FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Maya peoples
Maya
Total population

6 million[citation needed] “Maya language” redirects here. ... The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ...

Regions with significant populations
Parts of modern-day countries of El Salvador, Mexico, Guatemala, Belize and Honduras
Languages
Mayan languages, Spanish, Kriol and English
Religions
Christianity (predominantly Roman Catholic), Maya religion,

Maya civilization

Languages | Peoples
Architecture | Calendar
Human sacrifice | Mythology
Peoples | Religion
Society | Textiles
Pre-Columbian Music
Trade | Writing “Maya language” redirects here. ... Belizean Creole, also called Belizean Kriol or Kriol , is closely related to Miskito Coastal Creole, Rio Abajo Creole, Colón Creole, and San Andrés and Providencia Creole. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The indigenous religious beliefs and practices of the ancient and modern Maya vary greatly over space and time, but certain common features can be discerned, all of which are consistent with other Mesoamerican religions. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 467 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1326 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... As unique and spectacular as any Greek or Roman architecture, Maya architecture spans many thousands of years. ... The Maya calendar is a system of distinct calendars and almanacs used by the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and by some modern Maya communities in highland Guatemala. ... Human sacrifice is the act of killing a human being for the purposes of making an offering to a deity or other, normally supernatural, power. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Maya women be merged into this article or section. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Celebratory Mural in the halls of Bonampak The Music that was central to pre-Columbian Maya culture still remains a bit of a mystery today. ... During the height of the Maya civilization, trade was a crucial factor in maintaining cities. ... Maya glyphs in stucco at the Museo de sitio in Palenque, Mexico The Maya script, commonly known as Maya hieroglyphs, was the writing system of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization of Mesoamerica, presently the only deciphered script of the Mesoamerican writing systems. ...

Maya history

Classic Maya collapse
Spanish conquest of Yucatán This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Spanish Conquest of Yucatán was the campaign undertaken by the Spanish conquistadores against the Late Postclassic Maya states and polities, particularly in the northern and central Yucatán Peninsula but also involving the Maya polities of the Guatemalan highlands region. ...

The Maya peoples constitute a diverse range of the Native American peoples of southern Mexico and northern Central America. The overarching term "Maya" is a convenient collective designation to include the peoples of the region who share some degree of cultural and linguistic heritage; however the term embraces many distinct populations, societies and ethnic groups who each have their own particular traditions, cultures and historical identity. For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ...


There are an estimated 6 million Maya living in this area at the start of the 21st century. Some are quite integrated into the modern cultures of the nations in which they reside, others continue a more traditional culturally distinct life, often speaking one of the Mayan languages as a primary language. 20XX redirects here. ... “Maya language” redirects here. ...


The largest populations of contemporary Maya are in the Mexican states of Yucatán, Campeche, Quintana Roo, Tabasco, and Chiapas, and in the Central American countries of Belize, Guatemala, and the western portions of Honduras and El Salvador. The United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos or Mexico) comprises 31 states (estados) and one federal district (Distrito Federal), which contains the capital, Mexico City. ... For other uses, see Yucatán (disambiguation). ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 11 Largest City San Francisco de Campeche Government  - Governor Jorge Carlos Hurtado Valdez (PRI)  - Federal Deputies PRI:2  - Federal Senators PRI:2 PAN:1 Area Ranked 18th  - State 50,812 km²  (19,618. ... Quintana Roo is a state of Mexico, on the eastern part of the Yucatán Peninsula. ... This article is about the Mexican state of Tabasco. ... Location within Mexico Municipalities of Chiapas Country Mexico Capital Municipalities 118 Largest City Tuxtla Gutiérrez Government  - Governor Juan José Sabines Guerrero ( PRD)  - Federal Deputies PRI: 7 PRD: 5  - Federal Senators PRI: 1 PRD: 1 PVEM: 1 Area Ranked 8th  - Total 74,211 km² (28,653 sq mi) Population (2005...

Contents

The Yucatán Peninsula

The largest group of modern Maya can be found on Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula. They commonly identify themselves simply as "Maya" with no tribe (unlike in the Highlands of Western Guatemala), and speak the language which anthropologists term "Yucatec Maya", but is identified by speakers and Yucatecos simply as "Maya". Among Maya speakers Spanish is commonly spoken as a second or first language. The Yucatán peninsula as seen from space The Yucatán Peninsula, in Southeastern Mexico, separates the Caribbean Sea from the Gulf of Mexico. ... http://www. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Yucatán's indigenous population was first exposed to Europeans after a party of Spanish shipwreck survivors came ashore in 1511. One of the sailors, Gonzalo Guerrero, is reported to have started a family and taken up a position of counsel among a local polity near present-day Chetumal. Later Spanish expeditions to the region (Córdoba in 1517, Grijalva in 1518 and Cortés in 1519) resulted in numerous conflicts and open warfare. Vulnerability to European diseases and conflicts with the Spanish eventually reduced the Yucatec Maya population to less than 10,000 by 1850. Those in the jungles of Quintana Roo to the east were more cut off from the Spanish, enabling them to survive more easily. Historically, the population in the eastern half of the peninsula was less affected by and less integrated with Hispanic culture than those of the western half. Today in the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexican States of Campeche, Yucatan and Quintana Roo) between 750,000 - 1,200,000 people speak Mayan. However three times more than that are from Mayan origins but they do not speak their native language, but they hold ancient Mayan last names such as: Ak, Can, Chan, Be, Cantun, Dzib, Canche, Chi, Chuc, Coyoc, Hoil, Hau, May, Tamay, Ucan, Pool, Zapo, etc. Year 1511 (MDXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Gonzalo Guerrero was a sailor from Palos, in Spain. ... Front of the palace of the Governor of the state of Quintana Roo in Chetumal Chetumal (coordinates: ) is a city on the east coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. ... Francisco Hernández de Córdoba (died 1517) was a Spanish conquistador, known to history mainly for the ill-fated expedition he led in 1517, in the course of which the Yucatán Peninsula was discovered by Europeans. ... Juan de Grijalva (born around 1489 in Cuéllar - January 21, 1527) was a Spanish conquistador. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Quintana Roo is a state of Mexico, on the eastern part of the Yucatán Peninsula. ...


A large 19th century revolt by the native Maya people of Yucatán (Mexico), known as the Caste War of Yucatán, was one of the most successful modern Native American revolts; results included the temporary existence of the Maya state of Chan Santa Cruz, recognized as an independent nation by the British Empire. The Caste War of Yucatán (1847–1901) began with the revolt of native Maya people of Yucatán (Mexico) against the population of European descent (called Yucatecos) in political and economic control. ... Areas under the Mayas control, approximately 1870 Chan Santa Cruz or U Noh Kah Balam Nah Chan Santa Cruz is the Maya town now known as Felipe Carrillo Puerto in what is now the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ...


Chiapas

Chiapas was for many years one of regions of Mexico that were least touched by the reforms of the Mexican Revolution. The Zapatista Army of National Liberation, which launched a rebellion against the Mexican state in Chiapas in January 1994, declared itself to be an indigenous movement and drew its strongest and earliest support from Chiapan Mayans, a number of whom still support it today. Location within Mexico Municipalities of Chiapas Country Mexico Capital Municipalities 118 Largest City Tuxtla Gutiérrez Government  - Governor Juan José Sabines Guerrero ( PRD)  - Federal Deputies PRI: 7 PRD: 5  - Federal Senators PRI: 1 PRD: 1 PVEM: 1 Area Ranked 8th  - Total 74,211 km² (28,653 sq mi) Population (2005... This article is about the Mexican Revolution of 1910. ... The flag of the EZLN. The Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, EZLN) is an armed revolutionary group based in Chiapas, one of the poorest states of Mexico. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


Maya groups in Chiapas include the Tzotzil and Tzeltal, in the highlands of the state, the Tojolabales, concentrated in the lowlands around Las Margaritas, and the Ch'ol in the jungle. The Tzotzil Maya of the central highlands of Chiapas, Mexico are a Native American group, the direct descendants of the Classic Maya. ... Tzeltal is a Maya language spoken in Chiapas, Mexico. ... Tojolabal is a Mayan language related to the Chuj language spoken in Guatemala. ... Chol are an indigenous people of southeastern Mexico, mainly located in the northern Chiapas highlands in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. ...


The most traditional of Maya groups are the Lacandon, a small population avoiding contact with outsiders until the late 20th century by living in small groups in the rain forests. The Lacandon people are indigenous Native American Maya people who live mostly in the jungles in Chiapas, Mexico (until 1854 a part of Guatemala). ...


Belize

The Maya population is concentrated in the Cayo and Toledo districts, but they are scattered throughout the country. They are divided into the Yucatec, Kekchi, and Mopan. The Cayo District is a district in the west of the nation of Belize. ... The Toledo District is the southernmost district in the nation of Belize, with the district capital in the town of Punta Gorda, Belize. ... Yucatec Maya is a Maya language spoken in the Yucatan Peninsula, northern Belize and parts of Guatemala. ... The Qeqchi language is spoken in Guatemala and Belize. ... The Mopan Maya language is spoken in Belize and Guatemala. ...


Tabasco

The state of Tabasco is home to the Chontal Maya. For the group of Tequistlatecan languages spoken in Oaxaca, please see Chontal languages. ...


Guatemala

In Guatemala, the largest and most traditional Maya populations are in the western highlands.


In Guatemala the Spanish colonial pattern of keeping the native population legally separate and subservient continued well into the 20th century. This resulted in many traditional customs being retained, as the only other option than traditional Maya life open to most Maya was entering the Hispanic culture at the very bottom rung. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Considerable identification with local and linguistic affinities, often corresponding to pre-Columbian nation states, continues, and many people wear traditional clothing that displays their specific local identity. Clothing of women tends to be more traditional than that of the men, as the men have more interaction with the Hispanic commerce and culture.


Maya peoples of the Guatemala highlands include the K'iche', Mam, poqomam, Kaqchikel, Ixil, Q'eqchi', Tz'utujil, and Jakaltek. The Kiche (or Quiché in Spanish spelling), are a Native American people, one of the Maya ethnic groups. ... The Mam are a Native American people of the highlands of western Guatemala. ... Poqomam is a Mayan language, closely related to poqomchí. It is spoken by ca. ... The Kaqchikel (in modern orthography; formerly also spelled Cakchiquel) are one of the indigenous Maya peoples of the midwestern highlands in Guatemala. ... Ixil is a Mayan language. ... The Qeqchi language is spoken in Belize and Guatemala. ... The Tzutujil are a Native American people, one of the 21 Mayan ethnic groups that dwell in Guatemala. ... The Jacaltec (or Jakalteko or Popti) are a group of Maya Indians living in the Western Guatemala highlands and adjoining part of Chiapas and southern Mexico. ...


The southeastern region of Guatemala (bordering with Honduras) includes groups such as the Ch'orti'. The Chorti people (alternatively, Chorti Maya or Chorti) are one of the indigenous Maya peoples, who primarily reside in communities and towns of souteastern Guatemala and west-northern Honduras. ...


Quotes

  • "We are not myths of the past, ruins in the jungle or zoos. We are people and we want to be respected, not to be victims of intolerance and racism." — Rigoberta Menchú, 1992.[1]

Rigoberta Menchú Tum (b. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...

Notes

  1. ^ Quote taken from an interview with her by a representative of a Central American human rights organization (Riis-Hansen 1992). Menchú gave this interview shortly before she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

References

Chiappari, Christopher L. (2002). "Toward a Maya Theology of Liberation: The Reformulation of a "Traditional" Religion in the Global Context". Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 41 (1): pp.47–67. ISSN 0021-8294. 
Grube, Nikolai (2006). "Maya Today - From Indios Deprived of Rights to the Maya Movement", in Nikolai Grube (Ed.): Maya: Divine Kings of the Rain Forest, Eva Eggebrecht and Matthias Seidel (assistant Eds.), Cologne: Könemann Press, pp.417–425. ISBN 3-8331-1957-8. OCLC 71165439. 
Mooney, James (1911). "Maya Indians". Catholic Encyclopedia (New Advent online reproduction) vol. X. New York: Robert Appleton and Company. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
Riis-Hansen, Anders (1992). Interview with Rigoberta Menchu Tum. Commission for the Defense of Human Rights in Central America (CODEHUCA). Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
Warren, Kay (1998). Indigenous Movements and Their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-05882-5. 

ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikisource has an original article from the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia about:
Maya Indians
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:Maya peoples
Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maya (people) - MSN Encarta (944 words)
Maya (people), group of related Native American peoples of the Mayan linguistic stock, living in Mexico, in the states of Veracruz, Yucatán, Campeche, Tabasco, and Chiapas, and also in the greater part of Guatemala and in parts of Belize and Honduras.
Among the other politically significant peoples are the Huastec of northern Veracruz; the Tzental of Tabasco and Chiapas; the Chol of Chiapas; the Quiché, Cakchiquel, Pokonchi, and Pokomam of the Guatemalan highlands; and the Chortí of eastern Guatemala and western Honduras.
The Maya peoples developed a method of hieroglyphic notation and recorded mythology, history, and rituals in inscriptions carved and painted on stelae (stone slabs or pillars), on lintels and stairways, and on other monumental remains.
Maya people - Academic Kids (533 words)
The largest populations of Maya people are in the Mexican states of [[Yucatᮝ], Campeche, Quintana Roo, Tabasco, and Chiapas, and in the Central American countries of Belize, Guatemala, and the western portions of Honduras and El Salvador.
Maya groups in Chiapas include the Tzotzil and Tzeltal, in the highlands of the state, and the Ch'ol in the jungle.
The most traditional of Maya groups are the Lacandon, a small population avoiding contact with outsiders until the late 20th century by living in small groups in the rain forests.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m