973. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ...


In the 1990s, a Calgary-based company began producing new Mellotrons. These new MkVI Mellotrons were similar to the M400, with some modifications. The company also released sample discs featuring wav files of each individual note sampled from an original Mellotron. These files, when played using a sampler, enable keyboardists to recreate the sound of the original Mellotrons using cheaper and more reliable modern keyboards. Bands such as Counting Crows and The Musical Box have toured using these sampled Mellotrons to avoid the inconvenience of transporting and maintaining original Mellotrons on the road. This article is about the Canadian city. ... WAV (or WAVE), short for Waveform audio format, is a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing audio on PCs. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ... Counting Crows is an American Folk Rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... The Musical Box is a Canadian band founded in 1993 known for staging near-perfect recreations of famous Genesis shows from the 1972-1975 era. ...


The Mellotron in popular music

British multi-instrumentalist Graham Bond may have been the first "rock" musician to record with a Mellotron, beginning in 1965. A year later, The Beatles used it prominently on their groundbreaking single "Strawberry Fields Forever" (recorded November-December 1966). However, it was Mike Pinder of the Moody Blues who brought the Mellotron to the forefront of popular music with the 1967 album Days of Future Passed in songs including "Nights in White Satin" and "Tuesday Afternoon". Pinder, who worked for Mellotron for 18 months before joining The Moody Blues, actually suggested to The Beatles that they use a Mellotron. Pinder made regular use of the instrument on The Moody Blues' studio albums from 1967 through 1971. Their 1972 album Seventh Sojourn employed the Mellotron's predecessor, the Chamberlin. Graham John Clifton Bond (28 October 1937 in Romford, Essex, England – 8 May 1974 at Finsbury Park station, Finsbury Park, North London, England) was an English musician, considered a founding father of the English rhythm and blues boom of the 1960s. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... Alternate CD Cover Released in 1990 by Polydor as Deram 820 006-2. ... Nights in White Satin is a 1967 song by The Moody Blues, first featured on the album Days of Future Passed. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... Seventh Sojourn, released in 1972, was the eighth album released by The Moody Blues. ... The Chamberlin is an electro-mechanical keyboard instrument related to the Mellotron. ...


The Mellotron was also used by The Zombies ("Changes"), Donovan ("Celeste"), Manfred Mann (several Mike D'abo-era recordings, including "So Long Dad" and "Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James"), Lynyrd Skynyrd ("Tuesday's Gone"), The Rolling Stones ("2000 Light Years from Home"), The Bee Gees ("World", "Every Christian Lion-Hearted Man Will Show You"), Traffic ("House for Everyone", "Hole In My Shoe"), Pink Floyd ("A Saucerful of Secrets", "Julia Dream", "Sysyphus" and "Atom Heart Mother"), Procol Harum ("Magdalene (My Regal Zonophone)"), The Left Banke's "Myrah", Marvin Gaye's Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology), Big Star ("Kangaroo", played by producer Jim Dickinson) and others during the psychedelic era. The Kinks featured the instrument prominently in their recordings between 1967 and 1969, most obviously on 1968's "Phenomenal Cat," from The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society. The Zombies, formed in 1961 in St Albans, were an English rock band. ... Donovan (Donovan Philips Leitch, born May 10, 1946, in Maryhill, Glasgow) is a Scottish singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lĕh-nérd skin-nérd) (or IPA pronunciation: ) is an iconic U.S. Southern rock band. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... 2000 Light Years From Home is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1967 psychedelic rock album, Their Satanic Majesties Request. ... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... Traffic was a rock band from Birmingham, England, formed in late 1966 by Steve Winwood with Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood and Dave Mason. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is a multi-part instrumental by the rock band Pink Floyd from an album of the same name, released in 1968. ... Julia Dream is the b-side of the Pink Floyd single It Would Be So Nice. It was later released in the compilation album Relics, as well as on The Early Singles disc included in the Shine On boxed set. ... Sysyphus is a four part suite written by progressive rock band Pink Floyds keyboardist Rick Wright. ... Atom Heart Mother is a six-part suite by progressive rock band Pink Floyd, composed by the whole band and Ron Geesin. ... Procol Harum is an English rock band, formed in the 1960s, who built a heavy foundation for what would become progressive rock. ... The Left Banke was an American 1960s pop-music group which produced two hit singles, Walk Away Renee and Pretty Ballerina. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) was the second single off Marvin Gayes legendary 1971 album, Whats Going On. ... Big Star is an American rock and roll band of the early 1970s whose work is often cited as a prime example of power pop. ... Jim Dickinson is an American record producer, pianist and singer. ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society is a pop-rock album released by the English music group The Kinks on November 22, 1968. ...


The Mellotron was widely used to provide backing keyboard accompaniment by many of the progressive rock groups of the 1970s and, alongside the venerable Hammond organ, it was crucial to shaping the sound of the genre. It has been featured on the following albums (not an exhaustive list): Once Again by Barclay James Harvest, Grave New World by Strawbs, In the Court of the Crimson King by King Crimson, Space Oddity, Hunky Dory, and Diamond Dogs by David Bowie, 2112 by Rush, I Robot by The Alan Parsons Project, Fragile and Close to the Edge by Yes, and Nursery Cryme, Genesis Live, Foxtrot, Selling England by the Pound, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, A Trick of the Tail, Wind & Wuthering and Seconds Out by Genesis. Tony Banks, keyboard player for Genesis, best exemplified the dark, unsettling sounds of the Mellotron in the songs, The Fountain of Salmacis, Blood on the Rooftops, and the outro to the bonafide Mellotron classic Entangled. Especially haunting was the chorus used on Los Endos on A Trick of the Tail, and the famous introduction to Watcher of the Skies. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Once Again was the second album released by Barclay James Harvest, in early 1971. ... Barclay James Harvest is a British rock band specialising in Symphonic/Melodic Rock with folk/progressive/classical influences. ... Grave New World is a studio album by English band The Strawbs. ... The Strawbs are a rock band founded in 1964 in England. ... In the Court of the Crimson King is the 1969 debut album by the British progressive rock group King Crimson. ... This article is about the musical group. ... Space Oddity is a song written and performed by David Bowie and released as a single in 1969. ... Hunky Dory is David Bowies fourth album, released by RCA in 1971. ... Diamond Dogs is a concept album by David Bowie, originally released by RCA in 1974. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... For the year 2112, see 22nd century. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... I Robot is a progressive rock album recorded by The Alan Parsons Project, engineered by Alan Parsons and Eric Woolfson in 1976. ... This article is about the collective named The Alan Parsons Project. ... Fragile is the fourth album by British progressive rock band Yes. ... Close to the Edge is the fifth album by British progressive rock band Yes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nursery Cryme is the third studio album by Genesis and was recorded and released in 1971. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Foxtrot is the fourth studio album by British progressive rock band Genesis and the second from the classic lineup of Peter Gabriel, Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford, Phil Collins, and Steve Hackett. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Trick of the Tail was the seventh studio album by progressive rock band Genesis and the first to feature Phil Collins as full-time lead vocalist following the departure of original vocalist Peter Gabriel. ... Wind & Wuthering is a studio album by British progressive rock band Genesis, originally released in 1977. ... Seconds Out is a live double album by Genesis, released in October 1977. ... Genesis is an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Quantum entanglement is a quantum mechanical phenomenon in which the quantum states of two or more objects have to be described with reference to each other, even though the individual objects may be spatially separated. ... Los Endos is an instrumental piece by English progressive rock band Genesis from their 1976 album A Trick of the Tail. ... A Trick of the Tail was the seventh studio album by progressive rock band Genesis and the first to feature Phil Collins as full-time lead vocalist following the departure of original vocalist Peter Gabriel. ... Watcher of the Skies is the opening track on Genesis groundbreaking 1972 album Foxtrot. ...


Led Zeppelin used a Mellotron to recreate the recorder arrangement for live performances of "Stairway to Heaven", and is featured prominently on "The Rain Song" from Houses of the Holy. It was also used extensively by pioneering German electronic band Tangerine Dream through their prime, including solo work by Edgar Froese. The Tangerine Dream albums Phaedra, Rubycon, Ricochet, and Encore as well as Froese's Epsilon in Malaysian Pale provide excellent examples of Mellotron playing. Another example of the Mellotron's unique sounds can be heard on Immediate Curtain, played by former Soft Machine-percussionist Robert Wyatt on the first album of his second band Matching Mole. The Pillory, recorded in 1977 by American musician & composer Jasun Martz, is often considered the "Holy Grail" of Mellotron releases. ref: * [1] For the bands 1969 self-titled debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... For other uses of Stairway to Heaven, see Stairway to Heaven (disambiguation). ... The Rain Song is a song from English rock band Led Zeppelins fifth album Houses of the Holy, released in 1973. ... Houses of the Holy is an album by English rock band Led Zeppelin released by Atlantic Records on March 28, 1973 (see 1973 in music). ... Tangerine Dream is a German electronic music group founded in 1967 by Edgar Froese. ... Edgar W. Froese (born June 6, 1944) is an artist and electronic music pioneer, best known for co-founding the electronic music act Tangerine Dream. ... Tangerine Dream is a German electronic music group founded in 1967 by Edgar Froese. ... Phaedra can refer to: The mythological figure Phaedra. ... Rubycon is a Japanese company that makes, among other electronic components, Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... Encore may be referring to one of the following: Adobe Encore, a software program by Adobe Systems intended for authoring DVDs. ... Immediate Curtain is the final track on the first album of the English rockband Matching Mole, an instrumental piece by composed and performed by Robert Wyatt in 1972. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... Robert Wyatt (born Robert Wyatt-Ellidge, 28 January 1945, in Bristol) is an English musician, and a former member of the influential Canterbury scene band Soft Machine. ... -1... http://en. ...


The advent of cheaper and more reliable polysynths and preset 'string machines' saw the Mellotron's popularity wane by the end of the 1970s. Following the impact of punk, the Mellotron tended to be viewed as a relic of a pompous era. By 1980, Switzerland's progressive rock band Flame Dream used the Mellotron on all 6 of their Vertigo, Phonogram albums; and its status had diminished to the extent that Captain Beefheart was able to reappropriate it almost as an archaic "found instrument". One of the few UK post-punk bands to utilise its sounds were Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, who featured it heavily on their platinum-selling Architecture & Morality album (1981). Don Van Vliet (born Don Glen Vliet on January 15, 1941, in Glendale, California, USA) is a musician and visual artist, best known by the pseudonym Captain Beefheart. ... Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (often abbreviated to OMD) are a synth pop group whose founder members are originally from the Wirral Peninsula, UK. OMD record for Virgin Records (originally for Virgins DinDisc subsidiary). ... Architecture & Morality is an album by Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, released in 1981. ...


The Mellotron experienced a revival of sorts in the 1990s. A plethora of bands began using the instrument, including You Am I, Marillion, The Smashing Pumpkins, Counting Crows, Oasis, Barenaked Ladies, Sheryl Crow, Incubus, Tori Amos, Spock's Beard, Lenny Kravitz, The Flower Kings, Nine Inch Nails, Muse, Pearl Jam, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Screaming Trees, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Faith No More, Grandaddy, Tom Waits, The Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Charlatans, Paul Weller, Radiohead, Porcupine Tree, Air, Opeth, Enslaved, No-Man and Waterclime. In 1989/90, R.E.M. recorded the prevalent and mysterious-sounding cello parts of "Losing My Religion" using a Mellotron. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Marillion is a British Rock group. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... Counting Crows is an American Folk Rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... Oasis are an English rock band, formed in Manchester in 1991, led by lead guitarist and primary songwriter Noel Gallagher and his younger brother, lead vocalist and songwriter Liam Gallagher. ... Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... Incubus (IPA: /ɪŋkjubÉ™s/) is a five-piece American alternative rock band based out of Calabasas, California. ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Spocks Beard is a progressive rock band formed in 1992 in Los Angeles by brothers Neal and Alan Morse. ... Leonard Albert Lenny Kravitz (born May 26, 1964) is an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, and arranger whose retro style incorporates elements of rock, soul, funk, reggae, hard rock, psychedelic, folk, and ballads. ... The Flower Kings are a Swedish progressive rock band. ... “NIN” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ... This article is about the rock group. ... Red Hot Chili Peppers (from left): Flea, Chad Smith, John Frusciante and Anthony Kiedis Red Hot Chili Peppers are a Californian rock band who have combined aspects of funk and hip-hop with rock and roll, pioneering funk metal. ... Screaming Trees was a musical group considered part of the grunge music movement of the early 1990s. ... Tom Petty Thomas Earl Petty (born October 20, 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American musician. ... Faith No More was an experimental alternative rock group that formed in San Francisco, California in 1982 and disbanded in 1998. ... Grandaddy was an indie rock group from Modesto, California, United States. ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... The Brian Jonestown Massacre (frequently abbreviated as BJM or The BJM) is a psychedelic rock band founded in San Francisco, California in the early 1990s, led by Anton Newcombe. ... The Charlatans could refer to two bands The Charlatans, a United States band The Charlatans, a British band, sometimes known in the US as Charlatans UK This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Paul Weller The Modfather (born John William Weller May 25, 1958, in Sheerwater, near Woking, Surrey) is an English singer-songwriter. ... Radiohead are an English rock band. ... Porcupine Tree is an English progressive rock band formed in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England by Steven Wilson. ... For the Japanese band, see Air (Japanese band). ... Opeth is a Progressive death metal band from Sweden. ... Enslaved is a progressive black/viking metal band from Haugesund, Norway. ... No-Man is a British duo formed in 1987 as No Man Is An Island (Except The Isle Of Man) by Tim Bowness (from Stockton Heath, Cheshire, born, November 29th, 1963) and Porcupine Trees Steven Wilson (from Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, born, November 3, 1967). ... Waterclime is yet another project of Vintersorg, of Borknagar and Otyg fame as well as other bands. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... Losing My Religion is a song recorded by the alternative rock band R.E.M. from their 1991 album Out of Time. ...


On Porcupine Tree's 2005 album Deadwing, track 6 is titled "Mellotron Scratch" and includes lyrics about the sound of a Mellotron causing a woman to cry. Porcupine Tree's Steven Wilson prominently used the Mellotron's haunting choral sounds on No-Man's 2003 album Together We're Stranger. In 2006, Sloan featured the Mellotron's flute sound prominently on "Fading Into Obscurity" and "You Know What It's About." The flute sound was also used extensively on Eels' 2005 album Blinking Lights and Other Revelations. And most recently, the Mellotron can be sparingly heard on songs from the Canadian rock band Rush's 2007 release, Snakes & Arrows (the Mellotron has made an appearance on one of their earlier albums, as mentioned above) as well as British artist PJ Harvey's 2007 release, White Chalk. Porcupine Tree is an English progressive rock band formed in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England by Steven Wilson. ... Deadwing is the eighth studio album by British progressive rock band Porcupine Tree, first released in March 28, 2005. ... Porcupine Tree is an English progressive rock band formed in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England by Steven Wilson. ... Steven Wilson (born Steven John Wilson on November 3, 1967 in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England) is the lead guitarist/singer/songwriter and the founder of progressive rock band Porcupine Tree. ... No-Man is a British duo formed in 1987 as No Man Is An Island (Except The Isle Of Man) by Tim Bowness (from Stockton Heath, Cheshire, born, November 29th, 1963) and Porcupine Trees Steven Wilson (from Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, born, November 3, 1967). ... Released by Snapper Music during the spring of 2003, Together Were Stranger is No-Mans fifth studio album. ... Sloan is a power pop quartet from Halifax, Nova Scotia. ... Eels (also sometimes eels or EELS, depending on the album) is an American rock band formed by singer/songwriter Mark Oliver Everett, better known as Mr. ... Blinking Lights and Other Revelations (2005) is a double album by the band Eels. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Snakes & Arrows is the eighteenth full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ... Polly Jean Harvey (born 9 October 1969) is an English musician and songwriter. ... White Chalk is the eighth studio album by PJ Harvey. ...


References

  • BBC Radio 4 broadcast a documentary "Sampledelica! The History of the Mellotron" on 3rd June 2006, repeated 7th Jan 2007.
  • BBC Radio 4 download of 30 minute "Sampledelica! The History of the Mellotron" on 9th January 2007

old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ...

See also

The Birotron was an ill-fated tape replay keyboard conceived by Dave Biro of Yalesville, Connecticut, USA, and funded by Rick Wakeman of the progressive-rock group Yes in the late 1970s. ... The Chamberlin is an electro-mechanical keyboard instrument related to the Mellotron. ... The Optigan (a portmanteau of Optical Organ) was an early electronic keyboard instrument designed for the consumer market. ... The Optigan (a portmanteau of Optical Organ) was an early electronic keyboard instrument designed for the consumer market. ...

External links

  • 1960s promotional film for The Melotron
  • Mellotronics.com - website of Streetly Electronics - original manufacturers of the Mellotron
  • Gearwire Video - Mellotron from the inside out
  • Planet Mellotron.com - List of Mellotron recordings and album reviews
  • Candor Chasma - Information about Mellotron and other vintage keyboards
  • The Melloman - DIY Mellotron made of Walkmans
  • Mellotron - How does it work - Concise description of Mellotron operation
  • History of the Mellotron - from Mike Pinder of The Moody Blues
  • [2] - The home of the Mellotron document and tape archives

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mellotron (321 words)
As a real aficionado of the MIGHTY MELLOTRON, having owned thirty-eight different Mellotrons since the early 70s, I felt that it was time to publish the real and honest Mellotronstory based on facts, personal experience and knowledge without intentions to spread one more myth of yesteryear.
Parts of this story were published in the 90s in various German musical papers (Keyboard / Soundcheck) and are completed by the last interview that “Mr Mellotron” himself, Les Bradley, gave me in the house of John Bradley’s friend and companion Martin Smith, the general “good egg” of all things mellotronic.
We all have heard of those days in the 20s and 30s of the last century when musicians had to sit in front of an old-fashioned record-playerhorn to cut a direct disc of their music.
history (1941 words)
In 1977, Mellotronics was approached by Bill Eberline of Dallas Musical Instruments of Mahwah, New Jersey to act as worldwide distributors for Mellotron.
Mellotron Archives bought the Bradley Brothers master tape collection of Mellotron and Chamberlin sounds and the Mellotron Digital collection that descended from Mellotronics in London.
This collection of tapes and instruments was the source for this C.D. The sounds are exact recordings of Mellotrons and Chamberlins right down to the pressure pad contacting the tape head for 7 seconds.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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