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Encyclopedia > Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks circa February 1984
Birth name Melvin Kaminsky
Born June 28, 1926 (1926-06-28) (age 81)
Brooklyn, New York

Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. Image File history File links Actor, writer director and theatrical producer Mel Brooks in the talk show Parkinson, hosted by Michael Parkinson. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... The Producers may refer to one of the following: American actor and writer director Mel Brooks comedy about two con-men who attempt to cheat theatre investors out of their investment money. ... An Emmy Award. ... Winners of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series: Outstanding Guest Actor, Comedy Series 1989: Cleavon Little, Dear John 1990: Jay Thomas, Murphy Brown 1991: Jay Thomas, Murphy Brown 1992: no information 1993: David Clennon, Dream On 1994: Martin Sheen, Murphy Brown 1995: Carl Reiner... Mad About You is an American sitcom that aired on NBC from September 23, 1992, to May 24, 1999. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Comedy Album was awarded from 1994 until 2003. ... Cover of the 2000 Year Old Man album The 2000 Year Old Man was a persona created by Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner starting around 1961. ... The Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video has been awarded since 1984. ... The Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album has been awarded since 1959. ... This article is about the 2001 stage musical. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... This article is about the 2001 stage musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... This article is about the 2001 stage musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... This article is about the 2001 stage musical. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... Look up farce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Born Melvin Kaminsky in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., to Polish-Jewish parents Maximillian Kaminsky and Kate "Kittie" Brookman. Brooks' grandfather, Abraham Kaminsky, was a herring dealer who immigrated in 1893. He and his wife Bertha raised their ten children on Henry Street on the Lower East Side of New York City. This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Species Clupea alba Clupea bentincki Clupea caspiopontica Clupea chrysotaenia Clupea elongata Clupea halec Clupea harengus Clupea inermis Clupea leachii Clupea lineolata Clupea minima Clupea mirabilis Clupea pallasii Clupea sardinacaroli Clupea sulcata Herrings are small oily fish of the genus Clupea found in the shallow, temperate waters of the North Atlantic... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


His father died of kidney disease at age 34. A year later, in 1930, Kittie Kaminsky and her sons Irving, Leonard, Bernard and Melvin were living at 365 S. 3rd St. in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY.


As a child, Mel was a small and sickly boy. He was bullied and picked on by his peers. By taking on the comically aggressive job of Tummler in various Catskills resorts, he overcame his childhood of bullying and name calling.[1] This is a list of English language words of Yiddish language origin, many of which have entered the language by way of American English or Cockney. ...


He went to school in New York. For elementary, he went to Public School 19 (Williamsburg). For middle school, he went to Francis Scott Key, Jr. High (Williamsburg). Brooks graduated from Abraham Lincoln High School (New York).[citation needed]


In June 1944, Brooks enlisted in the Army.[1] He had basic training at Virginia Military Institute and finished up at Fort Sill in Oklahoma. He was shipped off to war in February of 1945 where he initially served as forward observer for the artillery. Shortly thereafter, Brooks was reassigned to the 1104th Combat Engineers Group. Several months later, Germany had surrendered and Brooks was promoted to corporal. He continued to serve in Germany for another four months in charge of Special Services (entertainment). Brooks completed his service at Fort Dix in New Jersey.


Career

He started out in show business as a stand-up comic, telling jokes and doing movie-star impressions. He found more rewarding work behind the scenes, becoming a comedy writer for television. He joined the hit comedy series Your Show of Shows with Sid Caesar and Carl Reiner. Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... Carl Reiner (born March 20, 1922) is an American actor, film director, producer, writer and comedian. ...


In 1960, an attack of gout (and the aftermath of the surgery done to relieve it) left him allegedly feeling like a 2000-year-old man. This became the persona of The 2000-Year-Old Man, the focus of ad-libbed comedy routines and comedy records, with Carl Reiner as his straight man. Carl Reiner (born March 20, 1922) is an American actor, film director, producer, writer and comedian. ...


Mel Brooks working as an actor, director, writer, and producer. Brooks' first film was The Critic (1963), an animated satire of arty, esoteric cinema, conceived by Brooks and directed by Ernest Pintoff. Brooks supplied running commentary as the baffled moviegoer trying to make sense of the obscure visuals. The short film won an Academy Award. The Critic is a 1963 short animation by director/producer Ernest Pintoff and creator/narrator Mel Brooks, that won an Academy Award for Short Subjects (Cartoons) in 1963 Simple, abstract, geometric shapes move and morph on the screen to what sounds like harpsichord music. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


With Buck Henry, Brooks created the successful TV series Get Smart, starring Don Adams as a bumbling secret agent. This series added to Brooks' reputation as a clever satirist. Buck Henry Zuckerman (born December 9, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American actor, writer and director, best known for his work in television, film, comedy, and satire. ... Get Smart was an American comedy television series that satirized the secret agent genre. ... For American former professional basketball player, see Don Adams (basketball). ...


Brooks' first feature film, The Producers, was a black comedy about two theatrical partners who deliberately contrive the worst possible Broadway show. The film was so brazen in its satire (its big production number was "Springtime for Hitler") that the major studios wouldn't touch it, nor would many exhibitors. Brooks finally found an independent distributor, which released it like an art film, as a specialized attraction. Despite horrible reviews ("thoroughly vile and inept") and disappointing boxoffice returns[citation needed], the film received an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. The film became a smash underground hit, first on the nationwide college circuit, then in revivals and on home video. Brooks later turned it into a musical, which became one of the most popular Broadway shows. This page is about the 1968 film. ... A row of dancing stormtroopers in the infamous opening musical number from Springtime for Hitler. ...


His two most financially successful films were released in 1974: Blazing Saddles (co-written with Richard Pryor, Andrew Bergman, Norman Steinberg and Alan Uger), and Young Frankenstein (co-written with Gene Wilder). He followed these up with an audacious idea: the first feature-length silent comedy in four decades. Silent Movie (1976) featured Brooks in his first leading role, with Dom DeLuise and Marty Feldman as his sidekicks. The following year he released his Hitchcock parody High Anxiety. Alex Karras as Mongo in Blazing Saddles Blazing Saddles (1974) is a comedy directed by Mel Brooks and starring Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder, and released by Warner Brothers. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Andrew Bergman is an American screenwriter, director, and novelist born in 1945. ... Young Frankenstein is a 1974 comedy film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Gene Wilder as the title character. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... This article is about the comedy film. ... Dominick Dom DeLuise (born August 1, 1933) is an American actor who has starred in numerous roles, mostly comedic. ... Martin Alan Marty Feldman (8 July 1934[1] – 2 December 1982) was an English writer, comedian and BAFTA award winning actor, notable for his bulging eyes, which were the result of a thyroid condition known as Graves Disease. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... High Anxiety is a 1977 comedy film directed by and starring Mel Brooks. ...


Brooks developed a repertory company of sorts for his film work: performers with three or more Brooks films to their credit include Gene Wilder, Dom DeLuise, Madeline Kahn, Harvey Korman, Cloris Leachman, Ron Carey and Andréas Voutsinas. Dom DeLuise has appeared in six of Brooks' 12 films, the only person with more appearances being Brooks himself. Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Dominick Dom DeLuise (born August 1, 1933) is an American actor who has starred in numerous roles, mostly comedic. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Actor Harvey Korman in the 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles. ... Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an Academy Award, nine-time Emmy and Golden Globe winning American actress of stage, film and television. ... Ron Carey (Born December 11, 1935 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American film and television actor. ... Andréas Voutsinas is a French actor. ... Dominick Dom DeLuise (born August 1, 1933) is an American actor who has starred in numerous roles, mostly comedic. ...


In 1975, at the height of his movie career, Brooks tried TV again with When Things Were Rotten, a Robin Hood parody that lasted only 13 episodes. Nearly 20 years later, Brooks mounted another Robin Hood parody with Robin Hood: Men in Tights. When Things Were Rotten was an American situation comedy television series created in 1975 by Mel Brooks and aired for half a season by ABC. A parody of the Robin Hood legend, the series starred Richard Gautier (who earlier had played Hymie the Robot in Brooks Get Smart series) as... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Robin Hood: Men In Tights (1993) is a film parody of the story of Robin Hood, particularly parodying Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. ...


In 1980 Brooks became interested in producing the dramatic film The Elephant Man (directed by David Lynch). Knowing that anyone seeing a poster reading "Mel Brooks presents The Elephant Man' would expect a comedy, he set up the company Brooksfilms. Brooksfilms has since produced a number of non-comedy films, including David Cronenberg's The Fly, Frances, and 84 Charing Cross Road, starring Anthony Hopkins and Anne Bancroft, as well as comedies, including Richard Benjamin's My Favorite Year. The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born May 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... The Fly is a 1986 science fiction/horror/romantic tragedy film produced by Brooksfilms and 20th Century Fox, directed by David Cronenberg, and starring Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis and John Getz. ... 84, Charing Cross Road is the title of a book by Helene Hanff, published in 1970 about the long correspondence (1949-1969) between Hanff, a resident of New York City, and Frank Doel of the Marks & Co. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Richard Benjamin in July 1986. ... My Favorite Year is a 1982 comedy film which tells the story of the early days of television, and a flamboyant film actor who is shepherded by a young intern through a week of overdrinking. ...


The 1980s saw Brooks produce and direct only two films, the first being History of the World Part I in 1981, a tongue-in-cheek look at human culture from the Dawn of Man to the French Revolution. As part of the film's soundtrack, Brooks, then aged 55, recorded a rap entitled "It's Good to Be the King", sending up Louis XVI and the French Revolution; it was released as a single, and became an unlikely US disco hit. His second movie release of the decade came in 1987 in the form of Spaceballs, a parody of Star Wars. Both films featured him in multiple roles. He also starred in the 1983 remake To Be or Not to Be. The DVD cover artwork for the movie depicts many of the eras parodied in the film History of the World, Part I is a 1981 film directed by Mel Brooks. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Louis XVI Louis XVI (August 23, 1754 - January 21, 1793), was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French in 1791-1792. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Bold text Spaceballs is a 1987 science fiction parody film co-written, directed by, and starring Mel Brooks. ... This article is about the series. ... To Be or Not to Be is a 1983 comedy film directed by Alan Johnson, written by Ronny Graham and Thomas Meehan, and starring Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft. ...


Brooks' most recent success has been a transfer of his film The Producers to the Broadway stage. Brooks also had a vocal role in the 2005 animated film Robots. He is currently working on an animated series sequel to Spaceballs. Spaceballs: The TV Series is expected to premiere in late 2007. This page is about the 1968 film. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Robots is a computer-animated film produced by Blue Sky Studios for 20th Century Fox (the same companies behind the film Ice Age), and was released theatrically (both in normal theaters and in IMAX theaters) on March 11th, 2005. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ...


Brooks is one of the few who have received an Oscar, Emmy, Tony, and Grammy. He was awarded his first Grammy award for Best Spoken Comedy Album in 1999 for his recording of The 2000 Year Old Man in the Year 2000 with Carl Reiner. His two other Grammys came in 2002 for Best Musical Show Album, for the soundtrack to The Producers, and for Best Long Form Music Video for the DVD "Recording the Producers - A Musical Romp with Mel Brooks". He won his first of four Emmy awards in 1967 for Outstanding Writing Achievement in Variety for a Sid Caesar special. He went on to win three consecutive Emmys in 1997, 1998, and 1999 for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series for his role of Uncle Phil on Mad About You. He won his three Tony awards in 2001 for his work on the musical, The Producers. He won Tonys for Best Musical, Best Original Musical Score, and Best Book of a Musical. Additionally, he won a Hugo Award and a Nebula Award for Young Frankenstein. In a 2005 poll to find The Comedian's Comedian, he was voted #50 of the top 50 comedy acts ever by fellow comedians and comedy insiders. Three of Brooks' films are on the American Film Institute's list of funniest American films: Blazing Saddles (#6), The Producers (#11), and Young Frankenstein (#13). Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... An Emmy Award. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... Mad About You is an American sitcom that aired on NBC from September 23, 1992, to May 24, 1999. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Film Institute, celebrating the 100th anniversary of film, created several top 100 lists covering movies in American cinema. ...


Brooks and his wife Anne Bancroft acted together in Silent Movie and To Be or Not to Be, and Bancroft also had a bit part in the 1995 film Dracula: Dead and Loving It. Years later, the Brookses appeared as themselves in the fourth season finale of Curb Your Enthusiasm, spoofing the finale of The Producers. It is reported that Bancroft encouraged Brooks to take The Producers to Broadway where it became an enormous success, as the show broke the Tony record with 12 wins, a record that had previously been held for 37 years by Hello, Dolly! at 10 wins. Such success has translated to a big-screen version of the Broadway adaptation/remake with actors Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane reprising their stage roles, in addition to new cast members Uma Thurman and Will Ferrell. As of early April 2006, Brooks had begun composing the score to a Broadway musical adaptation of Young Frankenstein, which he says is "perhaps the best movie [he] ever made." The world premiere was performed at Seattle's most historic theatre (originally built as a movie palace), The Paramount Theatre, between August 7, 2007, and September 1, 2007 after which it opened on Broadway at the Hilton Theatre, New York, on October 11, 2007. Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Dracula: Dead and Loving It is a 1995 movie directed by Mel Brooks. ... Curb Your Enthusiasm is an American sitcom starring Seinfeld writer, co-creator, and executive producer Larry David as himself. ... Hello, Dolly! is a musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilders 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is a Tony Award-winning American film and stage actor who is perhaps best known for his role as the title character in Ferris Buellers Day Off. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning actor of the stage and screen. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American comedian, actor and writer who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ... Musical composition is a phrase used in a number of contexts, the most commonly used being a piece of music. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Hilton Theatre is a Broadway theatre, located at 213 West 42nd Street. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Personal life

Brooks was married to Florence Baum from 1951 to 1961. Their marriage ended in divorce. Mel and Florence had three children, Stephanie, Nicky, and Eddie. More famously, he was married to the actress Anne Bancroft from 1964 until her death from uterine cancer on June 6, 2005. They met on rehearsal for the Perry Como Variety Show in 1961 and married three years later, August 5th. They had one son, Maximillian, in 1972. Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pierino Ronald Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an American crooner. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Works

As writer/director

This page is about the 1968 film. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Twelve Chairs is a 1970 film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Frank Langella, Dom DeLuise and Ron Moody . ... Alex Karras as Mongo in Blazing Saddles Blazing Saddles (1974) is a comedy directed by Mel Brooks and starring Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder, and released by Warner Brothers. ... Young Frankenstein is a 1974 comedy film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Gene Wilder as the title character. ... This article is about the comedy film. ... High Anxiety is a 1977 comedy film directed by and starring Mel Brooks. ... The Nude Bomb (also known as The Return of Maxwell Smart or Maxwell Smart and the Nude Bomb) was a 1980 comedy film based on the television series Get Smart. ... This article is about the film. ... Bold text Spaceballs is a 1987 science fiction parody film co-written, directed by, and starring Mel Brooks. ... Life Stinks is a 1991 comedy directed by Mel Brooks. ... Robin Hood: Men In Tights (1993) is a film parody of the story of Robin Hood, particularly parodying Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. ... Dracula: Dead and Loving It is a 1995 movie directed by Mel Brooks. ... Get Smart is an upcoming film adaptation of the hit spy parody 1960s television show Get Smart. ...

Theater

New Faces of 1952 is a musical revue with music and lyrics by various hands, including Ronny Graham and June Carroll, who also appeared in the Broadway production; and sketches by Ronny Graham and Melvin Brooks. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... Shinbone Alley is a musical with a book by Joe Darion and Mel Brooks, lyrics by Darion, and music by George Kleinsinger. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... This article is about the 2001 stage musical. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... Young Frankenstein is a musical with a book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan and music and lyrics by Brooks. ...

Other works

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Your Show of Shows was a live sketch comedy television series appearing weekly in the United States, from 1950 until June 5, 1954, featuring Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca. ... The Critic is a 1963 short animation by director/producer Ernest Pintoff and creator/narrator Mel Brooks, that won an Academy Award for Short Subjects (Cartoons) in 1963 Simple, abstract, geometric shapes move and morph on the screen to what sounds like harpsichord music. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... // The Academy Award for Animated Short Film is an award which has been given by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as part of the Academy Awards every year since the 5th Academy Awards, covering the year 1931-32, to the present. ... Get Smart was an American comedy television series that satirized the secret agent genre. ... The Electric Company was an educational American childrens television series produced by the Childrens Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) for PBS in the United States. ... The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... To Be or Not to Be is a 1983 comedy film directed by Alan Johnson, written by Ronny Graham and Thomas Meehan, and starring Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft. ... The Fly is a 1986 science fiction/horror/romantic tragedy film produced by Brooksfilms and 20th Century Fox, directed by David Cronenberg, and starring Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis and John Getz. ... The Fly II was a movie produced in 1989 starring Eric Stoltz and Daphne Zuniga. ... The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius is a spin-off of the Oscar-nominated computer-animated movie; Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, first officially aired in September 2002. ... Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks is a childrens television series, the adventures of Piggley Winks is a American but Irish infantile program, with melodrama and comedy that histories are different that to count. ... Curb Your Enthusiasm is an American sitcom starring Seinfeld writer, co-creator, and executive producer Larry David as himself. ... Promotional poster for Robots Robots is a computer-animated movie released March 11, 2005. ... The Producers is a 2005 film based on the 2001 Broadway musical of the same name, which is in turn based on the 1968 movie starring Zero Mostel, Gene Wilder and Andréas Voutsinas. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

See also

  • List of people who have won Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Awards

List of people who have won an Emmy (Primetime), a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony Award. ...

References

  1. ^ Lightfoot, David (March 6, 2002). Ages with the Parody Master - The Life and Films of Mel Brooks. Geocities.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-11.

is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... GeoCities is a free webhosting service founded by David Bohnett in late 1994 as Beverly Hills Internet. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links and references


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mel Brooks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1119 words)
Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an American actor, writer /director, and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies, or as he says, "spoofs."
Brooks and wife Anne Bancroft worked together on three films: Brooks' 1983 remake of To Be or Not to Be, his 1995 film Dracula: Dead and Loving It and in his 1976 Silent Movie.
Brooks was married to Florence Baum from 1951 to 1961.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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