FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Megatokyo" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Megatokyo
Megatokyo

Megatokyo volume 1, 1st edition
Author(s) Fred Gallagher, Rodney Caston
Website http://www.megatokyo.com/
RSS web feed
Current status / schedule Monday, Wednesday & Friday (with some interruptions)
Launch date 2000-08-14[1]
Publisher(s) Print: CMX, formerly Dark Horse Comics & Studio Iron Cat
Genre(s) Comedy, Drama, Action, Romance

Megatokyo is an English-language webcomic created by Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston, debuting on August 14, 2000,[1] and then written and illustrated solely by Gallagher as of July 17, 2002.[2] The style of its writing and illustrations is heavily influenced by Japanese manga. Megatokyo is freely available on its official website, with updates on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. It is among the most popular webcomics,[3] and is published in print by CMX. Sales of the comic's print editions rank it as the best selling original English-language manga.[4] Image File history File links Summary Megatokyo volume 1, 1st edition Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Frederick Gallagher (born 1969) is an American illustrator who has become a full-time web cartoonist. ... Rodney L. Caston (born 13 May 1977) is an American Unix systems engineer, freelance writer and is the co-creator and original writer of the popular comic book series Megatokyo. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Feed-icon. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... CMX is a division of Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics which in turn is owned by Time-Warner. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Studio Ironcat was a small publishing company based in Fredericksburg, Virginia, dedicated to publication of manga and later, Amerimanga. ... The webcomic genres are the types of themes a webcomic can take. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Look up Action film in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article primarily discusses philosophical ideologies in relation to the subject of romantic love. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ... Frederick Gallagher (born 1969) is an American illustrator who has become a full-time web cartoonist. ... Rodney L. Caston (born 13 May 1977) is an American Unix systems engineer, freelance writer and is the co-creator and original writer of the popular comic book series Megatokyo. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... CMX is a division of Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics which in turn is owned by Time-Warner. ... Original English-language manga or OEL manga are comic books or graphic novels whose language of original publication is English and which are created by comic artists and writers influenced by Japanese anime and manga. ...


Set in a fictional version of Tokyo, Megatokyo portrays the adventures of Piro, a young fan of anime and manga, and his friend Largo, a video game enthusiast. The comic often parodies and comments on the archetypes and clichés of anime, manga, dating simulations and video games, occasionally making direct references to real-world works. Megatokyo was originally presented in the gag-a-day format, with continuity of the story a subsidiary concern. Over time, it focused more on developing a complex plot and the personalities of its characters. This transition was due primarily to Gallagher's increasing control over the comic, which led to Caston's controversial removal from the project.[5][6] Megatokyo has received praise from such sources as The New York Times,[7] while negative criticism of Gallagher's changes to the comic has been given by sources including Websnark.[8][9] For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Fans of Janet Jackson, at Much Music in Toronto The word fan refers to someone who has an intense, occasionally overwhelming liking of a person, group of persons, work of art, idea, or trend. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... Archetype is defined as the first original model of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are merely derivative, copied, patterned, or emulated. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... A screenshot of the renai game True Love Story 3 A renai game (恋愛ゲーム) is a Japanese adventure video game focusing on romantic interactions with anime girls. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Websnark refers to the website Websnark. ...

Contents

History

Megatokyo began publication as a joint project between Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston, Internet acquaintances and, later, business partners. According to Gallagher, the comic's first two strips were drawn in reaction to Caston being "convinced that he and I could do [a webcomic] … [and] bothering me incessantly about it", without any planning or pre-determined storyline.[10] The comic's title was derived from an Internet domain owned by Caston, which had hosted a short-lived gaming news site maintained by Caston before the comic's creation.[11] With Caston writing the comic's scripts and Gallagher supplying its artwork,[1] the comic's popularity quickly increased,[12] eventually reaching levels comparable to those of such popular webcomics as Penny Arcade and PvP.[3] According to Gallagher, Megatokyo's popularity was not intended, as the project was originally an experiment to help him improve his writing and illustrating skills for his future project, Warmth.[13] Frederick Gallagher (born 1969) is an American illustrator who has become a full-time web cartoonist. ... Rodney L. Caston (born 13 May 1977) is an American Unix systems engineer, freelance writer and is the co-creator and original writer of the popular comic book series Megatokyo. ... The term domain name has multiple related meanings: A name that identifies a computer or computers on the internet. ... Penny Arcade is a webcomic and blog written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik. ... For PvP in multiplayer computer role-playing games, see player versus player. ... Frederick Gallagher (born 1969) is an American illustrator who has become a full-time web cartoonist. ...


In May 2002, Caston sold his ownership of the title to Gallagher, who has managed the comic on his own since then. In October of the same year, after Gallagher was laid off from his day job as an architect, he took up producing the comic as a full time profession.[14] Caston's departure from Megatokyo was not fully explained at the time. Initially, Gallagher and Caston only briefly mentioned the split, with Gallagher publicly announcing Caston's departure on June 17, 2002.[2] On January 15, 2005, Gallagher explained his view of the reasoning behind the split in response to a comment made by Scott Kurtz of PvP, in which he suggested that Gallagher had stolen ownership of Megatokyo from Caston. Calling Kurtz's claim "mean spirited", Gallagher responded:[6] A day job is a form of occupation taken by a person in order to make ends meet while working another low-paying (or non-paying) job in their preferred career track. ... A full time job usually has benefits (such as health insurance) and are often considered careers. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"While things were good at first, over time we found that we were not working well together creatively. There is no fault in this, it happens. I've never blamed Rodney for this creative 'falling out' nor do I blame myself. Not all creative relationships click, ours didn't in the long run."

Four days later, Caston posted his view of the development on his website:[5]

"After this he approached me and said either I would sell him my ownership of MegaTokyo or he would simply stop doing it entirely, and we'd divide up the company's assets and end it all. This was right before the MT was to go into print form, and I really wanted to see it make it into print, rather [than] die on the vine."

Production

Megatokyo is usually hand-drawn in pencil by Fred Gallagher, without any digital or physical "inking". Inking was originally planned, but dropped as Gallagher decided it was unfeasible.[15] Megatokyo's first strips were created by roughly sketching on large sheets of paper, followed by tracing, scanning, digital clean-up of the traced comics with Adobe Photoshop, and final touches in Adobe Illustrator to achieve a finished product.[16] Gallagher has stated that comics were traced as a result of his sketches being "way too messy to use without tracing them first".[17] Largely due to tracing, these comics regularly took six to eight hours to complete.[17] As the comic progressed, Gallagher became "better at drawing things with fewer scribbles and construction lines", causing him to drop the tracing step in comic creation.[18] Gallagher believes "that this eventually led to better looking and more expressive comics".[18] Tracing Paper is a type of paper, which is translucent so the light can go through, is made by immersing unsized and unloaded paper of good quality in sulphuric acid for a few seconds. ... In computing, a scanner is a device that analyzes images, printed text, or handwriting, or an object (such as an ornament) and converts it to a digital image. ... Photoshop redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Megatokyo's early strips were laid out in four square panels per strip, in a two-by-two square array — a formatting choice made as a compromise between the horizontal layout of American comic strips and the vertical layout of Japanese comic strips.[19] The limitations of this format became apparent during the first year of Megatokyo's publication, and in the spring of 2001, the comic switched to a manga-style, free-form panel layout. This format allowed for both large, detailed drawings and small, abstract progressions, as based on the needs of the script.[20] Gallagher has commented that his drawing speed had increased since the comic's beginning, and with four panel comics taking much less time to produce, it "made sense in some sort of twisted, masochistic way, that [he] could use that extra time to draw more for each comic".[21] This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ...


Megatokyo's earliest strips were drawn entirely on single sheets of paper.[22] Following these, Gallagher began drawing the comic's panels separately and assembling them in Adobe Illustrator, allowing him to draw more detailed frames.[22] This changed during Megatokyo's eighth chapter, with Gallagher returning to drawing entire comics on single sheets of paper.[22] Gallagher has stated that this change allows for more differentiated layouts,[23] in addition to allowing him a better sense of momentum during comic creation.[22]


Gallagher has occasional guest artists participate in the production of the comic, including Mohammad F. Haque of Applegeeks.[4]. Applegeeks is a webcomic illustrated by Mohammad Hawk Haque, and written by Ananth Panagariya. ...


Funding

Megatokyo has had several sources of funding during its production. In its early years, it was largely funded by Gallagher and Caston's full time jobs, with the additional support of banner advertisements. A store connected to ThinkGeek was launched during October of 2000 in order to sell Megatokyo merchandise, and, in turn, help fund the comic.[24] On August 1, 2004,[25] this store was replaced by "Megagear", an independent online store created by Fred Gallagher and his wife, Sarah, to be used solely by Megatokyo, although it now also offers Applegeeks and Angerdog merchandise. ThinkGeek is an electronic commerce company based in Fairfax, VA as part of the Open Source Technology Group. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Applegeeks is a webcomic illustrated by Mohammad Hawk Haque, and written by Ananth Panagariya. ...


Gallagher has emphasized that Megatokyo will continue to remain on the Internet free of charge, and that releasing it in book form is simply another way for the comic to reach readers,[26] as opposed to replacing its webcomic counterpart entirely.[27] Additionally, he has stated that he is against micropayments, as he believes that word of mouth and public attention are powerful property builders, and that a "pay-per-click" system would only dampen their effectiveness. He has claimed that such systems are a superior option to direct monetary compensation, and that human nature is opposed to micropayments.[27] Micropayments are means for transferring very small amounts of money, in situations where collecting such small amounts of money with the usual payment systems is impractical, or very expensive, in terms of the amount of money being collected. ... For other uses, see Word of mouth (disambiguation). ...


Themes and structure

Strip #619 demonstrates Megatokyo's style and several of the comic's themes. It depicts Piro, Largo, Sonoda Yuki and Nanasawa Kimiko.
Strip #619 demonstrates Megatokyo's style and several of the comic's themes. It depicts Piro, Largo, Sonoda Yuki and Nanasawa Kimiko.

Much of Megatokyo's early humor consists of jokes related to the video game subculture, as well as culture-clash issues. In these early strips, the comic progressed at a pace which Gallagher has called "haphazard",[28] often interrupted by purely punchline-driven installments.[29][30][31] As Gallagher gradually gained more control over Megatokyo's production, the comic began to gain more similarities to the Japanese shōjo manga that Gallagher enjoys.[2] Following Gallagher's complete takeover of Megatokyo, the comic's thematic relation to Japanese manga continued to grow. Download high resolution version (650x975, 294 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (650x975, 294 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... For the phase, see Punch line Punchline is a North American punk rock band from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Shōjo (少女 lit. ...


The comic features characteristics borrowed from anime and manga archetypes, often parodying the medium's clichés.[32][22] Examples include Junpei, a ninja who becomes Largo's apprentice; giant monsters based on Godzilla; the Tokyo Police Cataclysm Division, which fights the monsters with giant robots and supervises the systematic destruction and reconstruction of predesignated areas of the city; fan service;[22] a Japanese school girl, Yuki;[33] and Ping, a robot girl.[34] In addition, Dom and Ed, hitmen employed by Sega and Sony, respectively, are associated with a Japanese stereotype that all Americans are heavily armed.[35] Other characters include Seraphim and Boo, the "conscience enforcement agents" of Piro and Largo, respectively, who try to assist their clients in making morally correct decisions while Asmodeus, Piro's "anti-conscience", attempts to undermine their efforts. For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ... This article is about the character itself. ... This article is about the term used in science fiction, anime, and manga. ... Fan service ), sometimes written as a single word, fanservice, is a vaguely defined term chiefly used for Japanese visual media—particularly in anime fandom—to refer to elements in a story that are unnecessary to a storyline, but designed to amuse or sexually excite the audience[1][2]. It is... A hitman (alternately, hit man), also referred to as a contract killer, is a hired assassin, usually in the employ of organized crime. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ...


Characters in Megatokyo usually speak Japanese, although some speak English, or English-based l33t. Typically, when a character is speaking Japanese, it is signified by enclosing English text between angle brackets.[36] Not every character speaks every language, so occasionally characters are unable to understand one another. In several scenes, a character's speech is written entirely in rōmaji Japanese to emphasize this. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For technical reasons, :) and some similar combinations starting with : redirect here. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji The romanization of Japanese is the use of the Latin alphabet (called rōmaji )   in Japanese) to write the Japanese language, which is normally written in logographic characters borrowed from Chinese (kanji) and syllabic scripts...


Megatokyo is divided into chapters. Chapter 0, which contains all of the comic's early phase, covers a time span in the comic of about six weeks. Each of the subsequent chapters chronicles the events of a single day. Chapter 0 was originally not given a title, although the book version retroactively dubbed it "Relax, we understand j00".[37] Chapter 0 began during August 2000,[1] with chapters 1 through 8 beginning in June 2001,[38] November 2001,[39] October 2002,[40] April 2003,[41] February 2004,[42] November 2004,[43] September 2005,[44] and June 2006,[45] respectively. The ninth and most recent chapter, entitled "over1o4d", began in April 2007. [46]


Main characters

See also: Minor characters of Megatokyo and Alternate universes and omake theater in Megatokyo
The authors of Megatokyo chose to use "Surname–Given Name" order for characters of Japanese origin. The same format has been maintained here so as to avoid any confusion regarding these characters.

In Megatokyo, the popular webcomic by Fred Gallagher, Japanese names are written in Japanese order, with the family name before the given name. ... In Megatokyo, many characters and groups exist outside what makes up the bulk of the main plot. ... Megatokyo, Fred Gallaghers manga-influenced webcomic, occasionally includes alternate universes containing some of the same characters as Megatokyo, but bearing no relation to the world of Megatokyo. ... Yamada Tarō (), a typical Japanese name (male), equivalent to John Smith in English. ...

Piro

Piro

Piro, the main protagonist, is an author surrogate of Fred Gallagher. Gallagher has stated that Piro is an idealized version of himself when he was in college.[47] As a character, he is socially inept and frequently depressed. His design was originally conceived as a visual parody of the character Ruri Hoshino, from the Martian Successor Nadesico anime series.[48] His name is derived from Gallagher's online nickname, which was in turn taken from Makoto Sawatari's cat in the Japanese visual novel Kanon.[49] The character Piro in Fred Gallaghers webcomic Megatokyo. ... The character Piro in Fred Gallaghers webcomic Megatokyo. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... As a literary technique, an author surrogate is a character who expresses the ideas, questions, personality and morality of the author. ... Ruri Hoshino, as seen in Martian Successor Nadesico: The Prince of Darkness Ruri Hoshino (星野ルリ Hoshino Ruri) is a fictional character in the anime series Martian Successor Nadesico. ... It has been suggested that Naze Nani Nadesico be merged into this article or section. ... Makoto Sawatari ) is a fictional character from the Japanese visual novel Kanon, voiced by Mayumi Iizuka. ... A visual novel is an interactive fiction game featuring mostly static graphics, usually with anime-style art. ... Not to be confused with Canon (manga). ...


In the story, Piro has extreme difficulty understanding Megatokyo's female characters, making him for the most part ignorant to the feelings that the character Nanasawa Kimiko has for him, though he has become much more aware of her attraction. Gallagher has commented that Piro is the focal point of emotional damage.[50]


Largo

Largo

Largo is the comic's secondary protagonist, and the comic version of co-creator Rodney Caston. As the comic's primary source of humor, he is an impulsive alcoholic who speaks L33t fluently and frequently. A technically gifted character, he is obsessed with altering devices, often with hazardous results. Gallagher designed Largo to be the major recipient of the comic's physical damage.[50] Largo's name comes from Caston's online nickname.[49] Largo seems to be entering into a relationship with Hayasaka Erika, at present. Image File history File links Megatokyo_main_character_largo. ... Image File history File links Megatokyo_main_character_largo. ... Rodney L. Caston (born 13 May 1977) is an American Unix systems engineer, freelance writer and is the co-creator and original writer of the popular comic book series Megatokyo. ... King Alcohol and his Prime Minister circa 1820 Alcoholism is the consumption of or preoccupation with alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the alcoholics normal personal, family, social, or work life. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Hayasaka Erika

Hayasaka Erika

Hayasaka Erika (早坂 えりか?) is a strong-willed, cynical, and sometimes violent character. At the time of the story, she is a popular former Japanese idol (singer) and voice actress who has been out of the limelight for three years, though she still possesses a considerable fanbase. Erika's past relationship troubles, combined with exposure to swarms of fanboys have caused her to adopt a negative outlook on life. Gallagher has implied that her personality was loosely based around the tsundere (tough girl) stereotype often seen in anime and manga.[51] Image File history File links Megatokyo_main_character_erika. ... Image File history File links Megatokyo_main_character_erika. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Voice Animage, a magazine about all things about seiyÅ«. For the retail company named Seiyu, see Seiyu Group. ... Fans of Janet Jackson, at Much Music in Toronto The word fan refers to someone who has an intense, occasionally overwhelming liking of a person, group of persons, work of art, idea, or trend. ... Tsundere ) is a Japanese term for a personality that is initially combative, but becomes loving and emotionally vulnerable. ...


Nanasawa Kimiko

Nanasawa Kimiko

Nanasawa Kimiko (七澤 希美子?) is a Japanese girl who works as a waitress at an Anna Miller's restaurant. The story puts forth that she is an aspiring voice actress who sometimes finds herself too shy or insecure to take on roles. Kimiko is a kind and soft-spoken character, though she is prone to mood-swings, and often causes herself embarrassment by saying things she does not mean. Gallagher has commented that Kimiko was the only female character not based entirely on anime stereotypes.[51] Image File history File links Kimiko. ... Image File history File links Kimiko. ... A promotional image for Anna Millers, featuring the trademark uniform. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In modern usage, a stereotype is a simplified mental picture of an individual or group of people who share a certain characteristic (or stereotypical) qualities. ...


Tohya Miho

Tohya Miho

Tohya Miho (凍耶 美穂 Tōya Miho?) is an enigmatic and manipulative young goth girl. She is drawn to resemble a "Gothic Lolita", and is often described as "darkly cute," with Gallagher occasionally defining her as a "perkigoth."[52] Miho often acts strangely compared to the comic's other characters, and regularly accomplishes abnormal feats, such as leaping inhuman distances or perching herself atop telephone poles. Despite these displays of ability, it is hinted at that Miho has problems with her health. Little is revealed in the comic about Miho's past or motivations, although Gallagher states that these will eventually be explained.[49] Image File history File links Megatokyo_main_character_miho. ... Image File history File links Megatokyo_main_character_miho. ... This article is about the late 20th / early 21st century subculture. ... Two girls in frilly, somewhat extreme Lolita dress that was popular around 2002 in Takeshita Street, Tokyo Gothic Lolita or GothLoli , sometimes alternatively (though incorrectly) Loli-Goth) has two definitions. ...


Plot

Megatokyo's story begins when Piro and Largo fly to Tokyo after an incident at the Electronic Entertainment Expo. The pair are soon stranded without enough money to buy plane tickets home, forcing them to live with Tsubasa, a Japanese friend of Piro's. When Tsubasa suddenly departs for America to seek his "first true love", the protagonists are forced out of the apartment. Tsubasa leaves Ping, a robot girl PlayStation 2 accessory, in their care. E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo or E³, commonly known as E3, is an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... PS2 redirects here. ...


After their eviction, Piro begins work at "Megagamers", a store specializing in anime, manga, and video games. His employer allows him and Largo to live in the apartment above the store. Largo is mistaken for the new English teacher at a local school, where he takes on the alias "Great Teacher Largo" and instructs his students in L33t, video games, and computing. The "Tokyo Police Cataclysm Division" hires Largo after he manipulates Ping into stopping a rampaging monster, but they soon dismiss him for failing to contain a riot. Serialized in Weekly Shonen Magazine Manga Mania Manga Mania Original run 16 May 1997 – 17 April 2002 No. ... RAM (Random Access Memory) Look up computing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Megatokyo, many characters and groups exist outside what makes up the bulk of the main plot. ...


Early in the story, Piro meets Nanasawa Kimiko at an Anna Miller's restaurant, where she is a waitress. Much later, Piro encounters Kimiko outside a train station, where she is worrying aloud that she will miss an audition because she has forgotten her money and railcard. Piro hands her his own railcard and walks off before she can refuse his offer. This event causes Kimiko to develop an idealized vision of her benefactor, an image which is shattered the next time they meet. Despite this, she gradually develops feelings for Piro, though she is too shy to admit them. Later on in the story, Kimiko's outburst on a radio talk show causes her to suddenly rise to idol status. Angered by the hosts' derisive comments about fanboys, she comes to the defense of her audience, immediately and unintentionally securing their obsessive adoration. The stress of the audience's focused attention overwhelms Kimiko, and she lashes out at Piro when he tries to defend her. A promotional image for Anna Millers, featuring the trademark uniform. ... For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... Fanboy is a term used to describe an individual (usually male, though the feminine version fangirl may be used for females) who is utterly devoted to a single fannish subject, or to a single point of view within that subject, often to the point where it is considered an obsession. ...


Meanwhile, Largo develops a relationship with Hayasaka Erika, Piro's coworker at Megagamers. As with Piro and Kimiko, Largo and Erika meet by coincidence early in the story. Later, it is revealed that Erika is a former pop idol, who disappeared from the public eye after her fiancé left her. When she is rediscovered by her fans, Largo helps thwart a fanboy horde and offers to help Erika to deal with her "vulnerabilities in the digital plane". Erika insists on protecting herself, so Largo instructs her in computer-building. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Finally, the enigmatic Tohya Miho frequently meddles in the lives of the protagonists. Miho knows Piro and Largo from the "Endgames" MMORPG previous to Megatokyo's plot. She abused a hidden statistic in the game to gain control of nearly all of the game's player characters, but was ultimately defeated by Piro and Largo. In the comic, Miho becomes close friends with Ping, influencing Ping's relationship with Piro and pitting Ping against Largo in video game battles. Miho is also involved in Erika's backstory; Miho manipulated Erika's fans after Erika's disappearance. This effort ended badly, leaving Miho hospitalized, and the Tokyo Police Cataclysm Division cleaning up the aftermath. Most of the exact details of what happened are left to the readers' imagination. An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ...


Books

Megatokyo was first published in print by Studio Ironcat, a partnership announced in September 2002.[53] Following this, the first book, a compilation of Megatokyo strips under the title "Megatokyo Volume One: Chapter Zero", was released by Studio Ironcat in January of 2003.[54] According to Gallagher, Studio Ironcat was unable to meet demand for the book, due to problems the company was facing at the time.[55] On July 7, 2003, Gallagher announced that Ironcat would not continue to publish Megatokyo in book form.[56] This was followed by an announcement on August 27, 2003 that Dark Horse Comics would publish Megatokyo Volume 2 and future collected volumes, including a revised edition of Megatokyo Volume 1.[57] The comic once more changed publishers in February of 2006, moving from Dark Horse Comics to the CMX Manga imprint of DC Comics.[58] Studio Ironcat was a small publishing company based in Fredericksburg, Virginia, dedicated to publication of manga and later, Amerimanga. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... CMX is a division of Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics which in turn is owned by Time-Warner. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


As of June 26, 2006, four volumes are available for purchase, with volumes 1 through 3 printed by Dark Horse and volume 4 by DC. These books have been translated into German, Italian, French and Polish.[13] In July 2004, Megatokyo was the tenth best-selling manga property in the United States.[59] During the week ending February 20, 2005, volume 3 reached third place in Nielsen BookScan,[4] its highest ranking as of August 2006, making it the best selling original English-language manga.[4] is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Original English-language manga or OEL manga are comic books or graphic novels whose language of original publication is English and which are created by comic artists and writers influenced by Japanese anime and manga. ...

  • Megatokyo Volume 1: Chapter Zero (Megatokyo vol.1 1st ed.) ISBN 1-929090-30-7
  • Megatokyo Volume 1, 2nd ed. ISBN 1-59307-163-9 (published March 21, 2004)[60]
  • Megatokyo Volume 2 ISBN 1-59307-118-3 (published January 22, 2004)[61]
  • Megatokyo Volume 3 ISBN 1-59307-305-4 (published February 2, 2005)[62]
  • Megatokyo Volume 4 ISBN 1-4012-1126-7 (published June 21, 2006)[63]
  • Megatokyo Volume 5 ISBN 1-4012-1127-5 (published May 23, 2007)[64]

In July 2007, Kodansha has announced that it will publish a Japanese language edition of Megatokyo in 2008, in a silver slipcased box as part of Kodansha Box editions, a new manga line started in November 2006. Depending on reader response, Kodansha expects to publish the entire Megatokyo book series. [65] In printmaking, an edition is a set of prints off one plate, composing a limited run of prints. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The head office of Kodansha Kodansha Limited ) is the largest Japanese publisher of literature and manga, headquartered in (Bunkyo), Tokyo. ...


Reception

The artwork and characterizations of Megatokyo have received praise from such publications as The New York Times[7] and Silver Bullet Comics.[66] Some critics, such as Eric Burns of Websnark, have found the comic to suffer from "incredibly slow pacing", unclear direction or resolutions for plot threads, a lack of official character profiles and plot summaries for the uninitiated, and an erratic update schedule.[8] Burns also harshly criticized the often uncanonical filler material Gallagher employs to prevent the comic's front page content from becoming stagnant,[8] such as Shirt Guy Dom, a punchline-driven stick figure comic strip written and illustrated by Megatokyo editor Dominic Nguyen. Following Gallagher taking on Megatokyo as a full-time occupation, some critics have complained that updates should be more frequent than when he worked on the comic part time.[8] Update schedule issues have prompted Gallagher to install an update progress bar for readers awaiting the next installment of the comic. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Eric Alfred Burns (born January 27, 1968) is an American critic, writer, poet, columnist and Role Playing Game developer who lives in New Hampshire. ... Websnark refers to the website Websnark. ... A stick figure. ... A part-time job carries less hours per week than a full-time job, and usually pays less than a full-time job. ...


Megatokyo's fans have been called "some of the most patient and forgiving in the webcomic world."[28] During an interview, Gallagher stated that Megatokyo fans "always [tell] me they are patient and find that the final comics are always worth the wait,"[28] but he feels as though he "[has] a commitment to my readers and to myself to deliver the best comics I can, and to do it on schedule,"[28] finally saying that nothing would make him happier than "[getting] a better handle on the time it takes to create each page."[28] Upon missing deadlines, Gallagher often makes self-disparaging comments. Poking fun at this, Jerry "Tycho" Holkins of Penny Arcade has claimed to have "gotten on famously" with Gallagher, ever since he "figured out that [Gallagher] legitimately detests himself and is not hoisting some kind of glamour."[67] Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins (right) Keith Gerald Jerry Holkins (born February 6, 1976), is the writer of the popular webcomic Penny Arcade. ... Penny Arcade is a webcomic and blog written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik. ... For the magazine, see Glamour (magazine). ...


Megatokyo is often praised for its character designs and pencil work, rendered entirely in grayscale.[68][69][70] Conversely, it has been negatively criticized for perceived uniformity and simplicity in the designs of its peripheral characters, which have been regarded as confusing due to their similarities.[71] In computing, a grayscale or greyscale digital image is an image in which the value of each pixel is a single sample. ...


While Megatokyo was originally presented as a slapstick comedy, it began focusing more on the romantic relationships between its characters after Caston's departure from the project. As a result, some fans, preferring the comic's gag-a-day format, have claimed its quality was superior when Caston was writing it.[9] Additionally, it has been said that, without Caston's input, Largo's antics appear contrived.[8] Silver Bullet Comics regards Megatokyo's characters as convincingly portrayed, commenting that "the reader truly feels connected to the characters, their romantic hijinks, and their wacky misadventures with the personal touches supplied by the author".[66] Likewise, Anime News Network has praised the personal tone in which the comic is written, stating that much of its appeal is a result of the "friendly and casual feeling of a fan-made production".[68] For other uses, see Slapstick (disambiguation). ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Gallagher states early in Megatokyo Volume 1 that he and Caston "didn't want the humor … to rely too heavily on what might be considered 'obscure knowledge'." An article in The New York Times insists that such scenarios were unavoidable, commenting that the comic "sits at the intersection of several streams of obscure knowledge," including "gaming and hacking; manga … the boom in Web comics over the past few years; and comics themselves".[7] The article also held that "Gallagher doesn't mean to be exclusive … he graciously offers translation of the strip's later occasional lapses into L33t … [and] explains why the characters are occasionally dressed in knickers or as rabbits".[7] The newspaper went on to argue that "The pleasure of a story like Megatokyo comes not in its novelistic coherence, but in its loose ranginess".[7]


As of 2007, Megatokyo has been nominated in at least one category for every year that the Web Cartoonist's Choice Awards has run. It won Best Comic in 2002, as well as Best Writing, Best Serial Comic, and Best Dramatic Comic. The largest number of nominations it has received in one year is 14 in 2003, when it won Outstanding Environment Design.[72] The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards (WCCA) is an annual event, since the summer of 2001, in which online cartoonists nominate and select outstanding webcomics in a variety of categories. ... The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards is an award voted on by the cartoonists themselves, much like the Academy Awards. ... The Web Cartoonists Choice Awards is an award voted on by the cartoonists themselves, much like the Academy Awards. ...


See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... A promotional image for Anna Millers, featuring the trademark uniform. ... Applegeeks is a webcomic illustrated by Mohammad Hawk Haque, and written by Ananth Panagariya. ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Start of Megatokyo (strip #1). Retrieved on 2005-09-03.
  2. ^ a b c Gallagher, Fred (June 17, 2002). the other brick. Megatokyo. Retrieved on May 19, 2006. Fred Gallagher's news post announcing Caston's departure.
  3. ^ a b Alexa traffic rankings regularly show Megatokyo.com in the top 8,000 most popular sites[1], compared to PvPOnline.com which ranks in the top 4,000[2], and Penny-Arcade.com which ranks in the top 2,000[3]
  4. ^ a b c Megatokyo Reaches Number 3 (March 04, 2005). Retrieved on April 14, 2006.
  5. ^ a b Caston, Rodney (January 18, 2005). The truth about Megatokyo?. Retrieved on July 02, 2006.Rodney Caston's version of the events surrounding his departure
  6. ^ a b Gallagher, Fred (January 15, 2005). more largos??. Megatokyo. Retrieved on August 26, 2005. Fred Gallagher's view of Rodney Caston's departure.
  7. ^ a b c d e Hodgman, John (July 18, 2004). CHRONICLE COMICS; No More Wascally Wabbits. The New York Times. Retrieved on April 11, 2006.
  8. ^ a b c d e Burns, Eric (August 22, 2004). You Had Me, And You Lost Me: Why I don't read Megatokyo. Websnark. Retrieved on August 27, 2005.
  9. ^ a b Sanderson, Brandon (June 18, 2004). The Official Time-Waster's Guide v3.0. Retrieved on July 19, 2006.
  10. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 6
  11. ^ Weiser, Kevin (September 27, 2001). 20 Questions with Megatokyo. Retrieved on August 19, 2006. Interview with Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston accessed through archive.org
  12. ^ Reid, Calvin (February 24, 2003). American Manga Breaks Out. Publishers Weekly. Retrieved on July 23, 2006.
  13. ^ a b Gallagher, Fred (January 2, 2006). comiket dreamin'. Megatokyo. Retrieved on June 17, 2006. Fred Gallagher comments on Megatokyo's originally experimental status, and mentions that the Megatokyo books have been translated into German, Italian, French and Polish.
  14. ^ Gallagher, Fred (October 30, 2002). full time jitters. Megatokyo. Retrieved on August 16, 2006.A news post by Fred Gallagher in which he mentions that he has been laid off from work, and announces that he is now working on Megatokyo full-time.
  15. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 11
  16. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 148
  17. ^ a b Megatokyo book one, pg. 18
  18. ^ a b Megatokyo book one, pg. 42
  19. ^ Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston's reasoning for the square panel layout. Megatokyo (April 18, 2001). Retrieved on May 21, 2006.
  20. ^ Gallagher, Fred (April 23, 2001). 1:1.5. Megatokyo. Retrieved on May 9, 2006. Fred Gallagher details the change of panel layout.
  21. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 105
  22. ^ a b c d e f Gallagher, Fred (October 3, 2006). full page, part 2. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  23. ^ Gallagher, Fred (October 1, 2006). full page. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  24. ^ Gallagher, Fred (October 21, 2000). we have t-shirts…. Megatokyo. Retrieved on May 21, 2006. Fred Gallagher announces first Megatokyo store.
  25. ^ Gallagher, Fred (August 1, 2004). learning to fly. Megatokyo. Retrieved on August 5, 2005. Fred Gallagher comments about Megagear's launch status.
  26. ^ Megatokyo goes to Tokyo – interview with Fred Gallagher (April 26, 2004). Retrieved on June 4, 2006.
  27. ^ a b Curzon, Joe (January 28, 2004). Interview with Fred Gallagher. Retrieved on June 4, 2006.
  28. ^ a b c d e Take a Trip to Megatokyo (June 21, 2006). Retrieved on August 19, 2006. IGN interview with Fred Gallagher.
  29. ^ Megatokyo Strip 45. Retrieved on July 18, 2006.
  30. ^ Megatokyo Strip 51. Retrieved on July 18, 2006.
  31. ^ Megatokyo Strip 85. Retrieved on July 18, 2006.
  32. ^ Gallagher, Fred (February 2, 2006). common gripes. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  33. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 51
  34. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 156
  35. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 13
  36. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 33
  37. ^ Megatokyo book one, pg. 5
  38. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter one. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  39. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter two. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  40. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter three. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  41. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter four. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  42. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter five. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  43. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter six. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  44. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter seven. Retrieved on November 3, 2006.
  45. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter eight. Retrieved on May 11, 2007.
  46. ^ Start of Megatokyo chapter nine. Retrieved on February 15, 2007.
  47. ^ Gallagher, Fred (June 8, 2006). i'll take my art back now. Megatokyo. Retrieved on June 20, 2006. A news post by Fred Gallagher in which he states that the character "Piro" is an idealized version of himself (Gallagher) when he was in college.
  48. ^ An interview with Fred Gallagher (December 18, 2002). Retrieved on August 17, 2006.
  49. ^ a b c Megatokyo Panel at Akon 13. Retrieved on July 5, 2006.
  50. ^ a b Contino, Jennifer (September 5, 2002). MEGATOKYO'S FRED GALLAGHER. Retrieved on August 18, 2006.An interview with Fred Gallagher at THE PULSE
  51. ^ a b Gallagher, Fred (January 6, 2005). finding kimiko. Retrieved on August 18, 2006. Gallagher comments on Kimiko being of original design.
  52. ^ Gallagher, Fred. Megatokyo Volume 1. Dark Horse Books, 2004. Pages 90 and 154.
  53. ^ Megatokyo Press Release (8/2/2002). Retrieved on June 26, 2006.
  54. ^ Megatokyo Vol 1 Chapter Zero at Amazon.com. Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  55. ^ Kean, Benjamin. Fred Gallagher On The Megatokyo Move. Retrieved on June 27, 2006.
  56. ^ Gallagher, Fred (July 7, 2003). re: megatokyo book 2. Megatokyo. Retrieved on June 26, 2006. Fred Gallagher announces that Studio Ironcat will not publish Megatokyo volumes 2 and above.
  57. ^ Gallagher, Fred (August 27, 2003). Megatokyo joins Dark Horse Comics. Megatokyo. Retrieved on June 26, 2006. Fred Gallagher announces Megatokyo's move to Dark Horse Comics.
  58. ^ Megatokyo changes publishers to DC Comics / CMX Manga. Retrieved on February 26, 2006.
  59. ^ ICv2 Looks at Manga Channel Shift (July 07, 2004). Retrieved on April 14, 2006.
  60. ^ Darkhorse's product details on Volume One. Retrieved on September 1, 2005.
  61. ^ Darkhorse's product details on Volume Two. Retrieved on September 1, 2005.
  62. ^ Darkhorse's product details on Volume Three. Retrieved on September 1, 2005.
  63. ^ CMX Manga's product details on Volume 4. Retrieved on April 9, 2006.
  64. ^ Gallagher's blog on Megatokyo.com. Retrieved on April 23, 2007.
  65. ^ Calvin Reid (2007-07-10). Kodansha to Publish Megatokyo in Japan – 7/10/2007 – Publishers Weekly. Publishers Weekly. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  66. ^ a b Murray, Robert (June 28, 2006). Megatokyo v4 Review. Silver Bullet Comics. Retrieved on July 18, 2006.
  67. ^ Holkins, Jerry (March 27, 2006). The Doujinshi Code. Penny Arcade. Retrieved on April 11, 2006.
  68. ^ a b Megatokyo Volume 1 Special Review. Anime News Network (February 8, 2003).
  69. ^ Manga Review: Megatokyo Volume 1 (February 8, 2003). Retrieved on July 23, 2006.
  70. ^ Megatokyo Volume 3 Booklist review (2005). Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  71. ^ Welsh, David. Comic World News. Retrieved on July 19, 2006.
  72. ^ Web Cartoonist's Choice Awards (official site).

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Websnark refers to the website Websnark. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Calvin Reid is an artist. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Penny Arcade is a webcomic and blog written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Fan translations
  • Flag of the Netherlands Dutch
  • Flag of Finland Finnish #1
  • Flag of Finland Finnish #2
  • Flag of France French
  • Flag of Germany German
  • Flag of Italy Italian
  • Flag of Japan Japanese
  • Flag of Norway Norwegian
  • Flag of Poland Polish
  • Flag of Brazil (Brazilian) Portuguese
  • Flag of Serbia Serbian
  • Flag of Spain Spanish
  • Interlingua

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Feed-icon. ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ... Look up Wiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Fan sites


  Results from FactBites:
 
Megatokyo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3445 words)
Megatokyo centers around Piro, a man in his twenties who is an anime and manga fanatic; his friend Largo, a gaming enthusiast; and their adventures in a fantastical imagining of the city of Tokyo, Japan.
Megatokyo is divided into chapters, each consisting of approximately 100 pages.
Megatokyo was started as a joint project of Fred Gallagher and his friend (and later, business partner) Rodney Caston, with Caston writing the scripts and Gallagher supplying the artwork.
Characters of Megatokyo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5089 words)
He is a comic incarnation of Ken Hashimoto, one of Megatokyo forum's administrators and, at one point, a co-translator of the Japanese version of Megatokyo.
This, and other unusual abilities she is suggested to have, may imply that she too is a magical girl of some kind (see also [2]).
The personification of the Megatokyo server of the same name, similar in appearance to Ping-chan except with differently shaped ear-blades.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m