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Encyclopedia > Mayonnaise
Mayonnaise made in a food processor with an assortment of standard ingredients
Mayonnaise made in a food processor with an assortment of standard ingredients

Mayonnaise (often abbreviated mayo) is a thick condiment made primarily from vegetable oil and egg yolks.[1] Whitish-yellow in color, it is a stable emulsion formed from the oil and the yolks and is generally flavored with lemon juice and/or vinegar, salt, and sometimes mustard. Numerous other sauces can be created from it by adding additional seasonings (see below). The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... Mayonaise (not to be misspelled Mayonnaise) is a song by The Smashing Pumpkins, first officially released on the 1993 breakthrough album Siamese Dream. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 752 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (944 × 753 pixels, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo of homemade mayo taken in Tucson, Arizona, on 12 July 2005 by Hayford Peirce Photograph available under GFDL license. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 752 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (944 × 753 pixels, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo of homemade mayo taken in Tucson, Arizona, on 12 July 2005 by Hayford Peirce Photograph available under GFDL license. ... Salt, sugar and pepper are the most essential condiments in Western cuisine. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with cooking oil. ... An egg yolk surrounded by the egg white An egg yolk is the part of an egg which serves as the food source for the developing embryo inside. ... A. Two immiscible liquids, not emulsified; B. An emulsion of Phase II dispersed in Phase I; C. The unstable emulsion progressively separates; D. The surfactant (purple outline) positions itself on the interfaces between Phase A and Phase B, stabilizing the emulsion An emulsion is a mixture of two immiscible (unblendable... Binomial name Citrus X limon {{{author}}} Lemons are the citrus fruit from the tree Citrus X limon. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Mustard on bread. ... Seasoning is the process of adding flavours, or enhancing natural flavour of any type of food. ...

Contents

History and etymology

One explanation of the origin of the name is that the idea was brought back to France from Mahon, Spain, after Louis-François-Armand du Plessis de Richelieu's victory over the British at the city's port in 1756.[2] Later, Marie-Antoine Carême made it lighter by blending the vegetable oil and egg yolks into an emulsion; his recipe then became famous throughout Europe.[citation needed] If this history is correct, allioli (the Balearic version of aïoli) would seem to have been the inspiration. The name mayonnaise is generally said to have been derived either from Mahon (giving mahonnaise), or from the French word manier (meaning to stir or to blend, giving magnonnaise). Municipality of Mahón Mahón (alternately, Maó; Catalan it is also the official name, Spanish Mahón), is a municipality and the capital city of the Balearic Island of Minorca (an autonomic Spanish community), located in the eastern part of the island. ... Louis François Armand du Plessis, duc de Richelieu (March 13, 1696 - August 8, 1788) was a marshal of France and a grandnephew of Cardinal Richelieu. ... Marie Antoine (Antonin) Carême (June 8, 1784–January 12, 1833), was a French chef and author. ... Balearic is the Catalan variant spoken in the Balearic Islands (Spanish las Islas Baleares), Spain. ... Selfmade Aioli consisting of garlic, salt, egg, and olive oil Aioli with olives Aioli (French: aïoli, Modern Provençal: aiòli) is a cold sauce made of garlic, egg, acid (lemon juice or vinegar), and olive oil, basically a garlic-flavoured mayonnaise. ...


The Larousse Gastronomique 1961 suggests another explanation: "However logical Carême's justification for the exclusive use of the term magnonaise may seem, we are not by any means convinced that it should take the place of the usual form, mayonnaise. Mayonnaise, in our view, is a popular corruption of moyeunaise, derived from the very old French word moyeu[3], which means yolk of egg. For, when all is said, this sauce is nothing but an emulsion of egg yolks and oil."


Since the name's real origin is unknown, several other explanations exist:

  • The sauce may have been christened mayennaise after Charles de Lorraine, duke of Mayenne, because he took the time to finish his meal of chicken with cold sauce before being defeated in the Battle of Arques. Though, this suggestion was first made by the nineteenth-century culinary writer Pierre Lacam[4].

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, mayonnaise made its English language debut in a cookbook of 1841. Combatants French Royal Army Catholic League Commanders Henry IV of France Duke of Mayenne Strength 8,000 French, 5,250 British 35,000 Casualties massive massive The Battle of Arques occurred on 15-18 September, 1589 between the French royal forces of King Henry IV of France and troops of... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...


Ambrose Bierce said in his Devil's Dictionary that mayonnaise is "One of the sauces which serve the French in place of a state religion." Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – 1914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devils Dictionary. ...


Making mayonnaise

Mayonnaise is made by slowly adding oil to an egg yolk, while whisking vigorously to disperse the oil. The oil and the water in yolks form a base of the emulsion, while the lecithin from the yolks acts as the emulsifier that stabilizes it. Additionally, a bit of a mustard may also be added to further stabilize the emulsion. Small particles of the mustard serve as nucleation sites for the droplets forming the mayonnaise. Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Lecithin is mostly a mixture of glycolipids, triglycerides, and phospholipids (e. ... An emulsion is a mixture of two immiscible substances. ...


This produces the basic mayonnaise. The Wiki Cookbook has more elaborate varieties, and a more thorough description of the process. Mayonnaise can be made with an electric mixer, an electric blender, or a food processor, or by hand with a whisk or even a fork. In telecommunications a mixer is a frequency mixer. ... An electric blender. ... A food processor is a kitchen appliance used to facilitate various repetitive tasks in the process of preparation of food. ... Various whisks. ...


Traditional recipe

The traditional French recipe is essentially the same as the basic one described above, but it uses top-quality olive oil and sometimes vinegar or lemon juice. Some nouvelle cuisine recipes specify safflower oil. It is considered essential to constantly beat the mayonnaise using a whisk while adding the olive oil a drop at a time, fully incorporating the oil before adding the next tablespoon. Experienced cooks can judge when the mayonnaise is done by the emulsion's resistance to the beating action. Mayonnaise made this way may taste too strong or sharp to people accustomed to commercial products. One important thing to keep in mind when using olive oil is that overworking the oil can make it bitter. Therefore, it is common to use safflower oil to create the initial emulsion, then add olive oil, working it in with a wooden spoon rather than a whisk. The Nouvelle Cuisine was based on the style of Fernand Point and was developed in France and the USA in the 1970s. ... Binomial name Carthamus tinctorius (Mohler, Roth, Schmidt & Boudreaux, 1967) Safflower is a highly branched, herbaceous, thistle-like annual, usually with many long sharp spines on the leaves. ...


Composition

Homemade mayonnaise can approach 85% fat before the emulsion breaks down; commercial mayonnaises are more typically 70-80% fat. "Low fat" mayonnaise products contain starches, cellulose gel, or other ingredients to simulate the texture of real mayonnaise. Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ...


Some homemade recipes use the whole egg, including the white. It can also be made using solely egg whites, with no yolks at all, if it is done at high speed in a food processor. The resulting texture appears to be the same, and – if seasoned, for example, with salt, pepper, mustard, lemon juice, vinegar, and a little paprika – the taste is similar to traditional mayonnaise made with egg yolks. Albumen redirects here. ...


Commercial producers either pasteurize the yolks, freeze them and substitute water for most of their liquid, or use other emulsifiers. For homemade mayonnaise it is recommended using the freshest eggs possible. Some stores sell pasteurized eggs for home use. The eggs can also be coddled in 170°F (77°C) water, after which the hot yolks, now slightly cooked, are removed from the whites. Homemade mayonnaise will generally only keep under refrigeration for three to four days. Pasteurization (or pasteurisation) is the process of heating liquids for the purpose of destroying viruses and harmful organisms such as bacteria, protozoa, molds, and yeasts. ... Pasteurization (or pasteurisation) is the process of heating liquids for the purpose of destroying viruses and harmful organisms such as bacteria, protozoa, molds, and yeasts. ...

A jar of mayonnaise
A jar of mayonnaise

Mayonnaise has a pH between 3.8 and 4.6, making it an acidic food. There is a misconception that foods like potato salad can make a person sick if left out in the sun, due to the mayonnaise spoiling. This is false; the pH of mayonnaise prevents harmful bacteria from growing in it. Left out of refrigeration, mayonnaise will develop an unappetizing taste and smell, due to other types of bacteria and molds that can spoil it; but will not make one sick. [5] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (550x900, 178 KB) This is a photograph of a jar of mayonnaise with the brand name airbrushed out. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (550x900, 178 KB) This is a photograph of a jar of mayonnaise with the brand name airbrushed out. ... For other uses, see PH (disambiguation). ... For alternative meanings see acid (disambiguation). ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... Moldy cream cheese Molds (British English: moulds) are various fungi that cover surfaces as fluffy mycelium and usually produce masses of asexual, sometimes sexual spores. ...


Use of mayonnaise

Worldwide, mayonnaise is most commonly served in a sandwich, or with salad such as potato salad or canned tuna ("tuna mayo" or tuna salad). Regional uses are listed below: This article is about the salad. ... Tuna salad is a blend of tuna fish, emulsified thick and creamy vegetable oil based sauce, garnished with edible products and then served between two slices of various styles of bread. ...


In the US

Commercial mayonnaise sold in jars originated in New York City, in Manhattan's Upper West Side. In 1905, the first ready-made mayonnaise was sold at Richard Hellmann's delicatessen on Columbus Avenue, between 83rd and 84th Streets. In 1912, Mrs. Hellmann's mayonnaise was mass marketed and called Hellmann's Blue Ribbon Mayonnaise. Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ...


At about the same time that Hellmann's Mayonnaise was thriving on the East Coast of the United States, a California company, Best Foods, introduced their own mayonnaise, which turned out to be very popular in the western United States. Head-to-head competition between the two brands was averted when, in 1932, Best Foods bought out the Hellmann's brand. By then both mayonnaises had such commanding market shares in their own half of the country that it was decided that both brands be preserved. Hellmanns and Best Foods are brand names that are used for the same line of mayonnaise and other food products. ...


In the Southeastern part of the United States, Mrs. Eugenia Duke of Greenville, South Carolina, founded the Duke Sandwich Company in 1917 to sell sandwiches to soldiers training at nearby Fort Sevier. Her homemade mayonnaise became so popular that her company began to focus exclusively on producing and selling the mayonnaise, eventually selling out to the C.F. Sauer company of Richmond, Virginia, in 1929. Duke's Mayonnaise, still made to the original recipe, remains a popular brand of mayonnaise in the Southeast, although it is not generally available in other markets. Greenville is a mid-sized city located in the upstate of South Carolina. ... Conrad Frederick Sauer (1866-1927) was a German American pharmacist from Richmond Virginia who founded the C.F. Sauer Company. ... Dukes Mayonnaise is a popular product in the southeastern United States. ...


Reily Foods Company of New Orleans, LA, produces Blue Plate Mayonnaise, an extremely popular mayonnaise in the Southern United States. Formerly owned by Hunt-Wesson and manufactured in New Orleans, LA, Blue Plate Mayonnaise is now produced in Knoxville, TN. Reily Foods Company is the primary division of the independently held Wm. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Alternate uses: Knoxville (disambiguation) Knoxville is a city located in Knox County, Tennessee, United States. ...


Professional athletes have used mayonnaise as a home remedy for aching joints and an ache blocker. When applied direct to the aching joint it acts as a natural lubricator for overly tense muscle areas.


Europe

In northern Europe, mayonnaise is often served with French fries, especially in the The Netherlands, Belgium and Germany, as well as increasingly in the United Kingdom, France and Spain. It is also served with cold chicken or hard-boiled eggs in The Netherlands, France, Poland, Ukraine and the UK. French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth) are pieces of potato that have been chopped into batons and deep fried. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...


Guidelines issued in September 1991 by Europe's Federation of the Condiment Sauce Industries recommend that oil and liquid egg yolk levels in mayonnaise should be at least 70% and 5% respectively, although this is not legislated. Most available brands easily exceed this target. [1]


Japan

Japanese mayonnaise
Japanese mayonnaise

Japanese mayonnaise is typically made with rice vinegar and a small amount of MSG, which give it a different flavor profile from mayonnaise made from distilled vinegar. It is most often sold in soft plastic squeeze bottles. Its texture is thinner than most Western commercial mayonnaises. A variety containing karashi (Japanese mustard) is also common. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (455x1001, 29 KB) Mayonnaise Kewpie squeeze bottle Japanese I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (455x1001, 29 KB) Mayonnaise Kewpie squeeze bottle Japanese I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Rice vinegar is a vinegar made from fermented rice or rice wine in China and Japan. ... This article is about monosodium glutamate as a food additive. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Karashi ) is a type of mustard used as a condiment or as a seasoning in Japanese cuisine. ...


Apart from salads, it is popular with dishes such as okonomiyaki, takoyaki and yakisoba. It is sometimes served with cooked vegetables, or mixed with soy sauce or wasabi and used as dips. In the Tōkai region, it is a frequent condiment on hiyashi chuka (cold noodle salad). A man prepares okonomiyaki at in a restaurant in Hiroshima, Japan Cheese (above) and shrimp okonomiyaki fully seasoned with sauce, mayonnaise, katsuobushi and aonori in Osaka, Japan Lantern beckons the unwary tourist into an okonomiyaki restaurant Okonomiyaki ) is a pan-fried Japanese dish cooked with various ingredients. ... A Boat of Takoyaki Square takoyaki pan with 16 molds Takoyaki ) (literally fried or baked octopus) is a popular Japanese dumpling made of batter, diced octopus, tempura scraps (tenkasu), pickled ginger, konnyaku, and green onion, topped with okonomiyaki sauce, green laver (aonori), mayonnaise, and katsuobushi (fish shavings), originated in Osaka. ... Yakisoba ), literally fried noodles, is a dish often sold at festivals in Japan. ... The Tōkai region (東海, literally East Sea) is a subregion of Chubu, Japan along the Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the traditional Japanese noodle soup. ...


Kewpie (Q.P.) is the most popular brand of Japanese mayonnaise, advertised with a Kewpie doll logo. Rose ONeill and her patented dolls, mid 1910s. ...


People who are known to like mayonnaise are commonly called mayora (マヨラー) by their friends.


Russia

Mayonnaise is very popular in Russia where it is made with sunflower seed oil which gives it a very distinctive flavor. A 2004 study showed that Russia is the only market in Europe where more mayonnaise is sold than ketchup by volume. Leading brands are Calve (marketed by Unilever) and Sloboda (marketed by Efko). [2] For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ...


Chile

Chile is the world's third major per capita consumer of mayonnaise and first in Latin America. [3] Since mayonnaise became widely accessible in the 80s Chileans have used it on hot dogs, French fries, and on boiled potatoes. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s - 120s - 130s 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 Note: Sometimes 80s is used as shorthand for the 1980s, the 1880s, or other such decades in different centuries. ... A large hot dog with ketchup A hot dog is classified as a type of sausage or, alternatively, a sandwich on a suitably shaped bun with the sausage and condiments on it. ... French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth) are pieces of potato that have been chopped into batons and deep fried. ...


As a base for other sauces

Mayonnaise is the base for many other chilled sauces and salad dressings. For example: —Cleopatra, in Shakespeares Antony and Cleopatra, 1606 A salad is a food item generally served either prior to or after the main dish as a separate course, as a main course in itself, or as a side dish accompanying the main dish. ...

  • Aïoli is often made as an olive-oil mayonnaise with garlic.
  • Rouille is aïoli with added red pepper or paprika.
  • Tartar sauce is mayonnaise spiced with pickled cucumbers and onion. Capers, olives, and crushed hardboiled eggs are sometimes included. A simpler recipe calls for sweet pickle relish and more lemon juice.
  • Some types of Russian dressing (also known as Marie Rose sauce in Europe) combine mayonnaise with tomato sauce or ketchup and yoghurt or heavy cream. In North America, however, most homemade varieties and all commercial brands of Russian dressing use little or no mayonnaise as a base. They are very dark red and sweet dressings made with vegetable oil, tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, and a variety of herbs and spices (often including mustard).
  • Thousand Island dressing is a salmon-pink dressing that combines tomato sauce and/or tomato ketchup or ketchup-based chili sauce, minced sweet pickles or sweet pickle relish, assorted herbs and spices (usually including mustard), and sometimes including chopped hard-boiled egg—all thoroughly blended into a mayonnaise base.
  • Fry sauce is a mixture of mayonnaise, ketchup or another red sauce (e.g., Tabasco sauce, Buffalo wing sauce, or one of many smokey barbecue sauces popular in the Northwest states), spices, and sometimes a strong tasting salty liquid (such as worchestershire or soy sauce) is added to balance out the sweeter red sauces. Commonly eaten on french fries in Utah, Idaho, eastern Washington and rural Oregon.
  • Mayonesa is a lime-flavored mayonnaise, usually found in Mexican or Spanish grocers in North America.
  • Sauce rémoulade, in classic French cuisine is mayonnaise to which has been added mustard, gherkins, capers, parsley, chervil, tarragon, and possibly anchovy essence.[6] An industrially made variety is popular in Denmark with french fries and fried fish. It is quite different from most of the remoulade sauces that are frequently found in Louisiana and that generally do not have a mayonnaise base.
  • Ranch dressing is made of buttermilk or sour cream, mayonnaise, and minced green onion, along with other seasonings.

Selfmade Aioli consisting of garlic, salt, egg, and olive oil Aioli with olives Aioli (French: aïoli, Modern Provençal: aiòli) is a cold sauce made of garlic, egg, acid (lemon juice or vinegar), and olive oil, basically a garlic-flavoured mayonnaise. ... Rouille is a type of sauce that consists of olive oil with bread or breadcrumbs with spices. ... Chicken with tartar sauce Tartar sauce or tartare sauce is a thick white sauce made from mayonnaise and finely chopped pickled cucumber, capers, onions (or chives), and fresh parsley. ... A deli pickle. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... Caper Categories: Plant stubs | Spices | Magnoliopsida ... For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... Russian dressing in United States cooking is a salad dressing composed of a base of mayonnaise or yogurt with ketchup, horseradish, pimentos, and chives and/or other spices added. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Yoghurt or yogurt, less commonly yoghourt or yogourt (see spelling below), is a dairy product produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. ... North American redirects here. ... Thousand Island dressing, pink in color, is a variety of salad dressing, a variant of Russian dressing, commonly made of mayonnaise, ketchup, and a mixture of finely chopped vegetables, most often pickles, onions, bell peppers, and/or green olives; chopped hard-boiled egg is also common. ... Fry sauce is a condiment common in Utah. ... The classic Tabasco red pepper sauce Tabasco sauce is a brand of hot sauce made from tabasco peppers (Capsicum frutescens var. ... Buffalo chicken wings, or Buffalo wings as they are more commonly known, were first prepared at the Anchor Bar on Main Street in Buffalo, New York in 1964. ... The St. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Remoulade or rémoulade is a popular condiment in many countries, and was invented in France. ... Anchovy essence is a pink-colored, thick, oily sauce, consisting of pounded anchovies, spices, etc. ... Ranch dressing is an American condiment. ... Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Sour cream is a dairy product rich in fats obtained by fermenting a regular cream by certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria. ... Green Onion can refer to: Scallion, various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully developed bulb Green Onion - (בצל ירוק, Batzal Yarok) an Israeli band Green Onions, a 1962 soul instrumental by Booker T. & the M.G.s Green Onions (album), a 1962 album containing the above instrumental Category: ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Mayonnaise is an emulsion of oil droplets suspended in a base composed of egg yolk, lemon juice or vinegar, water, and often mustard, which provide both flavor and stabilizing particles and carbohydrates." On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee, Scribner, New York, 2004.
  2. ^ David, E. (1960). "French Provincial Cooking" (1999 edition) p.120
  3. ^ A more usual definition of moyeu, from Mallarme.net: "Partie centrale de la roue où s’emboîtent les rais, et par où passe l’essieu. "Mais de ce que les moyeux des roues de votre carrosse auront pris feu, s’ensuit-il que votre carrosse n’ait pas été fait expressément pour vous porter d’un lieu à un autre?" Voltaire, Dictionnaire Philosophique, "Causes finales." Translation: "Central part of the wheel, where the spokes are housed, through which the axle passes." A fourteenthth-century surgeon, Guy de Chauliac, did use moyeu to mean yolk of the egg: "Oeufs sont tempérez : toutes fois l'aulbin tire à froideur, et le moyeu [le jaune] à la chaleur, avec sédation." ("Eggs are tempered, for albumen tends to "cooling" and the yolk tends to "heating", in the Four humours theory. The word moyeu would have been pronounced quite close to "mayo".
  4. ^ The page reference has not been identified; the passage appeared either in Lacam's Mémorial historique et géographie de la pâtisserie (privately printed, Paris 1908), in his Nouveau pâtissier glacier français et étranger (1865) or his Glacier classique et artistique en France et en Italie, (1893).
  5. ^ Happy Birthday, Dear Mayo - We Hold You Dear : NPR
  6. ^ See, for example, Larousse Gastronomique, 2003, ISBN 0 600 60863 8, page 1054.

Harold McGee writes about the chemistry, techniques and history of food and cooking and is the author of two books that explain kitchen science in an approachable manner. ... Scribner is a city located in Dodge County, Nebraska. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Larousse Gastronomique is the most respected of all the food encyclopedias, produced by the French publishing company founded by Pierre Larousse (1817-1875). ...

External links

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

See also

Salad cream is a creamy, yellow condiment similar to mayonnaise. ... Miracle Whip is a salad dressing and sandwich spread that was invented in Salem, Illinois at Max Crossets Cafe. ... Hellmanns and Best Foods are brand names that are used for the same line of mayonnaise and other food products. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Howstuffworks "What is mayonnaise?" (593 words)
Mayonnaise is a thick, creamy sauce or dressing that is made of oil, egg yolks, lemon juice or vinegar, and seasonings.
Mayonnaise was invented in 1756 by the French chef of the Duc de Richelieu.
Mayonnaise is used as the base for other sauces, such as tartar sauce and thousand-island salad dressing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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