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Encyclopedia > Media personalities
Topics in Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, reporting and analyzing information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. Those who practice journalism are known as journalists. Journalism is sometimes called the first draft of history. Even though news articles are often written on deadline, they are usually edited... Journalism . (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Journalism&action=edit)
Professional concepts

Journalism ethics
Objectivity is frequently held to be essential to proper journalism (particularly in the United States); however, there is some disagreement about what the concept consists of. Definitions According to some, it refers to the prevailing ideology of newsgathering and reporting that emphasizes eyewitness accounts of events, corroboration of facts with... Objectivity & In journalism attribution is the identification of the source of reported information. Journalists ethical codes normally address the issue of attribution, which is sensitive because in the course of their work journalists may receive information from sources who wish to remain anonymous. In investigative journalism important news stories often depend... Attribution
News is the reporting of current events usually by local, regional or mass media in the form of newspapers, television and radio programs, or sites on the World Wide Web. News reporting is a type of journalism, typically written or broadcast in news style. Most news is investigated and presented... News
A reporter is a type of journalist who researches and presents information in certain types of mass media. Reporting is usually distinguished from similar work, such as writing in general, by news judgment (determining newsworthiness) and journalism values (such as objectivity). Reporters get their information in a variety of ways... Reporting & Writing

Styles and types

A journalist is a person who practices journalism. Reporters are one type of journalist. They create reports as a profession for broadcast or publication in mass media such as newspapers, television, radio, magazines, documentary film, and the Internet. Reporters find the sources for their work; the reports can be either... Journalists & Investigative journalism is a branch of journalism that usually concentrates on a very specific topic, and typically requires a lot of work to yield results. The classic example is the uncovering of the Watergate Scandal by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, resulting in reports being published in the Washington Post... Investigation
Citizen journalism, also known as participatory journalism is the act of citizens playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing and disseminating news and information, according to the seminal report, We Media: How Audiences are Shaping the Future of News and Information, by Shayne Bowman and Chris... Citizens & Advocacy journalism aims to persuade through fact-telling. It rejects the notion of objectivity, instead exposing bias to the reader and expressing explicit opinions on the subject matter. The general goal is to present facts in such a compelling, well-researched manner that even a skeptical reader or one who... Avocacy
As long as there has been media there has been alternative media. The line between the two is not always clearly defined. Proponents of alternative media often argue that the mainstream media is heavily biased. Causes of this bias include the political interests of the owners, government influence or the... Alternative news & This article is about a type of web application. For information on records of web server activity, see server log. A weblog, Web log or simply a blog, is a web application which contains periodic posts on a common webpage. These posts are often but not necessarily in reverse chronological... Blogs
In American English, a muckraker is a journalist or an author who searches for and exposes scandals and abuses occurring in business and politics. In International English it has a similar root meaning but is highly pejorative. The term muckraker is most properly applied to American reporters and writers from... Muckraking, Gonzo Journalism is a journalistic style, most famously used by Hunter S. Thompson. The name was coined by Bill Cardoso. Central to Gonzo Journalism is the notion that journalism can be more truthful without strict observance of traditional rules of factual reportage. The best work in the genre is characterised... Gonzo & New journalism was a style of journalism invented by Tom Wolfe who, when having trouble writing an assignment, sent his editor an unstructured narrative letter rather than the tight piece usually expected of a journalist of that time. This letter was published under the title There Goes (Varoom! Varoom!) That... "New" style |

The news media is a term used to describe print media (newspapers, magazines); broadcast media (radio stations, television stations, television networks), and often Internet-based media (World Wide Web pages, weblogs). Usually the term includes all working journalists and is often used by those who would make generalizations about the... News media

Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens Pawleys Island, South Carolina A newspaper is a lightweight and disposable publication, usually printed on low-cost paper called newsprint, containing a journal of current news in a variety of topics. These topics can include political events, crime, sports, opinion, weather. Newspapers also often include... Newspapers | This article is about the magazine as a published medium. For other meanings, see magazine (disambiguation) A collection of magazines Magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles on various subjects. Magazines are typically published weekly, biweekly, monthly, or quarterly, with a date on the cover... Magazines | Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, reporting and analyzing information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. Those who practice journalism are known as journalists. Journalism is sometimes called the first draft of history. Even though news articles are often written on deadline, they are usually edited... Broadcasting | Business journalism includes coverage of companies, the workplace, personal finance, and economics, including unemployment and other economic indicators. Business coverage gained prominence in the 1990s, with wider investment in the stock market. The Wall Street Journal focuses on business and is one of the USAs top newspapers, in both... Business | Online |

Marketing influence

Infotainment,
Yellow journalism is a type of journalism in which sensationalism triumphs over factual reporting. This may take such forms as the use of colorful adjectives, exaggeration, a careless lack of fact-checking for the sake of a quick breaking news story, or even deliberate falsification of entire incidents. The sensationalized... Yellow journalism
Distorted news or planted news are terms in journalism for two deviated aspects of the wider news media wherein media outlets deliberately present false data, evidence, or sources as factual, in contradiction to the ethical practices in professional journalism. It applies to any media organization wherin either corporate or government... Distorted news
A video news release (VNR) is a television video program used to promote or publicize a product or viewpoint. They are often created in the same style as traditional television news reports, which has led to some notable confusion. In 2004, a controversy with the Bush administration emerged when a... Video news release

See also

List of journalism topics A-D AP Stylebook Arizona Republic Associated Press Bar chart Canadian Association of Journalists Chart Citizen journalism Committee to Protect Journalists Conservative bias Copy editing Desktop publishing E-J Editor Freedom of the press Graphic design Hedcut Headline Headlinese Hostile media effect House style Information graphic... Topics & List of books related to journalism: The Art of Editing, by Floyd K. Baskette, Jack Z. Scissors, Brian S. Brooks Designing Infographics, by Eric K. Meyer The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect, by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel Infographics, by James Glen Stovall... Books
The term Fourth Estate refers to the press, both in its explicit capacity of advocacy and in its implicit ability to frame political issues. The term goes back at least to Thomas Carlyle. Primary meaning of the term In Carlyles On Heroes and Hero Worship (1841), he writes, ... does... Fourth estate, McLurg's Law

Infotainment or soft news, refers to a part of the wider news trade that provides information in a way that is considered Entertainment is an amusement or diversion intended to hold the attention of an audience or its participants. A stilt-walker entertains shoppers at a shopping centre in Swindon, England Examples of entertainment include: Animation (primarily traditional, computer, and stop-motion) Betting Chat Circus Dance Film Drinking Game Geisha Humor (including... entertaining to its viewers, as evident by attraction of a higher market demographic. The information in infotainment programming consists of mostly Celebrity news is an aspect of the wider infotainment/news trade which focuses on celebrities and celebrity gossip. Categories: News trade stubs ... celebrity news and human drama stories, leading the term to be used as a pejorative among those who hold professional Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, reporting and analyzing information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. Those who practice journalism are known as journalists. Journalism is sometimes called the first draft of history. Even though news articles are often written on deadline, they are usually edited... journalism in esteem. Infotainment is a Portmanteau has two meanings. It can refer to a travelling case or to a word formed by combining two or more words. Travelling case A portmanteau (plural portmanteaus or portmanteaux) is a large travelling case made of leather. These cases consist of two halves that are connected with a hinge... combination of information and entertainment. Controversies and distinctions with "hard news" are discussed in hard news, soft news, and infotainment.


Infotainment usually covers a long-term change or point of interest, or a general trend -- an aspect of the zeitgeist. Many such stories as those cover topics such as health tips or gardening tips, exploring television show genres, travel, shopping, yachting or exploring new wines -- topics that are not actually "news" at all, in the sense of things that are currently happening. Other stories deal with something that is happening, but is gradual, rather than tied to a single event -- a new music genre coming into prominence, a shift in tide in the political views of the nation, a new turn in teen attitudes about sexuality, a commonality among political candidates, the returning appeal of the retro styles and memories of a past decade, crazes like Re-creation of Tamagotchi screen The Tamagotchi (たまごっち Tamagotchi) is a handheld virtual pet created by Aki Maita and sold by Bandai. The name combines the Japanese word for egg (tamago) and the syllable chi which denotes affection, and is also a pun on the borrowed... Tamagotchi or This article is about Furby, the plush toy. For the place in Sweden, see Furby, Sweden. A furby A Furby is an electronic soft-toy made by Tiger Electronics which went through a brief period of being a must-have toy following its launch in 1998, selling for hundreds of... Furby, or a common thread among current events that reveals something about the times.


Criticism

Adding to the distinction between journalists and anchors and reporters are "human interest," personality, or celebrity news stories, which typically are directed by marketing departments based on a demographic appeal and audience share. Its commonly accepted that anchors are also media personalities, who may even be considered celebrities. The very nature of corporate network news requires its media personalites to use their public appeal to promote the networks investments, just as network broadcasts themselves (morning shows, TV news magazines) schedule self-promotional stories, in addition to advertising. Critics might go so far as to view anchors as a weak link in the news trade, representing the misplacement of both the credit and the accountability of a news journalism organization —hence adding to a percieved erosion of journalistic standards throughout the news business. (See Yellow journalism is a type of journalism in which sensationalism triumphs over factual reporting. This may take such forms as the use of colorful adjectives, exaggeration, a careless lack of fact-checking for the sake of a quick breaking news story, or even deliberate falsification of entire incidents. The sensationalized... yellow journalism.)


Entertainment and news crossovers

Main article: Infotainers

Infotainers are A news anchor (US and CA) or newsreader (UK, AU and SL) (occasionally newscaster) is a person that works in television or radio that hosts a regular news program or provides occasional on air news updates. News anchors generally read prepared scripts, but in emergencies, they often have to ad... news anchors or "news personalities" who cross the line between news and entertainment. US notables in this field, are Barbara Walters (born probably September 25, 19291) is an American television commentator known for her many years as the first woman network news anchor, on ABCNews starting in 1976. Previously she had spent 15 years at NBCs The Today Show, where she began as a writer but within a... Barbara Walters, Katie Couric with troops at Prince Sultan Air Base in Saudi Arabia Katherine Anne Couric, better known as Katie Couric (born January 7, 1957) is an American television journalist. She was born in Arlington, Virginia. In 1975, Couric enrolled in the University of Virginia, graduating in 1979. Her journalism career... Katie Couric, Bill O'Reilly, Maury Povich (born Maurice Richard Povich on January 17, 1939 in Washington, DC) is a controversial American television talk show host who currently hosts the self-titled Maury. Categories: People stubs | 1939 births | American television personalities | Talk show hosts ... Maury Povich, Deborah Norville (born August 8, 1958 in Dalton, Georgia) is an American television personality. Since 1995, she has been host of the American television program Inside Edition. She previously was a reporter and anchor for MSNBC and co-host of NBCs Today show, replacing Jane Pauley in a highly... Deborah Norville, and Geraldo Rivera (born July 4, 1943) is a television journalist with an affinity for dramatic high-profile stories and a style that has often been accused of sensationalism. He was born Gerald Miguel Rivera in New York City. He graduated from Brooklyn Law School in 1969, and was lawyer for... Geraldo Rivera among others.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Media Matters - Media Personalities (175 words)
Media Matters tags each item according to media personality, TV/radio show, network/publication, and the subject (broken down by issue, subissue, or a particular topic).
Please note: An item may fall under the umbrella of a particular issue but may not be further categorized under a subissue or topic.
Media Matters uses a taxonomy structure to help readers find information on various subjects.
Omedia : Ethics and the Media- The Media's Performance- Between Stridency and Emotional Blackmail (2829 words)
The Israeli media has become so mortgaged to ratings, which are primarily serviced by emphasis on the negative and exceptional in order to attract viewer and reader attention to its merchandise, that it automatically ascribes every "problem" to Israel even if the "problem" is totally unrelated to Israel, as in the Syrian case.
For example, in indictments presented to the court against criminals, whose actions were published in the media, we can encounter graphic descriptions that appear to have been taken word for word from the Israeli media (in a current example of an indictment-- "The mother turned her son into a veritable punching bag").
Many media personalities tend to use the expression "the public's right to know", but this expression has over the past years become a tool of gossip which focuses on the margins of the real debate and even this only under the best of circumstances.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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