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Encyclopedia > Medium frequency
medium frequency (MF)
Cycles per second: 300 kHz to 3000 kHz

Wavelength: 1000 m to 100 m

Medium frequency (MF) refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 300 kHz to 3000 kHz. Part of this band is the medium wave (MW) AM broadcast band. The MF band is also known as the hectometer band or hectometer wave as the wavelengths range from ten to one hectometers (1,000 to 100 m). It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Radio waves. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... AM radio is radio broadcasting using amplitude modulation. ... The metre (Commonwealth English) or meter (American English) (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ...

Contents

Uses and applications

Non-directional navigational radio beacons (NDBs) for maritime and aircraft occupy a band from 190 kHz to 435 kHz, which overlaps from the LF into the bottom part of the MF band. Radio Tower of NKR Leimen-Ochsenbach, Germany A Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) is a radio broadcast station in a known location, used as an aviation or marine navigational aid. ... Low Frequency or LF refers to Radio Frequencies (RF) in the range of 30–300 kHz. ...


500 kHz was for many years the Maritime distress and emergency frequency, and there are more NDBs between 510 and 530 kHz. Navtex, which is part of the current Global Maritime Distress Safety System occupies 518 kHz and 490 kHz for important digital text broadcasts. In recent years, some limited amateur radio operation has also been allowed in the region of 500 kHz.[1] For most of the 20th century, the radio frequency 500 kHz (known as 600 meters or 500 kc for most of the century, before kilohertz replaced kilocycle) was the international calling and distress frequency for ships on the high seas. ... A NAVTEX receiver prints an incoming message. ... The Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS) is an internationally agreed-upon set of safety procedures, types of equipment, and communication protocols used to increase safety and make it easier to rescue distressed ships, boats and aircraft. ... Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD display and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is a hobby that uses various types of radio broadcasting equipment to communicate with other radio amateurs for public service, recreation and self-training. ...


Medium waveband radio transmissions are allocated an AM broadcast band from 530 kHz to 1610 kHz with an extension to 1710 kHz in the US. Amplitude modulation (AM) is a technique used in electronic communication, most commonly for transmitting information via a radio carrier wave. ...


Many home-portable or cordless telephones, especially those that were designed in the 1980s, transmit low power FM audio signals between the table-top base unit and the handset on frequencies in the range 1600 to 1800 kHz.[2]


There is an amateur radio band known as 160 meters or 'top-band' between 1810 and 2000 kHz. Amateur operators transmit CW morse code, digital signals and SSB voice signals on this band. At just above the AM Broadcast band, 160 meters is the lowest radio frequency band alloted for use by Amateur Radio operators. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... Single-sideband modulation (SSB) is a refinement of the technique of amplitude modulation designed to be more efficient in its use of electrical power and bandwidth. ...


There are a number of Coastguard and other ship-to-shore frequencies in use across the range from 1600 to 2850 kHz. These include, as examples, the French MRCC on 1696 kHz and 2677 kHz, Stornoway Coastguard on 1743 kHz, the US Coastguard on 2670 kHz and Madeira on 2843 kHz.[3] RN Northwood in England broadcasts Weather Fax data on 2618.5 kHz.[4]


2182 kHz is the international calling and distress frequency for SSB voice maritime communication (radiotelephony) on the marine MF bands. It is analogous to Channel 16 on the marine VHF band. The radio frequency of 2182 kilohertz (kHz) is the international calling and distress frequency for voice maritime communication (radio telephony) on the marine MF bands. ...


Lastly, there are aeronautical and other mobile SSB bands from 2850 kHz to 3500 kHz, crossing the boundary from the MF band into the HF radio band.[3][5] High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. ...


See also


Radio spectrum
ELF SLF ULF VLF LF MF HF VHF UHF SHF EHF
3 Hz 30 Hz 300 Hz 3 kHz 30 kHz 300 kHz 3 MHz 30 MHz 300 MHz 3 GHz 30 GHz
30 Hz 300 Hz 3 kHz 30 kHz 300 kHz 3 MHz 30 MHz 300 MHz 3 GHz 30 GHz 300 GHz


Legend γ = Gamma rays HX = Hard X-rays SX = Soft X-Rays EUV = Extreme ultraviolet NUV = Near ultraviolet Visible light NIR = Near infrared MIR = Moderate infrared FIR = Far infrared Radio waves EHF = Extremely high frequency (Microwaves) SHF = Super high frequency (Microwaves) UHF = Ultra high frequency VHF = Very high frequency HF = High... In telecommunication, a maritime broadcast communications net is a communications net that is used for international distress calling, including international lifeboat, lifecraft, and survival-craft high frequency (HF); aeronautical emergency very high frequency (VHF); survival ultra high frequency (UHF); international calling and safety very high frequency (VHF); combined scene-of... The International Telecommunication Union uses a special system for classifying radio frequency signals. ... The Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS) is an internationally agreed-upon set of safety procedures, types of equipment, and communication protocols used to increase safety and make it easier to rescue distressed ships, boats and aircraft. ... A NAVTEX receiver prints an incoming message. ... Radio frequency, or RF, refers to that portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in which electromagnetic waves can be generated by alternating current fed to an antenna. ... Extremely low frequency (ELF) is the band of radio frequencies from 3 to 30 Hz. ... Super Low Frequency (SLF) is the frequency range between 30 hertz and 300 hertz. ... Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) is the frequency range between 300 hertz and 3000 hertz. ... Very low frequency or VLF refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 to 30 kHz. ... Low Frequency or LF refers to Radio Frequencies (RF) in the range of 30–300 kHz. ... High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. ... Very high frequency (VHF) is the radio frequency range from 30 MHz (wavelength 10 m) to 300 MHz (wavelength 1 m). ... This article is about the radio frequency. ... Microwave Slang for small waves, like at a beach, often used by surfers. ... Extremely high frequency is the highest radio frequency band. ...

Legend γ = Gamma rays HX = Hard X-rays SX = Soft X-Rays EUV = Extreme ultraviolet NUV = Near ultraviolet Visible light NIR = Near infrared MIR = Moderate infrared FIR = Far infrared Radio waves EHF = Extremely high frequency (Microwaves) SHF = Super high frequency (Microwaves) UHF = Ultra high frequency VHF = Very high frequency HF = High... This article is about electromagnetic radiation. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ... “Visible light” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Infrared (disambiguation). ... Electromagnetic waves sent at terahertz frequencies, known as terahertz radiation, terahertz waves, terahertz light, T-rays, T-light, T-lux and THz, are in the region of the electromagnetic spectrum between 300 gigahertz (3x1011 Hz) and 3 terahertz (3x1012 Hz), corresponding to the wavelength range starting at submillimeter (<1 millimeter... This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. ... Radio waves are electromagnetic waves occurring on the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... “Visible light” redirects here. ... Violet (named after the flower violet) is used in two senses: first, referring to the color of light at the short-wavelength end of the visible spectrum, approximately 380–420 nanometres (this is a spectral color). ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... A yellow Tulip. ... The orange, a fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. ... The W band of the microwave part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges from 75 to 111 GHz. ... The V band (vee-band) of the electromagnetic spectrum ranges from 50 to 75 GHz. ... The Ka band (kurz-above band) is a portion of the K band of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... K band is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging between 12 to 63 GHz. ... The Ku band (kay-yoo kurz-under band) is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from 11 to 18 GHz. ... The X band (3-cm radar spot-band) of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum roughly ranges from 5. ... C band (compromise band) is a portion of electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from 4 to 6 GHz. ... The S band ranges from 2 to 4 GHz. ... L band (20-cm radar long-band) is a portion of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging roughly from 0. ... Radio frequency, or RF, refers to that portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in which electromagnetic waves can be generated by alternating current fed to an antenna. ... Extremely high frequency is the highest radio frequency band. ... Microwave Slang for small waves, like at a beach, often used by surfers. ... This article is about the radio frequency. ... Very high frequency (VHF) is the radio frequency range from 30 MHz (wavelength 10 m) to 300 MHz (wavelength 1 m). ... High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. ... Low Frequency or LF refers to Radio Frequencies (RF) in the range of 30–300 kHz. ... Very low frequency or VLF refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 to 30 kHz. ... Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) is the frequency range between 300 hertz and 3000 hertz. ... Super Low Frequency (SLF) is the frequency range between 30 hertz and 300 hertz. ... Extremely low frequency (ELF) is the band of radio frequencies from 3 to 30 Hz. ... The wavelength is the distance between repeating units of a wave pattern. ... This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. ... A solid-state, analog shortwave receiver Shortwave radio operates between the frequencies of 3 MHz (3,000 kHz) and 30 MHz (30,000 kHz) [1] and came to be referred to as such in the early days of radio because the wavelengths associated with this frequency range were shorter than... Mediumwave radio transmissions serves as the most common band for broadcasting. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.500kc.com
  2. ^ http://www.totse.com/en/phreak/bugs_and_taps/tapphon.html
  3. ^ a b http://www.yachtcom.info/Frequencies.htm
  4. ^ http://www.hffax.de/Northwood-95.txt
  5. ^ http://www.ntia.doc.gov/osmhome/allochrt.pdf U.S. Government Frequency Allocation Chart

Federal Standard 1037C, entitled Telecommunications: Glossary of Telecommunication Terms is a United States Federal Standard, issued by the General Services Administration pursuant to the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended. ...

Further reading

  • Charles Allen Wright and Albert Frederick Puchstein, "Telephone communication, with particular application to medium-frequency alternating currents and electro-motive forces". New York [etc.] McGraw-Hill Book Company, inc., 1st ed., 1925. LCCN 25008275

External articles

  • Tomislav Stimac, "Definition of frequency bands (VLF, ELF... etc.)". IK1QFK Home Page (vlf.it).

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