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Encyclopedia > Meat analogue

A meat analogue, also called meat substitute, mock meat or veat, approximates the aesthetic qualities (primarily texture, flavor and appearance) and/or chemical characteristics of certain types of meat. Some meat analogues rely on one or more types of flavouring. Various meats Cold Meat Salad Meat, in its broadest modern definition, is all animal tissue intended to be used as food. ... Flavouring (CwE) or flavoring (AmE) is a product which is added to food in order to change or augment its taste. ...


Generally, meat analogue is understood to mean a food made from non-meats, sometimes without dairy products. The market for meat-less foods includes health-conscious non-vegetarians, persons following rules of Kashrut, or to address ethical and nutritional issues for vegetarians and vegans. An example of this type of use is in Buddhist cuisine, which has the oldest known use of meat analogues. It has been suggested that Kosher foods be merged into this article or section. ... Vegetarianism is the practice of not eating meat, including beef, poultry, fish, or their by-products, with or without the use of dairy products or eggs. ... The logo of the worlds first Vegan Society, registered in 1944 [2] Veganism is a philosophy and lifestyle which seeks to exclude — as far as is possible and practical — all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes... Buddhist cuisine is a kind of cuisine mainly for the believers of Buddhism. ...


Meat analogue may also refer to a meat-based, but healthier and/or less-expensive alternative to a particular meat product, such as surimi.

Contents


Vegetarian meat, dairy, and egg analogues

Some of the more traditional vegetarian meat analogues are based on centuries-old recipes for seitan (wheat gluten), other grains such as rice, mushrooms, legumes, tempeh, and/or pressed-tofu, with flavouring to make the finished product taste like chicken, beef, lamb, ham, sausage, seafood, etc. Some of the more-recent meat analogues include textured vegetable protein (TVP, which is a dry bulk commodity derived from soy), soy concentrate, Quorn, and modified defatted peanut flour to replace meat. TVP is produced more than any other meat analogue in most Western nations. Seitan (say-tahn), also called wheat gluten, wheat meat, or wheatmeat, is the Japanese term for wheat gluten, a vegan/vegetarian food often used in place of meat. ... Wheat - a prime source of gluten Gluten is an amorphous ergastic protein found combined with starch in the endosperm of some cereals, notably wheat, rye, and barley. ... An assortment of grains The word grain has a great many meanings, most being descriptive of a small piece or particle. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice refers to two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southeastern Asia and to Africa, which together provide more than one fifth of the calories consumed by humans[1]. Rice is an annual plant, growing to 1-1. ... Basidiocarps (mushrooms) of the fungus Leucocoprinus sp. ... Varieties of soybean seeds, a popular legume The term legume has two closely related meanings in botany, a situation encountered with many botanical common names of useful plants whereby an applied name can refer to either the plant itself, or to the edible fruit (or useful part). ... Tempeh is a fermented food typically made from soybeans, most popular in Indonesia and other parts of Southeast Asia. ... Tofu, sometimes also called doufu (often in Chinese recipes) or bean curd (literal translation), is a food of Chinese origin, made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. ... Dry TVP flakes are an inexpensive protein source when purchased in bulk and can be added to a variety of vegetarian dishes or used as a supplement to bulk out a meat dish. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ...


Examples of dairy analogues include those based primarily on processed rice, soy (tofu, soymilk, soy protein isolate), almond, cashew, gluten (such as with the first non-dairy creamers), nutritional yeast, or a combination of these, plus flavouring to make it taste like milk, cheeses, yogurt, mayonnaise, ice cream, cream cheese, sour cream, whipped cream, buttermilk, rarebit, or butter. Many dairy analogues contain casein, which is extracted dried milk proteins, when combined with soy and gluten, and are therefore not suitable for vegans. Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice refers to two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southeastern Asia and to Africa, which together provide more than one fifth of the calories consumed by humans[1]. Rice is an annual plant, growing to 1-1. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... Tofu, sometimes also called doufu (often in Chinese recipes) or bean curd (literal translation), is a food of Chinese origin, made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. ... Soy milk or soya milk (Chinese: 豆浆 or 豆奶, Japanese:豆乳) is the liquid extraction processed from soy beans after soaking, grinding, cooking and straining. ... Binomial name Prunus dulcis (Mill. ... Binomial name Anacardium occidentale L. The Cashew (Anacardium occidentale) is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. ... Wheat - a prime source of gluten Gluten is an amorphous ergastic protein found combined with starch in the endosperm of some cereals, notably wheat, rye, and barley. ... Nutritional yeast, similar to brewers yeast, is a nutritional supplement popular with vegans and the health conscious who use it as an ingredient in recipes or simply as a condiment. ... Casein is the predominant phosphoprotein found in fresh milk. ... Hens kept in cramped conditions — the avoidance of animal suffering is the primary motivation of people who become vegans A vegan is a person who avoids the ingestion or use of animal products. ...


Examples of egg substitutes include tofu-scramblers, as well as Ener-G (primarily tapioca starch) and other similar products which recreate the leavening and binding effects of eggs in baked goods. Many people also use fruit products such as banana paste and applesauce as egg analouges in baking. A leavening agent is an organism or substance that when added to a dough of flour and water causes it to rise by evolving carbon dioxide or other gases that become trapped as bubbles within the dough. ...


Surimi and other meat-based meat analogues

Many common products such as 'imitation crab meat' are called surimi, or a processed hash of fish plus flavorings to make it taste more like a shellfish. In some regions, 'Surimi' refers to the finished product or only to products made from fish, but the same process is also used with turkey in North America (e.g. turkey-dogs), and thus also called "surimi" often. Surimi (擂り身, lit. ... Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus: one of the most abundant species of fish in the world. ...


Examples of surimi include:

  • Surimi from fish, such as imitation crab, imitation shrimp, or imitation lobster
  • Surimi from turkey, such as hot dogs, brats, sausage, salami, lunch meats, loafs, burgers, bacon, ham, or ground
  • Other processed poultry products, such as emu, in the same forms described above for turkey.

Non-meat (vegetarian) products and Surimi products are both marketed often as "imitation" meats, rather than "meat analogues" (e.g. imitation crab or imitation shrimp). Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus: one of the most abundant species of fish in the world. ... Ducks amongst other poultry The Poultry-dealer, after Cesare Vecellio. ... Species Dromaius novaehollandiae Dromaius baudinianus(extinct) Dromaius ater(extinct) Synonyms Dromiceius novaehollandiae disambiguation page The Emu (pronounced , or (primarily American) ) (Dromaius novaehollandiae, Latin for fast-footed New Hollander. ... Sections Dromiacea Raninoida Heterotremata Thoracotremata The term crab is often applied to several different groups of short (nose to tail) decapod crustaceans with thick exoskeletons, but only members of the Brachyura are true crabs; other taxa, such as hermit crabs, porcelain crabs, king crabs, and horseshoe crabs are, despite superficial... Superfamilies and families Alpheoidea Alpheidae - snapping shrimps Barbouriidae Hippolytidae Ogyrididae Atyoidea Atyidae Bresilioidea Agostocarididae Alvinocarididae Bresiliidae Disciadidae Mirocarididae Campylonotoidea Bathypalaemonellidae Campylonotoidae Crangonoidea Crangonidae Glyphocrangonidea Galatheacaridoidea Galatheacarididae Nematocarcinoidea Eugonatonotidae Nematocarcinidae Rhynchocinetidae Xiphocarididae Oplophoroidea Oplophoridae Palaemonoidea Anchistioididae Desmocarididae Euryrhynchidae Gnathophyllidae Hymenoceridae Kakaducarididae Palaemonidae Typhlocarididae Pandaloidea Pandalidae Thalassocarididae Pasiphaeoidea Pasiphaeidae Procaridoidea Procarididae Processoidea...


Nomenclature

The most used term in English for meat analogues is 'fake meat.' 'Meat substitute' is used for other things than meat analogues (such as cabbage), but in this use it is second. 'Mock meat' is third. 'Artificial meat' may be used slightly more than 'meat analogue' and 'meat analog' but the terms are statistically tied for fourth place. The term 'imitation meat' follows in fifth place. The term 'veat' which is predominately used in a commercial context, comes in sixth. While 'synthetic meat' is seventh, as it is seldom used outside of a manufacturing context. See also such terms as 'engineered meat,' 'laboratory meat,' and 'lab-grown meat'.


One firm attempted to trademark the pre-existing term 'veat,' but may now be out of business. There appears to be little or no non-commercial use of the termsĖ 'vam' (vegetarian ham), 'veef' (vegetarian beef), 'valmon' (vegetarian salmon), 'vausage' (veggie sausage) , 'vicken' and 'vurkey.' In the case of venison a vegetarian alternative is allegedly called 'v'venison' (pronounced viv- ven'is on), and goat is 'voat'.


See also

Vegetable sushi Vegetarian cuisine is cookery of food that meets vegetarian ethical principles and health standards. ... Vegetarianism is the practice of not eating meat, including beef, poultry, fish, or their by-products, with or without the use of dairy products or eggs. ... The logo of the worlds first Vegan Society, registered in 1944 [2] Veganism is a philosophy and lifestyle which seeks to exclude — as far as is possible and practical — all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes...

External links

Some manufacturers of imitation meats, dairy, or eggs


  Results from FactBites:
 
Meat analogue - definition of Meat analogue in Encyclopedia (198 words)
Meat and dairy analogues or analogs (Americanized spelling) is a North American classification of foods made from vegetable proteins, nuts, or Surimi processed poultry or fish designed to imitate or be used in place of beef, pork, poultry, and dairy products.
Most Meat Analogues are made from soy or gluten however some are made from rice and almonds.
They tend to be made from lower fat materials and are thought to be healthier than the dairy, beef, or pork counterparts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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