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Encyclopedia > Mel Gibson
Mel Gibson

Gibson at the 1990 Air America premiere
Born Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson
January 3, 1956 (1956-01-03) (age 52)
Peekskill, New York, U.S.
Occupation Actor,
Director,
Producer,
Screenwriter
Years active 1976-present
Spouse(s) Robyn Moore (1980-present)

Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, AO (born January 3, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American-Australian actor, director, producer and screenwriter. Born in the United States, Gibson moved to Australia when he was 12 years old and he later studied acting at the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Sydney. After establishing himself as a household name with the Mad Max and Lethal Weapon series, Gibson went on to direct and star in the Academy Award-winning Braveheart. Gibson's direction of Braveheart made him the sixth actor-turned-filmmaker to receive an Oscar for Best Director.[1] In 2004, he directed and produced The Passion of the Christ, a blockbuster movie[2] that portrayed the last hours of the life of Jesus. Gibson is an honorary Officer of the Order of Australia and was ranked the world's most powerful celebrity in the annual list by Forbes magazine in 2004.[3] The Australian Film Institute Awards (often abbreviated to AFI Awards) is an annual awards ceremony administered by the Australian Film Institute, held in late November or early December. ... The Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role is an award in the annual Australian Film Institute Awards. ... Tim (1979) is an Australian romance movie between an older woman (played by Piper Laurie) and a younger, retarted man (played by Mel Gibson). ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... The Order of Australia is an order of chivalry for the purpose of according recognition to Australian citizens and other persons for achievement or for meritorious service. The Order was established on February 14, 1975, when Queen Elizabeth II signed Letters Patent instituting the Order. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... This article is about the film. ... Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Order of Australia is an order of chivalry for the purpose of according recognition to Australian citizens and other persons for achievement or for meritorious service. The Order was established on February 14, 1975, when Queen Elizabeth II signed Letters Patent instituting the Order. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ...

Early life

Gibson was born in Peekskill, New York, the sixth of eleven children. He is the second son of Hutton Gibson and Irish-born Anne Reilly Gibson. His paternal grandmother was the Australian opera soprano, Eva Mylott (1875–1920).[4] One of Gibson's younger brothers, Donal, is also an actor. Gibson's first name comes from a 5th century Irish Saint, Mel, founder of the diocese of Ardagh which contains most of his mother's native County, while his second name, Columcille, is also linked to an Irish saint.[5] Columcille is also the name of the parish in County Longford where Anne Reilly was born and raised. Because of his mother, Mel Gibson holds dual citizenship in America and the Republic of Ireland.[6] Peekskill is a city in Westchester County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Hutton Peter Gibson (born August 26, 1918) is a writer on religion and the father of actor Mel Gibson. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... This article is about the voice-type. ... Eva Mylott (1875 Tuross Head, Australia - c. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: notability If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... Saint Mel died in 488. ... The Diocese of Ardagh was established in 1111 at the Synod of Rathbreasail as the see for east Connacht. ... A separate article is titled Columba (constellation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ...


Hutton Gibson relocated his family to Sydney, Australia in 1968, after winning $145,000 in a work related injury lawsuit against New York Central on February 14, 1968.[7][unreliable source?] The family moved when Gibson was twelve. The move to Hutton's mother's native Australia was for economic reasons and because he thought the Australian military would reject his oldest son for the Vietnam War draft.[8] This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Conscription in Australia, or mandatory military service also known as National Service, has a controversial history dating back to the first years of nationhood. ...


Gibson was educated by Christian Brothers at St. Leo's Catholic College in Wahroonga, New South Wales during his High School years. Note: This page needs to be cleaned up to be brought into conformance with the Manual of Style. ... St. ... Wahroonga is a suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ...


Stage career

Growing up, Mel Gibson considered becoming a journalist, a chef, or a religious brother. Then Gibson’s older sister Mary secretly submitted $5 along with an application for the recent high school graduate to the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Sydney. After the audition, Gibson was accepted into an acting class that included Judy Davis and Steve Bisley. The students at NIDA were classically trained in the British theatre tradition rather than for screen acting[9]. As students, Gibson and Judy Davis played the leads in Romeo and Juliet, and Gibson played the role of Queen Titania in an experimental production of A Midsummer Night's Dream.[10]. After graduation in 1977, Gibson immediately began work on the filming of Mad Max, but he continued to work as a stage actor, joining the State Theatre Company of South Australia in Adelaide. Gibson’s theatrical credits include Waiting for Godot, playing Estragon opposite Geoffrey Rush, and a 1982 Sydney production of Death of a Salesman, playing Biff Loman. Gibson’s most recent theatrical performance was a 1993 Telluride production of Love Letters by A. R. Gurney, opposite Sissy Spacek.[11] At the beginning of his acting career, Gibson also appeared in television pilots for series including The Sullivans, Cop Shop and Punishment. The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Judy Davis (born 23 April 1955) is an Academy Award-nominated and 3-time Emmy Award-winning Australian actress. ... Steve Bisley (born 1951 at Lake Munmorah, New South Wales, Australia), is a well-known Australian actor, who attended the National Institute of Dramatic Art. ... The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... Judy Davis (born 23 April 1955) is an Academy Award-nominated and 3-time Emmy Award-winning Australian actress. ... For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Titania (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Waiting for Godot is a play by Samuel Beckett, in which the characters wait for Godot, who never arrives. ... Estragon (affectionately Gogo; he tells Pozzo his name is Adam) is one of the two main characters from Samuel Becketts Waiting for Godot. ... Geoffrey Roy Rush (born 6 July 1951) is an Academy Award- and Emmy Award-winning Australian actor. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... For other uses, see Death of a Salesman (disambiguation). ... The Town of Telluride, a Home Rule Municipality, is the county seat of San Miguel County in the southwestern portion of the State of Colorado in the United States. ... Love Letters is a play written by A. R. Gurney. ... A.R. Gurney (November 1, 1930 - ) is an American playwright and novelist. ... Mary Elizabeth Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... The Sullivans was an Australian made drama television series produced by Crawford Productions which ran from 1976 until 1983. ... Cop Shop is also an informal term for a police station Cop Shop was an Australian police drama television series produced by Crawford Productions that revolved around the everyday operations of both the uniformed police officers and the plain-clothes detectives of the fictional Riverside Police Station. ... Punishment is an Australian television series made by the Reg Grundy Organisation for the Ten Network in 1981. ...


Career in Australian cinema

Before Gibson became a Hollywood star, his starring roles in the Mad Max series and the films of Peter Weir during the New Wave of Australian cinema propelled him to international film stardom. While a student at NIDA, Gibson made his film debut in the 1977 film Summer City, for which he was paid $250. After being cast in Mad Max by Australian doctor-turned-director George Miller, Gibson began his first lead role in 1977 at the age of 21 on the day after he graduated from drama school. Gibson also played a mentally-slow youth in Tim, which earned him the Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role. The release of Mad Max in 1979 then made Gibson internationally famous overnight. Gibson joined the cast of the World War II action film Attack Force Z, which was not released until 1982 when Gibson had become a bigger star. Director Peter Weir cast Gibson as one of the leads in the critically-acclaimed World War I drama Gallipoli, which earned Gibson another Best Actor Award from the Australian Film Institute. The film Gallipoli also helped to earn Gibson the reputation of a serious, versatile actor and gained him the Hollywood agent Ed Limato. The sequel Mad Max 2 was his first hit in America (released as The Road Warrior). In 1982 Gibson again attracted critical acclaim in Peter Weir’s romantic thriller The Year of Living Dangerously. Following a year hiatus from film acting after the birth of his twin sons, Gibson took on the role of Fletcher Christian in The Bounty in 1984. Playing Max Rockatansky for the third time in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome in 1985 earned Gibson his first million dollar salary. Hollywood Star, vol 1 no 10, circa 1978 The Hollywood Star was a highly idiosyncratic gossip tabloid published on an erratic schedule in Hollywood, California by William Kern, who wrote much of the magazine under the pseudonym Bill Dakota. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... A resergence in worldwide popularity of Australian cinema culture that started in the late 1970s and lasted until the late 1980s. ... The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... Summer City is a 1970s Australian film, most notable for having Mel Gibson in his inaugural role. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... George (Miliotis) Miller (born March 3, 1945), is an Academy-Award winning Australian film and television screenwriter, director and producer. ... Tim (1979) is an Australian romance movie between an older woman (played by Piper Laurie) and a younger, retarted man (played by Mel Gibson). ... The Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role is an award in the annual Australian Film Institute Awards. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Attack Force Z is a 1982 Australian World War II film, directed by Tim Burstall. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... The Australian Film Institute (AFI), established in 1958, is an organisation that promotes Australian film and television through the annual AFI Awards, a membership program and AFI film events throughout the year. ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (released in the US in 1981 as The Road Warrior) was a sequel to Mad Max. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... The Year of Living Dangerously is a novel by Christopher Koch, which was made into a film in 1982, directed by Peter Weir and written by Koch, Weir, and David Williamson. ... Fletcher Christian, an artists impression Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 – October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants (see Mutiny on the Bounty). ... This article is about the 1984 film. ... Mad Max Rockatansky is the main character from director George Millers Mad Max film trilogy, appearing in the films Mad Max, The Road Warrior, and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome. ... Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome is a 1985 film, the third installment to the action movie Mad Max. ...


Hollywood acting career

Early Hollywood career

Mel Gibson’s first American film was Mark Rydell’s 1984 drama The River in which he and Sissy Spacek played struggling Tennessee farmers. Gibson then starred in the gothic romance Mrs. Soffel for Australian director Gillian Armstrong. He and Matthew Modine played condemned convict brothers opposite Diane Keaton as the warden's wife who visits them to read the Bible. In 1985, after working on four films in a row, Gibson took almost two years off at his Australian cattle ranch. He returned to play the role of Martin Riggs in Lethal Weapon, a film which helped to cement his status as a Hollywood star. Gibson’s next film was Robert Towne’s Tequila Sunrise, followed by Lethal Weapon 2 in 1989. After starring in three films back-to-back, Bird on a Wire, Air America, and Hamlet, Gibson took another hiatus from Hollywood. Mark Rydell (born March 23, 1934 in New York City) is an American actor, film director and producer. ... The River is a 1984 film which tells the story of an American farm family which tries to keep its farm going in the face of bank foreclosures, floods, and other hard times. ... Mary Elizabeth Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Mrs. ... Gillian Armstrong (born December 18, 1950 in Melbourne, Australia) is a film director. ... Matthew Avery Modine (born March 22, 1959) is an American actor, perhaps most famous for playing Private Joker in Stanley Kubricks 1987 film, Full Metal Jacket. ... Diane Keaton (née Hall; January 5, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress, director and producer. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Martin Riggs (born 1950) is a fictional police officer from the Lethal Weapon franchise. ... Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... Towne in the 1960 movie Last Woman on Earth Robert Towne (born November 23, 1934) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ... Tequila Sunrise is a 1988 movie written and directed by Oscar-winner Robert Towne. ... Lethal Weapon 2 is the second movie in the Lethal Weapon series, released in 1989. ... Bird on a Wire redirects here. ... Air America is a 1990 film starring Mel Gibson and Robert Downey Jr as Air America pilots in Vietnam War era Laos. ... Hamlet is a 1990 film based on the Shakespearean play of the same name. ...


1990s Acting career

During the 1990s, Gibson used his boxoffice power to alternate between commercial and personal projects. His films in the first half of the decade were Forever Young, Lethal Weapon 3, Maverick, and Braveheart. He then starred in Ransom, Conspiracy Theory, Lethal Weapon 4, and Payback. Gibson also served as the speaking and singing voice of John Smith in Disney’s Pocahontas. Forever Young is a 1992 film. ... Lethal Weapon 3 is a 1992 film starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Rene Russo and Stuart Wilson. ... Maverick is a 1994 comedy Western movie, based on the 1950s television series Maverick, and created by Roy Huggins. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Ransom is a thriller film released in 1996, starring Mel Gibson, Rene Russo, and Gary Sinise and directed by Ron Howard. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Lethal Weapon 4 is a 1998 buddy cop action-comedy film directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Rene Russo, Chris Rock and Jet Li. ... Payback is a 1999 action film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Brian Helgeland. ... // John Smith is a name often regarded as the archetype of a common personal name in most English-speaking countries, a generic name sometimes representing everyman or the average person. ... Pocahontas is the thirty-third animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ...


2000s Acting career

In 2000, Gibson acted in three films that each grossed over $100 million: The Patriot, Chicken Run, and What Women Want, the all-time top-grossing romantic comedy. In 2002, Gibson acting in the Vietnam War drama We Were Soldiers and M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs, which became the highest-grossing film of Gibson’s acting career. While promoting Signs, Gibson said that he no longer wanted to be a movie star and would only act in film again if the script were truly extraordinary. The Patriot is a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Roland Emmerich. ... This article is about the movie. ... What Women Want is a [[2000 in film|2000](with fantasy elements), directed by Nancy Meyers and starring Mel Gibson and Helen Hunt. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... We Were Soldiers is a 2002 war film that dramatized the Battle of Ia Drang in November 1965, the first major engagement of American troops in the Vietnam War. ... Manoj Nelliattu Shyamalan (born August 6, 1970), known professionally as M. Night Shyamalan, //, is an Academy Award nominated screenwriter and director, who also performs smaller roles in his own movies. ... Signs is a 2002 science fiction thriller film directed by M. Night Shyamalan starring Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix, Rory Culkin, and Abigail Breslin. ... Signs is a 2002 science fiction thriller film directed by M. Night Shyamalan starring Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix, Rory Culkin, and Abigail Breslin. ...


Producing career

After his success in Hollywood with the Lethal Weapon series, Gibson began to move into the areas of producing and directing. With partner Bruce Davey, Gibson formed Icon Productions in 1989 in order to make Hamlet. In addition to producing or co-producing many of Gibson's own star vehicles, Icon has turned out many other small films ranging from Immortal Beloved to An Ideal Husband. Gibson has taken supporting roles in some of these films, such as The Million Dollar Hotel and The Singing Detective to improve their commercial prospects. Gibson has also produced a number of projects for television, including a biopic on The Three Stooges and the 2008 PBS documentary Carrier. Icon has grown beyond just a production company to an international distribution company and a film exhibitor in Australia and New Zealand. Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... Bruce Davey is an Austrailian film producer in the United States. ... Icon Productions LLC is an American independent production company founded in August 1989 by American-Australian actor/director Mel Gibson and Australian producing partner Bruce Davey. ... Hamlet is a 1990 film based on the Shakespearean play of the same name. ... Immortal Beloved is a 1994 film about the life of composer Ludwig van Beethoven. ... An Ideal Husband is a 1999 feature film based on the play by Oscar Wilde. ... The Million Dollar Hotel is an English language 2000 movie based on a concept story by Bono of Irish rock band U2 and Nicholas Klein and directed by Wim Wenders. ... The Singing Detective was a 2003 film based on the BBC mini-series of the same name, a work by Dennis Potter. ... The Three Stooges was an American comedy act in the 20th century. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Icon Productions LLC is an American independent production company founded in August 1989 by American-Australian actor/director Mel Gibson and Australian producing partner Bruce Davey. ...


Directing career

Mel Gibson has credited his directors, particularly George Miller, Peter Weir, and Richard Donner, with teaching him the craft of filmmaking and influencing him as a director. According to Robert Downey, Jr., studio executives encouraged Gibson in 1989 to try directing, an idea he rebuffed at the time.[12] Gibson made his directorial debut in 1993 with The Man Without a Face, followed two years later by Braveheart, which earned Gibson the Oscar for Best Director. Gibson had long planned to direct a remake of Fahrenheit 451, but in 1999 the project was indefinitely postponed because of scheduling conflicts.[13] Gibson was scheduled to direct Robert Downey, Jr. in a Los Angeles stage production of Hamlet in January 2001, but Downey’s drug relapse ended the project.[14] While promoting We Were Soldiers to the press, Gibson mentioned that he was planning pare back on acting and return to directing. Later in 2002, Gibson announced his film The Passion of the Christ. After The Passion, Gibson directed a few episodes of Complete Savages, and then directed the 2006 action-adventure film Apocalypto. George (Miliotis) Miller (born March 3, 1945), is an Academy-Award winning Australian film and television screenwriter, director and producer. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... Richard Donner (born Richard Donald Schwartzberg on April 24, 1930) is an American film director and also producer through the production company, The Donners Company, he and his wife, producer Lauren Shuler-Donner, own. ... Robert John Downey, Jr. ... The Man Without a Face is a 1993 drama starring and directed by Mel Gibson. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit 451 (disambiguation). ... Robert John Downey, Jr. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... We Were Soldiers is a 2002 war film that dramatized the Battle of Ia Drang in November 1965, the first major engagement of American troops in the Vietnam War. ... This article is about the film. ... Complete Savages was a comedy sitcom television program that began airing on ABC in September 2004. ... Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ...


Film career

Gibson gained very favorable notices from film critics when he first entered the cinematic scene as well as comparisons to several classic movie stars. In 1982, Vincent Canby wrote that “Mr. Gibson recalls the young Steve McQueen… I can't define "star quality," but whatever it is, Mr. Gibson has it.”[15] Gibson has also been likened to “a combination Clark Gable and Humphrey Bogart.”[16] Gibson's physical appearance made him a natural for leading male roles in action projects such as the "Mad Max" series of films, Peter Weir's Gallipoli, and the "Lethal Weapon" series of films. Later, Gibson expanded into a variety of acting projects including human dramas such as Hamlet, and comedic roles such as those in Maverick and What Women Want. His most artistic and financial success came with films where he expanded beyond acting into directing and producing, such as 1993's The Man Without a Face, 1995's Braveheart, 2000's The Patriot, 2004's Passion of the Christ and 2006's Apocalypto. Gibson was considered for roles in Batman, GoldenEye, Amadeus, Gladiator, The Golden Child, X-Men, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, Runaway Bride and Primary Colors.[17] Actor Sean Connery once suggested Gibson should play the next James Bond to Connery's M. Gibson turned down the role, reportedly because he feared being typecast.[18] Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... For other uses, see Steve McQueen (disambiguation). ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Bogart redirects here. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Maverick is a 1994 comedy Western movie, based on the 1950s television series Maverick, and created by Roy Huggins. ... What Women Want is a [[2000 in film|2000](with fantasy elements), directed by Nancy Meyers and starring Mel Gibson and Helen Hunt. ... The Man Without a Face is a 1993 drama starring and directed by Mel Gibson. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... The Patriot is a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Roland Emmerich. ... The Passion of the Christ promotional poster The Passion of the Christ (2004) is an independent film about the last twelve hours of the life of Jesus Christ. ... Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... For the album based on the film, see Batman (album). ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ... Amadeus is a 1984 film directed by MiloÅ¡ Forman. ... Gladiator is a 2000 movie directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Russell Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix. ... The Golden Child (1986) is an American mystical comedy film starring Eddie Murphy. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was a 1991 film directed by Kevin Reynolds. ... Runaway Bride is a 1999 romantic comedy starring Richard Gere and Julia Roberts and directed by Garry Marshall. ... Primary Colors is a 1998 film starring John Travolta based on the popular book (a success in part fueled by speculation over the identity of the author). ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... This article is about the spy series. ... M is a fictional character in Ian Flemings James Bond series, as well as the films in the Bond franchise. ... Typecasting is the process by which an actor is strongly identified with a specific character, one or more particular roles, or characters with the same traits or ethnic grouping. ...


Honors

On July 25, 1997, Gibson was named an honorary Officer of the Order of Australia (AO), in recognition of his "service to the Australian film industry". The award was honorary because substantive awards are made only to Australian citizens.[19][20] In 1985, Gibson was named "The Sexiest Man Alive" by People, the first person to be named so.[21] Gibson quietly declined the Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government in 1995 as a protest against France's resumption of nuclear testing in the Southwest Pacific.[22] Time magazine chose Mel Gibson and Michael Moore as Men of the Year in 2004, but Gibson turned down the photo session and interview, and the cover went instead to George W. Bush.[23] is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Order of Australia is an order of chivalry for the purpose of according recognition to Australian citizens and other persons for achievement or for meritorious service. The Order was established on February 14, 1975, when Queen Elizabeth II signed Letters Patent instituting the Order. ... 1985-02-04 - Mel Gibson, 29; first winner 1986-01-27 - Mark Harmon, 34 1987-03-30 - Harry Hamlin, 35 1988-09-12 - John F. Kennedy Jr. ... -1... The Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Order of Arts and Literature) is an Order of France, established on May 2, 1957 by the Minister of Culture, and confirmed as part of lOrdre National du Mérite by President Charles de Gaulle in 1963. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Person of the Year is an annual issue of United States (U.S.) newsmagazine Time that features a profile on the man, woman, couple, group, idea, place, or machine that [1] // The tradition of selecting a Man of the Year began in 1927, when Time editors contemplated what they could... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Landmark films

Mad Max series

Main article: Mad Max

Gibson got his breakthrough role as the leather-clad post-apocalyptic survivor in George Miller's Mad Max. The film was independently financed and had a reported budget of $300,000 AUD — of which $15,000 was paid to Mel Gibson for his performance. The film achieved incredible success, earning $100 million world wide. It held a record in Guinness Book of Records as the highest profit-to-cost ratio of a motion picture, and only lost the record in 2000 to The Blair Witch Project. The film was awarded four Australian Film Institute Awards in 1979. For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... George (Miliotis) Miller (born March 3, 1945), is an Academy-Award winning Australian film and television screenwriter, director and producer. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... The Blair Witch Project is a low-budget American horror film released in 1999. ... The Australian Film Institute (AFI), established in 1958, is an organisation that promotes Australian film and television through the annual AFI Awards, a membership program and AFI film events throughout the year. ...

"Mad" Max is "a burnt out, desolate" loner who roams the wasteland of the post-apocalypse Australian outback, scavenging wrecked vehicles for petrol and ammunition. ((Mad Max 2)).

Gibson almost did not get the role that made him a star. His agent got him an audition for Mad Max, but the night before, he got into a drunken brawl with three men at a party, resulting in a swollen nose, a broken jawline, and various other bruises. Mel showed up at the audition the next day looking like a "black and blue pumpkin" (his own words). Mel did not expect to get the role and only went to accompany his friend. However, the casting agent told Mel to come back in two weeks, telling him "we need freaks." When Mel did come back, he was not recognized because his wounds had healed almost completely, and received the part. This incident is listed in Ripley's Believe It or Not![24] Image File history File links MadmaxII21. ... Image File history File links MadmaxII21. ... Road Warrior redirects here. ... Believe It or Not redirects here. ...


When the film was first released in America, all the voices, including that of Mel Gibson's character, were dubbed with U.S. accents at the behest of the distributor, American International Pictures, for fear that audiences would not take warmly to actors speaking entirely with Australian accents. The early AIP logo. ...


The original film spawned two sequels: Mad Max 2 (known in North America as The Road Warrior), and Mad Max 3 (known in North America as Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome). A fourth movie, Mad Max 4: Fury Road, has been considered but has not been produced. Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (released in the US in 1981 as The Road Warrior) was a sequel to Mad Max. ... Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome is a 1985 film, the third installment to the action movie Mad Max. ... The fourth of the Mad Max movies. ...


The Year of Living Dangerously

Gibson played a naïve but ambitious journalist opposite Sigourney Weaver and Linda Hunt in Peter Weir’s atmospheric 1982 film The Year of Living Dangerously. The movie was both a critical and commercial success, and the upcoming Australian actor was heavily marketed by MGM studio. In his review of the film, Vincent Canby of the New York Times wrote, "If this film doesn't make an international star of Mr. Gibson, then nothing will. He possesses both the necessary talent and the screen presence."[25] Gibson was initially reluctant to accept the role of Guy Hamilton. "I didn't necessarily see my role as a great challenge. My character was, like the film suggests, a puppet. And I went with that. It wasn't some star thing, even though they advertised it that way."[26] Gibson saw some similarities between himself and the character of Guy. "He's not a silver-tongued devil. He's kind of immature and he has some rough edges and I guess you could say the same for me."[27] Gibson has cited this screen performance as his personal favorite. The Year of Living Dangerously is a novel by Christopher Koch, which was made into a film in 1982, directed by Peter Weir and written by Koch, Weir, and David Williamson. ... Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Alexandra Weaver on October 8, 1949 in New York City) is an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... The Year of Living Dangerously is a novel by Christopher Koch, which was made into a film in 1982, directed by Peter Weir and written by Koch, Weir, and David Williamson. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


The film production in the Philippines was disrupted by radical Muslims, forcing the filmmakers to return to Australia to complete the film. Gibson downplayed the death threats, saying, "It wasn't really that bad. We got a lot of death threats to be sure, but I just assumed that when there are so many, it must mean nothing is really going to happen. I mean, if they meant to kill us, why send a note?"[28][29]


The Bounty

Main article: The Bounty

Gibson followed the footsteps of Errol Flynn, Clark Gable, and Marlon Brando by starring as Fletcher Christian in a cinematic retelling of the mutiny on the Bounty. The resulting 1984 film The Bounty is considered to be the most historically accurate version. However, Gibson does not believe that the film went far enough in correcting the historical record. This article is about the 1984 film. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Fletcher Christian, an artists impression Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 – October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants (see Mutiny on the Bounty). ... For other uses, see Mutiny on the Bounty (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1984 film. ...

"I think the main problem with that film was that it tried to be a fresh look at the dynamic of the mutiny situation, but didn't go far enough. In the old version, Captain Bligh was the bad guy and Fletcher Christian was the good guy. But really Fletcher Christian was a social climber and an opportunist. They should have made him the bad guy, which indeed he was. He ended up setting all these people adrift to die, without any real justification. Maybe he'd gone island crazy. They should have painted it that way. But they wanted to exonerate Captain Bligh while still having the dynamic where the guy was mutinying for the good of the crew. It didn't quite work."[30] 1814 portrait of William Bligh Vice-Admiral William Bligh FRS RN (9 September 1754 – 7 December 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and colonial administrator. ... Fletcher Christian, an artists impression Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 – October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants (see Mutiny on the Bounty). ... Fletcher Christian, an artists impression Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 – October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants (see Mutiny on the Bounty). ... 1814 portrait of William Bligh Vice-Admiral William Bligh FRS RN (9 September 1754 – 7 December 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and colonial administrator. ...

Gibson considers the performance of Anthony Hopkins as William Bligh to be the saving grace of the film: For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... 1814 portrait of William Bligh Vice-Admiral William Bligh FRS RN (9 September 1754 – 7 December 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and colonial administrator. ...

"It was a kind of fresh look at Captain Bligh, and I think of all the renditions of who Bligh was, his was probably the closest. His Bligh was stubborn and didn't suffer fools, but he was brilliant and just had a lot of bad luck."[31] 1814 portrait of William Bligh Vice-Admiral William Bligh FRS RN (9 September 1754 – 7 December 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy and colonial administrator. ...

Gibson described the making of the film as difficult because of the long production and bad weather. "I went mad. They would hold their breath at night when I went off. One night I had a fight in a bar and the next day they had to shoot only one side of my face because the other was so fucked up. If you see the film, you can see the swelling in certain scenes." Anthony Hopkins was worried about Gibson’s heavy drinking, saying, "Mel is a wonderful, wonderful fellow with a marvelous future. He's already something of a superstar, but he's in danger of blowing it unless he takes hold of himself." Gibson agreed with this concern, and added his admiration for Welsh actor, "He was terrific. He was good to work with because he was open and he was willing to give. He’s a moral man, and you could see this. I think we had the same attitudes."[32] For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ...


Lethal Weapon series

Main article: Lethal Weapon

Gibson moved into more mainstream commercial filmmaking with the popular buddy cop Lethal Weapon series, which began with the 1987 original. In the films he played LAPD Detective Martin Riggs, a recently widowed Vietnam veteran with a death wish and a penchant for violence and gunplay. In the films, he is partnered with a reserved family man named Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover). This series would come to exemplify the action genre's so-called buddy film. Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... The Buddy Cop subgenre of buddy films are actions films with plots involving two men of very different and conflicting personalities who are forced to work together to solve a crime and/or defeat criminals, sometimes learning from each other in the process. ... LAPD and L.A.P.D. redirect here. ... Martin Riggs (born 1950) is a fictional police officer from the Lethal Weapon franchise. ... Roger Murtaugh (born December 15th, 1937) is a fictional character in the Lethal Weapon films, played in all four by Danny Glover. ... Danny Lebern Glover( Glover pronounced with a long O)[1] (born July 22, 1946) is an American actor, film director, and political activist. ... The Buddy Cop genre of films are action films with plots involving two men of very different and conflicting personalities who are forced to work together to solve a crime and/or defeat criminals, sometimes learning from each other in the process. ...


The two actors were trained in two different schools of acting. Gibson is classically trained and Glover is a method actor. Four films were produced in 1987, 1989, 1992 and 1998. Method acting is the endeavour to apply natural rules and laws to the theatre and film acting which can aid an actor with the process of playing a role. ...


Hamlet

Main article: Hamlet (1990 film)

Gibson made the unusual transition from the action to classical genres, playing the melancholic Danish prince in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet. Gibson was cast alongside such experienced Shakespearean actors as Ian Holm, Alan Bates, and Paul Scofield. He described working with his fellow cast members as similar to being "thrown into the ring with Mike Tyson". Hamlet is a 1990 film based on the Shakespearean play of the same name. ... Franco Zeffirelli (born Gianfranco Corsi on February 12, 1923), is an Italian film director. ... Hamlet is a 1990 film based on the Shakespearean play of the same name. ... William Shakespeare—born April 1564; baptised April 26, 1564; died April 23, 1616 (O.S.), May 3, 1616 (N.S.)—has a reputation as the greatest of all writers in English. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Sir Ian Holm Sir Ian Holm CBE (born 12 September 1931), born as Ian Holm Cuthbert, is an English actor. ... Alan Bates as butler in Gosford Park (2001) Sir Alan Arthur Bates CBE, (February 17, 1934 – December 27, 2003) was a British actor. ... David Paul Scofield, CH, CBE (born 21 January 1922) is a British actor who was born in Hurstpierpoint, Sussex, England. ... For the former baseball player, see Mike Tyson (baseball). ...


The film met with critical and marketing success and remains steady in DVD sales. It also marked the transformation of Mel Gibson from action hero to serious actor and filmmaker.


Braveheart

Main article: Braveheart

Gibson stated that when the Braveheart script arrived and was recommended by his agents, he rejected it outright because he thought he was too old to play the part. After careful thought, he decided that he wanted to direct the picture, and direct only. He finally agreed to act due to pressure from the film's producers. For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ...


Gibson received five Academy Awards, Best Director and Best Picture, for his 1995 direction of Braveheart. In the movie, Gibson starred as Sir William Wallace, a 13th century martyr of Scottish nationalism. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... Walter Thomas Monningtons 1925 painting called Parliamentary Union of England and Scotland 1707 hangs in the Palace of Westminster depicting the official presentation of the law that ended Scottish independence. ...


In one of his interviews, he attempted to make a film similar to the big screen epics he had loved as a child, such as Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus and William Wyler's The Big Country. The filming began in the Scottish Highlands. After learning that the intended filming locations were among the rainiest spots in Europe, the shooting was moved to the Republic of Ireland, where members of the Irish Army Reserve worked as extras in the film's many battles. The Battle of Stirling sequence in Braveheart is considered one of the best directed battle scenes in all of film history.[33] Kubrick redirects here. ... Spartacus is a 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Howard Fast about the historical life of Spartacus and the Third Servile War. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... The Big Country was a 1958 American movie starring Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker, Charlton Heston, Burl Ives, Charles Bickford, and Chuck Connors. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... The Irish Army (Irish: Arm na hÉireann) is the main branch of the Irish Defence Forces[1] (Óglaigh na hÉireann). ... Belligerents Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of England Commanders Andrew de Moray† William Wallace John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey Hugh de Cressingham† Strength 300 cavalry 10,000 infantry 1000 - 3000 cavalry 15,000 - 50,000 infantry Casualties and losses Comparatively light 6,000 killed, or around 30-40% dead. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


The Passion of the Christ

In 2004 Gibson directed The Passion of the Christ which was based on the last twelve hours of the life of Jesus Christ. It was rendered in Aramaic, Latin, Hebrew. Gibson originally intended to release the film without subtitles; however, subtitles were used in the theatrical exhibitions while they were optional in DVD releases. This article is about the film. ... This article is about the film. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Aramaic is a group of Semitic languages with a 3,000-year history. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Hebrew redirects here. ...


Gibson co-wrote the screenplay with writer Benedict Fitzgerald and financed the film himself. The filming took place on location in Matera, Italy and Cinecittà Studios in Rome. Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Benedict Fitzgerald is a screenwriter who co-wrote the screenplay The Passion of the Christ with Mel Gibson. ... Matera is a town and a province in the region of Basilicata, sometimes referred to as Lucania, in the south of Italy. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


Reviews were mixed, with critics ranging from praising the film for its realistic depiction of Jesus' final hours from a Catholic point of view and criticism of violence, manipulation and charges of anti-Semitism.[34][35]


The movie grossed US$611,899,420 worldwide and $370,782,930 in the US alone, a figure, at that time, surpassed any motion picture starring Gibson. It became the eighth highest-grossing film in history and the highest-grossing rated R film of all time. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Original Music Score, Best Cinematography, and Best Makeup at the 77th Academy Awards and won the People's Choice Award for Best Drama. The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The uses of Rated R include: The R-rating is a rating of the MPAA film rating system. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... These are the Academy Award for Makeup winners and nominees: 1980s 1982 Quest for Fire Gandhi 1983 none given 1984 Amadeus 2010: The Year We Make Contact Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle 1985 Mask The Color Purple 1986 The Fly The Clan of the Cave Bear... The 77th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 2004, were held on February 27, 2005, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California. ... The Peoples Choice Awards, held annually in January, is one of the few awards shows to be based on popularity. ...


Apocalypto

Main article: Apocalypto

Gibson's next historical epic, Apocalypto, was released to theaters on December 8, 2006. The film is set in Mesoamerica, during the fifteenth century against the turbulent end times of a Maya civilization. The sparse dialogue is spoken in the Yucatec Maya language. It features a cast of actors from Mexico City, the Yucatán, and some Native Americans from the United States. Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the culture area. ... // In the three Abrahamic Religions (Islam, Judaism, and Christianity), the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Maya language” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... For other uses, see Yucatán (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


Gibson's Icon Productions financed the film, and Disney released it in specific markets. Icon Productions LLC is an American independent production company founded in August 1989 by American-Australian actor/director Mel Gibson and Australian producing partner Bruce Davey. ... Disney redirects here. ...


Future films

In March 2007, Gibson told a screening audience that he was preparing another script with Farhad Safinia about the writing of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).[36] Gibson's company has long owned the rights to The Professor and the Madman, which tells the story of the creation of the OED.[37] Farhad Safinia is a screenwriter and producer. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... The Surgeon of Crowthorne: A Tale of Murder, Madness and the Love of Words is a book by Simon Winchester. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...


Gibson has dismissed the rumors that he is considering directing a film about Spanish explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa.[38][39][40] Asked in September 2007 if he planned to return to acting and specifically to action roles, Gibson said:[41] Vasco Núñez De Balboa (1475–January 15, 1519) was a Spanish explorer, governor, and conquistador. ...

"I think I’m too old for that, but you never know. I just like telling stories. Entertainment is valid and I guess I’ll probably do it again before it's over. You know, do something that people won’t get mad with me for."

Variety has reported that Gibson is set to star in a film adaptation of the BBC miniseries, Edge of Darkness. He's a big fan of the serial and was very enthusiastic about playing the part of the lead character, Ronald Craven, when producer Graham King and director Martin Campbell approached him for the role. This will be his first starring role since Signs and We Were Soldiers back in 2002.[3] Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1985 British television drama Edge of Darkness. ... Graham King (born 19 December 1961) is an English Academy Award-winning film producer. ... Martin Campbell (born October 24, 1944, Hastings) is a New Zealand film and television director. ...


Family and personal life

Gibson met his wife Robyn Moore in the late 1970s soon after filming Mad Max when they were both tenants at the same house in Adelaide. At the time, Robyn was a dental nurse and Mel was an unknown actor working for the South Australian Theatre Company. On June 7, 1980, they married in a Catholic Church in Forestville, New South Wales.[42] Gibson has referred to his wife as "my Rock of Gibraltar, only much prettier" and said, "life is about love and commitment and screw anyone who thinks that's a cliché." They have one daughter, six sons, and one grandchild.[43] Their seven children are Hannah (born 1980), twins Edward and Christian (born 1982), William (born 1985), Louis (born 1988), Milo (born 1990), and Thomas (born 1999). For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Forestville is a suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... For the racehorse of the same name, see Rock of Gibraltar (horse). ...


Daughter Hannah Gibson married Blues musician Kenny Wayne Shepherd on September 16, 2006.[44][45] Mel Gibson's spokesman had previously denied the rumor that Hannah was planning to become a nun.[46] Blues music redirects here. ... Kenny Wayne Shepherd or KWS (Kenny Wayne Brobst, Jr) (musician) (June 12, 1977-) is an American Blues musician. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Gibson has an avid interest in real estate investments, with multiple properties in Malibu, California, several locations in Costa Rica, a private island in Fiji and properties in Australia.[47][48] In December 2004, Gibson sold his 300-acre (1.2 km²) Australian ranch in the Kiewa Valley for $6 million.[49] Also in December 2004, Gibson purchased Mago Island in Fiji from Tokyu Corporation of Japan for $15 million. Descendants of the original native inhabitants of Mago (who were displaced in the 1860s) have protested the purchase. Gibson stated it was his intention to retain the pristine environment of the undeveloped island.[50] In early 2005, he sold his 45,000-acre (180 km²) Montana ranch to a neighbor for an undisclosed multimillion dollar sum.[51] In April 2007 he purchased a 400-acre (1.6 km²) ranch in Costa Rica for $26 million, and in July 2007 he sold his 76 acre Tudor estate in Connecticut (which he purchased in 1994 for $9 million) for $40 million to an unnamed buyer.[52] Also that month, he sold a Malibu property for $30 million that he had purchased for $24 million two years before.[53] Location of Malibu in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1991-03-28 [2] Government  - Mayor Jeff Jennings [1] Area  - Total 100. ... Mago Island (pronounced Mungo) (S17 degrees, 26 minutes latitude W179 degrees, 9 minutes longitude) lies in the northwest sector of Fijis northern Lau Group of islands. ... Tokyu Series-8000 train approaching Daikanyama Station. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km... Location of Malibu in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1991-03-28 [2] Government  - Mayor Jeff Jennings [1] Area  - Total 100. ...


In keeping with his interest in organic foods, Gibson has used his ranch properties to produce all-organic beef.[54]


Mel Gibson has eclectic tastes in music and is particularly fond of Italian opera. He is a lover of Italian Renaissance artwork and is a great admirer of the 17th century artist Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. Much of the cinematography in The Passion of the Christ was modeled after the style of this painter.[55][56] Italian opera can be divided into three periods, the Baroque, the Romantic and the modern. ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Caravaggio re-directs here; for alternate uses see Caravaggio (disambiguation) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610), often short Caravaggio after his hometown, was an Italian Baroque painter, whose large religious works portrayed saints and other biblical figures as ordinary people. ... Cinematography (from Greek: kinesis (movement) and grapho (to record)), is the discipline of making lighting and camera choices when recording photographic images for the cinema. ... This article is about the film. ...


Gibson's height is disputed. Varied sources place him from 5'6" (170 cm) to 5'11" (180 cm).[57][58][59] In 2002 Gibson stood next to interviewer Michael Parkinson (5 ft 10 in) and demonstrated that they were about the same height.[60] It should be noted however that at the time of the interview Parkinson was 67 years old and probably not at his peak height. Sir Michael Parkinson CBE (born March 28, 1935) is an English broadcaster and journalist. ...


Religious and political views

Faith

Based on many of his positions, Gibson may be considered a Traditionalist Catholic. Despite the rumors[61] on whether Gibson shares his father's adherence to Sedevacantism, Gibson has not spoken publicly on the matter, and some of his public interviews give the opposite impression. As part of his response to a question on whether Pope John Paul II saw The Passion of the Christ, Gibson said, "I’d like to hear what he has to say. I’d like to hear what anyone has to say. This film isn’t made for the elite. Anyone could see this film, even the occupier of the chair of Peter can see this film."[62]Gibson also referred to him as “Pope John Paul II” in a 2004 Reader's Digest interview,[63] and acquaintance Father William Fulco has said that Gibson denies neither the Pope nor Vatican II.[64] Traditionalist Catholics are Roman Catholics, or persons who identify as Roman Catholics, who believe that there should be a restoration of many or all of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions and presentation of Catholic teachings which prevailed in the Roman Catholic Church before the Second Vatican Council (1962... Sede vacante coat of arms, used by the Holy See from a Popes death to the election of his successor Sedevacantism is a theological position embraced by a minority of Traditionalist Catholics which holds that the Papal See has been vacant since the death of Pope Pius XII in... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... This article is about the film. ... The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago preaches from his cathedra, placed in front of the altar on special occasions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Reverend William J. Fulco (born February 24, 1936, Los Angeles) is a Jesuit priest and National Endowment for the Humanities Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California in the United States. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ...


When asked about the Catholic doctrine of "Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus", Gibson replied, "There is no salvation for those outside the Church … I believe it. Put it this way. My wife is a saint. She's a much better person than I am. Honestly. She's, like, Episcopalian, Church of England. She prays, she believes in God, she knows Jesus, she believes in that stuff. And it's just not fair if she doesn't make it, she's better than I am. But that is a pronouncement from the chair. I go with it.”[65] Gibson does not understand this dogma to mean that non-Catholics will go to hell. When Gibson was asked at Willow Creek church whether John 14:6[66] is an intolerant position, he said that “through the merits of Jesus' sacrifice… even people who don't know Jesus are able to be saved, but through him.”[67][68] Gibson also told Diane Sawyer that he believes non-Catholics and non-Christians can go to heaven.[69] The Latin phrase Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus, meaning: Outside the Church there is no salvation, is a dogma of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Cathedra Petri The chair of a bishop is a cathedra. ... For other senses of this word, see dogma (disambiguation). ... Willow Creek Community Church (or simply Willow Creek Church) is an American interdenominational super-megachurch located in the Chicago suburb of South Barrington, Illinois. ... For rule by those having merit, see meritocracy. ...


In May 2007, Mel Gibson flew to Hermosillo, Mexico, where he attended a Tridentine Mass during which grandchildren of his friends and two of his children received the sacrament of Confirmation, administered by Archbishop emeritus Carlos Quintero Arce.[70] The same Archbishop Arce consecrated Gibson's private traditional Roman Catholic church of the Holy Family in Malibu in February, 2007.[71] Hermosillo is the capital of the state of Sonora, México. ... A pre-1969 Latin Rite altar with reredos: A main altar was usually preceded by three steps, below which were said the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar. ... confirmed redirects here. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Emeritus (IPA pronunciation: or ) is an adjective that is used in the title of a retired professor, bishop or other professional. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... Traditionalist Catholics are Roman Catholics, or persons who identify as Roman Catholics, who believe that there should be a restoration of many or all of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions and presentation of Catholic teachings which prevailed in the Roman Catholic Church before the Second Vatican Council (1962... Holy Family is a private, independent traditional Catholic chapel in Malibu, California. ...


Gibson's Traditionalist Catholic beliefs have also been the target of attacks, especially during the controversy over his film The Passion of the Christ. When the film premiered in France, the newspaper Libération, considered the voice of French liberalism, dubbed Gibson's religious beliefs "the Shiite version of Christianity." Gibson has recently stated in an interview with Diane Sawyer that he feels that his "human rights were violated", by the often vitriolic attacks on his person, his family, and his religious beliefs which were sparked by The Passion. Traditionalist Catholics are Roman Catholics, or persons who identify as Roman Catholics, who believe that there should be a restoration of many or all of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions and presentation of Catholic teachings which prevailed in the Roman Catholic Church before the Second Vatican Council (1962... This article is about the film. ... Libération (affectionately known as Libé) is a French daily newspaper founded in Paris in 1973 by Jean-Paul Sartre, Pierre Victor alias Benny Lévy and Serge July in the wake of the protest movements of May 1968. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Politics

Gibson has been called everything from “ultraconservative”[72] to “politically very liberal” by acquaintance William Fulco.[73] Although he has denied that he is a Republican,[74] Gibson is often referred to as one in the press, and WorldNetDaily once reported that there was grassroots support among Republicans for "a presidential run" in 2008.[75] Reverend William J. Fulco (born February 24, 1936, Los Angeles) is a Jesuit priest and National Endowment for the Humanities Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California in the United States. ... GOP redirects here. ... For the Internet service, see AT&T WorldNet. ...


Gibson complimented filmmaker Michael Moore and his documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 when he and Moore were recognized at the 2005 People's Choice Awards.[76] Gibson's Icon Productions originally agreed to finance Moore's film, but later sold the rights to Miramax Films. Moore said that his agent Ari Emanuel claimed that "top Republicans" called Mel Gibson to tell him, "don’t expect to get more invitations to the White House".[77] Icon's spokesman dismissed this story, saying "We never run from a controversy. You'd have to be out of your mind to think that of the company that just put out The Passion of the Christ."[78] Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is a controversial, award-winning documentary film by American left-wing filmmaker Michael Moore which presents a critical look at the presidency of George W. Bush, the War on Terrorism, and its coverage in the American news media. ... The Peoples Choice Awards, held annually in January, is one of the few awards shows to be based on popularity. ... Icon Productions LLC is an American independent production company founded in August 1989 by American-Australian actor/director Mel Gibson and Australian producing partner Bruce Davey. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... Ari Emanuel is an Israeli-American literary agent at the Endeavor_Agency in Beverly Hills, California. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... This article is about the film. ...


In a July 1995 interview with Playboy magazine, Gibson said President Bill Clinton was a "low-level opportunist" and someone was "telling him what to do". He said that the Rhodes Scholarship was established for young men and women who want to strive for a "new world order" and this was a campaign for Marxism.[79] Gibson later backed away from such conspiracy theories saying, "It was like: 'Hey, tell us a conspiracy' . . . so I laid out this thing, and suddenly, it was like I was talking the gospel truth, espousing all this political shit like I believed in it."[80] For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... One World Government redirects here. ... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... For other uses, see Conspiracy theory (disambiguation). ...


In 2004, he publicly spoke out against taxpayer-funded embryonic stem-cell research that involves the cloning and destruction of human embryos.[81] Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... For the cloning of human beings, see human cloning. ... For other uses, see Embryo (disambiguation). ...


In March 2005, he issued a statement condemning the ending of Terri Schiavo's life, referring to her death as "state-sanctioned murder" on Sean Hannity's radio show.[82] Theresa Terri Marie Schindler Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005), from St. ... Sean Hannity is an American radio/television host, author, and conservative political commentator. ...


Gibson joked about WMDs in a February 2004 interview with Diane Sawyer and in March 2004 questioned the Iraq war on Sean Hannity's radio show.[83] In 2006, Gibson told the Time magazine that the "fearmongering" depicted in his film Apocalypto "reminds me a little of President Bush and his guys."[72] For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Sean Hannity is an American radio/television host, author, and conservative political commentator. ... TIME redirects here. ... Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Controversy

Allegations of homophobia

The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) accused Gibson of homophobia after a December 1991 interview in the Spanish newspaper El País. Asked what he thought of gay people, he said, "They take it up the ass." Gibson pointed, continuing, "This is only for taking a shit." When reminded that he had worked closely with gays at drama school, Gibson said, "They were good people, kind, I like them. But their thing is not my thing." When the interviewer asked if Gibson was afraid that people would think he is gay because he's an actor, Gibson replied, "Do I sound like a homosexual? Do I talk like them? Do I move like them? What happens is when you're an actor, they stick that label on you." Gibson later defended his comments on Good Morning America, saying, "[Those remarks were a response] to a direct question. If someone wants my opinion, I'll give it. What, am I supposed to lie to them?" In his 1995 Playboy interview, he responded to GLAAD's protests over his comment with "I'll apologize when hell freezes over. They can fuck off".[79] Eventually, however, to make amends with the gay community and show he was not homophobic, Gibson joined GLAAD in hosting 10 lesbian and gay filmmakers for an on-location seminar on the set of the movie Conspiracy Theory in January 1997.[84] In 1999 when asked about the comments to El País, Gibson said, "I shouldn't have said it, but I was tickling a bit of vodka during that interview, and the quote came back to bite me on the ass."[80] It has been suggested that GLAAD Media Awards be merged into this article or section. ... A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church, a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... El País (Spanish for The Country) is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Spain. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Good Morning America is a weekday morning news show that is broadcast on the ABC television network. ... The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) is dedicated to promoting and ensuring fair, accurate and inclusive representation of people and events in the media as a means of eliminating homophobia and discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation. ... The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ... Homophobia is a term used to describe: A culturally determined phobia manifesting as fear, revulsion, or contempt for homosexuality. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... El País (Spanish for The Country) is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Spain. ...


Some have criticized Braveheart for its portrayal of the future Edward II as weak and effeminate and for the scene in which Edward I throws his son's male lover out of the window.[85][86] Gibson defended his depiction of Prince Edward as weak and ineffectual, saying, For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ...

“'I'm just trying to respond to history. You can cite other examples – Alexander the Great, for example, who conquered the entire world, was also a homosexual. But this story isn't about Alexander the Great. It's about Edward II.”[87] For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ...

Gibson asserted that the reason the king killed his son's lover was because the king was a “psychopath,”[88] and he expressed bewilderment that some audience members would laugh at this murder: See Also: Antisocial Personality Disorder Theoretically, psychopathy is a three-faceted disorder involving interpersonal, affective and behavioral characteristics. ...

"We cut a scene out, unfortunately . . . where you really got to know that character (Edward II) and to understand his plight and his pain. . . . But it just stopped the film in the first act so much that you thought, 'When's this story going to start?' "[89]

Gibson was also accused of homophobia based on his portrayal of Herod Antipas in The Passion of the Christ.[90] In the film, the Hellenized Antipas is depicted as a luxurious, wig-wearing buffoon who surrounds himself with young male and female drunken revelers. The character of the Jewish high priest Caiphas is shown to be disgusted by the mascara-wearing Herod and his debauchery. The effeminate portrayal of Antipas in The Passion is common to other representations, including Jesus Christ Superstar. The origin of this tradition may have been Christ's description of Herod as a “fox” in Luke 13:32, using a feminine word meaning “vixen” in the original Greek.[91] Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... This article is about the film. ... Hellenization (or Hellenisation) is a term used to describe a cultural change in which something non-Greek becomes Greek (Hellenistic civilization). ... This page gives the traditional list of High Priests of Israel up to the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 AD. The earlier parts of the list are possibly legendary. ... In the New Testament, Caiaphas was the Jewish high priest to whom Jesus was taken to after his arrest in the garden of Gethsemane, and who played a part in Jesus crucifixion. ... Herod was the name of several members of the Herodian Dynasty of Roman Iudaea Province: Herod the Great (c. ... This article is about the film. ... Jesus Christ Superstar is a 1973, Oscar-nominated film adaptation of the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar, about the last weeks of the life of Jesus. ...


Allegations of Anglophobia

Due to some of his film choices as well as his Irish and Australian background, accusations of anglophobia, both sincere and joking, have been made against Gibson. This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...


Criticisms have been leveled at the historical accuracy of the Gibson-directed Braveheart, including its portrayal of English lords asserting Droit de seigneur. Gibson has acknowledged the reliance on anachronistic elements and the legends about William Wallace to make Braveheart more cinematically compelling. Furthermore, Gibson has dissociated himself from Scottish nationalists using the film to campaign for separation from England.[92] For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Vasily Polenov: Le droit du Seigneur (1874). ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Walter Thomas Monningtons 1925 painting called Parliamentary Union of England and Scotland 1707 hangs in the Palace of Westminster depicting the official presentation of the law that ended Scottish independence. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Gibson was called anti-English following the release of The Patriot in 2000, despite neither directing or writing the script for the film. The American Revolutionary character played by Gibson (loosely inspired by four people) waged a private war against a villainous British officer based on Colonel Banastre Tarleton.[93] The Patriot is a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Roland Emmerich. ... Lieutenant-Colonel Banastre Tarleton by Sir Joshua Reynolds General Sir Banastre Tarleton, 1st Baronet, GCB (21 August 1754 – 25 January 1833) was a British soldier and politician. ...


According to unauthorised biographer and vocal Gibson critic Wensley Clarkson, Mel Gibson was raised in an openly anti-British atmosphere by his Irish-American parents. Clarkson cites alleged family stories saying that several of Gibson's maternal relations (possibly including his grandmother) were raped by the Black and Tans during the Irish War of Independence.[94][unreliable source?] Clarkson further accuses Gibson of deliberately standing up the British Royal Family at the London premiere of Hamlet. However, Gibson had also missed the New York premiere of Hamlet to attend the funeral of his mother in Australia.[95] Wensley Clarkson (born 1956) is a British tabloid writer. ... Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánach) are citizens of the United States who can claim ancestry originating in the west European island of Ireland. ... For other senses of the term, see Black and tan (disambiguation). ... Combatants Irish Republic United Kingdom Commanders Michael Collins Richard Mulcahy Cathal Brugha Important local IRA leaders Henry Hugh Tudor Strength Irish Republican Army c. ... Hamlet was filmed in 1990 with Mel Gibson in the title role and Glenn Close as his mother, Queen Gertrude. ... Hamlet was filmed in 1990 with Mel Gibson in the title role and Glenn Close as his mother, Queen Gertrude. ...


Gibson has, however, played British characters several times in his career, playing Fletcher Christian in The Bounty, and voicing John Smith, in Disney's Pocahontas, and narrating the novel My Cousin Rachel. He has enjoyed cordial working relations with British people during the making of several films, including The Bounty, Lethal Weapon 2, Conspiracy Theory and Chicken Run. Fletcher Christian, an artists impression Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 – October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants (see Mutiny on the Bounty). ... This article is about the 1984 film. ... Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Captain/Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... Pocahontas is the thirty-third animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ... This article is about the 1984 film. ... Lethal Weapon 2 is the second movie in the Lethal Weapon series, released in 1989. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the movie. ...


While promoting The Patriot, Gibson told reporters, "I'm actually an Anglophile. I like the Brits, you know?" The fact that he keeps battling the British onscreen is "an unhappy accident, really. I'll have to remedy the situation someday."[96] The Patriot is a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Roland Emmerich. ...


Gibson has also publicly supported keeping Queen Elizabeth II as the Australian head of state.[97] Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ...


Allegations of antisemitism

Gibson has been accused of antisemitism over two issues: Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism, also known as judeophobia) is prejudice and hostility toward Jews as a religious, racial, or ethnic group. ...

His 2004 film The Passion of the Christ sparked a fierce debate over alleged anti-Semitic imagery and overtones. Gibson denied that the film was anti-Semitic, but critics remained divided. Some agreed that the film was consistent with the Gospels and traditional Catholic teachings, while others argued that it reflected a selective reading of the Gospels[98] or that it failed to comply with recommendations for dramatization of the Passion issued by the Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the USCCB in 1988.[99] This article is about the film. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the film. ... This article is about the film. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (also known as the USCCB) is the official governing body of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ...

According to a leaked report on Gibson's July 28, 2006 arrest for driving under the influence, Gibson made anti-Semitic remarks to arresting officer James Mee, who is Jewish, saying, "Fucking Jews... Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world. Are you a Jew?"[100] Gibson issued two apologies for the incident through his publicist, and in a later interview with Diane Sawyer, he affirmed the accuracy of the alleged quotations. Mel Gibsons mugshot from his July 28, 2006 arrest for DUI On July 28, 2006, at 2:36am PDT,[1] Mel Gibson was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol after being stopped for speeding (84 mph/140 km per hour in a 45 mph/72... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Under the influence. ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ...


Apocalypto

Gibson engaged in an angry confrontation with Alicia Estrada, an Assistant Professor of Central American Studies, during a Q&A session that followed a screening of his film Apocalypto to film students at Cal State University at Northridge, California on March 22, 2007. Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... California State University, Northridge (also known as CSUN, Cal State Northridge, or C-Sun) is a public university in the San Fernando Valley, within the city limits of Los Angeles, California, USA. Part of the California State University system, CSUN was founded in 1958 as San Fernando Valley State College... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Estrada began by calling Gibson "racist" and "ignorant",[101][102] and saying, "It's a racist film, and I demand an apology."[103] Gibson replied that he was insulted by this accusation. Estrada handed the microphone to her friend KPFK radio host Felipe Perez, who began reading a lengthy statement in Spanish. The organizers eventually said, "ask a question or leave" and cut off the microphone, but Gibson said he should be allowed to continue. Estrada took back the mic and began to translate the prepared statement. When officials concluded that she was not going to ask a question, they called security to escort her out. Estrada then asked Gibson if he was aware of certain scholars, and Gibson replied that he knew them well, and he detailed his research for the film. Although Estrada said that Gibson used profanity in his response, CSUN spokesman John Chandler disagreed: "He didn't respond with a profanity. He responded by answering the question." After Estrada's microphone was turned off, Gibson said, "No, let her talk. Please." Estrada became angry that she was being "silenced", and Gibson responded, "I'm listening to you! I can still hear you!" As Estrada and Perez were being escorted out, the audience applauded. Later in the Q&A session, Gibson expressed regret at the incident[104] and the evening ended with a standing ovation for the filmmaker. California State University, Northridge (also known as CSUN, Cal State Northridge, or C-Sun) is a public university in the San Fernando Valley, within the city limits of Los Angeles, California, USA. Part of the California State University system, CSUN was founded in 1958 as San Fernando Valley State College...


Soon afterwards, student newspaper photographer Khristian Garay sold his photographs to the paparazzi, resulting in a story at TMZ.[105]Gibson's publicist told journalists, "This was just a reaction to someone being disruptive and rude. He went on and completed the session and said it was successful. It's unfortunate it was tarnished with a momentary confrontation." Estrada defended herself, saying, "In no way was my question aggressive in the way that he responded to it. These are questions that my peers, my colleagues, ask me every time I make a presentation. These are questions I pose to my students in the classroom." Estrada furthermore demanded an apology, "not only to me but to the Central American program at CSUN, to the university and most importantly to the Mayan people and Mayan community." University spokesman John Chandler commented, "The students were very appreciative of Mr. Gibson being there. He spent a lot of time answering questions about moviemaking."


Prankster

Mel Gibson is known for his sense of humor on the set of his movies.[106] He has a reputation for practical jokes, puns, Stooge-inspired physical comedy, and doing outrageous things to shock people. Gibson is fond of drawing caricatures and hiring high school marching bands to pay tribute to his coworkers. As a director he sometimes breaks the tension on set by having his actors perform serious scenes wearing a red clown nose.[107] Helena Bonham Carter, who appeared alongside him in Hamlet, said of him, "He has a very basic sense of humor. It's a bit lavatorial and not very sophisticated."[108] On the set of Maverick Gibson played a joke on costar Jodie Foster's birthday by secretly rewriting the script to give her character all corny dialogue. Foster returned the favor by hiring a bagpiper in full Scottish regalia to follow Mel around at the Vanity Fair Oscar party after he won for Braveheart. On the set of Ransom, Gibson presented Ron Howard and Brian Grazer with a mock Braveheart For Your Consideration ad when both Braveheart and Apollo 13 were nominated for Best Picture. The ad was for “Best Moon Shot,” and featured a picture of Braveheart's Scottish army mooning the English.[109] While filming Conspiracy Theory, he and co-star Julia Roberts played a series of pranks on each other, beginning with Gibson welcoming Roberts to the set with a gift-wrapped freeze-dried rat.[110]. In addition to inserting several homages to the Three Stooges in his Lethal Weapon movies, Gibson produced a television movie on the comedy group in 2000. As a gag, Gibson inserted a single subliminal frame of himself smoking a cigarette into the 2005 teaser trailer of Apocalypto[111] This article is about the comedy trio. ... Helena Bonham Carter (born 26 May 1966) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe-nominated English actress, known for her portrayals of Bellatrix Lestrange in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Marla Singer in the film Fight Club, her Oscar-nominated performance as Kate Croy in The Wings... Hamlet is a 1990 film based on the Shakespearean play of the same name. ... Maverick is a 1994 comedy Western movie, based on the 1950s television series Maverick, and created by Roy Huggins. ... Alicia Christian Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... The bagpiper, by Hendrick ter Brugghen (17th Century, Netherlands) Bagpipes are a class of musical instrument, aerophones using enclosed reeds fed from a constant reservoir of air in the form of a bag. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Ransom is a thriller film released in 1996, starring Mel Gibson, Rene Russo, and Gary Sinise and directed by Ron Howard. ... Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... Brian Grazer (born July 12, 1951, in Los Angeles, California) is a Jewish-American film and television producer who founded Imagine Entertainment with partner Ron Howard. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... For Your Consideration is a heading frequently used in advertisements in entertainment trade publications such as Variety and The Hollywood Reporter. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Apollo 13 is a 1995 film portrayal of the ill-fated Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Mooning is the act of displaying ones bare buttocks by removing clothing, e. ... For other uses, see Conspiracy theory (disambiguation). ... Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... This article is about the comedy trio. ... Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... Subliminal may refer to: Subliminal messages Subliminal (rapper), an Israeli rapper and producer Subliminal (record label), an electronic music label known for the Subliminal Sessions compilation series. ... Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ...


Alcohol abuse

Mel Gibson has said that he started drinking at the age of thirteen.[112] In a 2002 interview about his time at NIDA, Gibson said, The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ...

"I had really good highs but some very low lows. I found out recently I'm manic depressive." [113] For other uses, see Bipolar. ...

Gibson has not made any other public mention of having bipolar disorder. For other uses, see Bipolar. ...


In 1984, Gibson was arrested in Toronto for driving with a blood alcohol level between 0.12%-0.13% after he rear-ended a car. According to Clarkson, when the other driver exited his vehicle and began shouting profanity at him, Mel Gibson laughed and offered him a drink. Gibson plead guilty and was fined $300 and banned from driving in Ontario for 3 months. In court he apologized to the Toronto community and thanked the police.[114][115] For the act of consuming a liquid through the mouth, see Drinking . ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


In 1985, Gibson retreated to his Australian farm for over a year to recover, but he continued to struggle with drinking. Despite this problem, Gibson gained a reputation in Hollywood for professionalism and punctuality, so that Lethal Weapon 2 director Richard Donner was shocked when Gibson confided that he was drinking five pints of beer for breakfast.[69] Gibson said in 2003 that his despair in his mid-thirties led him to contemplate suicide, and he meditated on Christ's Passion to heal his wounds.[65] In 1992, Gibson provided financial support to Hollywood's Recovery Center, saying, "Alcoholism is something that runs in my family. It's something that's close to me. People do come back from it, and it's a miracle."[116] ... Lethal Weapon 2 is the second movie in the Lethal Weapon series, released in 1989. ... Richard Donner (born Richard Donald Schwartzberg on April 24, 1930) is an American film director and also producer through the production company, The Donners Company, he and his wife, producer Lauren Shuler-Donner, own. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ...

On July 28, 2006, Gibson was arrested for DUI while speeding in his vehicle with an open container of alcohol. He admitted to making anti-Semitic remarks during his arrest and apologized for his "despicable" behavior, saying the comments were "blurted out in a moment of insanity" and asked to meet with Jewish leaders to help him "discern the appropriate path for healing." When pressed for what his thoughts were at the time in a later interview with Diane Sawyer, he cited the vitriolic attacks on his film The Passion of the Christ and Israel-Lebanon conflict. After Gibson's arrest, his publicist said he had entered a recovery program to battle alcoholism. On August 17, 2006, Gibson pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor drunken-driving charge and was sentenced to three years on probation. Superior Court Judge Lawrence Mira ordered him to attend self-help meetings five times a week for four and a half months and three times a week for the remainder of the first year of his probation. He was also ordered to attend a First Offenders Program, was fined $1,300, and his license was restricted for 90 days. He also volunteered to record a public service announcement. Mel Gibsons mugshot from his July 28, 2006 arrest for DUI On July 28, 2006, at 2:36am PDT,[1] Mel Gibson was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol after being stopped for speeding (84 mph/140 km per hour in a 45 mph/72... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Under the influence. ... This article is about the film. ... Belligerents Hezbollah Amal[1] LCP[2] PFLP-GC[3] Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Imad Mughniyeh Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[4] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[5] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nolo contendere, in criminal trials, in some common law jurisdictions, is a plea where the defendant neither admits nor disputes a charge, serving as an alternative to a pleading of guilty or not guilty. ...


In a October 12, 2006 interview with Diane Sawyer, Gibson spoke on his struggle to remain sober. is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ...

"The risk of everything - life, limb, family - is not enough to keep you from it… You cannot do it of yourself. And people can help, yeah. But it's God. You've got to go there. You've got to do it. Or you won't survive…This whole experience in a way, for me, I'm sort of viewing it now as a kind of a blessing because, firstly, I got stopped before I did any real damage to anyone else. Thank God for that. I didn't hurt myself, you know. I didn't leave my kids fatherless…The other thing is sometimes you need a cold bucket of water in the face to sort of snap to because you're dealing with a sort of a malady of the soul, an obsession of the mind and a physical allergy. And some people need a big tap on the shoulder. In my case, public humiliation on a global scale seems to be what was required."[117]

At a May 2007 progress hearing, Judge Mira praised Gibson for complying with the terms of his probation, saying,

"I know his extensive participation in a self-help program - and I should note he has done extensive work, beyond which was required."[118]

Philanthropy

Although the Gibsons have avoided publicity over their philanthropy, they are believed to spend much money on various charities. One known charity is Healing the Children. According to Cris Embleton, one of the founders, the Gibsons have given millions to provide lifesaving medical treatment to needy children worldwide.[119][120] The Gibsons have also supported the arts, funding the restoration of Renaissance artwork[121] and giving millions of dollars to NIDA.[122] Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ...


While filming the movie Apocalypto in the jungles of Mexico's Veracruz state, Mel Gibson donated one million dollars to the Rotary Club[123] to build houses for poor people in the region after some severe flooding wiped out many homes, stating: Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 212 Largest City Veracruz Government  - Governor Fidel Herrera Beltrán (PRI)  - Federal Deputies PRI: 6 PAN: 11 PRD: 2 Convergencia: 2  - Federal Senators PRD: 1 PAN: 1 Convergencia: 1 Area Ranked 11th  - Total 71,699 km² (27,683. ... Logo of Rotary International Rotary International is an organisation whose members comprise Rotary Clubs (service clubs) located all over the world. ...

"[T]hey had a lot of floods down there. It was like Louisiana down there in the southern regions. They had severe flooding and something like a million people were displaced and washed out. I've always been of the opinion that if you go into someone else's country to make a film you don't just go in there and stomp all over the place. You bring a gift. It's like going to somebody's house. You bring them a bottle of wine or a bunch of flowers or a box of chocolates and it's the same sort of thing on a big scale when you're going in to somebody's country and they are going to help you make your film. You help them first somehow or you give them a gift or you help in what way you can. So we sort of assisted with the flood relief stuff down there."[124]

Gibson has a reputation for discreetly assisting members of the entertainment community with substance abuse problems. He worked behind the scenes to get Robert Downey, Jr. some help at Corcoran State Prison.[125] Hole rocker Courtney Love praised Mel Gibson for saving her from a drug relapse after the Hollywood actor helped force her into rehab. Gibson sought to help the musician at a hotel in Los Angeles when he heard she was using drugs again. Love later recalled, Robert John Downey, Jr. ... California State Prison, Corcoran (COR) is a male-only California state prison located in the city of Corcoran, in Kings County. ... -1... Courtney Love[1] (born Courtney Michelle Harrison on July 9, 1964) is an American rock musician. ...

"I kept slamming the door in (Gibson's) face. There were two drug people with me who wouldn't leave, so they couldn't get me to rehab. But because of Mel, two drug people ran off to have a cheeseburger with him because he's Mel, and then Warren [Boyd] (her drug minder) could get me into rehab."[126]

Gibson has donated $500,000 to the El Mirador Basin Project to protect the last tract of virgin rain forest in Central America and to fund archeological excavations in the "cradle of Mayan civilization."[127] In July 2007, Gibson again visited Central America to make arrangements for donations to the indigenous population. Gibson met with Costa Rican President Oscar Arias to discuss how to "channel the funds."[128] During the same month, Gibson pledged to give financial assistance to a Malaysian company named Green Rubber Global for a tire recycling factory located in Gallup, New Mexico.[129] While on a business trip to Singapore in September 2007, Gibson donated to a local charity for children with chronic and terminal illnesses.[130] The Mirador Basin is a geographically defined elevated basin found in the remote rain forest of the northern department of Petén , Guatemala. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... Gallup (Navajo: Naʼnízhoozhí) is a city in McKinley County, New Mexico, United States. ...


Quotations

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • "I've been goofing off all my life. I thought might as well get paid for that." — explanation for why he wanted to be an actor at his 1975 NIDA audition.
  • "[In Hollywood] you have to realize you're working in a factory and you're part of the mechanism. If you break down, you'll be replaced, and there should never be any offense taken at people's attitudes." — Los Angeles Times, May 6, 1990
  • "I am politically incorrect, that's true. Political correctness to me is just intellectual terrorism. I find that really scary, and I won't be intimidated into changing my mind. Everyone isn't going to love you all the time." — 1996 interview with Roald Rynning

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ...

Filmography

For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Tim (1979) is an Australian romance movie between an older woman (played by Piper Laurie) and a younger, retarted man (played by Mel Gibson). ... Road Warrior redirects here. ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... The Year of Living Dangerously is a novel by Christopher Koch, which was made into a film in 1982, directed by Peter Weir and written by Koch, Weir, and David Williamson. ... This article is about the 1984 film. ... The River is a 1984 film which tells the story of an American farm family which tries to keep its farm going in the face of bank foreclosures, floods, and other hard times. ... Mrs. ... Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome is a 1985 film, the third installment to the action movie Mad Max. ... Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... Tequila Sunrise is a 1988 movie written and directed by Oscar-winner Robert Towne. ... Lethal Weapon 2 is the second movie in the Lethal Weapon series, released in 1989. ... Bird on a Wire redirects here. ... Air America is a 1990 film starring Mel Gibson and Robert Downey Jr as Air America pilots in Vietnam War era Laos. ... Hamlet is a 1990 film based on the Shakespearean play of the same name. ... Forever Young is a 1992 film. ... Lethal Weapon 3 is a 1992 film starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Rene Russo and Stuart Wilson. ... Maverick is a 1994 comedy Western movie, based on the 1950s television series Maverick, and created by Roy Huggins. ... Pocahontas is the thirty-third animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... Ransom is a thriller film released in 1996, starring Mel Gibson, Rene Russo, and Gary Sinise and directed by Ron Howard. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Lethal Weapon 4 is a 1998 buddy cop action-comedy film directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Rene Russo, Chris Rock and Jet Li. ... Payback is a 1999 action film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Brian Helgeland. ... This article is about the movie. ... The Patriot is a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Roland Emmerich. ... What Women Want is a [[2000 in film|2000](with fantasy elements), directed by Nancy Meyers and starring Mel Gibson and Helen Hunt. ... The Million Dollar Hotel is an English language 2000 movie based on a concept story by Bono of Irish rock band U2 and Nicholas Klein and directed by Wim Wenders. ... We Were Soldiers is a 2002 war film that dramatized the Battle of Ia Drang in November 1965, the first major engagement of American troops in the Vietnam War. ... Signs is a 2002 science fiction thriller film directed by M. Night Shyamalan starring Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix, Rory Culkin, and Abigail Breslin. ... Paparazzi is a 2004 action film directed by Paul Abascal, produced by actor Mel Gibson, and starring Cole Hauser and Tom Sizemore. ... This article is about the television miniseries. ... The Man Without a Face is a 1993 drama starring and directed by Mel Gibson. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... This article is about the film. ... Apocalypto is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 epic film directed by Mel Gibson, starring Rudy Youngblood. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...

Awards and accomplishments

  • Australian Film Institute: Best Actor in a Lead Role, Tim (1979)
  • Australian Film Institute: Best Actor in a Lead Role, Gallipoli (1981)
  • People's Choice Awards: Favorite Motion Picture Actor (1991)
  • MTV Movie Awards: Best Action Sequence, Lethal Weapon 3 (1993)
  • MTV Movie Awards: Best On-Screen Duo, Lethal Weapon 3 (1993) - shared with Danny Glover
  • ShoWest Award: Male Star of the Year (1993)
  • National Board of Review: Special Achievement in Filmmaking, Braveheart (1995)
  • American Cinematheque Gala Tribute: American Cinematheque Award (1995)
  • ShoWest Award: Director of the Year (1996)
  • Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards: Best Director, Braveheart (1996)
  • Golden Globe Awards: Best Director, Braveheart (1996)
  • Academy Awards: Best Director, Braveheart (1996)
  • Academy Awards: Best Picture, Braveheart (1996)
  • People's Choice Awards: Favorite Motion Picture Actor (1997)
  • Hasty Pudding Theatricals: Man of the Year (1997)
  • Blockbuster Entertainment Awards: Favorite Actor - Suspense, Ransom (1997)
  • Blockbuster Entertainment Awards: Favorite Actor - Suspense, Conspiracy Theory (1998)
  • People's Choice Awards: Favorite Motion Picture Star in a Drama (2001)
  • People's Choice Awards: Favorite Motion Picture Actor (2001)
  • Blockbuster Entertainment Awards: Favorite Actor - Drama, The Patriot (2001)
  • Australian Film Institute: Global Achievement Award (2002)
  • People's Choice Awards: Favorite Motion Picture Actor (2003)
  • Honorary Doctorate Recipient and Undergraduate Commencement Speaker, Loyola Marymount University (2003)
  • People's Choice Awards: Favorite Motion Picture Actor (2004)
  • Named as the world's most powerful celebrity by US business magazine Forbes (2004)
  • Outstanding Contribution to World Cinema Award at the Irish Film and Television Awards (2008)[131]
Awards
Preceded by
Bill Hunter
for Newsfront
Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
1979
for Tim
Succeeded by
Jack Thompson
for Breaker Morant
Preceded by
Jack Thompson
for Breaker Morant
Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
1981
for Gallipoli
Succeeded by
Ray Barrett
for Goodbye Paradise
Preceded by
Robert Zemeckis
for Forrest Gump
Academy Award for Best Director
1995
for Braveheart
Succeeded by
Anthony Minghella
for The English Patient
Preceded by
Robert Zemeckis
for Forrest Gump
Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture
1996
for Braveheart
Succeeded by
Milos Forman
for The People Vs. Larry Flynt
Preceded by
N/A
People's Sexiest Man Alive
1985
Inaugural Year
Succeeded by
Mark Harmon

The Australian Film Institute (AFI), established in 1958, is an organisation that promotes Australian film and television through the annual AFI Awards, a membership program and AFI film events throughout the year. ... Tim (1979) is an Australian romance movie between an older woman (played by Piper Laurie) and a younger, retarted man (played by Mel Gibson). ... The Australian Film Institute (AFI), established in 1958, is an organisation that promotes Australian film and television through the annual AFI Awards, a membership program and AFI film events throughout the year. ... The Peoples Choice Awards, held annually in January, is one of the few awards shows to be based on popularity. ... The MTV Movie Awards is a film awards show presented annually on MTV (Music Television). ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George B. McClellan, Jr. ... The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is the largest film critics organization in the U.S. and Canada, representing 199 television, radio and online critics. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals and for its status as the oldest collegiate theatrical organization in the United States. ... Loyola Marymount University (LMU) is a comprehensive co-educational private Roman Catholic Jesuit university in Los Angeles, California, USA. The University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and one of five Marymount institutions of higher education. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... Bill Hunter (born February 27, 1940) is one of Australias acting legends, having worked with almost every notable Australian director and actor of the last thirty years - evidence of his genuine popularity amongst the public and acting fraternity alike. ... Newsfront is a 1978 Australian drama film starring Bill Hunter, Wendy Hughes, and Bryan Brown, directed by Phillip Noyce. ... The Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role is an award in the annual Australian Film Institute Awards. ... Tim (1979) is an Australian romance movie between an older woman (played by Piper Laurie) and a younger, retarted man (played by Mel Gibson). ... Jack Thompson AM (born August 31, 1940) is an Australian actor and one of the major figures of Australian cinema. ... Breaker Morant is a 1980 Australian feature film, directed by Bruce Beresford and starring British actor Edward Woodward in the title role. ... Jack Thompson AM (born August 31, 1940) is an Australian actor and one of the major figures of Australian cinema. ... Breaker Morant is a 1980 Australian feature film, directed by Bruce Beresford and starring British actor Edward Woodward in the title role. ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... Ray Barrett (born 2 May 1927in Brisbane, Queensland) is an Australian actor. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Anthony Minghella (January 6, 1954–March 18, 2008[1]) was an Academy Award-winning English film director, playwright and screenwriter. ... The English Patient is a 1996 film adaptation of the novel by Michael Ondaatje. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Jan Tomáš Forman (born February 18, 1932), better known as Miloš Forman, is a film director, actor and script writer. ... The People vs. ... For the musician of the same name, see Mark Harmon (musician). ...

References

  1. ^ 1995 Academy Awards
  2. ^ Box Office Mojo.com Domestic Total Gross:$370,782,930 60.6% + Foreign: $241,116,490 39.4%
  3. ^ Jesus helps Mel hit No. 1: Controversial film gives Gibson the most weight on Forbes power list; Britney off the chart again June 18, 2004
  4. ^ Ancestry of Mel Gibson
  5. ^ Michael Dwyer, The Irish Times film critic, interviewed on RTÉ Radio 1's This week programme, 6 August 2006.
  6. ^ Stephen M. Silverman. Jonathan Rhys Meyers Crowned Best Actor in Ireland. People Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-03-02.
  7. ^ Mel Gibson: Living Dangerously, Wensley Clarkson, Thunder's Mouth Press, New York, 1993, page 30.
  8. ^ Wendy Grossman. Is the Pope Catholic?. Dallas Observer. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  9. ^ Graeme Blundell. "Youth with stars in their eyes", The Australian, 2008-05-24. 
  10. ^ “A Night on Mount Edna,” 15 December 1990
  11. ^ Robert Weller. "Welcome to Telluride - Now Go Away", Associated Press, 1993-07-17. 
  12. ^ Erin McWhirter. "Robert Downey Jr has irons in the fire", The Courier Mail, 2008-05-01. 
  13. ^ Dan Cox and Michael Fleming. "Gibson in talks for 'Patriot'", Daily Variety, 1999-02-01. 
  14. ^ "Gibson Downey Jr becomes Hamlet", BBC, 2000-09-21. 
  15. ^ Vincent Canby. "New Faces Brighten a Mixed Batch of Movies", The New York Times, 1982-08-29. 
  16. ^ Vernon Scott. "Mel Gibson: Australia's new hunk", U.P.I., 1983-02-24. 
  17. ^ Roles turned down by Mel Gibson
  18. ^ Mel Gibson: Living Dangerously, pages 170-171, by Wensley Clarkson
  19. ^ Search Australian Honours - Simple Search
  20. ^ Order of Australia Association
  21. ^ Think You Know Sexy?
  22. ^ "It was a definite decision to make a protest against the nuclear tests", said Gibson, who is mad at French President Jacques Chirac for deciding to detonate some bombs in the Pacific. “The Hollywood Reporter” October 30, 1995, by Stephen Galloway
  23. ^ Michael Moore Defends Cruise, Slags Gibson September 16, 2006
  24. ^ (2001) in Mary Packard and the editors of Ripley Entertainment: Ripley's Believe It or Not! Special Edition, Leanne Franson (illustrations), 1st ed., Scholastic Inc.. ISBN 0-439-26040-X. 
  25. ^ Vincent Canby. "Year of Living Dangerously", New York Times, 1983-01-21. 
  26. ^ Michael Fleming. "Mel’s Movies", Movieline, July 2000. 
  27. ^ Vernon Scott. "Mel Gibson: Australia's new hunk", U.P.I., 1983-02-24. 
  28. ^ Davin Seay. "An American from Kangaroo-land hops to the top", Ampersand, February 1983. 
  29. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mzsz08GKhv0 GTV 9 Don Lane Show, Interview with Peter Weir and Mel Gibson, 1982
  30. ^ Michael Fleming. "Mel’s Movies", Movieline, July 2000. 
  31. ^ Michael Fleming. "Mel’s Movies", Movieline, July 2000. 
  32. ^ Joan Goodman. "Mel Gibson: Living Dangerously", Playgirl, December 1984. 
  33. ^ The best -- and worst -- movie battle scenes April 2, 2007
  34. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Movie Reviews: The Passion of the Christ", Chicago Sun-Times, 2004-02-2. Retrieved on 2006-08-02. (English) 
  35. ^ Scott, A. O.. "FILM REVIEW; Good and Evil Locked In Violent Showdown", New York Times, 2004-02-25. Retrieved on 2006-08-05. (English) 
  36. ^ Event Report: "Mel Gibson Goes Mad At CSU" - CinemaBlend.com - March 23, 2007
  37. ^ Gussow, Mel. "The Strange Case of the Madman With a Quotation for Every Word", New York Times, 1998-09-07. Retrieved on 2007-11-07. 
  38. ^ 10 minutes with Mel Gibson: "When going green comes naturally" - The New Straits Times - September 1, 2007 - accessed September 9, 2007
  39. ^ "Mel Gibson to film in Panama?" - Opodo Travel News - March 7, 2007
  40. ^ Mel Gibson Thinking About Setting Next Splatter Film In Panama March 6, 2007
  41. ^ Enter the eco warrior The Star (Malaysia) - September 10, 2007 - accessed September 10, 2007
  42. ^ [http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,22606,22591118-2682,00.html The Advertiser: Star's family farewell father
  43. ^ [1] Mel Gibson has become a granddad.
  44. ^ Hannah Gibson marrying Shepherd
  45. ^ Mel Gibson's Daughter Marries Guitarist
  46. ^ George Rush and Joanna Molloy, "New York Daily News" September 18, 2002
  47. ^ Mel Gibson denied bid to reclassify estate as farm Jan 17, 2005
  48. ^ Mel Gibson: Hollywood Takes Sides August 4, 2006
  49. ^ Mel Gibson selling up 16 September 2004
  50. ^ "Displaced Fijians may sue island-buying Mel Gibson", Sydney Morning Herald, 2005-05-03. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. 
  51. ^ "Gibson's neighbor buys his Beartooth Ranch", Deseret News, 2005-02-28. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. 
  52. ^ Mel Gibson reportedly listing his Greenwich, CT estate for $39.5M; status of his Malibu properties is uncertain July 12, 2007
  53. ^ Mel Gibson sells Malibu home for $30 million: Star bought the property two years ago for $24 million July 30, 2007
  54. ^ "10 minutes with Mel Gibson: When going green comes naturally", New Strait Times, 2007-09-01. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. 
  55. ^ vbuttons.com
  56. ^ artcyclopedia.com
  57. ^ Gibson's height 1
  58. ^ Mel Gibson at the Internet Movie Database
  59. ^ celebheights.com
  60. ^ Mel Gibson sets the record straight on his height and talks about what women want on Parkinson March 1, 2002
  61. ^ "As for Mel Gibson, in spite of his silence over the years promoting his film, like his father, I knew he was (and still is) a Sedevacantist. For this reason, I went through great pains to get him and Lucia of Fatima together at Coimbra. My hope was that she would convert him back to the true Church."
    Report by author PhD Richard Salbato, who personally met Mel Gibson and brought him to Sister Lucy of Fatima.
    Source: 'Gerry Matatics is not a sedevacantist' In: Unity Publishing Online Edition
  62. ^ Mike Goodridge in Screen International “The Passion of Mel Gibson” pg 12, February 20, 2004
  63. ^ Peggy Noonan in Readers Digest “Face to Face with Mel Gibson,” February 2004
  64. ^ “Whose Passion? Media, Faith & Controversy” panel discussion video, time 1:05
  65. ^ a b Peter J. Boyer, The New Yorker, September 15, 2003
  66. ^ [Jesus answered, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." John 14:6]
  67. ^ Inside Mel Gibson's "Passion"
  68. ^ Salon on The Passion: Two Pods Down January 27, 2004
  69. ^ a b ""Transcript of February 2004 Primetime"". Retrieved on 2006-07-31. 
  70. ^ Gibson attends Roman Catholic Confirmation in Mexico
    Mel Gibson y el Obispo emérito de Hermosillo
  71. ^ Mel Gibson visits Archbishop
  72. ^ a b Apocalypto Now Mar. 19, 2006
  73. ^ “Whose Passion? Media, Faith & Controversy” panel discussion video, time 1:05
  74. ^ The Year of Living Dangerously
  75. ^ Mel Gibson Pushed for President
  76. ^ Moore, Gibson: I Love His Work
  77. ^ Not so hot: Fahrenheit 9/11 is more smoke than fire
  78. ^ http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/05/06/MNGIH6GI6C1.DTL 'Fahrenheit 9/11' too hot for Disney by Ruthe Stein, May 6, 2004
  79. ^ a b Grobel, Lawrence, "Interview: Mel Gibson". Playboy. July 1995. Vol. 42, No. 7, Pg. 51. Retrieved May 17, 2006.
  80. ^ a b The Daily Telegraph, January 30, 1999, pg 33, "Did I say that?" by Nui Te Koha
  81. ^ Braveheart Stands Athwart a Brave New World November 01, 2004
  82. ^ It's Modern Crucifixion
  83. ^ Mel Gibson joins stars to question Iraq war March 18, 2004
  84. ^ Mel Gibson to Meet Up-and-Coming Lesbian and Gay Filmmakers
  85. ^ Gays Should Beware of Men in Kilts
  86. ^ Masculinity and marginality in 'Rob Roy' and 'Braveheart' Winter 1997
  87. ^ The San Francisco Chronicle, May 21, 1995, “Mel Gibson Dons Kilt and Directs” by Ruth Stein
  88. ^ Matt Zoller Seitz. Mel Gibson talks about Braveheart, movie stardom, and media treachery. Dallas Observer. Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
  89. ^ USA Today, May 24, 1995, “Gibson has faith in family and freedom” by Marco R. della Cava
  90. ^ The Passion of the Christ
  91. ^ [2] Herod Antipas in The Passion of the Christ
  92. ^ “Mel's a Bit Stiff Off Camera,” Ruthe Stein, The San Francisco Chronicle, March 12, 1996.
  93. ^ “Revolutionary superstar Reserved Mel Gibson drops guard enough to push 'The Patriot' ” The Daily Oklahoman, June 25, 2000, by Gene Triplett
  94. ^ Mel Gibson; Living Dangerously, Page 8, by Wensley Clarkson
  95. ^ Williams, Jeannie. "Gibson misses opening after mom dies", USA Today, 1990-12-12. (English) 
  96. ^ “Revolutionary superstar Reserved Mel Gibson drops guard enough to push 'The Patriot' ” The Daily Oklahoman, June 25, 2000, by Gene Triplett
  97. ^ Australia poll promises close result November 5, 1999
  98. ^ Some criticism of The Passion
  99. ^ USCCB stance on The Passion dramatizations
  100. ^ Gibson's Anti-Semitic Tirade - Alleged Cover Up; TMZ.com; July 28, 2006
  101. ^ Event Report: Mel Gibson Goes Mad At CSU 2007-03-23
  102. ^ Apocalypto...and Gibson!batshit insanity 2007-03-23
  103. ^ Letter to the Editor April 12, 2007
  104. ^ Cohen, Sandy; "Gibson at center of campus uproar after prof challenges movie" SFGate.com; March 23, 2007
  105. ^ "Mel Goes Ballistic -- "Lady, F**k Off!"; TMZ.com story and video on Gibson and Estrada's confrontation.
  106. ^ Mel Gibson: Clowning Around; Anecdotage.com Accessed August 3, 2006
  107. ^ The Passion of Mel Gibson Jan. 19, 2003, Time.com Accessed September 9, 2007
  108. ^ Wensley Clarkson's "Mel Gibson: Living Dangerously", page 287
  109. ^ To Mel & Back2
  110. ^ Mel's Other 'Passion': Practical Jokes Accessed September 2, 2007, etonline.com
  111. ^ Teaser Trailer. Frame 2546. Timecode 01:01:47:03. Time 00:01:46
  112. ^ Rant aftermath a gift, says Gibson January 15, 2007
  113. ^ Elicia Murray and Garry Maddox (2008-05-15). Mel opens up, but ever so fleetingly. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved on 2008-05-15.
  114. ^ Matt Zoller Seitz. Mel Gibson talks about Braveheart, movie stardom, and media treachery. Dallas Observer. Retrieved on 2006-07-29.
  115. ^ The Associated Press, May 3, 1984
  116. ^ By Bill Higgins, Los Angeles Times, December 14, 1992
  117. ^ Gibson: 'Public Humiliation on a Global Scale' Made Him Address Alcoholism. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  118. ^ Mel Gibson Praised for Progress in Alcohol Rehab May 12, 2007
  119. ^ Actor and Director Mel Gibson Donates $10 Million
  120. ^ Mel's $14m donation
  121. ^ "Mel Gibson and Sting to fund David restoration", The Telegraph, 2003-07-16. Retrieved on 2007-09-23. 
  122. ^ "Mel An Interview with John Clark", Quadrant Magazine, May 2004. Retrieved on 2007-09-23. 
  123. ^ Mel Gibson gives Rotary $1 million for Mexico disaster recovery
  124. ^ Mel Gibson Reveals His Apocalypto October 30, 2006
  125. ^ "SHOWBIZ 7s: The delicate art of the celebrity interview", Los Angeles Times, 2007-10-02. Retrieved on 2007-10-03. 
  126. ^ Gibson Saves Love From Drugs
  127. ^ "Enter the eco warrior", The Star (Malaysia), 2007-09-10. Retrieved on 2007-09-13. 
  128. ^ Mel Gibson Meets With Costa Rican Leader July 10, 2007
  129. ^ Mel Gibson Backs Green Rubber July 12, 2007
  130. ^ "Mel Gibson makes S$25,000 donation to charity organisation", Channel NewsAsia, 2007-09-14. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. 
  131. ^ RTÉ.ie Entertainment: Mel Gibson to be honoured at IFTA ceremony

is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Irish Times Trust be merged into this article or section. ... Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ; Irish for Radio and Television of Ireland) is the national publicly-funded broadcaster of Ireland. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... People, a weekly magazine of celebrity and popular culture news, debuted on February 27, 1974. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian is a national daily broadsheet newspaper published by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Mail is the only daily newspaper published in Brisbane, Australia. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily magazine for the entertainment industry. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with The Straits Times, the Singaporean newspaper. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Star can refer to a film from 1952 a Malaysian newspaper The Star an abbreviation for many newspapers with Star in the title, such as The Irish Star, the Daily Star, the Toronto Star etc. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... TMZ.com is a celebrity gossip and news website, the result of a collaboration between AOL and Telepictures Productions, a division of Warner Bros. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Star is the leading English-language newspaper in Malaysia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Channel NewsAsia (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated CNA) is a pan-Asian news channel based in Singapore and owned by MediaCorp. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Published sources

  • McCarty, John (September 2001). The Films Of Mel Gibson. Citadel. ISBN 0806522267. 
  • Clarkson, Wensley (September 2004). Mel Gibson, Man on a Mission. John Blake. ISBN 1-85782-537-3. 

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
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Mel Gibson
Persondata
NAME Gibson, Mel
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson
SHORT DESCRIPTION American actor, director, and producer
DATE OF BIRTH January 3, 1956
PLACE OF BIRTH Peekskill, New York
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... Lethal Weapon 2 is the second movie in the Lethal Weapon series, released in 1989. ... Lethal Weapon 3 is a 1992 film starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Rene Russo and Stuart Wilson. ... Lethal Weapon 4 is a 1998 buddy cop action-comedy film directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Rene Russo, Chris Rock and Jet Li. ... Martin Riggs (born 1950) is a fictional police officer from the Lethal Weapon franchise. ... Roger Murtaugh (born December 15th, 1937) is a fictional character in the Lethal Weapon films, played in all four by Danny Glover. ... Danny Lebern Glover( Glover pronounced with a long O)[1] (born July 22, 1946) is an American actor, film director, and political activist. ... Joseph Frank Joe Pesci ( Born February 9, 1943 ) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer. ... Rene Russo Rene Russo (born February 17, 1954 in Burbank, California, USA) is an American film actress and model. ... Christopher Julius Rock III[5] (born February 7, 1965)[6][7] is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... Darlene Love (born Darlene Wright, 26 July 1941, Los Angeles, California) is an American popular music singer. ... Mary Ellen Trainor is a American film and television actress who is probably best remembered as either Dr. Stephanie Woods in the Lethal Weapon movies or as Harriet Walsh (the mother) in The Goonies. ... William Gareth Jacob Gary Busey, Sr. ... Mitchell Ryan (January 11, 1928-) is an American actor known as Gregs father on Dharma & Greg. ... Tom Atkins as Dr. Dan Challis in the last scene of Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982). ... Jackie Swanson (born June 25, 1963) is an American actress. ... Ed ORoss was born on July 4, 1946 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Joss Ackland CBE (born Sidney Edmond Jocelyn Ackland on February 29, 1928 in North Kensington, London) is an English actor who has appeared in more than 130 films in his career. ... Derrick OConnor is a character actor, mostly known for his roles in Terry Gilliam films. ... Patricia Jude Frances Kensit (born 4 March 1968 in Hounslow, Middlesex) is an English actress and singer, and is also well-known for her three celebrity marriages. ... Li Lianjie (Simplified Chinese: 李连杰; Traditional Chinese: 李連杰; pinyin: Lǐ Liánjié; born April 26, 1963), better known by his stage name Jet Li, is a Chinese martial artist (Kung Fu), actor, Wushu champion, and international film star. ... Kim Chan is an actor and producer. ... Richard Donner (born Richard Donald Schwartzberg on April 24, 1930) is an American film director and also producer through the production company, The Donners Company, he and his wife, producer Lauren Shuler-Donner, own. ... Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Hollywood film producer. ... Shane Black (born December 16, 1961) is an American actor, screenwriter and film director. ... Michael Kamen (April 15, 1948 – November 18, 2003) was an American composer (especially of film scores), orchestral arranger, orchestral conductor, song writer, and session musician. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... For other persons named David Sanborn, see David Sanborn (disambiguation). ... Stephen Goldblatt is an Oscar nominated cinematographer. ... Stuart Baird is a British film editor, producer, and director who is mainly associated with action films. ... Rorion Gracie is a martial artist and a prominent member of the Gracie family. ... Dar Allen Robinson (March 26, 1947 – November 21, 1986) was a film stuntman and film actor. ... Warren Murphy (born in Jersey City, New Jersey, September 13, 1933) is an American author, most famous as the co-creator of The Destroyer series, the basis for the film Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins. ... Jeffrey Boam (November 30, 1949 – January 24, 2000) was an American screenwriter and producer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Jan de Bont (born October 22, 1943) is a Dutch cameraman and film director. ... Jonathan Lemkin is an American screenwriter. ... Alfred Gough is a screenwriter and producer. ... Miles Millar is a screenwriter and producer. ... Andrzej Bartkowiak (Born 1950 in Lodz, Poland) is a Polish cinematographer, director and actor. ... Performed by Eric Clapton, David Sanborn, and Michael Kamen. ... This is the soundtrack to the movie Lethal Weapon 3 (1992). ... Jingle Bell Rock is the name of a popular Christmas song. ... Cheer Down is a song with music written by George Harrison and lyrics written by Harrison and Tom Petty. ... For other uses, see Knockin on Heavens Door (disambiguation). ... Since I Dont Have You is a song by doo wop group The Skyliners. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fire in the hole is a standard warning, used in many countries in the world, indicating that an explosive detonation in a confined space is imminent. ... Why Cant We Be Friends? is a name of a recording by War, recorded in 1974 and released in 1975. ... Lethal Weapon is a video game released for the Nintendo Entertainment System and Game Boy in 1992 by Ocean. ... Lethal Weapon the ride, is a fast paced Roller coaster in Warner Bros. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peekskill is a city in Westchester County, New York. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mel Gibson Relationships (754 words)
Mel Gibson is apt to do more than his fair share in the family, to go the extra mile, but for the most part this is satisfying rather than burdensome to him.
Mel Gibson does not want to be caged or dictated to, and he feels everyone is entitled to do as they please in their personal and emotional affairs.
Gibson tends to surround himself with people who are unusual, creative, open-minded, unpredictable, restless, and changeable, and his relationships, with women in particular, may be somewhat unstable as a result.
Mel Gibson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4427 words)
Gibson was born in Peekskill, New York, the sixth of ten children born to Hutton Gibson and Anne Reilly Gibson.
Gibson's first name comes from a 5th-century Irish saint, Mel, founder of the diocese of Ardagh containing most of his mother's native county, while his second name, Columcille is also linked to an Irish saint.
Gibson has stated that it was more cinematically compelling to falsely include the Droit de seigneur because it portrayed Edward Longshanks, the King of England played by Patrick McGoohan as a sinister tyrant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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