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Encyclopedia > Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor

From left to right, the Army, Navy/Marine Corps and Air Force medals
Awarded by the United States of America
Type Single-grade neck order
Eligibility Military personnel only
Awarded for "...a person who, while a member of the Army, distinguished himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States..."[1]
Status Currently awarded
Statistics
Established July 12, 1862
First awarded American Civil War
Last awarded April 8, 2008
Total awarded 3,465[2]
Posthumous
awards
618
Distinct
recipients
3,446[2]
Precedence
Next (higher) None
Next (lower) Army - Distinguished Service Cross
Navy - Navy Cross
Air Force - Air Force Cross

Medal of Honor ribbon

The Medal of Honor (also commonly referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor) is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government, similar to the British Victoria Cross or the French Legion of Honor. It is bestowed on a member of the United States armed forces who distinguishes himself "…conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States…"[1] Because of its nature, the medal is frequently awarded posthumously. Image File history File links Medalsofhonor2. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration of the United States Army, awarded for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. ... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... For other uses, see Air Force Cross. ... Image File history File links Ribbon-MOH.jpg‎ Current MOH ribbon. ... Awards and decorations of the United States military are military decorations which recognize a service members service and personal accomplishments while a member of the United States armed forces. ... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Medal for the officer class, decorated with a rosette Napoleon wearing the Grand Cross The President of France is the Grand Master of the Legion. ...


Members of all branches of the U.S. military are eligible to receive the medal, and each service has a unique design with the exception of the Marine Corps and Coast Guard, which both use the Navy's medal. The Medal of Honor is often presented personally to the recipient or, in the case of posthumous awards, to next of kin, by the President of the United States. Due to its high status, the medal has special protection under U.S. law.[3] The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... A posthumous recognition is a ceremonial award given after the recipient has passed away. ...


The Medal of Honor is one of two military neck order awards issued by the United States Armed Forces, but is the sole neck order awarded to its members. The other is the Commander's Degree of the Legion of Merit and is only authorized for issue to foreign dignitaries equivalent to a US military chief of staff. While American servicemembers are eligible for the Legion of Merit, they are awarded the lowest degree, "Legionnaire", which is a standard suspended medal.[4] Texas Medal of Valor A neck order is a type of military decoration which is designed to be worn and displayed around a persons neck, rather than hung from the chest as is the standard practice for displaying military decorations. ... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ...

Contents

Origin

The first formal system for rewarding acts of individual gallantry by American soldiers was established by George Washington on August 7, 1782, when he created the Badge of Military Merit, designed to recognize "any singularly meritorious action." This decoration is America's first combat award and the second oldest American military decoration of any type, after the Fidelity Medallion.[1][5] George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Badge of Military Merit is considered to be the first official military combat badge of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Fidelity Medallion is the oldest decoration of the United States military and was created by act of the Continental Congress in 1780. ...


Although the Badge of Military Merit fell into disuse after the American Revolutionary War, the concept of a military award for individual gallantry by members of the U.S. armed forces had been established. In 1847, after the outbreak of the Mexican-American War, a Certificate of Merit was established for soldiers who distinguished themselves in action. The certificate was later granted medal status as the Certificate of Merit Medal.[6] This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Certificate of Merit Medal The Certificate of Merit Medal was a military decoration of the United States Army which was issued between the years of 1905 to 1918. ... Certificate of Merit Medal The Certificate of Merit Medal was a military decoration of the United States Army which was issued between the years of 1905 to 1918. ...


Early in the Civil War, a medal for individual valor was proposed (by James W. Grimes) to Winfield Scott, the Commanding General of the United States Army. Scott did not approve the proposal, but the medal did come into use in the Navy. Public Resolution 82, containing a provision for a Navy Medal of Valor, was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on December 21, 1861.[7] The medal was "to be bestowed upon such petty officers, seamen, landsmen, and Marines as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry and other seamanlike qualities during the present war."[8] Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles directed the Philadelphia Mint to design the new decoration.[9] Shortly afterward, a resolution of similar wording was introduced on behalf of the Army and was signed into law on July 12, 1862. This measure provided for awarding a Medal of Honor, as the Navy version also came to be called: "to such noncommissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities, during the present insurrection."[7][8] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... James Wilson Grimes (October 20, 1816 – February 7, 1872), born in Deering, New Hampshire, was an American politician, serving as the Whig governor of and senator from Iowa. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... Prior to the institution of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army in 1903, there was generally a single senior-most officer in the army. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Gideon Welles (July 1, 1802–February 11, 1878) was the United States Secretary of the Navy from 1861 to 1869, including the entire duration of the American Civil War: his dedication to naval blockades was one of the key reasons for the Norths victory over the South. ... The Philadelphia Mint was created from the need to establish a national identity and the needs of commerce. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), or NCO, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been delegated leadership or command authority by a commissioned officer. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Insurrection could refer to: * in a general sense, it means Rebellion * it is also a title of a Star Trek film, see Star Trek: Insurrection ...


Appearance

Early Army versions of the Medal of Honor.
Early Army versions of the Medal of Honor.
Early Navy versions of the Medal of Honor.
Early Navy versions of the Medal of Honor.

The Medal of Honor has evolved in appearance since its creation in 1862. The present Army medal consists of a gold star surrounded by a wreath, topped by an eagle on a bar inscribed with the word "Valor." The medal is attached by a hook to a light blue moiré silk neckband that is 1316 inches (30 mm) in width and 21¾ inches (552 mm) in length.[1][10] Early Army MOHs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Early Army MOHs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Early Navy MOHs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Early Navy MOHs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... It has been suggested that Line moiré be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ...


There is a version of the medal for each branch of the U.S. armed forces: the Army, Navy and Air Force. Since the U.S. Marine Corps is administratively a part of the Department of the Navy, Marines receive the Navy medal. Before 1965, when the U.S. Air Force design was adopted, members of the U.S. Army Air Corps, U.S. Army Air Forces, and Air Force received the Army version of the medal.[9] The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... USN redirects here. ... USAF redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ... 1. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ...


The Coast Guard Medal of Honor, which was distinguished from the Navy medal in 1963, has never been awarded, partly because the U.S. Coast Guard is subsumed into the U.S. Navy in time of declared war. No design yet exists for it. Only one member of the Coast Guard has received a Medal of Honor, Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro, who was awarded the Navy version for action during the Battle of Guadalcanal.[11][12] USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Douglas A. Munro Douglas Albert Munro (11 October 1919 – 27 September 1942) is the only member of the United States Coast Guard to have received the Medal of Honor, the U.S. militarys highest decoration. ... Combatants Allied forces including:  United States  Australia  Empire of Japan Commanders William Halsey, Jr Daniel J. Callaghan† Willis A. Lee Isoroku Yamamoto Nobutake Kondo Hiroaki Abe Strength 1 carrier, 2 battleships, 5 cruisers, 12 destroyers 2 battleships, 8 cruisers, 16 destroyers Casualties 2 cruisers, 7 destroyers sunk, 36 aircraft destroyed...


In the rare cases (19 thus far) where a service member has been awarded more than one Medal of Honor, current regulations specify that an appropriate award device be centered on the Medal of Honor ribbon and neck medal. To indicate multiple presentations of the Medal of Honor, the U.S. Army and Air Force bestow oak leaf clusters, while the Navy Medal of Honor is worn with gold award stars.[13] Bronze and Silver oak leaf clusters An Oak leaf cluster is a common device which is placed on military awards and decorations to denote those who have received more than one bestowal of a particular decoration. ... Gold and Silver Award Stars An Award star is a decoration issued by the United States military to denote multiple military awards issued to personnel of the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and United States Marines. ...


A ribbon which is the same shade of light blue as the neckband, and includes five white stars, pointed upwards, in the shape of an "M" is worn for situations other than full dress uniform. When the ribbon is worn, it is placed alone, ¼ inch (6 mm) above the center of the other ribbons. For wear with civilian clothing, a rosette is issued instead of a miniature lapel pin (which usually shows the ribbon bar). The rosette is the same shade of blue as the neck ribbon and includes white stars. The ribbon and rosette are presented at the same time as the medal.[9]


Flag

On October 23, 2003, Pub.L. 107-248 was enacted, modifying 36 U.S.C. § 903, authorizing a Medal of Honor flag to be presented to recipients of the decoration.[14] is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Title 36 of the United States Code outlines the role of Patriotic Societies and Observances in the United States Code. ...

Medal of Honor Flag
Medal of Honor Flag

The flag was based on a concept by retired Army Special Forces 1SG. Bill Kendall of Jefferson, Iowa,[15] who designed a flag to honor Medal of Honor recipient Captain Darrell Lindsey, a B-26 pilot killed in World War II who was also from Jefferson. Kendall's design of a light blue field emblazoned with thirteen white five-pointed stars was nearly identical to that of Sarah LeClerc's of the Institute of Heraldry. LeClerc's design, ultimately accepted as the official flag, does not include the words "Medal of Honor" and is fringed in gold. The color of the field and the 13 white stars, arranged in the form of a three bar chevron, consisting of two chevrons of 5 stars and one chevron of 3 stars,[1] replicate the Medal of Honor ribbon. The flag has no set proportions.[16] File links The following pages link to this file: Medal of Honor Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Image:Medal of Honor flag. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Medal of Honor Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Image:Medal of Honor flag. ... This article is about the U.S. Special Operations Force. ... First Sergeant is the name of a military rank used in some countries. ... Jefferson is a city in Greene County, Iowa, along the North Raccoon River. ... Memorial at the Lindsey Air Station, Wiesbaden before 1993 Darrell Robins Lindsey (December 30, 1919—August 9, 1944) was a bomber pilot in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II and a posthumous recipient of the Medal of Honor. ... Martin B-26 Marauder See A-26 Invader for the plane known as the B-26 from 1948 to 1962. ... A division of the U.S Army Human Resources Command, the Institute of Heraldry is charged with determining heraldic entitlements of all U.S. Army badges, medals, and insignia. ... A chevron (also spelled cheveron, especially in older documents) is a V-shaped pattern. ...


The first Medal of Honor recipient to receive the official flag was Paul R. Smith. The flag was cased and presented to his family along with his medal.[17] A special ceremony presenting this flag to 60 Medal of Honor recipients was held onboard the USS Constitution on September 30, 2006.[18] U.S. Army SFC Paul R. Smith, Medal of Honor for actions in Operation Iraqi Freedom (April 4, 2003). ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Awarding the medal

There are two distinct protocols for awarding the Medal of Honor. The first and most common is nomination by a service member in the chain of command, followed by approval at each level of command. The other method is nomination by a member of Congress (generally at the request of a constituent) and approval by a special act of Congress. In either case, the Medal of Honor is presented by the President on behalf of the Congress. Although commonplace,[3] the term "Congressional Medal of Honor" is not correct.[19][20] IS the order you go to see people in. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is...


Evolution of criteria

Several months after President Abraham Lincoln signed Public Resolution 82 into law on December 21, 1861, a similar resolution for the Army was passed. Six Union soldiers who hijacked the General, a Confederate locomotive were the first recipients. Raid leader James J. Andrews, a civilian hanged as a Union spy, did not receive the medal. Many Medals of Honor awarded in the 19th century were associated with saving the flag, not just for patriotic reasons, but because the flag was a primary means of battlefield communication. During the time of the Civil War, no other military award was authorized, and to many this explains why some seemingly less notable actions were recognized by the Medal of Honor during that war. The criteria for the award tightened after World War I. In the post-World War II era, many eligible recipients might instead have been awarded a Silver Star, Navy Cross or similar award. is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... The Great Locomotive Chase or Andrews Raid was a military raid that occurred April 12, 1862, in northern Georgia during the American Civil War. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Great Western Railway No. ... James J. Andrews (about 1829 – June 7, 1862) was an American Civil War espionage agent who led a daring raid on the Western and Atlantic Railroad that became famous as the Great Locomotive Chase. ... Hanging to Music. ... SPY may refer to: SPY (spiders), ticker symbol for Standard & Poors Depository Receipts SPY (magazine), a satirical monthly, trademarked all-caps SPY (Ivory Coast), airport code for San Pédro, Côte dIvoire SPY (Ship Planning Yard), a U.S. Navy acronym SPY, short for MOWAG SPY, a... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ...


During the Civil War, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton promised a Medal of Honor to every man in the 27th Regiment, Maine Infantry who extended his enlistment beyond the agreed upon date. Many stayed four days extra, and then were discharged. Due to confusion, Stanton awarded a Medal of Honor to all 864 men in the regiment.[21] The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... The Running Machine An 1864 cartoon featuring Stanton, William Fessenden, Abraham Lincoln, William Seward and Gideon Welles takes a swing at the Lincoln administration. ... The 27th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was organized in Portland, Maine and mustered in for nine months service; starting September 30, 1862. ...


In 1916, a board of five Army generals convened by law to review every Army Medal of Honor awarded. The commission, led by Nelson Miles, recommended that the Army rescind 911 medals. This included the 864 medals awarded to members of the 27th Maine, 29 who served as Abraham Lincoln's funeral guard, six civilians (including Dr Mary Edwards Walker, the only woman to have been awarded the medal), and Buffalo Bill Cody, and 12 others whose awards were judged frivolous. Dr. Walker's medal was restored posthumously by President Jimmy Carter in 1977.[21] Cody's award was restored in 1989.[22] Nelson Appleton Miles ( August 8, 1839 – May 15, 1925) was an American soldier who served in the American Civil War, Indian Wars, and the Spanish-American War. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, ca 1870. ... For other uses, see Buffalo Bill (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Early in the 20th century, the Navy awarded many Medals of Honor for peacetime bravery. For instance, seven sailors aboard the USS Iowa received the medal when a boiler exploded on January 25, 1904. Aboard the USS Chicago in 1901, John Henry Helms received the medal for saving Ishi Tomizi, the ship's cook, from drowning. Even after World War I, Richard Byrd and Floyd Bennett received the medal for exploration of the North Pole.[23] Thomas J. Ryan received it for saving a woman from the burning Grand Hotel in Yokohama, Japan following the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake.[24] USS Iowa (BB-4) was the first ship commissioned in honor of the 29th state. ... A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... The first USS Chicago (later CA-14) was a protected cruiser of the United States Navy, the largest of the original three authorized by Congress for the New Navy. She was launched 5 December 1885 by John Roach and Sons, Chester, Pennsylvania, sponsored by Edith Cleborne (daughter of Navy Medical... Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was an pioneering polar explorer and famous aviator. ... Floyd Bennett (25 October 1890 – 25 April 1928) was an aviator who flew with Richard E. Byrd to the North Pole in 1926. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... For the town of Yokohama in Aomori Prefecture, see Yokohama, Aomori. ... Great Kanto Earthquake The Great Kanto Earthquake (関東大震災 Kantō daishinsai) struck the Kanto plain on the Japanese main island of Honshu at 11:58 on the morning of September 1, 1923. ...

"Tiffany Cross" version of the Medal of Honor
"Tiffany Cross" version of the Medal of Honor

Between 1919 and 1942, the Navy issued two separate versions of the Medal of Honor, one for non-combat bravery and the other for combat-related acts. Official accounts vary, but generally the combat Medal of Honor was known as the "Tiffany Cross", after the company that manufactured the medal. "The Tiffany" was first issued in 1919 but was rare and unpopular, partly because it was presented both for combat and noncombat events.[25] As a result, in 1942, the United States Navy reverted to a single Medal of Honor, awarded only for heroism.[26]


Since the beginning of World War II, the medal has been awarded for extreme bravery beyond the call of duty while engaged in action against an enemy. Arising from these criteria, approximately 60% of the medals earned during and after World War II have been awarded posthumously.[27] Capt. William McGonagle is an exception to the enemy action rule, earning his medal during the USS Liberty incident, which the Israeli government claimed was friendly fire.[28][29] For the Scottish poet see William McGonagall William Loren McGonagle (November 19, 1925 -- March 3, 1999) was a United States Naval officer in command of the USS Liberty when he was attacked by the Israel Defense Force. ... Help arrives after the Israeli attack on USS Liberty. ... For other uses, see Friendly Fire (disambiguation). ...


Controversies

A 1993 study commissioned by the Army described systematic racial and religious discrimination in the criteria for awarding medals during World War II.[30] At the time, no Medals of Honor had been awarded to black soldiers who served in World War II. After an exhaustive review of files, the study recommended that several black Distinguished Service Cross recipients be upgraded to the Medal of Honor. On January 13, 1997, President Bill Clinton awarded the medal to seven African American World War II veterans. Of these, only Vernon Baker was still alive.[30] A similar study of Asian Americans in 1998 resulted in President Bill Clinton awarding 21 new Medals of Honor in 2000, including 20 to Japanese American members of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, among them Senator Daniel Inouye.[31] In 2005, President George W. Bush awarded the Medal of Honor to Jewish veteran and Holocaust survivor Tibor Rubin, who many believed to have been overlooked because of his religious beliefs.[31] The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration of the United States Army, awarded for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Vernon Joseph Baker (b. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ... The 442nd Regimental Combat Team, hiking up a muddy French road in the Chambois Sector, France, in late 1944. ... Daniel Ken Inouye (born September 7, 1924) is a recipient of the Medal of Honor and currently serves as the senior United States Senator from Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Rubin wears the Medal of Honor he received at the White House. ...


Authority and privileges

The grave of a recipient at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial
The grave of a recipient at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial

The U.S. Army Medal of Honor was first authorized by a joint resolution of Congress on July 12, 1862. The specific authorizing statute was 10 U.S.C. § 3741, effective January 26, 1998: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 882 KB) Summary Grave marker of Medal of Honor recipient Jimmie W. Monteith at the World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 882 KB) Summary Grave marker of Medal of Honor recipient Jimmie W. Monteith at the World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. ... The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War II cemetery and memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, that honors American soldiers who died in Europe during World War II. // On June 8, 1944, the U.S. First Army established the temporary St. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

The President may award, and present in the name of Congress, a medal of honor of appropriate design, with ribbons and appurtenances, to a person who while a member of the Army, distinguished himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.[32]

Later authorizations created similar medals for other branches of the service.


The Medal of Honor confers special privileges on its recipients, both by tradition and by law. By tradition, all other soldiers, sailors, Marines, and airmen—even higher-ranking officers up to the President of the United States—who are not also recipients of the Medal of Honor initiate the salute. In the event of an officer encountering an enlisted member of the military who has been awarded the Medal of Honor, officers by tradition salute not the person, but the medal itself, thus attempting to time their salute to coincide with the enlisted member's. By law, recipients have several benefits:[33][34][35] This article is about the gesture. ...

Grave of a recipient at the Memphis National Cemetery
Grave of a recipient at the Memphis National Cemetery
  • Enlisted recipients of the Medal of Honor are entitled to a supplemental uniform allowance.
  • Recipients receive special entitlements to air transportation under the provisions of DOD Regulation 4515.13-R.
  • Special identification cards and commissary and exchange privileges are provided for Medal of Honor recipients and their eligible dependents.
  • Children of recipients are eligible for admission to the United States military academies without regard to the quota requirements.
  • Recipients receive a 10% increase in retired pay under 10 U.S.C. § 3991.
  • Those awarded the medal after October 23, 2002 also receive a Medal of Honor Flag. The law also specifies that all 143 living Medal of Honor recipients receive the flag along with all future recipients.(14 U.S.C. § 505).
  • As with all medals, retired personnel may wear the Medal of Honor on "appropriate" civilian clothing. Regulations also specify that recipients of the Medal of Honor are allowed to wear the uniform "at their pleasure" with standard restrictions on political, commercial, or extremist purposes; other former members of the armed forces may do so only at certain ceremonial occasions.[36][37]

Title 38 of the United States Code outlines the role of Veterans Benefits in the United States Code. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee Memphis National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Memphis, in Shelby County, Tennessee. ... // Private college-prep military schools Admiral Farragut Academy (St. ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Title 14 of the United States Code outlines the role of the United States Coast Guard in the United States Code. ...

Legal protection

Until late 2006, the Medal of Honor was the only service decoration singled out in federal law to protect it from being imitated or privately sold. The Stolen Valor Act of 2005, enacted December 20, 2006, extended some of these protections to other military awards as well.[38] Now, any false verbal, written or physical claim to an award or decoration authorized for wear by authorized military members or veterans is a federal felony. The Stolen Valor Act of 2005 (the Act), signed into law by President George W. Bush on December 20, 2006,[1] is a U.S. law that broadens the provisions of previous U.S. law addressing the unauthorized wearing, manufacture or selling of military decorations and medals. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Medal of Honor on display
The Medal of Honor on display

All Medals of Honor are issued in the original only, by the Department of Defense, to a recipient. Misuse of the medal, including unauthorized manufacture or wear, is punishable by fine and imprisonment pursuant to (18 U.S.C. § 704(b)), which prescribes a harsher penalty than that for violations concerning other medals.[3] After the Army redesigned its medal in 1903, a patent was issued (United States Patent #D37,236) to legally prevent others from making the medal. When the patent expired, the Federal government enacted a law making it illegal to produce, wear, or distribute the Medal of Honor without proper authority. Violators of this law have been prosecuted. A number of veterans' organizations and private companies devote themselves to exposing those who falsely claim to have received the Medal of Honor.[39] Image File history File links Moh2. ... Image File history File links Moh2. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Title 18 of the US Code deals with Crimes and Criminal Proceedings in five parts: Part I - Crimes Part II - Criminal Procedure Part III - Prisons and Prisoners Part IV - Correction of Youthful Offenders Part V - Immunity of Witnesses Title 18, specifically Part 1 > Chapter 113B > § 2331 and § 2332a(a)), is... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ...


Enforcement

HLI Lordship Industries Inc., a former Medal of Honor contractor, was fined in 1996 for selling 300 fake medals for US$75 each.[40]


Also that year, Ft Lauderdale, Florida resident Jackie Stern was convicted of wearing a medal to which he was not entitled; instead of six months in jail, a federal judge sentenced him to serve one year's probation and to write a letter of apology to each of the then-living 171 actual recipients of the medal; the letter was also published in the local newspaper.[41]


In 2003, Edward Fedora and Gisela Fedora were charged with violating (18 U.S.C. § 704(b)) - Unlawful Sale of a Medal of Honor. They sold medals awarded to U.S. Navy Seaman Robert Blume (for action in the Spanish-American War) and to U.S. Army First Sergeant George Washington Roosevelt (for action in the Civil War) to an FBI agent.[42] Edward Fedora, a Canadian businessman,[43] pleaded guilty and was sentenced to prison;[44] Gisela Fedora's status is unknown. Title 18 of the US Code deals with Crimes and Criminal Proceedings in five parts: Part I - Crimes Part II - Criminal Procedure Part III - Prisons and Prisoners Part IV - Correction of Youthful Offenders Part V - Immunity of Witnesses Title 18, specifically Part 1 > Chapter 113B > § 2331 and § 2332a(a)), is... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


Recipients

A statue in Louisville, Kentucky honors Medal of Honor recipients from Kentucky.

In total, 3,465 medals have been awarded to 3,446 different people.[45][46] Nineteen men received a second award: 14 of these received two separate medals for two separate actions, and five received both the Navy and the Army Medals of Honor for the same action. Since the beginning of World War II, 854 Medals of Honor have been awarded, 528 posthumously. In total, 618 had their medals presented posthumously.[27] I took this picture. ... I took this picture. ... Louisville redirects here. ... The following is a partial list of Medal of Honor recipients. ...


The first Army Medal of Honor was awarded to Private Jacob Parrott during the American Civil War for his role in the Andrews Raid. The only female Medal of Honor recipient is Mary Edwards Walker, a Civil War surgeon. Her medal was rescinded in 1917 along with many other non-combat awards, but it was restored by President Jimmy Carter in 1977.[47] Private Jacob Parrot (17 July 1843, Fairfield County, Ohio - 22 December 1908, Hardin County, Ohio), Company K, 33rd Ohio Infantry was the first recipcient of the Medal of Honor. ... The Great Locomotive Chase or Andrews Raid was a military raid that occurred April 12, 1862, in northern Georgia during the American Civil War. ... Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, ca 1870. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


While current regulations, (10 U.S.C. § 6241), beginning in 1918, explicitly state that recipients must be serving in the U.S. Armed Forces at the time of performing a valorous act that warrants the award, exceptions have been made. For example, Charles Lindbergh, while a reserve member of the U.S. Army Air Corps, received his Medal of Honor as a civilian pilot. In addition, the Medal of Honor was presented to the British Unknown Warrior by General Pershing on October 17, 1921; later the U.S. Unknown Soldier was reciprocally awarded the Victoria Cross, Britain's highest award for gallantry, on November 11, 1921. Apart from these few exceptions, Medals of Honor can only be awarded to members of the U.S. armed forces - although being a U.S. citizen is not a prerequisite. Sixty-one Canadians who were serving in the United States armed forces have been awarded the Medal of Honor, with a majority awarded for actions in the American Civil War. Since 1900, only four have been awarded to Canadians.[48] In the Vietnam War, Peter C. Lemon was the only Canadian recipient of the Medal of Honor.[49] Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (aka Lucky Lindy; The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and peace activist who, on May 20–21, 1927, rose from virtual obscurity to instantaneous world fame as the result of his exploits as the pilot of the... 1. ... The British tomb of The Unknown Warrior holds an unidentified British soldier killed on a European battlefield during World War I.[1] He was buried in Westminster Abbey, London on November 11, 1920, the earliest such tomb honouring the unknown dead of World War I. Even the battlefield the Warrior... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing, GCB (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... , Sailor and woman at the Tomb of the Unknowns, May 1943 The Tomb of the Unknowns (also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, although it has never been officially named) is a monument in Arlington National Cemetery in the United States dedicated to the American servicemen who have... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Peter C. Lemon is one of the youngest surviving recipients of the Medal of Honor. ...

By conflict
Civil War 1,522 Indian Wars 426
Korean Expedition 15 Spanish-American War 110
Samoan Civil War 4 Philippine-American War 86
Boxer Rebellion 59 Mexican Expedition 56
Haiti (1915–1934) 8 Dominican Republic Occupation 3
World War I 124 Occupation of Nicaragua 2
World War II 464 Korean War 133
Vietnam War 246 Battle of Mogadishu 2
Operation Iraqi Freedom 3 Operation Enduring Freedom 1
Peacetime 193 Unknowns 9
By branch of service
Service Awards
Army 2404
Navy 746
Marines 297
Air Force 17
Coast Guard 1


Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For wars involving India, see Military history of India. ... Shinmiyangyo (lit. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... The Samoan Civil Wars were a series of wars between Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States, ending in the partioning of the island chain in 1899. ... Belligerents United States Philippine Constabulary Philippine Scouts First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar several unofficial leaders post-1902 Strength 126,000 soldiers[1] First Philippine Republic: 80,000 soldiers Casualties and losses ~5,000-7,000[1][2] ~12,000... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... The Pancho Villa Expedition was an abortive punitive expedition conducted by the United States against the military forces of Mexican Revolutionary General Pancho Villa in retaliation for Villas invasion of the United States and attack on the village of Columbus, New Mexico. ... The United States occupation of Haiti began on July 28, 1915 and ended in mid-August, 1934. ... Early map of Hispaniola // Early History to 1599 The island of Hispaniola, of which the Dominican Republic forms the eastern two-thirds and Haiti the remainder, was originally occupied by Taínos, an Arawak-speaking people who called the island Quisqueya (or Kiskeya). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The United States occupied Nicaragua from 1909-1933 and intervened in the country several times before that. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Combatants USSOF, UNOSOM II, Frontier Force Regiment Somali National Alliance-affiliated militias Commanders William F. Garrison Mohamed Farrah Aidid Strength 160 2,000-4,000 Casualties U.S. 18 killed 73 wounded 1 captured Malaysia 1 killed 7 wounded Pakistan 2 wounded SNA Militia and civilians At least 500[1... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... Gari Melchers, Mural of Peace, 1896. ...


Double recipients

Nineteen men have been awarded the Medal of Honor twice. Five of these men were awarded both the Army and Navy Medal of Honor for the same action.

Name Service Rank War Notes
Frank Baldwin Army First Lieutenant, Captain American Civil War, Indian Wars
Smedley Butler Marine Corps Major Vera Cruz, Haiti
John Cooper Navy Coxswain American Civil War
Louis Cukela Marine Corps Sergeant World War I Both awarded for same action.
Thomas Custer Army Second Lieutenant American Civil War
Daniel Daly Marine Corps Private, Gunnery Sergeant Boxer Rebellion, Haiti
Henry Hogan Army First Sergeant Indian Wars
Ernest A. Janson Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant World War I Both awarded for same action. Received the Army MOH under the name Charles F. Hoffman.
John J. Kelly Marine Corps Private World War I Both awarded for same action.
John King Navy Watertender Peacetime
Matej Kocak Marine Corps Sergeant World War I Both awarded for same action.
John Lafferty Navy Fireman, First Class Fireman American Civil War, peacetime
John C. McCloy Navy Coxswain, Chief Boatswain Boxer Rebellion, Vera Cruz
Patrick Mullen Navy Boatswain's Mate Civil War
John H. Pruitt Marine Corps Corporal World War I Both awarded for same action.
Robert Sweeney Navy Ordinary Seaman Peacetime
Albert Weisbogel Navy Captain Peacetime
Louis Williams Navy Captain Peacetime
William Wilson Army Sergeant Indian Wars

Frank Dwight Baldwin, (26 June 1842 – 22 April 1923) a native of Constantine, Michigan, and born in Manchester, Michigan, is one of only 19 servicemen to be awarded the Medal of Honor twice. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For wars involving India, see Military history of India. ... Smedley Darlington Butler (July 30, 1881–June 21, 1940), nicknamed The Fighting Quaker and Old Gimlet Eye, was a Major General in the U.S. Marine Corps and, at the time of his death, the most decorated Marine in U.S. history. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Frank Friday Fletcher Gustavo Mass Manuel Azueta Strength Total: 3948 Landing force: 757 N/A Casualties 22 killed 70 wounded 92 total 152-172 killed 195-250 wounded 347-422 total The United States occupation of Veracruz lasted for six months in response to the... John Cooper (born as John Laver Mather Cooper) was a member of the United States Navy. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Louis Cukela (1 May 1888 – 19 March 1956) was a famous United States Marine. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Capt. ... Sergeant Major Daniel Joseph Dan Daly (11 November 1873 – 28 April 1937) was a United States Marine. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... Henry Hogan was a First Sergeant in the United States Army during the Indian Wars. ... Sergeant Major Ernest August Janson (1878-1930) was a United States Marine who was highly decorated for his heroic actions in World War I, receiving both the Army and Navy Medal of Honor and the French Medaille Militaire, as well as decorations from Montenegro, Portugal, and Italy. ... John Joseph Kelly (June 24, 1898-November 20, 1957) was a United States Marine who was awarded both the Army and Navy Medals of Honor for his heroic actions on October 13, 1918 at Blanc Mont Ridge, France during World War I. // Biography Kelly was born in Chicago, Illinois on... John King (7 February 1865 – 20 May 1938) was a sailor in the United States Navy who was twice awarded the Medal of Honor. ... For heroism above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on 18 July 1918, Sgt Matej Kocak (1882-1918), a United States Marine Corps sergeant, was posthumously awarded both the Army and Navy Medals of Honor. ... John McCloy is noted as being one of few individuals to received the Medal of Honor twice. ... John Henry Pruitt (4 October 1896 – 4 October 1918) was a United States Marine during World War I and a posthumous Medal of Honor recipient. ... Robert Augustus Sweeney is one of only nineteen servicemen to receive the Medal of Honor twice. ... Albert Weisbogel (born 1844) was a 19th century United States Navy sailor. ...

Post-Vietnam

For actions occurring since the withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam in 1973, the Medal of Honor has been awarded seven times, all of them posthumously. The first two were earned by U.S. Army Special Forces Delta Force snipers Sergeant First Class Randy Shughart and Master Sergeant Gary Gordon, who defended downed Black Hawk helicopter pilot Chief Warrant Officer Michael Durant and his crew during the Battle of Mogadishu in 1993.[50] Two others were awarded during the Iraq War, to Army Sergeant First Class Paul Ray Smith and Marine Corps Corporal Jason Dunham. In 2005, a posthumous Medal of Honor was awarded to Sergeant First Class Smith for actions in Operation Iraqi Freedom; his medal was presented to his survivors. In April 2003, Smith organized the defense of a prisoner of war holding area which was attacked by a company-sized Iraqi force, personally manning a machine gun under enemy fire.[51] In 2007, President George W. Bush awarded Marine Corporal Dunham, of Scio, New York, the Medal of Honor posthumously for his bravery in Iraq during a combat mission during which he threw himself on a grenade to save his fellow Marines during an action near the Syrian border in April 2004.[52] This article is about the U.S. Special Operations Force. ... The 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (1st SFOD-D) — commonly known as Delta in the U.S. Army, Delta Force by civilians, and Combat Applications Group by the Department of Defense — is a Special Operations Force (SOF) and an integral element of the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). ... Sergeant First Class insignia Sergeant First Class (SFC) is the seventh enlisted rank in the U.S. Army, just above Staff Sergeant and below Master Sergeant, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Sgt. ... United States Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Marine Corps Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Army Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Air Force A Master Sergeant is: the eighth enlisted rank in the United States Marine Corps, just above Gunnery Sergeant, below Master Gunnery Sergeant, Sergeant Major, and Sergeant Major of... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... For other uses of Blackhawk/Black Hawk, see Black Hawk. ... A warrant officer (WO) or a chief warrant officer (CWO) is a member of a military organization, with a rank subordinate to other commissioned officers and senior to noncommissioned officers. ... Michael Mike J. Durant (born July 23, 1961) is the American pilot who was held prisoner after a raid in Mogadishu, Somalia on October 3, 1993. ... Combatants USSOF, UNOSOM II, Frontier Force Regiment Somali National Alliance-affiliated militias Commanders William F. Garrison Mohamed Farrah Aidid Strength 160 2,000-4,000 Casualties U.S. 18 killed 73 wounded 1 captured Malaysia 1 killed 7 wounded Pakistan 2 wounded SNA Militia and civilians At least 500[1... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... U.S. Army SFC Paul R. Smith, Medal of Honor for actions in Operation Iraqi Freedom (April 4, 2003). ... This article is about the military rank. ... Jason Dunham (November 10, 1981 – April 22, 2004) was a corporal in the United States Marine Corps who served with 4th Platoon, Company K, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (3/7), 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Scio is a town in Allegany County, New York, USA. The population was 1,914 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about the state. ... Grenade redirects here. ...


On October 22, 2007, President George W. Bush presented the award to the family of Navy SEAL Lieutenant Michael P. Murphy for his actions in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom in 2005. On March 3, 2008, President Bush presented the Medal of Honor posthumously to Master Sergeant Woodrow W. Keeble for his actions during the Korean War. His family had waged a long campaign for the medal after the recommendation was twice lost during the conflict. Master Sergeant Keeble, who passed away in 1982, was the first member of the Sioux Native American tribe to be awarded the medal.[53] This was the 49th belated Medal of Honor award since 1979.[54] is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Navy SEALs redirects here. ... Michael Patrick Murphy (May 7, 1976 — June 28, 2005) was a United States Navy SEAL. On October 11, 2007, the U.S. Navy announced that Murphy would be posthumously awarded the United States militarys highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during the current War in Afghanistan. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... This is a list of the 563 Native American Tribal Entities which are recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...


On April 8, 2008, President Bush presented the Medal of Honor to the parents of Navy SEAL Michael A. Monsoor, who had jumped onto a live grenade thrown by a Sunni insurgent in order to save the lives of two fellow SEALs who, unlike him, had no route to escape the blast.[55] is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Petty Officer Second Class Michael Anthony Monsoor (April 5, 1981 – September 29, 2006) was a U.S. Navy SEAL killed during the Iraq War and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. ... Grenade may refer to: The well-known hand grenade commonly used by soldiers. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ...


Similar decorations within the United States

The following United States decorations bear similar names to the Medal of Honor, but are separate awards with different criteria for issuance.

Several United States law enforcement decorations also bear the name "Medal of Honor". The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor, established by Congress in 2001, "the highest national award for valor by a public safety officer", is also awarded by the President.[56][57][58] Cardenas Medal of Honor The Cardenas Medal of Honor was a decoration of the Revenue Cutter Service which was established by an act of Congress in the year 1900. ... The United States Revenue Cutter Service was established by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in 1790 as an armed maritime law enforcement service. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The Chaplains Medal for Heroism is a decoration of the United States military which was authorized by an act of the United States Congress on January 18, 1961. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... Congressional Space Medal of Honor The Congressional Space Medal of Honor was authorized by the United States Congress in 1969 to recognize any astronaut who in the performance of his duties has distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious efforts and contributions to the welfare of the Nation and mankind. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... United States law enforcement decorations are various pseudo-military awards which are awarded by the police forces of the United States of America. ... The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor is the highest decoration for bravery performed by public safety officers in the United States, comparable to the militarys Medal of Honor. ...

  • The Grand Army of the Republic's medal can look similar to the Medal of Honor, particularly in photos or on gravestones See picture on website.

Stephenson GAR Memorial, Washington, D.C. The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army who had served in the American Civil War. ...

See also

The following is a partial list of Medal of Honor recipients. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Department of the Army (2002-07-01). Section 578.4 Medal of Honor. Code of Federal Regulations Title 32, Volume 2. Government Printing Office. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  2. ^ a b Congressional Medal of Honor Society. MOH Stats. Retrieved on 2006-07-24.
  3. ^ a b c Office of the Law Revision Counsel. 18USC704(b). US Code Collection. Cornell Law School. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  4. ^ Legion of Merit. Awards. Institute of Heraldry. Retrieved on 2006-08-20.
  5. ^ U.S. Army Center of Military History. The Badge Of Military Merit/The Purple Heart. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  6. ^ Foxfall Medals. Certificate of Merit. Retrieved on 2006-07-25.
  7. ^ a b Two Chief Engineers Were Medal of Honor Recipients?. Did You Know?. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Retrieved on 2006-07-29.
  8. ^ a b History of the Medal. Public Broadcasting System. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  9. ^ a b c Types of the Medal of Honor: 1862 To Present. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  10. ^ The Medal. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  11. ^ MOH FAQ. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-07-25.
  12. ^ Douglas Albert Munro, USCG. US Coast Guard. Retrieved on 2006-07-25.
  13. ^ Double Recipients. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-07-25.
  14. ^ Designation of the Medal of Honor Flag. US Code.gov (23 Oct 2002). Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  15. ^ Special Forces veteran's idea leads to new Medal of Honor flag. Army News Service. Retrieved on 2006-07-24.
  16. ^ Medal of Honor Flag. The Institute of Heraldry. US Army. Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  17. ^ Cramer, Eric W. (29 March 2005). First Medal of Honor flag to be presented. Army News Service. US Army. Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  18. ^ "Old Ironsides" Hosts Medal of Honor Recipients. Navy Newsstand. US Navy (2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  19. ^ (Boatner, Military Customs and Traditions. and Johnson, The Oxford Companion to American History.)
  20. ^ The Congressional Medal of Honor Society is so named because that is the name it was given in an act of Congress signed into law by President Eisenhower on August 5, 1958 as Title 36, Chapter 33 of the U.S. Code. (See The Congressional Medal of Honor Society's History. Official Site. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-10-01..) The law authorizing the society has since been transferred to Title 36, Chapter 405 of the U.S. Code.
  21. ^ a b Sterner, C. Douglas (2004). The Purge of 1917. homeofheroes.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  22. ^ The Medal's History. Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  23. ^ Floyd Bennett. Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  24. ^ Medal of Honor Recipients, Interim Awards 1920–1940. Center for Military History. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  25. ^ Tillman, Barrett (2003). Above and Beyond: The Aviation Medals of Honor. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 3. 
  26. ^ Types of the Medal of Honor: 1862 To Present. Navy Medal of Honor (1913). Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  27. ^ a b Medal of Honor Statistics. Center for Military History. US Army (May 2003). Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  28. ^ USS Liberty. National Security Agency, Central Security Service (July 2003). Retrieved on 23 Jul 2006. audio and transcripts
  29. ^ USS Liberty. Naval Historical Center. Retrieved on 2006-07-23. audio and transcripts
  30. ^ a b WWII African American MOH recipients. Center for Military History. US Army. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  31. ^ a b 22 Asian-Pacific Americans Receive Medals of Honor. Center for Military History. US Army (21 June 2000). Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  32. ^ Sec. 3741. Medal of honor: award. Washington Watchdog (Jan 26, 1998). Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  33. ^ Medal of Honor Recipients. Tricare. Retrieved on 2006-07-24.
  34. ^ Navy & Marine Corps Awards and Decorations: Medal of Honor. usmilitary.about.com. Retrieved on 24 Jul 2006.
  35. ^ Special Benefits and Allowances Table. Dept. of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved on 2006-07-24.
  36. ^ Ribbon and Rosette. homeofheroes.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  37. ^ Army Uniform Regulations AR 670-1 3 Feb 2005 Section 30-5 and 30-6 p.339. Department of the Army. Retrieved on 2006-07-24.
  38. ^ S. 1998: Stolen Valor Act of 2005. 109th U.S. Congress (2005–2006). GovTrak.us. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  39. ^ Chozick, Amy. Veterans' Web Sites Expose Pseudo Heroes, Phony Honors. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  40. ^ Company fined for selling fake Medals of Honor. US News. CNN (4 Dec 1996). Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  41. ^ Florida Man wears medal without Honor. US News. CNN (4 Dec 1996). Retrieved on 2006-09-30.
  42. ^ Defendants Charged With Conspiracy to Sell Several Congressional Medals of Honor. Federal Bureau of Investigation (July 9, 2003). Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  43. ^ Associated Press (2003-07-09). Man Charged With Selling Medals of Honor. WHEC-TV 10 Rochester, NY. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  44. ^ Honoring Our Veterans. Federal Bureau of Investigation (May 28, 2004). Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  45. ^ The Congressional Medal of Honor Society's History. Official Site. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  46. ^ Marines Awarded the Medal of Honor. US Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  47. ^ Mary Edwards Walker. Women in History. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  48. ^ Canada honours winners of top U.S. medal. CBC News (1 Jul 2005). Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  49. ^ Thousands of Canadians, including a Medal of Honor winner, served with the U.S. military in Vietnam. Veterans With a Mission. Retrieved on 2006-07-20.
  50. ^ Medal of Honor Recipients: Somalia. Center for Military History. US Army. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  51. ^ Medal of Honor Recipients: Iraq. Center for Military History. Retrieved on 2006-11-10.
  52. ^ Bush Awards Fallen Marine Medal of Honor. SFGate.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  53. ^ Korean War Hero Receives Posthumous Medal of Honor March 3, 2008
  54. ^ Medal of Honor recipients 1979-2007. Julissa Gomez-Granger, Congressional Research Service Report for Congress
  55. ^ Perry, Tony, "Sailor Killed In Iraq Awarded Medal Of Honor", Los Angeles Times, April 1, 2008, Pg. 1.
  56. ^ Office of Justice Programs: Medal of Valor. U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  57. ^ Harry S. Truman (July 6, 1945). Executive Order No. 9586. The Presidential Medal of Freedom. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  58. ^ John F. Kennedy (February 22, 1963). Executive Order 11085. The Presidential Medal of Freedom. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.

Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules and regulations (sometimes called administrative law) published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the Federal Government of the United States. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) prints and provides access to documents produced by and for all three branches of the federal government, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Office of the Law Revision Counsel prepares and publishes the United States Code, which is a consolidation and codification by subject matter of the general and permanent laws of the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Title 36 of the United States Code outlines the role of Patriotic Societies and Observances in the United States Code. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Military of the United States Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Medal of Honor
  • Official Society of Medal of Honor Recipients
  • U.S. Army Center for Military History
  • U.S. Army Medal of Honor Recipients - History and Heritage
  • U.S. Army Human Resources Command. Medal of Honor designs
  • National Medal of Honor Museum of Military History in Chattanooga, Tennessee
  • Pritzker Military Library. Podcasts from the Medal of Honor series.
  • American Valor PBS/WETA.
  • History, Legend and Myth: Hollywood and the Medal of Honor (Medal of Honor recipients depicted on Film).
  • Stealing the General: The Great Locomotive Chase and the First Medal of Honor by Russell S. Bonds
  • U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry: Medal of Honor
  • US Navy, Marine and Coast Guard recipients of the Medal of Honor in World War 2, a British perspective

Inter-service decorations of the United States military are military awards which are issued by the United States armed forces to members of all five branches of military service. ... The Defense Distinguished Service Medal is a United States military award which is presented for exceptionally distinguished performance of duty contributing to national security or defense of the United States. ... Defense Superior Service Medal The Defense Superior Service Medal of the United States is a senior decoration of the Department of Defense. ... The Defense Meritorious Service Medal is the third highest award bestowed upon members of the United States military by the United States Department of Defense. ... The Commendation Medal is a mid-level United States military award which is presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service. ... The Achievement Medal is the lowest of the United States military’s meritorious service medals. ... The Joint Meritorious Unit Award is a military award that was established on June 4, 1981 by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and was implemented by Department of Defense Directive 1348. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ... For other uses, see Distinguished Flying Cross. ... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... Image File history File links Purple_Heart_BAR.svg‎ Source Own work, based on PD image from Commons uploaded by User:Zscout370. ... For other uses, see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... The Meritorious Service Medal is a military award presented to members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguished themselves by outstanding non-combat meritorious achievement or service to the United States subsequent to January 16, 1969. ... Air Medal Ribbon The Air Medal is a military decoration of the United States which was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on May 11, 1942. ... Ribbon for the National Defense Service Medal The National Defense Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States military originally commissioned by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. ... The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AFEM) is a military award of the United States military which was first created in 1961 by Executive Order of President John Kennedy. ... The Humanitarian Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created in 1977 by order of President Gerald Ford. ... The Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by Presidential Order of George Bush on January 9, 1993. ... Armed Forces Service Medal ribbon The Armed Forces Service Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by order of President William J. Clinton in January 1996. ... Armed Forces Reserve Medal The Armed Forces Reserve Medal is a military decoration of the United States Armed Forces which has existed since 1953. ... Prisoner of War Medal The Prisoner of War Medal was authorized by Congress and signed into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. ... The Antarctica Service Medal was established by the United States Congress in 1960. ... The Korean Service Medal is a decoration of the United States military and was created in November 1950 by order of President Harry Truman. ... The Korea Defense Service Medal is a United States military decoration that was first created in 2002 by order of President George W. Bush. ... Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal ribbon The Vietnam Service Medal is a military award which was created in 1965 by order of President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... The Southwest Asia Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created by order of President George Bush on March 12, 1991. ... The Kosovo Campaign Medal is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was established by Presidential Order of William J. Clinton on May 3, 2000. ... Afghanistan Campaign Medal obverse (left) and reverse (right). ... The Iraq Campaign Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by Executive Order of President George W. Bush on May 28, 2004. ... The Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (GWOTEM) is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created by Presidential Order of George W. Bush in March 2003. ... The Global War on Terrorism Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States military which was created by Presidential Order of George W. Bush in March 2003. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Medal of Honor (2417 words)
The Army Medal of Honor was first awarded during the American Civil War and was last officially awarded on April 4, 2005 (posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith for actions that occurred outside of Baghdad, Iraq in 2003.
Before the posthumous awarding of the Medal of Honor in 2005 to Paul R. Smith, the medal was last awarded during the Battle of Mogadishu in 1993, when MSG Gary Gordon and SFC Randy Shughart lost their lives defending downed Black Hawk helicopter pilot CWO Michael Durant.
The highest civilian honor is the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which is the civilian equivalent of the Medal of Honor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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