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Encyclopedia > Medusa (mythology)
A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin

In Greek mythology, Medusa (Μεδουσα "Queen"), was a monstrous female character whose gaze could turn people to stone. Download high resolution version (700x698, 80 KB)Arnold Böcklin circa 1878 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Download high resolution version (700x698, 80 KB)Arnold Böcklin circa 1878 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The Isle of the Dead (Die Toteninsel) Arnold Böcklin (16 October 1827 – 16 January 1901) was a Swiss-German artist. ... Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ...


Some classical references describe her as one of three Gorgon sisters. Medusa, Stheno, and Euryale were monsters with brass hands, sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous serpents. The Gorgons and their other sisters the Graeae (and possibly the Hesperides) were daughters of Phorcys and Ceto. In Greek mythology, the Gorgons (terrible or, according to some, loud-roaring) were vicious female monsters with sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... Stheno (forceful), in Greek mythology, was one of the immortal Gorgons, vicious female monsters with brass hands, sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... Euryale (far-roaming), in Greek mythology, was one of the immortal Gorgons, vicious female monsters with brass hands, sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... The Graeae (old women or gray ones), were three sisters, one of several trinities of archaic goddesses in Greek mythology. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was a primevil sea god, son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ...


In the most well known version of the myth, Medusa originally started out as a beautiful human. She was raped by Poseidon in Athena's temple. Poseidon was an arch-rival of Athena's since at one time he vied for patronage of Athens; the soon-to-become Athenians chose Athena's offering of the olive tree over Poseidon's offering of horses or a spring of water. Andrea Doria as Neptune by Agnolo Bronzino: a potent allegory of Genoas hegemony in the Tyrrhenian Sea In Greek Mythology, Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea, known to the Romans as Neptune, and to the Etruscans as Nethuns. ... Athena from the east pediment of the Afea temple in Aegina After a sculpture of Athena at the Louvre. ... ... Species About 20, including: Olea brachiata Olea capensis Olea caudatilimba Olea europaea Olea exasperata Olea guangxiensis Olea hainanensis Olea laxiflora Olea neriifolia Olea paniculata Olea parvilimba Olea rosea Olea salicifolia Olea tetragonoclada Olea tsoongii Olea undulata The olives (Olea) are a genus of about 20 species of small trees in...


Upon discovery of the desecration of her temple, Athena changed Medusa's form to match that of her sister Gorgons as punishment. Medusa's hair turned into snakes and her glance would turn all living creatures to stone. She was banished beyond the Hyperborean lands. The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ... In Greek mythology, according to tradition, the Hyperboreans were a mythical people who lived to the far north of Greece. ...


While Medusa was pregnant by Poseidon, she was beheaded by the hero Perseus with help from Athena and Hermes. From her neck came her offspring: Pegasus and Chrysaor. Perseus used Medusa's head to rescue Andromeda, kill Polydectes, and, in some versions, petrify the Titan Atlas. Then he gave it to Athena, who placed it on her shield Aegis. Perseus with the Head of Medusa Perseus, Greek Περσεύς, was the son of Danae, the only child of Acrisius king of Argos. ... Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles Hermēs (Greek: Έρμης: pile of marker stones), in Greek mythology, is the god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators, literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures and invention and commerce in general... In Greek mythology, Pegasus, or Pegasos was a winged horse that was the foal of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. ... Greek mythology In Greek mythology, Chrysaor (Greek Χρυσάωρ, golden falchion, from χρυσός, gold, and ἄορ, sword, falchion) was a giant, the son of Poseidon and Medusa. ... In Greek mythology, Andromeda was the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, king and queen of Ethiopia. ... In Greek mythology, King Polydectes of Seriphos was the brother of Dictys. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was the son of the Titan Iapetus and the nymph Clymene, and brother of Prometheus. ... Aegis (Gr. ...


Asteroid 149 Medusa, and an important geological region on the planet Mars, Medusa Fossae bear her name. An asteroid is a small, solid object in our Solar System, orbiting the Sun. ... 149 Medusa is a bright-colored, stony main belt asteroid. ... Mars, with polar ice caps visible. ... Medusa Fossae a large geological region of uncertain origin on the planet Mars. ...

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Medusa (mythology)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mythology Guide - Perseus and Medusa (0 words)
Greek and Roman Mythology > Perseus and Medusa
Medusa had once been a beautiful maiden, whose hair was
Perseus espied in the bright shield the image of Medusa and her
Medusa 1 | Medusa 1, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (1061 words)
Medusa 1, one of the GORGONS, was beheaded by Perseus 1.
Medusa 2 was daughter of King Sthenelus 3 of Mycenae, son of Perseus 1.
Medusa 4 was a daughter of King Pelias 1 of Iolcus, the man who sent Jason and the ARGONAUTS to fetch the Golden Fleece in Colchis (Caucasus).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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