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Encyclopedia > McGill University
McGill University
McGill University

Motto: Grandescunt aucta labore
(By work, all things increase and grow)
Established: 1821
Type: Public university
Endowment: $928.0 million[1]
Chancellor: Richard Pound
Principal: Heather Munroe-Blum
Faculty: 5,947[2]
Staff: 9,345[2]
Undergraduates: 23,758[3]
Postgraduates: 7,323[3]
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Campus: Urban
Downtown: 320,000 m² (80 acres)
Macdonald Campus: 6.5 km² (1,600 acres)
Sports teams: Martlets (women), Redmen (men)
Colours: Red and White            
Mascot: Marty the Martlet
Affiliations: AAU, G13, Universitas 21
Website: www.mcgill.ca

McGill University is a public co-educational research university located in Montréal, Québec, Canada. Its main campus is set upon 320,000 square metres (80 acres) at the foot of Mount Royal in Montréal's downtown district. A second campus—Macdonald Campus—is situated on 6.5 square kilometres (1,600 acres) of fields and forested land in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, 30 kilometres west of the downtown campus. McGill Logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... C$ redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Richard W. Pound, OC, OQ (born March 22, 1942) is a partner of leading Canadian law firm Stikeman Elliott and the chairman of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) based in Montreal. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... Heather Anne Elyse Lilian Munroe-Blum, OC (born 1950) is the Principal and Vice-Chancellor of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Montreal. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Macdonald College under construction, 1906 The Macdonald Campus of McGill University (Mac Campus) houses its Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, and the McGill School of Environment. ... The McGill Martlets are the womens athletic teams that represent McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The McGill Redmen are the mens athletic teams that represent McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Red re-directs here; for alternate uses see Red (disambiguation) Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A martlet is a type of heraldic bird similar to the swallow, but having no feet. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... This article is about the group of research-intensive Canadian universities. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Salvation through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... For other uses, see Mount Royal (disambiguation). ... Macdonald College under construction, 1906 The Macdonald Campus of McGill University (Mac Campus) houses its Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, and the McGill School of Environment. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue within the Island of Montreal. ...


McGill has 21 faculties and professional schools and offers degrees and diplomas in over 300 fields of study. The university also has field research stations in Mont-Saint-Hilaire and Schefferville, Quebec; Axel Heiberg Island in Nunavut; and Holetown, Barbados. Mont-Saint-Hilaire is a town in southwestern Quebec, Canada on the Richelieu River in the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-du-Richelieu. ... Schefferville is a town in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Axel Heiberg Island within Nunavut Closeup of Axel Heiberg Island Satellite photo montage of Axel Heilberg Island Axel Heiberg Island is the 31st largest island in the world and Canadas 7th largest island. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... Holetown is now a small town of Barbados, along with Speightstown, Oistins and the capital city, Bridgetown. ...


McGill was founded in 1821 from a bequest by James McGill, a prominent Montreal merchant, who left an endowment in addition to the property on which the university now stands. McGill would become the first non-denominational university in the British Empire. Categories: Canadian people stubs | 1744 births | 1813 deaths | Canadian historical figures | McGill University | People from Quebec | Philanthropists ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...


McGill's Redpath Museum, commissioned in 1880 and opened in 1882, is the oldest building built specifically as a museum in North America. Its natural history collections boast material collected by the same individuals who founded the collections of the Royal Ontario Museum and the Smithsonian. Outer view of the entrance of the museum View of the Albertosaurus in the central evolution exhibit atrium. ... The Palais du Louvre in Paris, which houses the Musée du Louvre, one of the worlds most famous museums, and most certainly the largest. ... North American redirects here. ... The Royal Ontario Museum, commonly known as the ROM (rhyming with Tom), is a major museum for world culture and natural history in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ...

Contents

History

Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning

The Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning (R.I.A.L.), McGill's corporate personality, was created in 1801 by an Act of the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada, which called for the "Establishment of Free Schools and the advancement of Learning in this Province."[4] The institution's initial purpose was to administer the provision of elementary education in Quebec, but the R.I.A.L. spent most of its early years trying to get funds from the government to enable it to establish and operate these schools, which were primarily for the Protestant English-speaking inhabitants of Lower Canada (now largely comprising modern-day Quebec). The R.I.A.L. was the first institution in Canada to receive royal patronage.[citation needed] The Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada was the lower house of the bicameral structure of provincial government in Lower Canada until 1838. ... Primary or elementary education consist of the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... This is a list of Canadian organizations with designated royal status and/or under the patronage of members of the Canadian Royal Family, listed by the king or queen who granted the designation. ...

James McGill, the original benefactor of McGill University
James McGill, the original benefactor of McGill University

In 1811, James McGill, a Scottish immigrant and successful English and French-speaking merchant, drew up a will leaving a 19 hectare (46 acre) tract of land—his estate, which he called Burnside[citation needed]—in what was then rural land. In addition, he bequeathed the sum of 10,000 pounds to the R.I.A.L. As a condition of the bequest, the land and funds would have to be used for the establishment of a "University or College, for the purposes of Education and the Advancement of Learning in the said Province."[4] When he died in December 1813, this task became the responsibility of the R.I.A.L. The will specified that, if a college was not established within 10 years of his death, the estate and the money would revert to the heirs of his wife, Charlotte Desrivieres. As an added condition, the new institution would be required to bear his name.[citation needed] James McGill, Original Benefactor of McGill University [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... James McGill, Original Benefactor of McGill University [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Categories: Canadian people stubs | 1744 births | 1813 deaths | Canadian historical figures | McGill University | People from Quebec | Philanthropists ... Categories: Canadian people stubs | 1744 births | 1813 deaths | Canadian historical figures | McGill University | People from Quebec | Philanthropists ... This article is about the country. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ...


In 1821, after protracted legal battles with the Desrivieres family, McGill College received a Royal Charter from King George IV, establishing it as a university.[citation needed] In fact, due to the lawsuits—which did not finally end until 1835—and because the college had little money (the government was not funding the institution at the time), classes were not held until 1829, when McGill College was officially inaugurated. That same year, the Montreal Medical Institution became the college's Faculty of Medicine and its first academic unit. The Faculty of Medicine remained the college's only functioning faculty until 1843 when the Faculty of Arts commenced teaching in the newly constructed Arts Building and East Wing (Dawson Hall). For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... George IV redirects here. ...


In due course, the R.I.A.L. lost control of the 84 grammar schools it had administered. At that point, its sole purpose was to administer the McGill bequests on behalf of the college. The Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning continues to exist and is the "legal person" that runs the university and its various constituent bodies, including the former Macdonald College (now Macdonald Campus), Royal Victoria College (the former women's college turned residence) and the Montreal Neurological Institute. The Institution's name appears on all cheques cut by the university. The Trustees of the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning comprise, since the revised Royal Charter of 1852, the Board of Governors of McGill University.[5]


Early years

The Arts Building, built in 1839 and designed by John Ostell, is the oldest existing building on campus.
The Arts Building, built in 1839 and designed by John Ostell, is the oldest existing building on campus.

The first classes were held in Burnside Place, James McGill's country home, until the 1840s when the university began construction on its first buildings, the central and east wings of the Arts Building.[6] However, the rest of the campus was essentially a cow pasture. Sir John William Dawson, McGill's fifth principal (from 1855 to 1893) is often credited with transforming the school into a modern university.[7] He recruited the aid of Montreal's wealthiest citizens, many of whom donated the property and funding needed to construct the campus' buildings. Their names adorn many of the campus's prominent buildings including the Redpath Museum (1880), Macdonald Physics Building (1893), the Redpath Library (1893), the Macdonald Chemistry Building (1896), the Macdonald Engineering Building (1907), and the Strathcona Medical Building (1907 - now the Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry Building). This expansion of the campus continued through to 1920. In 1885, the university's Board of Governors formally adopted the use of the name McGill University. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1198 KB) Summary Photo of the Mcgill University Arts Building, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, taken by en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1198 KB) Summary Photo of the Mcgill University Arts Building, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, taken by en. ... John Ostell (1813-1892) architect, born London England, he emigrated to Canada in 1834, where he apprenticed himself to a Montreal surveyor Andre Trudeau to learn French methods of surveying. ... Sir John William Dawson, KCMG , FRSC (October 13, 1820 – November 19, 1899), was a Canadian geologist, born in Pictou, Nova Scotia. ... Outer view of the entrance of the museum View of the Albertosaurus in the central evolution exhibit atrium. ...


Women's education at McGill began in 1884 when Donald Smith, also known as Lord Strathcona, began funding separate lectures for women, given by university staff members. The first degrees granted to women at McGill were conferred in 1888.[8] Later, in 1899, the Royal Victoria College (RVC) opened as a residential college for women at McGill. Until the 1970s, all female undergraduate students, known as "Donaldas," were considered to be members of RVC.[9] Today, the College is an all-women's dormitory forming part of the university's residence system. Donald Alexander Smith (August 6, 1820-January 21, 1914) was a Scotch-Québécois fur trader, financier, railroad baron and politician in Canada. ...


In 1905, the university acquired a second campus when Sir William C. Macdonald, one of the university's major benefactors, endowed a college in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, 32 kilometres west of Montreal. Macdonald College, now known as the Macdonald Campus, opened to students in 1907, originally offering programs in agriculture, household science, and teaching. Sir William C. Macdonald (February 10, 1831 – died June 9, 1917) was a Scots-Quebecer tobacco manufacturer and major education philanthropist in Canada. ... Macdonald College under construction, 1906 The Macdonald Campus of McGill University (Mac Campus) houses its Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, and the McGill School of Environment. ...


McGill established the first post-secondary institutions in British Columbia, to provide degree programs to the growing cities of Vancouver and Victoria. It created Victoria College in 1903, a two-year college offering first- and second-year McGill courses in arts and science, which was the predecessor institution to the modern University of Victoria. The province's first university was incorporated in Vancouver in 1908 as the McGill University College of British Columbia. The private institution granted McGill degrees until it became the independent University of British Columbia in 1915.[10] Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... Victoria College, was a two-year college in Victoria, British Columbia, founded in 1903 with sponsorship from McGill University. ... The University of Victoria (usually known as UVic, though originally as U of V) is located in Greater Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (northeast of Victoria). ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. ...


McGill français movement

The Macdonald-Harrington Building, home to the School of Architecture
The Macdonald-Harrington Building, home to the School of Architecture

The 1960s represented an era of large nationalist and labour mobilizations in Quebec. At the time, English was seen as the privileged language of commerce, and McGill, with francophones comprising only three percent of the student population, was seen by some as a bastion of anglophone privilege in a predominantly French-speaking city.[11][12] In addition, there was only one French-language university in Montreal at the time: the Université de Montréal. McGill was largely out of reach to the 10,000 francophone graduates of the newly-created CEGEP system who had nowhere else to go, locally, to continue their studies, and almost no other French-speaking university to go to in Canada. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1932x2576, 1131 KB) Summary Photo of a building on the McGill University downtown campus, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1932x2576, 1131 KB) Summary Photo of a building on the McGill University downtown campus, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Sir William C. Macdonald (February 10, 1831 – died June 9, 1917) was a Scots-Quebecer tobacco manufacturer and major education philanthropist in Canada. ... The Macdonald-Harrington Building, home to the School of Architecture The School of Architecture is a constituent school of the McGill University, McGill University Faculty of Engineering offering accredited professional undergraduate and graduate degrees and post-professional graduate degrees in architecture. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up Anglophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Université de Montréal (UdeM) (translated into English commonly as (the) University of Montreal) is one of six universities in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... A CEGEP (IPA: or ; French: Cégep) is a post-secondary education institution exclusive to the province of Quebec in Canada. ...


The McGill français movement began in 1969, clamouring for a new McGill that would be francophone, pro-nationalist, and pro-worker. The movement was led by Stanley Gray, a political science professor from Ontario. It was argued that, since McGill received the lion's share of government funding, paid by a taxpayer base that was largely francophone, the university should equally be accessible to that segment of the population. Gray led a demonstration of 10,000 trade unionists, leftist activists, CEGEP students, and even some McGill students, at the university's Roddick Gates on March 28, 1969, with protesters shouting McGill français, McGill aux Québécois, and McGill aux travailleurs (McGill for workers). However, the majority of students and faculty opposed such a position, and many of the protesters were arrested.[13][14] The McGill fraçais movement is the second-largest protest in the history of Montreal.[15] Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...


McGill never became a francophone or bilingual university. However, francophones now make up approximately 20 percent of the student body, a goal set by the administration in the wake of the movement.[16]


Language of instruction

McGill is one of three English-language universities in Quebec (the others being Concordia University, also in Montreal, and Bishop's University in Lennoxville); fluency in French is not a requirement to attend. The Faculty of Law does, however, require all students to be "passively bilingual," meaning that all students must be able to read and understand spoken French, or English if the student is Francophone, since English or French may be used at any time in a course. Since 1964, students in all faculties have been able to write exams and papers in either English or French, provided that the objective of the class is not to learn a particular language.[17] This article is about Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. ... Bishops University is an English-language liberal arts university located in the borough of Lennoxville, in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. ... Lennoxville, population 4,963 (2001), is a borough (Fr. ...


Academics

Profile

688 Sherbrooke Street West, a high-rise office building, is situated directly across from the main campus. It houses many of the university's continuing education and language classes.
688 Sherbrooke Street West, a high-rise office building, is situated directly across from the main campus. It houses many of the university's continuing education and language classes.

McGill's student population includes, both full-time and part-time, 23,758 undergraduate and 7,323 graduate students in over 340 academic programs in eleven faculties (as of 2007-2008). Its students represent a diverse geographic and linguistic background. Of the entire student population, 57.3% are from Quebec, while 23.7% come from the rest of Canada, and 19.0% are international. As their mother tongue, 52.8% of all students speak English, while 18.1% speak French, and 29.1% speak a language other than English or French. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1932x2576, 1042 KB) Summary Photo of a building part of McGill Universitys downtown campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1932x2576, 1042 KB) Summary Photo of a building part of McGill Universitys downtown campus. ... Route 138 is one of the oldest highways in Canada. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Academically, about 90% of McGill students ranked in the top 10% of their high school graduating class.[18] The university has produced 128 Rhodes Scholars, more than any other Canadian university, as well as seven Nobel Laureates.[19] Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ...


Nearly 30% of all students are enrolled in the Faculty of Arts, McGill's largest academic unit. Of the other larger faculties, the Faculty of Science enrolls 14%, the Centre for Continuing Education enrolls 13%, the Faculty of Medicine enrolls 12%, the Faculty of Engineering and the Desautels Faculty of Management enroll 10% each. The remainder of all students are enrolled in McGill's smaller schools, including the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Law, Schulich School of Music, and the Faculty of Religious Studies. The Faculty of Arts is one of the constituent faculties of McGill University. ... The Faculty of Science is one of the constituent faculties of McGill University. ... The Faculty of Medicine is one of the constituent faculties of McGill University. ... The Faculty of Engineering is one of the constituent faculties of the McGill University in Montréal, Canada, offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in various fields including Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Mechanical, Metals and Materials, and Mining Engineering, as well as Architecture and Urban Planning. ... The Desautels Faculty of Management is one of the constituent faculties of McGill University. ... Macdonald College under construction, 1906 The Macdonald Campus of McGill University (Mac Campus) houses its Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, and the McGill School of Environment. ... The Faculty of Dentistry is a constituent faculty of McGill University. ... The McGill Faculty of Education services both international and Canadian students. ... Old Chancellor Day Hall, Faculty of Law The Faculty of Law is a constituent faculty of McGill University, in Montreal, Quebec. ... The Schulich School of Music is one of the constituent colleges of the McGill University in Montréal, Canada. ... The Faculty of Religious Studies is one of the constituent faculties of McGill University. ...

The Macdonald-Stewart Library Building houses the Schulich Library of Science and Engineering.
The Macdonald-Stewart Library Building houses the Schulich Library of Science and Engineering.

Comprising nearly 20% of the university's student body, international students are a significant presence on the McGill campus. The plurality of McGill's international students are from the United States, making up 37% of all international students and 49% of all undergraduate international students.[18] A growing number of American students are attending McGill, with such students representing 9.7% of all undergraduates and 6.9% of all students at the university.[18] Many are attracted to the culture and dynamism of Montreal, the university's reputation, and the relatively low tuition in comparison to many top public and private universities in the United States.[20] However, this trend is being repeated at many other Canadian universities, particularly those close to the Canada/U.S. border. In turn, many Canadian universities, including McGill, are stepping up their recruitment efforts at U.S. high schools.[21] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1915 KB) Summary Photo of a building on the McGill University downtown campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1915 KB) Summary Photo of a building on the McGill University downtown campus. ... Sir William C. Macdonald (February 10, 1831 – died June 9, 1917) was a Scots-Quebecer tobacco manufacturer and major education philanthropist in Canada. ...


Since 1996, McGill, in accordance with the Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS), has had eight categories qualifying certain international students an exemption from paying international fees. These categories include students from France, a quota of students from select countries which have agreements with MELS (including Algeria, China, and Morocco)[22], students holding diplomatic status (and their dependants), and students enrolled in certain language programs leading to a degree in French.[23]

The Macdonald Engineering Building is adjacent to the Milton Street Gates, the campus's eastern entrance.
The Macdonald Engineering Building is adjacent to the Milton Street Gates, the campus's eastern entrance.

There are nearly 1,600 tenured or tenure-track professors, plus another 4,300 adjunct and visiting professors teaching at the university.[2] McGill consistently leads the rest of Canada in terms of research dollars per full-time faculty member and number of refereed publications per full-time faculty member. According to a study by Research Infosource, research funding represents approximately $259,100 per faculty member, the fourth highest in the country.[24] Overall, in 2007, Research Infosource ranked McGill the second-best research university in the country, after the University of Toronto.[25] McGill also has one of the most per faculty research dollars nationwide from federal and provincial sources of funding (including the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1544 KB) Summary Photo of McGill Universitys Macdonald Engineering Building, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, taken by en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1544 KB) Summary Photo of McGill Universitys Macdonald Engineering Building, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, taken by en. ... Look up tenure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


McGill professors have won 26 Prix du Québec, 14 Prix de l'Association francophone pour le savoir and 15 Killam Prizes. The Prix du Québec are awards given by the Government of Quebec to individuals for cultural and scientific achievements. ... Acfas is the principal French-language learned society in Canada and, particularly, Quebec. ...


Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies

McGill offers over 250 Doctoral and Master’s graduate degree programs. McGill Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office (GPSO)[26] oversees the admission and registration of graduate students (both Master's and PhD), and administers graduate fellowships, postdoctoral affairs, the graduation process (including the examination of theses) and, along with other units, conducts regular program reviews in all disciplines.


Rankings

McGill is Canada's top-ranked medical-doctoral university, ranking first in Canada for the third consecutive year in the Maclean's 17th annual University Rankings issue.[27] The university has held first place in student awards for nine consecutive years, and consistently ranks first for reputation and average size and number of social sciences/humanities grants per full-time faculty.[28] A cover of the Canadian magazine Macleans. ...


In the THES - QS World University Rankings 2007, McGill University was ranked the best public university in North America, 8th overall in North America, and 12th in the world.[29][30] In the world, McGill ranked 26th in the natural sciences, 10th in the life sciences and biomedicine, 27th in technology, 12th in the social sciences, and 12th in the humanities.[29] This achievement has been regarded as the "highest rank to be reached by a Canadian institution."[31] The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ...


Shanghai Jiao Tong University, in its Academic Ranking of World Universities 2007, ranked McGill third in Canada, 44th in the Americas, and 63rd in the world.[32][33] Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ...


In 2006, Newsweek also ranked McGill third in Canada, 30th in North America, and 42nd worldwide.[34] The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


McGill is a member of the Association of American Universities (AAU), an organization of research-intensive universities in North America. It is also a member of Universitas 21, an international association of research-driven universities. In addition, it is a member of the G13, a group of prominent research universities in Canada. The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... The Group of 10, more commonly referred to as the G10 (or G-10), is a group of leading research intensive universities in Canada. ...


Admissions

According to the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, McGill admitted 46% of undergraduate applicants and 38% of graduate applicants for the entering class in Fall 2007.[35] The median high school average for the entering undergraduate class was 90% for Canadian students (89% for students in Ontario and 91% for students from other provinces) and a 3.7/4.0 GPA for American students.[35] The median SAT scores for verbal, math, and writing were 690, 680, and 690, respectively, and the median ACT score was 30.[35] The median Quebec CEGEP r-score was 30.13.[35] For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The ACT is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ... A CEGEP (IPA: or ; French: Cégep) is a post-secondary education institution exclusive to the province of Quebec in Canada. ...


McGill's entering class has the highest average entering grades in Canada.[3]


Research

McGill is ranked third in Canada in research-intensity and fourth in total-research funding[24], and is recognized as one of the top research universities in Canada and was named "Research University of the Year" by Research Infosource in its 2003 and 2005 ranking of Canada's Top 50 Research Universities.[36][25] Researchers and scientists at the university are affiliated with nearly 100 research centres and networks.


The university is perhaps best recognized for its research and discoveries in the health sciences. William Osler, Wilder Penfield, Donald Hebb, Brenda Milner, and others made significant discoveries in medicine, neuroscience and psychology while at McGill. The invention of the world's first artificial cell was made by an undergraduate student at the university. As chair of physics at McGill, nuclear physicist Ernest Rutherford performed the experiment that led to the discovery of the alpha particle and its function in radioactive decay, which won him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1908. Similarly, William Chalmers, invented Plexiglas while a graduate student at McGill.[37] Sir William Osler Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet (July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian-born physician. ... Dr Wilder Graves Penfield, CC, OM, CMG, MD, FRS (January 25/26, 1891 – April 5, 1976) was a American-born Canadian neurosurgeon. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Dr. Brenda Milner CC (born 15 July 1918, Manchester England) has contributed extensively to the research literature on various topics in the field of clinical neuropsychology. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 – 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a chemist (B.Sc. ... Structure of PMMA: (C5O2H8)n Structure of methyl methacrylate Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or polymethyl-2-methylpropanoate is the synthetic polymer of methyl methacrylate. ...


In terms of contributions to computing, MUSIC/SP, a piece of software for mainframes once popular among universities and colleges around the world at its time, was developed at McGill. A team also contributed to the development of Archie, one of the pre-WWW search engines. A 3270 terminal emulator developed at McGill was commercialized and later sold to Hummingbird Software. MUSIC/SP (Multi-User System for Interactive Computing / System Product) was developed at McGill University in the late 1960s from an IBM system called RAX (Remote Access). ... Archie was the first search engine ever invented, designed to index FTP archives, allowing people to find specific files. ...


McGill's Bellairs Research Institute, in Barbados, serves as Canada's only teaching and research facility in the tropics. These facilities are used by the Canadian Space Agency for research. The Bellairs Research Institute located on the Caribbean island nation of Barbados was founded in 1954, as a field-station for McGill University. ... The Canadian Space Agency (CSA or, in French, lAgence spatiale canadienne, ASC) is the Canadian government space agency responsible for Canadas space program. ...


Campus

McGill's downtown campus at night viewed from Mount Royal. The circular building in the foreground is the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building.
McGill's downtown campus at night viewed from Mount Royal. The circular building in the foreground is the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building.

The main campus is situated in downtown Montréal at the foot of Mount Royal. Most of the buildings are situated in a park-like campus north of Sherbrooke Street and south of Avenue des Pins between Peel and Aylmer streets. North of Docteur-Penfield, it also extends west of Peel for several blocks. The campus is near the Peel and McGill metro stations. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3860x1440, 4595 KB) Cropped image of Wikipedia image found at: http://en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3860x1440, 4595 KB) Cropped image of Wikipedia image found at: http://en. ... For other uses, see Mount Royal (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mount Royal (disambiguation). ... Peel Peel is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro, located in downtown Montreal in the borough of Ville-Marie. ... McGill McGill is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro, located in downtown Montreal in the borough of Ville-Marie. ... The Montreal Metro is the main form of public transportation within the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


The downtown campus reflects an eclectic mix of old and new buildings, reflecting the various periods in which the buildings were erected and a variety of architectural styles. All of the major university buildings were constructed using local grey limestone, which serves as a unifying element.


The university's athletic facilities, including Molson Stadium, are located on Mount Royal, near the residence halls and the Montreal Neurological Institute. The Gymnasium is named in honour of General Sir Arthur William Currie. The Percival Molson Memorial Stadium is a stadium owned by McGill University and is the home of the Montreal Alouettes and the McGill Redmen. ... General Sir Arthur William Currie, GCMG, KCB (December 5, 1875 – November 30, 1933) was the first Canadian commander of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (a corps of four divisions) on the Western Front during World War I. Currie was among the most successful generals of the war; he is still considered...

The Henry Birks Building, located on University Street.
The Henry Birks Building, located on University Street.

A second campus, the Macdonald Campus, in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue houses the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Science, the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, the Institute of Parasitology and the McGill School of Environment. The Morgan Arboretum and the J. S. Marshall Radar Observatory are nearby. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1163 KB) Summary Photo of a building on the McGill University downtown campus, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1163 KB) Summary Photo of a building on the McGill University downtown campus, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Macdonald College under construction, 1906 Macdonald College is a Canadian institution of higher learning created in 1905 in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec on the western tip of the Island of Montreal. ... Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue within the Island of Montreal. ... The Morgan Arboretum is a 245 hectare forested reserve, situated on the Mcgill University Macdonald Campus in Ste. ... The J.S. Marshall Radar Observatory (or MRO) is a McGill University facility in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec housing several weather radars and other meteorological sensors, many of them running around the clock. ...


There are plans to consolidate the various hospitals of the McGill University Health Centre on the site of an old CP railyard adjacent to the Vendôme metro station. This site, known as Glen Yards, comprises 170,000 square metres (43 acres) and spans portions of Montreal's Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighborhood and the city of Westmount.[38] The Glen Yards project has been fraught with controversy due to local opposition to the project, environmental issues, and the cost of the project itself.[39] The project, which has received approval from the provincial government, is expected to be complete by 2010.[40] The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) is a network of five teaching hospitals in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, all of which are affiliated with McGill University. ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... Vendôme is a station on the Montreal Metro Orange Line, located in the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce area of the borough of Côte-des-Neiges/Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. ... The Montreal Metro is the main form of public transportation within the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Notre-Dame-de-Grâce is a residential district of Montreal located to the west of downtown; population: 30102 (according to the 2001 census data) [1]). This district, which is known as NDG to locals, is one of five districts of the borough of Côte-des-Neiges—Notre-Dame... Westmount redirects here. ...


Student life

Residential life

McTavish Street on a foggy day, looking towards Mount Royal. The street is the formal western boundary of the downtown campus (although some McGill buildings are located west of McTavish).
McTavish Street on a foggy day, looking towards Mount Royal. The street is the formal western boundary of the downtown campus (although some McGill buildings are located west of McTavish).

Unlike other large schools, most McGill students do not live in residence (known colloquially as "rez") after their first year of study, even if they are not from the Montreal area. This is due to the fact that McGill's residence system is relatively small for a school of its size, housing approximately 2,400 undergraduate students and a handful of graduate students.[41] With the exception of upper year students returning as "floor fellows," the majority of McGill residences are for first-year undergraduate students only. Upper-year students are expected to find off-campus housing. Image File history File links McgillMCTAVISHbroulliard. ... Image File history File links McgillMCTAVISHbroulliard. ...


Residences at McGill come in a variety of forms. Many first-years live in the Bishop Mountain Residences (known to most students as "Upper Rez"), a series of concrete dormitories on the slope of Mount Royal, consisting of McConnell Hall, Molson Hall, Gardner Hall, and Douglas Hall. While the other three dormitories were constructed during the 1960s, Douglas Hall, which opened in 1937, is distinguished by its impressive stone facade and wood interiors. McConnell, Molson, and Gardner Halls share a cafeteria, located at the centre of the three dormitories, known as Bishop Mountain Hall. McConnell Hall is one of the residence halls in McGill University. ...


Royal Victoria College, the second-largest residence at McGill, is a women's only dormitory. McGill's newest residence, aptly named New Residence Hall (known simply as "New Rez") is a converted four-star hotel located a few blocks east of campus. New Rez is the largest of the university's dormitories. Solin Hall, an apartment-style residence four metro stops from campus is situated in a converted chocolate factory. The Montreal Metro is the main form of public transportation within the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


The McGill Off-Campus Residence Experience (MORE) residences consist of a series of converted apartment buildings and houses, the largest of which is The Greenbriar, an apartment-style residence located across from the Milton Gates.

The Roddick Gates, the university's "main entrance" from Sherbrooke Street. The gates were erected in 1925 in memory of Sir Thomas Roddick, former Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. Roddick lobbied for the creation of the Medical Council of Canada which established common standards for medical practice in Canada. Burnside Hall, the tower in the background, houses a number of science departments.
The Roddick Gates, the university's "main entrance" from Sherbrooke Street. The gates were erected in 1925 in memory of Sir Thomas Roddick, former Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. Roddick lobbied for the creation of the Medical Council of Canada which established common standards for medical practice in Canada. Burnside Hall, the tower in the background, houses a number of science departments.

Most second-year students transition to off-campus apartment housing, and apartment hunting is sometimes seen as a "rite of passage" for McGill students. In recent years, finding affordable housing has been challenging because of the city's tight housing market, particularly in neighbourhoods close to the McGill campus. Many students end up living in the "McGill Ghetto," the neighbourhood directly to the east of campus, although students have, in recent years, begun moving out to other areas because of rising rent prices in the "Ghetto." ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 283 KB) Summary The main gates, called Roddick Gates, of McGill University, Montreal. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 283 KB) Summary The main gates, called Roddick Gates, of McGill University, Montreal. ... Typical McGill Ghetto street, Aylmer looking north from the corner with Milton, in August. ...


Activities

There are hundreds of clubs and student organizations at the university. Many of them are centred around McGill's student union building—the University Centre—known unofficially as the Shatner Building. In 1992, students held a referendum and named the building after actor and McGill alumnus William Shatner, although the university administration refuses to accept the name and did not show up for the opening. Traditionally, the administration names buildings in honour of deceased members of the university community or for major benefactors -- and Shatner is neither.[42][43] Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ...


McGill has two English-language student-run newspapers: the McGill Daily, which is a financially independent publication, and the McGill Tribune, which is published through the Students' Society of McGill University. The Délit français is the Daily's French-language counterpart. CKUT (90.3 FM) is the campus radio station. TVMcGill is the University TV station, broadcasting on closed-circuit television and over the internet.[44] The McGill Daily is a campus newspaper created and run by students of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The McGill Tribune is a campus newspaper published by the Students Society of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Students Society of McGill University (SSMU) is the accredited representative of the undergraduate student body at the downtown campus of McGill University. ... Le Délit français, also simply known as Le Délit, is an independent francophone newspaper on the McGill University campus, in Montreal, Quebec. ... CKUT is the official campus/community radio station of McGill University. ...


Student representation

The campus has an active students' union represented by the undergraduate Students' Society of McGill University (SSMU) and the Post-Graduate Students' Society of McGill University (PGSS). In addition, each faculty has its own student governing body. The Students Society of McGill University (SSMU) is the accredited representative of the undergraduate student body at the downtown campus of McGill University. ... The Post-Graduate Students Society of McGill University (PGSS) PGSS Website McGill University Categories: | | ...


Athletics

A hockey match taking place at McGill in 1901
A hockey match taking place at McGill in 1901

The university is represented in Canadian Interuniversity Sport by the McGill Redmen (men's) and the McGill Martlets (women's). CIS Logo. ... The McGill Redmen are the mens athletic teams that represent McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The McGill Martlets are the womens athletic teams that represent McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


McGill maintains a rivalry with Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. Animosity between rowing athletes at the two schools has inspired an annual boat race between the two universities in the spring of each year since 1997. This academic and athletic rivalry, which was once very intense, waned after Queen's pulled their football team out of the Ontario-Quebec Intercollegiate Football Conference in 2000, but returned in 2002 and transferred to the annual home-and-home varsity hockey games between the two institutions. Nevertheless, the schools share a successful publishing house (McGill-Queen's University Press). The school also competes in the annual "Old Four" soccer tournament, with Queen's, the University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario. Grant Hall, the iconic symbol of Queens The McGill Arts Building, the oldest and most recognizable building at McGill. ... Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... The McGill-Queens University Press is a joint venture between McGill University in Montreal, Quebec and Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, two of the oldest and most prestigious universities in Canada. ... The Old Four is a soccer conference comprised of four public institutions of higher education in Central Canada. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The University of Western Ontario (known as Western, as well as UWO or Western Ontario) is a research university located in London, Ontario. ...


The inventions of North American football, hockey, and basketball are all related to McGill in some way. The first game of North American football was played between McGill and Harvard in 1874. The world's first organized hockey club (known as the Redmen since 1927), played their first game on January 31, 1877. McGill alumnus James Naismith invented basketball in early December of 1891.[45] Gridiron football (or more commonly, just gridiron) is a term used in some countries outside the United States and Canada that refers to both American football and Canadian football. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... This article is about the sport. ... Harvard redirects here. ... James Naismith James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ...


There has been a McGill alumnus or alumna competing at most Olympic Games since 1912. Gold medallists include swimmer George Hodgson—winner of two gold medals—at the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, ice hockey goaltender Kim St-Pierre— also a winner of two gold medals—at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, and at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, where recently, Jennifer Heil (a current student) was a gold medallist in the women's freestyle mogul event and goaltender Charline Labonté (also a current student) helped Canada win gold in women's ice hockey. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... George Ritchie Hodgson (October 12, 1893, Montreal – May 1, 1983, Montreal) was a Canadian swimmer of the early 20th century, and considered by many to be the greatest swimmer in Canadian history. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Category: ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... For ships of the United States Navy of the same name, see USS Salt Lake City. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... For other uses, see Turin (disambiguation). ... Jennifer Heil Jennifer Heil (born November 4, 1983) is a Canadian freestyle skier. ... Charline Labonté (born October 15, 1982 in Boisbriand, Quebec) is a womens ice hockey player. ...


In 1996, the McGill Sports Hall of Fame was established to honour its best student athletes. Notable members of the Hall of Fame include James Naismith and Sydney Pierce. James Naismith James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ... Sydney David Pierce (March 30, 1901 – May 17, 1992) was a Canadian Olympic hurdler and career diplomat. ...


Hazing scandal

McGill's Redmen football program was hit by a hazing scandal in 2005 forcing the cancellation of the final two games of the season by school officials. A formal investigation into the hazing scandals showed that "the event did involve nudity, degrading positions and behaviours, gagging, touching in inappropriate manners with a broomstick, as well as verbal and physical intimidation of rookies by a large portion of the team."[46] Dubbed 'Hazegate' by the local Montreal Gazette, the scandal made national news. In 2006, McGill's Senate approved a proposed anti-hazing policy to define forbidden initiation practices.[47] Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... The Gazette is a major English-language daily newspaper produced out of Montreal, Quebec. ...


Symbols

The university's symbol is the martlet, stemming from the presence of the mythical bird on the official Arms of the university. Inscribed on its arms is also In Domino Confido (I trust in the Lord), James McGill's personal motto. A martlet is a type of heraldic bird similar to the swallow, but having no feet. ...


The University's patent of arms was granted by England's Garter-King-at-Arms in 1922 and registered in 1956 with Lord Lyon King of Arms in Edinburgh and in 1992 with the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada. In heraldic terms, the arms are described as follows: Heraldry is the science and art of describing of coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ...

Argent three Martlets Gules, on a chief dancette of the second, an open book proper garnished or bearing the legend In Domino Confido in letters Sable between two crowns of the first. Motto: Grandescunt Aucta Labore.

The school song is entitled "Hail, Alma Mater."[48] The lyrics to the song are:

Hail, Alma Mater, we sing to thy praise;
Loud in thy Honour, our voices we raise.
Full to thy fortune, our glasses we fill.
Life and Prosperity, Dear Old McGill.

Hail, Alma Mater, thy praises we sing:
Far down the centuries, still may they ring.
Long through the ages remain — if God will,
Queen of the Colleges, Dear Old McGill.

McGill's motto is Grandescunt Aucta Labore, Latin for "by work, all things grow." Its official colours are red and white. Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


Battle honours

Battle Honours are awarded to regiments of the British Empire to commemorate their participation in battles. On only two occasions have they been awarded to educational institutions. On the first occasion they were awarded to La Martiniere College in Lucknow and secondly to the McGill University contingent for their bravery at Arras in 1917 during the First World War.[49] The custom has been to award, to those units who took part, the right to display the name of a particular battle, campaign or war. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... La Martinière College is a private school located in Lucknow in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. ... , Lucknow ( , Hindi: लखनऊ, Urdu: لکھنؤ, ) is the capital city of Uttar Pradesh, the most populous state of India. ... The Battle of Arras took place from 9 April to 16 May 1917. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Notable alumni and faculty

The faculty and alumni of the university include seven Nobel Prize winners, 1 Templeton Prize winner[50], 128 Rhodes Scholars[19], 1 Pulitzer Prize winner[51], and 7 Academy Award winners[52]. McGill professors have won 26 Prix du Québec, 14 Prix de l'Association francophone pour le savoir and 15 Killam Prizes. In addition, McGill is the alma mater of two Canadian prime ministers and several Supreme Court of Canada justices[53] and Canadian Ministers of Justice. The following is a list of chancellors, principals, and noted alumni and professors of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities was until 2001 awarded for Progress in Religion. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Prix du Québec are awards given by the Government of Quebec to individuals for cultural and scientific achievements. ... Acfas is the principal French-language learned society in Canada and, particularly, Quebec. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ...


See also

This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... McGill Science Undergraduate Research Journal(mSURJ) is a student-run and student-founded scientific journal. ...

References

  1. ^ Report on Endowment Performance 2006-07. McGill University. Retrieved on 2008-01-20. The endowment figure consists of investments for McGill endowments, accounts managed on behalf of McGill units and affiliated entities and an allocation from the restricted fund.
  2. ^ a b c Faculty and staff. McGill University. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  3. ^ a b c Students. McGill University. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  4. ^ a b The Royal Charter of McGill University, accessed January 21, 2006.
  5. ^ Frost, Stanley Brice. McGill University, Vol. I. For the Advancement of Learning, 1801-1895. McGill-Queen's University Press, 1980. ISBN 978-0-7735-0353-3
  6. ^ The Early Campus, Virtual McGill.
  7. ^ McGill University Faculty of Medicine: History
  8. ^ William Dawson, CCHeritage.
  9. ^ Royal Victoria College, McGill University Archives.
  10. ^ Higher Education in British Columbia Before the Establishment of UBC, UBC Archives.
  11. ^ Reporter: McGill français
  12. ^ Reporter: Kaleidoscope
  13. ^ Chester, Bronwyn. "McGill français and Quebec society". McGill Reporter, April 8, 1999. Accessed on January 20, 2006.
  14. ^ Provart, John. McGill français 30 years later. McGill News, Summer 1999.
  15. ^ Reporter Volume 29 Number 2
  16. ^ McGill Facts 2004-2005
  17. ^ « McGill français! » - Souvenirs - Les Archives de Radio-Canada
  18. ^ a b c Enrolment reports. McGill University. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  19. ^ a b Introduction to McGill. McGill University.
  20. ^ Bauer, Andrew. "NEWS ANALYSIS: Americans love McGill". McGill Tribune, October 26, 2004.
  21. ^ CNN.com. "College costs push Americans to Canada". October 4, 2002.
  22. ^ Countries and International Organizations Granted Exemptions from the Additional Financial Contribution by the Government of Quebec, Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport.
  23. ^ International Fee Exemption
  24. ^ a b Top 50 Research Universities List. Research Infosource.
  25. ^ a b Research Universities of the Year 2007. Research Infosource.
  26. ^ Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. McGill University. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  27. ^ Search and subscribe to news
  28. ^ Search and subscribe to news
  29. ^ a b 2007 THES-QS World University Rankings. THES-QS.
  30. ^ McGill tops on continent: global survey. The Gazette.
  31. ^ McGill takes 12th spot in global ranking. The Globe and Mail.
  32. ^ Top 500 World Universities. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University.
  33. ^ Top 100 North & Latin American Universities. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University.
  34. ^ The Top 100 Global Universities. Newsweek.
  35. ^ a b c d Admissions Profile. McGill University. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  36. ^ Zeindler, Christine. "McGill is research university of the year, tops in Times". McGill Reporter, October 27, 2005.
  37. ^ Alumni
  38. ^ This Land Was Made for You and Me..., McGill University Health Centre Journal, July/August 2001.
  39. ^ McCabe, Daniel. MUHC site chosen, McGill Reporter, November 5, 1998.
  40. ^ Reynolds, Mark. Green light on Glen Yards, McGill Reporter, September 11, 2003.
  41. ^ McGill Residences
  42. ^ Stojsic, Leslie. "The trek back home". McGill Reporter, March 11, 1999.
  43. ^ History of the SSMU
  44. ^ TVMcGill
  45. ^ Athletics, Viewbook 2005-2006.
  46. ^ "McGill University cancels football season", McGill University Press Release, October 19, 2005. Available online at http://www.football.mcgill.ca/mediaroom/2005/10_19_2005.php
  47. ^ McGill get tough with hazing. The Globe and Mail, 11 Jan. 07. Caroline Alphonso.
  48. ^ McGill Songs > McGill Facts and Institutional History > McGill History > Outreach
  49. ^ McGill University at regiments.org accessed July 2007
  50. ^ Charles Taylor awarded Templeton
  51. ^ The Washington Post Writers Group
  52. ^ Alumni
  53. ^ Alumni

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Coordinates: 45°30′15″N, 73°34′29″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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McGill University | Definition | Information | Explanation | Review | WikiCity.com - Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, Free ... (1521 words)
McGill University, established in 1821, is in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
One of the oldest universities in Canada, it has long been considered to be one of the most prestigious universities in the country and among the finest in North America.
The university also has the distinction of having the highest publication intensity in the country for many years, and this was one of the factors leading to it being named Research University of the Year in 2003.
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