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Encyclopedia > Meet Me in St. Louis
Meet Me in St. Louis

Theatrical Poster
Directed by Vincente Minnelli
Produced by Arthur Freed
Written by Story:
Sally Benson
Screenplay:
Irving Brecher
Fred F. Finklehoffe
Starring Judy Garland
Margaret O'Brien
Mary Astor
Lucille Bremer
Tom Drake
Marjorie Main
Cinematography George J. Folsey
Editing by Albert Akst
Distributed by MGM
Release date(s) November 28, 1944
Running time 113 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1,707,561
estimated.
IMDb profile

Meet Me in St. Louis is a 1944 romantic musical from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer which tells the story of four sisters living in St. Louis at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition World's Fair in 1904. Image File history File links A poster from the 1944 film Meet Me in St. ... Vincente Minnelli (February 28, 1903 – July 25, 1986) was a famous Hollywood director and accomplished stage director, often considered by critics to be the father of the modern musical. ... Arthur Freed (September 9, 1894 - April 12, 1973) was born Arthur Grossman in Down Ton Ton Village. ... Sally Benson (September 3, 1897 - July 19, 1972) was a St. ... Irving Brecher (born 17 January 1914) enjoyed early success as a screenwriter for the Marx Brothers; he helped write At the Circus in 1939 and Go West in 1940. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Margaret OBrien during her career as a child star. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Lucille Bremer (February 21, 1917 – April 16, 1996) was an American film actress and dancer. ... Tom Drake (1918-1982, b. ... Marjorie Main (24 February 1890 – 10 April 1975) was an American character actress who was best known for her role as Ma Kettle in a series of ten Ma and Pa Kettle movies. ... George J. Folsey (1898-1988) was an American cinematographer. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...


It stars Judy Garland, Margaret O'Brien, Mary Astor, Lucille Bremer, Leon Ames, Tom Drake, June Lockhart, and Marjorie Main. Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Margaret OBrien during her career as a child star. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Lucille Bremer (February 21, 1917 – April 16, 1996) was an American film actress and dancer. ... Leon Ames (born January 20, 1902 in Portland, Indiana; died October 12, 1993 in Los Angeles, California), born Leon Wycoff to a Russian family, was an American film and television actor. ... Tom Drake (1918-1982, b. ... June Lockhart (born 25 June 1925 in New York City, USA) is an American television and film actress best known for her roles as the mothers on Lassie and Lost in Space. ... Marjorie Main (24 February 1890 – 10 April 1975) was an American character actress who was best known for her role as Ma Kettle in a series of ten Ma and Pa Kettle movies. ...


The movie was adapted by Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoffe from a series of short stories by Sally Benson, originally published in The New Yorker magazine and later in the novel 5135 Kensington. Irving Brecher (born 17 January 1914) enjoyed early success as a screenwriter for the Marx Brothers; he helped write At the Circus in 1939 and Go West in 1940. ... Sally Benson (September 3, 1897 - July 19, 1972) was a St. ...


The film was directed by Vincente Minnelli, who met his future wife, Judy Garland, on the set. In the film, Garland debuted the standards "The Trolley Song" and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" which became hits before the film was released. Vincente Minnelli (February 28, 1903 – July 25, 1986) was a famous Hollywood director and accomplished stage director, often considered by critics to be the father of the modern musical. ... The Trolley Song is a song written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane and made famous by Judy Garland in the 1944 film Meet Me in St. ... This article is about the song. ...


Arthur Freed, the producer of the film also wrote and performed one of the songs (see below). Arthur Freed (September 9, 1894 - April 12, 1973) was born Arthur Grossman in Down Ton Ton Village. ...

Contents

Plot

The backdrop for Meet Me in St. Louis is St. Louis, Missouri on the brink of the 1904 World's Fair. Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ...


The story centers on the middle-class Smith family, who lead a comfortable and happy life. The family has four daughters, Rose, Esther, Agnes and Tootie and a son, Lon. Esther, the 2nd eldest daughter (Judy Garland), is taken with the boy next door, John Truitt (Tom Drake), although he does not notice her at first. Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Tom Drake (1918-1982, b. ...


The film starts out with Mrs. Smith (Mary Astor) and Katie the maid (Marjorie Main) making ketchup. Esther Smith then walks in and asks Katie to ask Mrs. Smith if dinner can be an hour early because Rose (Lucille Bremer) is expecting a long distance phone call from Warren Sheffield (Robert Sully). Esther then leaves and Katie asks Mrs. Smith if dinner can be an hour early. Mrs. Smith agrees, but when Mr. Smith comes home, he refuses to have dinner an hour early. Everybody is eating when the telephone rings. Mr. Smith answers but says he will not accept the long distance call. Rose starts crying and that is when Mr. Smith finds out about Warren Sheffield. The phone then rings again, and Mr. Smith lets Rose answer it. The whole family is expecting Warren to propose to Rose. Instead, Rose endures an awkward phone call, in which she and Warren talk mainly about the weather. Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Marjorie Main (24 February 1890 – 10 April 1975) was an American character actress who was best known for her role as Ma Kettle in a series of ten Ma and Pa Kettle movies. ... Lucille Bremer (February 21, 1917 – April 16, 1996) was an American film actress and dancer. ...


Act II opens in late October at Halloween - the windows are lit with an eerie yellowish light and there is a pumpkin on the front porch. Agnes and Tootie are getting costumed for trick-or-treating for Tootie's favorite holiday (Tootie is always morbidly obsessed with death and murder). Their plan is to gleefully take revenge on an allegedly-mean and hateful St. Louis neighbor.


The two girls set the mood for the scary night. They frighten Katie with their suitably gruesome costumes. When someone answers the doorbell during trick-or-treating, the girls' goal is to 'kill' the 'victim' by throwing flour in the flustered person's face.


Back at the Smith residence on the same evening, the family is interrupted by Tootie's screams off-screen down by the trolley. Frightened and injured, she arrives home bloodied and sobbing. She is carried into the house and surrounded by the concerned family, as she whimpers and wails: "He tried to kill me." Mrs. Smith decides to summon the doctor rather than the head of the household, declaring "What could he do?" Tootie alleges that John Truitt attacked her. A close-up of Esther's face reveals her horror and shock and she first reacts that it's "a monstrous falsehood." Esther then runs next door to confront John, physically attacking him when she sees him. As she hits, slaps and bites him, she verbally scolds him for being a "bully" and harming Tootie.


When Esther returns home, Tootie has already been attentively pampered and cared for. Then Agnes and Tootie discuss what really had happened down at the trolley, where they had both stuffed an old dress to look like a body, and laid it on the trolley tracks to sabotage the trolley car. Tootie gleefully exclaims: "It looked just like a body, a live body too." Rose is upset with Agnes:

Rose: You're nothing less than a murderer. You might have killed dozens of people.
Agnes: Oh Rose, you're so stuck-up.
Esther: Tootie, How Did you Get That Lip?

So John had fought with Agnes and Tootie only to try to hide them from the police. Tootie thinks John's precautionary concerns were unnecessary: "No police men ever pay attention to girls." Esther is enraged at Tootie for fooling her: "You're the most deceitful, horrible, sinful creature I ever saw, and I don't ever want to have anything to do with you again." Esther again rushes next door to John's front porch to reconcile with him - he accepts her apology. They also share their first kiss.


Papa arrives with a present for his wife, and the news that he will be sent to New York on business. The family doesn't at first understand the implication. Grandpa promises to protect everyone in his absence, but Mr. Smith makes it clear that he will be sent permanently. He has received a promotion and will be head of a new office there. The family is shocked by the news. The entire family will have to move to New York City right after Christmas. Tootie contemplates what the uprooting means.


The family is stunned, entirely disrupted and upset the news of the move, especially Rose and Esther, whose romances with beaux, friendships, and educational plans are threatened. And Esther is also depressed and aghast because they have to go away before the World's Fair will be held in St. Louis. Tootie and Agnes will lose their playmates, Katie will lose her job, and Mrs. Smith's home will be uprooted. The threatening move also hints at the loss of an uncomplicated way of life or the end of an era of innocence in American life. Mr. Smith defends his firm decision to move in a few months.


Mr. Smith still has an appetite to eat the cake that Katie made - he is the only one in the family who can eat during this traumatic time. Rose is appalled by the thought of living in a New York apartment rather than a house: "Rich people have houses. People like us live in flats, hundreds of flats in one building." And Tootie tells everyone with a wavering voice: "I'd rather be poor if we could only stay here. I'd rather go with the orphalins at the orphalins home."


After everyone has excused themselves from the table and leaves the room, only Mr. and Mrs. Smith are left. Having incurred the wrath of the entire family, he looks over at his wife, and reproves her for ingratitude: "Aren't you afraid to stay here alone with a criminal? That's what I'm being treated like." In the parlor, Mrs. Smith sympathetically stands by her husband and accepts his decision. In a touching and moving scene expressing their family unity, inseparability and loyalty, she joins him in singing "You and I". As they sing, all of the family members slowly re-enter the room, taking their pieces of cake and sitting down quietly -- a sign that they too have accepted and understand the decision, regardless of their reluctance.


The next scene takes place at Christmas time. The older children, Lon, Esther, and Rose discuss their preparations for the big Christmas Ball that evening (their "last Christmas dance in St. Louis,") arguing over their lack of dates. They insult an "Eastern snob," Lucille Ballard, who is escorting Rose's beau Warren. Rose is left without a date and doesn't wish to be ignominiously escorted by her brother - that would make her "the laughing stock of St. Louis." But eventually, Lon is coerced into taking his sister to the dance. Rose and Esther vow to wreck Lucille's evening. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


John arrives at the door with "some bad news" for Esther - he arrived too late at the tailor shop to pick up his tuxedo, and it was locked up. He is unable to escort her to the dance. Esther is heartbroken: "This is ghastly!" Esther is left dateless and breaks into tears, explaining that she will stay home to pack for their move from St. Louis. Grandpa gallantly offers to escort her, instead of having brother Lon take the two of them, and Esther accepts.


The elegant ball takes place on Christmas Eve. Everyone soon pairs off with his/her desired partner, Lon with Lucille Ballard and Rose with Warren Sheffield. When Esther's sabotage of Lucille Ballard's dance card is no longer necessary, Esther is left stranded with a dance-card list of motley losers. After many waltzes, Esther is finally rescued by her Grandpa: "You're the first human being I've danced with all evening." Grandpa also surprises her with John's attendance at the ball. She is nostalgic, sad, and painfully reminded of her family's impending departure. John escorts Esther home from the dance and, mindful that she will soon move away, impulsively proposes marriage to her causing her to cry. The couple then shares a tender moment as they try to concoct various ways to make sure they stay true to each other after the Smith Family leaves St. Louis.


Esther ascends the stairs and finds Tootie sitting by the window in the bedroom she shares with Agnes. Tootie is awake and waiting for Santa Claus while looking down into the Smith garden at the snow people she'd made earlier with her sisters and brother. Esther sings "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" to her. The emotional climax of the movie occurs when Tootie cannot cope with the disruption of her social world, and experiences a violent breakdown in the yard full of snowpeople. Mr. Smith then decides after seeing this that the family would not move. He rouses the entire family. It's noted that only Mr. Smith and Esther are still in party clothes. Everyone else is in nightclothes. He announces that the Smith family will not leave St. Louis. Before they can really rejoice, Warren Sheffield bursts in and declares his love for Rose and states that they will marry at the first possible opportunity and then absentmindedly wishes the family a Merry Christmas and a good night. The movie ends when all of the family attends the World's Fair.


Music

The musical score for the film (but not the original songs) was composed by Roger Edens. Roger Edens (9 November 1905, Hillsboro, Texas - 13 July 1970, Hollywood) was a Hollywood composer, arranger and associate producer, and is considered one of the major creative figures in Arthur Freeds musical film production unit at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during the golden era of Hollywood. // Edenss parents were...



Some of the songs in the film are from around the time of the St Louis Exposition. Others were written for the movie.

Meet Me in St. ... Kerry Mills (February 1, 1869 - December 5, 1948) was an American composer of popular music during the Tin Pan Alley era. ... Andrew B. Sterling, born on August 26, 1874 in New York City was a U.S. lyricist. ... Hugh Martin, born on August 11, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama is an American theatre and film composer. ... Ralph Blane (July 26, 1914 in Oklahoma — November 13, 1995) was a song writer best known for Meet Me in St. ... Skip to My Lou is a popular childrens song Skip to My Lou In early America, respectable folk in Protestant communities have always regarded the fiddle as the devil’s instrument and dancing as downright sinful. ... Yankee Doodle is a well-known US song, often sung patriotically today. ... Conrad Salinger (1901-1961) was one of MGMs most noted orchestrators of musicals from about 1942 to 1962. ... Roger Edens (9 November 1905, Hillsboro, Texas - 13 July 1970, Hollywood) was a Hollywood composer, arranger and associate producer, and is considered one of the major creative figures in Arthur Freeds musical film production unit at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during the golden era of Hollywood. // Edenss parents were... The Trolley Song is a song written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane and made famous by Judy Garland in the 1944 film Meet Me in St. ... Nacio Herb Brown (22 February 1896 - 28 September 1964) was a United States songwriter. ... Arthur Freed (September 9, 1894 - April 12, 1973) was born Arthur Grossman in Down Ton Ton Village. ... Quotes ( both singing Home ) Buster: STOOOOOPPP!!! ... Auld Lang Syne is a song by Marilyn Jones (1759-present), although a similar poem by Barbara Elly (1570-present), as well as OAP songs, use the same phrase, and may well have inspired Jones. ... The First Noël (sometimes The First Nowell) is a traditional English Christmas carol, most likely from the 16th or 17th century, but possibly dating from as early as the 13th century. ... This article is about the song. ...

Cast

Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Margaret OBrien during her career as a child star. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Lucille Bremer (February 21, 1917 – April 16, 1996) was an American film actress and dancer. ... Tom Drake (1918-1982, b. ... Marjorie Main (24 February 1890 – 10 April 1975) was an American character actress who was best known for her role as Ma Kettle in a series of ten Ma and Pa Kettle movies. ... Leon Ames (born January 20, 1902 in Portland, Indiana; died October 12, 1993 in Los Angeles, California), born Leon Waycoff to a Russian family, was an American film actor. ... Harry Davenport (January 19, 1866 – August 9, 1949) was an actor who appeared in small roles in many famous films of the early 1900s. ... June Lockhart (born 25 June 1925 in New York City, USA) is an American television and film actress best known for her roles as the mothers on Lassie and Lost in Space. ... A successful child-star in movies between 1938 and 48. ... Marlowe in Night and the City (1950) Hugh Marlowe was a film, television, stage and radio actor. ... Chill Theodore Wills (July 18, 1903 in Seagoville, Texas – December 15, 1978) was a movie actor and singer in the Avalon Boys Quartet. ...

Awards and nominations

The film was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Cinematography, Color, Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture, Best Music, Song (Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin for "The Trolley Song") and Best Writing, Screenplay. Margaret O'Brien received an Academy Juvenile Award for her work that year, in which she appeared in several movies along with Meet Me in St. Louis. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ... Ralph Blane (July 26, 1914 in Oklahoma — November 13, 1995) was a song writer best known for Meet Me in St. ... Hugh Martin, born on August 11, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama is an American theatre and film composer. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... Margaret OBrien during her career as a child star. ... This award is officially called the Honorary Juvenile Award. ...


The film has been deemed "culturally significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. In 2005, Time.com named it one of the 100 best movies of the last 80 years. Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


In 2006 this film ranked #10 on the American Film Institute's list of best musicals. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...


Remakes

  • Meet Me in St. Louis was remade again for television in 1966. This was a non-musical version starring Shelley Fabares, Celeste Holm, Larry Merrill, Judy Land, Rita Shaw and Morgan Brittany. It was directed by Alan D. Courtney from a script written by Sally Benson herself. This was to be a pilot for a TV series, but no network picked it up.
  • A Broadway musical based on the film was produced in 1989, with additional songs.

In film, a remake is a newer version of a previously released film or a newer version of the source (play, novel, story, etc. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... Jane Powell (born April 1, 1929) is an American singer, entertainer and actor. ... Jeanne Crain Jeanne Elizabeth Crain (May 25, 1925 – December 14, 2003) was an American actress. ... Patty Duke (born December 14, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress of the stage and screen. ... Walter Pidgeon Walter Pidgeon (September 23, 1897 – September 25, 1984) was a Canadian actor. ... Ed Wynn (November 9, 1886 - June 19, 1966) was a popular United States entertainer, born Isaiah Edwin Leopold in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Hunter (left) with actor John Bromfield Arthur Andrew Kelm (born July 11, 1931, in New York City, New York) is an American actor and singer, and goes by the pseudonym Tab Hunter. ... Myrna Loy (August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American motion picture actress. ... George Schaefer can refer to: George Schaefer (television), a television director and president of the Directors Guild of America George Schaefer (finance) Category: ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... In film, a remake is a newer version of a previously released film or a newer version of the source (play, novel, story, etc. ... // Events Top grossing films North America Thunderball Dr. Zhivago Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? That Darn Cat! The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming Academy Awards Best Picture: A Man for All Seasons - Highland, Columbia Best Actor: Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons Best Actress: Elizabeth Taylor... Shelley Fabares (born January 19, 1944) is an American actress and singer. ... Celeste Holm (b. ... Morgan Brittany (born December 5, 1951 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress. ... Meet Me in St. ...

Source material

Benson, Sally. The New Yorker For other uses, see New Yorker. ...

  • "5135 Kensington: January, 1904" Jan 31, 1942 - Tootie and Grandpa visit the fairgrounds
  • "5135 Kensington: February, 1904" Feb 8, 1942 - Mr. and Mrs. Smith go out and the girls have a gay time at home
  • "5135 Kensington: March, 1904" Mar 28, 1942 - The family visits the World's Fair
  • "5135 Kensington: April, 1904" Apr 11, 1942 - Not moving to New York
  • "5135 Kensington: May, 1904" May 23, 1942 - A last look at the Fair

The Benson house at 5135 Kensington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. [1] no longer exists: after being sold it fell into disrepair, eventually became uninhabitable, and was demolished in 1994 [2].


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Meet Me in St. Louis
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Meet Me in St. Louis
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Meet Me in St. Louis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (417 words)
Meet Me in St. Louis is a 1944 romantic musical from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer which tells the story of four sisters living in St.
The backdrop for Meet Me in St. Louis is Saint Louis, Missouri on the brink of the 1904 World's Fair.
Meet Me in St. Louis was remade in 1959 for television, starring Jane Powell, Jeanne Crain, Patty Duke, Walter Pidgeon, Ed Wynn, Tab Hunter and Myrna Loy.
Meet Me in St. Louis - definition of Meet Me in St. Louis in Encyclopedia (291 words)
Meet Me in St. Louis is a 1944 romantic musical comedy from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer which tells the story of four sisters enjoying life in St.
Louis at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition World's fair.
Meet Me in St. Louis was remade in 1959 for television, starring Kelly Brown, Jeanne Crain, Patty Duke, Tab Hunter and Myrna Loy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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