FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Medusa" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Medusa
Medusa, by Caravaggio (1592:1600)
Medusa, by Caravaggio (1592:1600)
Topics in Greek mythology
Gods
Heroes
Related

In Greek mythology, Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα (Médousa), "guardian, protectress"[1]) was a monstrous chthonic female character; gazing upon her would turn onlookers to stone. She was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon[2] until giving it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. In classical antiquity and today, the image of the head of Medusa finds expression in the evil-averting device known as the Gorgoneion.[3] She also has two gorgon sisters. For the mythological characters named Medusa, see Medusa. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 587 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (935 × 955 pixel, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 587 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (935 × 955 pixel, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Alcides redirects here. ... Hercules and the Hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours (Greek: dodekathlos) of Heracles (Latin: Hercules) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... This article is about the hero from Greek mythology. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Επτά επί Θήβας The Seven Against Thebes is a mythic narrative that finds its classic statement in the play by Aeschylus (467 BCE) concerning the battle between the Seven led by Polynices and the army of Thebes headed by Eteocles and his supporters, traditional Theban... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... This article is about the mythological monster. ... Triptolemus (threefold warrior; also Buzyges), in Greek mythology always connected with Demeter of the Eleusinian Mysteries, might be accounted the son of King Celeus of Eleusis in Attica, or, according to Apollodorus (Library I.v. ... The Eleusinian Mysteries (Greek: Ἐλευσίνια Μυστήρια) were initiation ceremonies held every year for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based at Eleusis in ancient Greece. ... A mystery religion is any religion with an arcanum, or body of secret wisdom. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... Dragons play a role in Greek mythology. ... Greek religion encompasses the collection of beliefs and rituals practiced in Ancient Greece in form of cult practices, there for the practical counterpart of Greek mythology. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aegis (disambiguation). ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Apotrope (adj. ... Apotropaic magic is a ritual observance that is intended to turn away evil. ...

Contents

Medusa in classical mythology

The three Gorgon sisters — Medusa, Stheno, and Euryale — were children of Phorcys and Ceto, or sometimes, Typhon and Echidna, in each case chthonic monsters from an archaic world. Their genealogy is shared with other sisters, the Graeae, as in Aeschylus's Prometheus Unbound, who places both trinities of sisters far off "on Kisthene's dreadful plain": This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... Stheno (forceful), (Greek: Σθεννω), in Greek mythology, was one of the Gorgons, vicious female monsters with brass hands, sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... Euryale as depicted in God of War II. Euryale (far-roaming), in Greek mythology, was one of the immortal Gorgons, three vicious sisters with brass hands, sharp fangs, and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (Greek: Κητος, Ketos, sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... Zeus darting his lightning at Typhon, Chalcidian black-figured hydria, ca. ... In the most ancient layers of Greek mythology Echidna (ekhis, meaning she viper) was called the Mother of All Monsters. Echidna was described by Hesiod as a female monster spawned in a cave, who mothered with her mate Typhoeus (or Typhon) every major monster in the Greek myths, (Theogony, 295... The Graeae (old women, gray ones, or gray witches, alternatively spelled Graiai, Graiae, Graii ), were three sisters, one of several trinities of archaic goddesses in Greek mythology. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... There are two plays named Prometheus Unbound. ...

"Near them their sisters three, the Gorgons, winged
With snakes for hair— hated of mortal man—"

While ancient Greek vase-painters and relief carvers imagined Medusa and her sisters as beings born of monstrous form, sculptors and vase-painters of the fifth century began to envisage her as a being both beautiful as well as terrifying. In an ode written in 490 BCE Pindar already speaks of "fair-cheeked Medusa".[4] In a late version of the Medusa myth, related by the Roman poet Ovid (Metamorphoses 4.770), Medusa was originally a beautiful maiden, "the jealous aspiration of many suitors," priestess in Athene's temple, but when she was raped by the "Lord of the Sea" Poseidon in Athena's temple, the enraged goddess transformed her beautiful hair to serpents and she made her face so terrible to behold that the mere sight of it would turn a man to stone. In Ovid's telling, Perseus describes Medusa's punishment by Athena as just and well-deserved. In the majority of the versions of the story, while Medusa was pregnant by Poseidon, she was beheaded in her sleep by the hero Perseus, who was sent to fetch her head by King Polydectes of Seriphus. With help from Athena and Hermes, who supplied him with winged sandals, Hades' cap of invisibility, a sword, and a mirrored shield, he accomplished his quest. The hero slew Medusa by looking at her reflection in the mirror instead of directly at her to prevent being turned into stone. When the hero severed Medusa's head, from her neck two offspring sprang forth: the winged horse Pegasus and the giant Chrysaor who later became the hero wielding the golden sword. For the PINDAR military bunker in London, please see the PINDAR section of Military citadels under London Pindar (or Pindarus, Greek: ) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was a Greek lyric poet. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, King Polydectes was the ruler of the island of Seriphos Polydectes fell in love with Danae when she and her son Perseus were saved by his brother Dictys (see: Acrisius). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... Perseus wearing the Cap of Invisibility while carrying Medusas head. ... For other uses, see Pegasus (disambiguation). ... Greek mythology In Greek mythology, Chrysaor (Greek Χρυσάωρ, golden falchion, from χρυσός, gold, and ἄορ, sword, falchion) was a giant, the son of Poseidon and Medusa. ...

Perseus with the Head of Medusa, by Benvenuto Cellini, installed 1554
Perseus with the Head of Medusa, by Benvenuto Cellini, installed 1554

Jane Ellen Harrison argues that "her potency only begins when her head is severed, and that potency resides in the head; she is in a word a mask with a body later appended... the basis of the Gorgoneion is a cultus object, a ritual mask misunderstood."[5] In Odyssey xi, Homer does not specifically mention the Gorgon Medusa, Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1129 KB) Statue of Perseus, Piazza della Signoria, Florence - Canon S45 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1129 KB) Statue of Perseus, Piazza della Signoria, Florence - Canon S45 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Gold Salt cellar by Cellini. ... Jane Ellen Harrison (September 9, 1850–April 5, 1928) was a ground-breaking English classical scholar and feminist. ... Apotropaic magic is a ritual observance that is intended to turn away evil. ... In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ...

"lest for my daring Persephone the dread
From Hades should send up an awful monster's grizzly head"

Harrison's translation states "the Gorgon was made out of the terror, not the terror out of the Gorgon."[5] This article is about the Greek goddess. ...


According to Ovid, in North-West Africa Perseus flew past the Titan Atlas, who stood holding the sky aloft, and transformed him into stone. In a similar manner, the corals of the Red Sea were said to have been formed of Medusa's blood spilled onto seaweed when Perseus laid down the petrifying head beside the shore during his short stay in Aethiopia where he saved and wed his future wife, the lovely princess Andromeda. Furthermore the poisonous vipers of the Sahara, in the Argonautica 4.1515, Ovid's Metamorphoses 4.770 and Lucan's Pharsalia 9.820, were said to have grown from spilt drops of her blood. For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the primordial Titans. ... Precious coral or red coral is the common name given to Corallium rubrum and several related species of marine coral. ... Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ... Andromeda Chained to the Rock by the Nereids (1840) Théodore Chassériau, Louvre Andromeda was a woman from Greek mythology who was chained to a rock to be a sacrifice to a sea monster as divine punishment for her mothers bragging. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the poem Metamorphoses written by the poet Ovid. ... This article is about the poem. ...


Perseus then flew to his mother's island where she was about to be forced into marriage with the king. He cried out "Mother, shield your eyes", and everyone but his mother was turned into stone by the gaze of Medusa's head.


Then he gave the Gorgon's head to Athena, who placed it on her shield, the Aegis. Some say[attribution needed] the goddess gave Medusa's magical blood to the physician Asclepius, that which was from the left-side of the neck a deadly poison, and the right-side had the power to raise the dead. For other uses, see Aegis (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek , transliterated Asklēpiós; Latin Aesculapius) is the demigod of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. ...


Some classical references refer to three Gorgons; Harrison considered that the tripling of Medusa into a trio of sisters was a secondary feature in the myth:

"The triple form is not primitive, it is merely an instance of a general tendency... which makes of each woman goddess a trinity, which has given us the Horae, the Charites, the Semnai, and a host of other triple groups. It is immediately obvious that the Gorgons are not really three but one + two. The two unslain sisters are mere appendages due to custom; the real Gorgon is Medusa." [5] Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... In Greek mythology the Erinyes (the Romans called them the Furies) were female personifications of vengeance. ...

Modern interpretations

Psychoanalysis

In 1940, Sigmund Freud's Das Medusenhaupt (Medusa's Head) was published posthumously. This article laid the framework for his significant contribution to a body of criticism surrounding the monster. Medusa is presented as “the supreme talisman who provides the image of castration -- associated in the child's mind with the discovery of maternal sexuality -- and its denial. The snakes are multiple phalluses and petrifaction represents the comforting erection.”[6][7] Psychoanalysts continue archetypal literary criticism to the present day. 2002's The Rape of Medusa in the Temple of Athena: Aspects of Triangulation in the Girl by Dr. Beth Seeley, analyzes Medusa's punishment for the ‘crime’ of having been raped in Athena's temple as an outcome of the goddess' unresolved conflicts with her father, Zeus.[8] Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Medusas Head (1922), by Sigmund Freud In this essay, he lays the framework his significant contribution to a body of criticism surrounding the Medusa Myth. ... An amulet from the Black Pullet grimoire. ... Castration (also referred as: gelding, neutering, orchiectomy, orchidectomy, and oophorectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which a male loses the functions of the testes or a female loses the functions of the ovaries. ... Psychoanalysis is the revelation of unconscious relations, in a systematic way through an associative process. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ...


Feminism

In the 20th century, feminists reassessed Medusa's appearances in literature and in modern culture, including the use of Medusa as a logo by fashion company Versace.[9][10][11] The attack on Medusa is discussed as a potential example of violence against women or rape. Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ...


The name "Medusa" itself is often used in ways not directly connected to the mythological figure but to suggest the gorgon's abilities or to connote malevolence; despite her origins as a beauty, the name in common usage "came to mean monster."[12] The book Female Rage: Unlocking Its Secrets, Claiming Its Power by Mary Valentis and Anne Devane notes that "When we asked women what female rage looks like to them, it was always Medusa, the snaky-haired monster of myth, who came to mind ... In one interview after another we were told that Medusa is 'the most horrific woman in the world' ... [though] none of the women we interviewed could remember the details of the myth."[13] Connotation is a subjective cultural and/or emotional coloration in addition to the explicit or denotative meaning of any specific word or phrase in a language, i. ...


Medusa in art

Tête de Méduse, by Peter Paul Rubens (1618)
Tête de Méduse, by Peter Paul Rubens (1618)
Main article: Cultural depictions of Medusa and gorgons

From ancient times, the Medusa was immortalized in numerous works of art, including: Image File history File linksMetadata Rubens_Medusa. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Rubens_Medusa. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... The mythological monster Medusa and other gorgons have featured in art and culture from the days of ancient Greece to the modern day. ...

Accompanied by a revival of the legend by Thomas Bulfinch's Mythology, "Medusa had become a common theme in art" by the nineteenth century. Edward Burne-Jones' Perseus Cycle of paintings and a drawing by Aubrey Beardsley gave way to the twentieth century works of Paul Klee, John Singer Sargent, Pablo Picasso, and Auguste Rodin's bronze sculpture The Gates of Hell.[14] For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... The Alexander Mosaic, dating from approx. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... The House of the Faun is the largest private residence to be discovered in the ruins of Pompeii. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,730 × 1,730 pixels, file size: 1. ... Apotropaic magic is a ritual observance that is intended to turn away evil. ... For other uses, see Aegis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Caravaggios version of the subject, 1597. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1129 KB) Statue of Perseus, Piazza della Signoria, Florence - Canon S45 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Gold Salt cellar by Cellini. ... The Medusa, circa 1597, is an oil painting by the Italian Baroque master Caravaggio. ... For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Download high resolution version (1458x1944, 262 KB)Statue of Persus with Medusas head This is the original mentioned here: Image:Perseus-slays-medusa. ... Self-portrait by Canova, 1792. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 601 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (700 × 698 pixel, file size: 80 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Medusa by Arnold Böcklin, circa 1878 Originally uploaded at en. ... Self-portrait, oil on canvas, 1872 Arnold Böcklin (16 October 1827 – 16 January 1901) was a symbolist Swiss painter. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2460 KB) Description: Perseo Subject: Sculpture Artist : Salvador Dalí City : Marbella Country : Spain Photographer: © Manuel González Olaechea y Franco Shot date : January, 3rd, 2006 File links The following pages link to this file: Perseus Metadata This file contains additional... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Thomas Bulfinch (July 15, 1796 - May 27, 1867) was an American writer, born in Newton, Massachusetts to a highly-educated but not rich Bostonian merchant family. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... This is a list of the paintings of the British Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ... “Klee” redirects here. ... Self Portrait, 1906, oil on canvas, 70 x 53 cm, Uffizi Gallery, Florence. ... Picasso redirects here. ... Auguste Rodin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Probably the feminine present participle of medein, "to protect, rule over" (American Heritage Dictionary; compare Medon, Medea, Diomedes, etc.). If not, it is from the same root, and is formed after the participle. OED 2001 revision, s.v.; medein in LSJ.
  2. ^ Bullfinch, Thomas. Bulfinch Mythology - Age of Fable - Stories of Gods & Heroes. Retrieved on 2007-09-07. “...and turning his face away, he held up the Gorgon’s head. Atlas, with all his bulk, was changed into stone.”
  3. ^ A classic example of apotropaic magic.
  4. ^ (Pythian Ode 12). Noted by Marjorie J. Milne in discussing a red-figured vase in the style of Polygnotos, ca. 450-30 BCE, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Milne noted that "It is one of the earliest illustrations of the story to show the Gorgon not as a hideous monster but as a beautiful woman. Art in this respect lagged behind poetry." (Marjorie J. Milne, "Perseus and Medusa on an Attic Vase" The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin New Series, 4.5 (January 1946, pp. 126-130) 126.p.)
  5. ^ a b c Jane Ellen Harrison, (1903) 3rd ed. 1922. Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion. "The Ker as Gorgon." Pg.187.
  6. ^ Medusa in Myth and Literary History
  7. ^ Das Medusenhaupt (Medusa's Head. First published posthumously. Int. Z. Psychoanal. Imago, 25 (1940), 105; reprinted Ges. W., 17,47. The manuscript is dated May 14, 1922, and appears to be a sketch for a more extensive work. Translation, reprinted from Int. J. Psychoanal.,22 (1941), 69; by James Strachey.
  8. ^ Seelig, B.J. (2002). The Rape of Medusa in the Temple of Athena: Aspects of Triangulation. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 83:895-911.
  9. ^ Pratt, A. (1994). Archetypal empowerment in poetry: Medusa, Aphrodite, Artemis, and bears : a gender comparison. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. ISBN 0253208653
  10. ^ Stephenson, A. G. (1997). Endless the Medusa: a feminist reading of Medusan imagery and the myth of the hero in Eudora Welty's novels.
  11. ^ Garber, Marjorie. The Medusa Reader, 24 February 2003, ISBN 0-415-90099-9.
  12. ^ The Medusa Reader, Introduction, pg. 1
  13. ^ Medusa: Solving the Mystery of the Gorgon, pg. 218.
  14. ^ Wilk, Stephen R. Medusa: Solving the Mystery of the Gorgon, 26 June 2000, pg. 200, ISBN 0-195-12431-6.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (AHD) is a dictionary of American English published by Boston publisher Houghton-Mifflin, the first edition of which appeared in 1969. ... In Greek mythology, there were two people called Medôn. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... DiomÄ“dÄ“s or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... OED stands for Oxford English Dictionary Office of Enrollment & Discipline This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A Greek-English Lexicon is the standard lexicographical work of the ancient Greek language, begun in the nineteenth century and now in its ninth (revised) edition. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Apotropaic magic is a ritual observance that is intended to turn away evil. ... Woman officiating at an altar, Attic red-figure kylix by Chairias, c. ... Polygnotos (active approx. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Jane Ellen Harrison (September 9, 1850–April 5, 1928) was a ground-breaking English classical scholar and feminist. ... Medusas Head (1922), by Sigmund Freud In this essay, he lays the framework his significant contribution to a body of criticism surrounding the Medusa Myth. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...

See also

Apotropaic magic is a ritual observance that is intended to turn away evil. ... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... Theodontius was the author of a now lost Latin work on mythology. ...

External links

Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ...

References

Primary sources

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Servius, In Aeneida vi.289
  • Lucan, Bellum civile ix.624-684
  • Ovid, Metamorphoses iv.774-785, 790-801

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Secondary sources

  • Jane Ellen Harrison, (1903) 3rd ed. 1922. Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion,: "The Ker as Gorgon"
Jane Ellen Harrison (September 9, 1850–April 5, 1928) was a ground-breaking English classical scholar and feminist. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Medusa 1 | Medusa 1, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (1061 words)
Medusa 1, one of the GORGONS, was beheaded by Perseus 1.
Medusa 2 was daughter of King Sthenelus 3 of Mycenae, son of Perseus 1.
Medusa 4 was a daughter of King Pelias 1 of Iolcus, the man who sent Jason and the ARGONAUTS to fetch the Golden Fleece in Colchis (Caucasus).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m