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Encyclopedia > Medical Research Council (UK)
Current MRC logo

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is a UK organisation dedicated to "promot[ing] the balanced development of medical and related biological research in the UK". Image File history File links MRC_logo. ...

Contents

Organisation

The MRC is one of seven Research Councils and is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Office of Science and Innovation, which - in turn - is part of the Department of Trade and Industry. The Research Councils of the UK are government agencies responsible for particular areas of science and technology. ... The Office of Science and Innovation is a non-ministerial government department of the British government, headed by the Chief Scientific Adviser, currently Sir David King, who took over from Sir (now Lord) Robert May in 2000. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ...


It is governed by a council of 14 members, which convenes every two months. Daily management is in the hands of the Chief Executive. Members of the council also chair specialist boards on specific areas of research. For specific subjects, the council convenes committees.


The MRC funds research centres, three main institutes (in Cambridge, Mill Hill and Hammersmith) and 35 smaller units nationwide. Overseas facilities are located in Gambia and Uganda. Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... Mill Hill is a place in the London Borough of Barnet. ... Hammersmith is an urban centre in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in West London, England, approximately 5 miles (8km) west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames. ...


History

The MRC started as the Medical Research Committee in 1913, its prime role being the distribution of medical research funds under the terms of the 1911 National Insurance Act. This was a consequence of the recommendation of the Royal Commission on Tuberculosis, which recommended the creation of a permanent medical research body. The mandate was not limited to tuberculosis, however. Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1920, it became the Medical Research Council under Royal Charter. A supplemental Charter would be approved by the Queen at the 17 July 2003 Privy Council. 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Landmark research

Important early work carried out under MRC auspices was:

In all, scientists associated with the MRC have received 22 Nobel Prizes in both Medicine or Physiology and Chemistry. Rickets is a softening of the bones in children potentially leading to fractures and deformity. ... Professor Edward Mellanby (1884 - 1955) discovered vitamin D and the role of the vitamin in preventing rickets in 1919. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Influenza, commonly known as flu, is an infectious disease of birds and mammals caused by an RNA virus of the family Orthomyxoviridae (the influenza viruses). ... Groups I: dsDNA viruses II: ssDNA viruses III: dsRNA viruses IV: (+)ssRNA viruses V: (-)ssRNA viruses VI: ssRNA-RT viruses VII: dsDNA-RT viruses A virus (from the Latin noun virus, meaning toxin or poison) is a microscopic particle (ranging in size from 20 - 300 nm) that can infect the... Neurotransmitters are chemicals that are used to relay, amplify and modulate electrical signals between a neuron and another cell. ... Chemical structure of D-aspartic acid, a common amino acid neurotransmitter. ... The chemical compound acetylcholine, often abbreviated as ACh, was the first neurotransmitter to be identified. ... Sir Henry Hallett Dale (June 9, 1875 - July 23, 1968) was an English scientist. ... Otto Loewi (June 3, 1873 – December 25, 1961) was a Austrian-German-American pharmacologist. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Penicillin nucleus Penicillin (sometimes abbreviated PCN) refers to a group of β-lactam antibiotics used in the treatment of bacterial infections caused by susceptible, usually Gram-positive, organisms. ... Alexander Fleming Sir Alexander Fleming (6 August 1881 – 11 March 1955) was a Scottish biologist and pharmacologist. ... Sir Ernst Boris Chain (June 19, 1906 – August 12, 1979) was a German-born British biochemist, and a 1945 co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his work on penicillin. ... Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey of Adelaide and Marston, OM, FRS, (September 24, 1898 – February 21, 1968) was a pharmacologist who shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for his role in the extraction of penicillin. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... The cigarette is the most common method of smoking tobacco. ... Sir William Richard Shaboe Doll CH OBE FRS (28 October 1912–24 July 2005) was a British epidemiologist, physiologist, and a pioneer in the research linking smoking to health problems. ... Austin Bradford Hill (July 8, 1897 - April 18, 1991), English epidemiologist and statistician, pioneered the randomized clinical trial and, together with Richard Doll, was the first to demonstrate the connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. ... The British doctors study is the generally accepted name of a prospective clinical trial which has been running from 1951 to 2001, and in 1956 provided convincing statistical proof that tobacco smoking increased the risk of lung cancer. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions for the development and function of living organisms. ... James Dewey Watson born April 6, 1928) is an American molecular biologist, best known as one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was an English molecular biologist, physicist, and neuroscientist, who is most noted for being one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953. ... Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958) was an English physical chemist and crystallographer who made important contributions to the understanding of the fine structures of DNA, viruses, coal and graphite. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Magnetic Resonance Image showing a median sagittal cross section through a human head. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Peter Mansfield, FRS, (born 9 October 1933), is a British physicist who was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ... Paul Christian Lauterbur, (born May 6, 1929) is an American chemist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2003 with Peter Mansfield for his work which made the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) possible. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are antibodies that are identical because they were produced by one type of immune cell, all clones of a single parent cell. ... César Milstein (October 8, 1927 – March 24, 2002) was an Argentine-born scientist who spent most of his life in Great Britain. ... Georges Jean Franz Köhler (Munich, March 17, 1946 – March 7, 1995 in Freiburg im Breisgau) was a German biologist. ... See also: Other events of 1975 List of years in science . ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Folic acid and folate (the anion form) are forms of the water-soluble Vitamin B9. ... The neural tube is the embryonal structure that gives rise to the brain and spinal cord. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid (IPA: ), (acetosal) is a drug in the family of salicylates, often used as an analgesic (to relieve minor aches and pains), antipyretic (to reduce fever), and as an anti-inflammatory. ... Cardiovascular disease refers to the class of diseases that involve the heart and/or blood vessels (arteries and veins). ... In biology the genome of an organism is the whole hereditary information of an organism that is encoded in the DNA (or, for some viruses, RNA). ... Binomial name Caenorhabditis elegans Wild-type C. elegans hermaphrodite stained to highlight the nuclei of all cells Caenorhabditis elegans () is a free-living nematode (a roundworm), about 1 mm in length, which lives in a temperate soil environment. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Heart Protection Study is a large randomized controlled trial by the Medical Research Council (MRC) in the United Kingdom. ... Simvastatin (INN) (IPA: ) is a hypolipidemic drug belonging to the class of pharmaceuticals called statins. It is used to control hypercholesterolemia (elevated cholesterol levels) and to prevent cardiovascular disease. ...


CEOs

As Chief Executive Officers (originally secretaries) served:

Sir Walter Morley Fletcher (1873-1933) was a British physiologist and administrator. ... Professor Edward Mellanby (1884 - 1955) discovered vitamin D and the role of the vitamin in preventing rickets in 1919. ... Sir Harold Percival (Harry) Himsworth (19 May 1905 - 1 November 1993) was a British scientist, best known for his medical research on diabetes mellitus. ... Notable people named John Gray include: John Gray (LSE), Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics, who has written numerous books on political philosophy. ... Sir George was born in 1936 in Hungary. ... Colin Blakemore is a neurobiologist specialising in vision. ...

Institutes, Centres and Units

Bristol

  • Health Services Research Collaboration (HSRC)

Cambridge

MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge EXTERNAL LINKS www. ... The Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit is a branch of the UK Medical Research Council. ... The Dunn Human Nutrition Unit is an institution of the Medical Research Council based at the Addenbrooke’s Hospital site in Cambridge, England. ...

Edinburgh

  • Human Genetics Unit
  • Human Reproductive Sciences Unit
  • Centre for Inflammation Research (with the University of Edinburgh)
  • Centre for Stem Cell Research (with the University of Edinburgh)

Leicester

University of Leicester seen from Victoria Park - Left to right: the Department of Engineering, the Attenborough tower, the Charles Wilson building. ...

London

Kings College London is the largest college of the University of London and one of a number of university institutions founded in England in the early 19th century: only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge have royal charters predating that of Kings. ... Kings College London is the largest college of the University of London and one of a number of university institutions founded in England in the early 19th century: only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge have royal charters predating that of Kings. ... Kings College London is the largest college of the University of London and one of a number of university institutions founded in England in the early 19th century: only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge have royal charters predating that of Kings. ... Kings College London is the largest college of the University of London and one of a number of university institutions founded in England in the early 19th century: only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge have royal charters predating that of Kings. ... Kings College London is the largest college of the University of London and one of a number of university institutions founded in England in the early 19th century: only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge have royal charters predating that of Kings. ... Kings College London is the largest college of the University of London and one of a number of university institutions founded in England in the early 19th century: only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge have royal charters predating that of Kings. ... A Medical Research Council (MRC) longitudinal survey of people born in Britain in a week in May 1946. ... University College London, commonly known as UCL, is a college of the University of London. ...

Mill Hill

The National Institute For Medical Research, commonly abbreviated to NIMR, is a large medical research facility situated in rural Mill Hill, England, on the outskirts of London. ...

External links

  • MRC official web site
  • Cognition and Brain Sciences dept., Cambridge
  • MRC Toxicology Unit
  • Research Councils UK
  • A list of all MRC Units and Institutes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Medical research - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (416 words)
Medical research is basic research and applied research conducted to aid the body of knowledge in the field of medicine.
Medical research can be divided into two general categories; new treatments that are tested in clinical trials, and all other research contributing to the development of new treatments.
In the UK, funding bodies such as the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust derive their assets from UK tax payers, and distribute this to institutions in a competitive manner.
Medical Research Council (UK) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (561 words)
The Medical Research Council (MRC) is a UK organisation dedicated to "promot[ing] the balanced development of medical and related biological research in the UK".
The MRC is one of eight Research Councils and is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Office of Science and Technology, which - in turn - is part of the Department of Trade and Industry.
The MRC started as the Medical Research Committee in 1913, its prime role being the distribution of medical research funds under the terms of the 1911 National Insurance Act.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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