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Encyclopedia > Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
200
Maya Angelou speaking at the groundbreaking of the African Burial Ground on October 5, 2007

Born April 4, 1928 (1928-04-04) (age 79)
Saint Louis, Missouri
Occupation Poet, dancer, producer, playwright, director, author
Nationality American

[www.mayaangelou.com Official website] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The African Burial Ground is a site in Lower Manhattan (in New York City) where the remains of over 400 Africans, buried during the 17th and 18th-centuries, were found during the construction of the Foley Square Federal office building in 1991. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Gateway City, Gateway to the West, or Mound City Motto: Official website: http://stlouis. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ...

Maya Angelou (IPA: /ˈmaɪə ˈændʒəloʊ/[1]), born Marguerite Ann Johnson, April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri,[2] is an American poet, memoirist, actress and an important figure in the American Civil Rights Movement. Angelou is known for her series of six autobiographies, starting with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, (1969)[3] which was nominated for a National Book Award and called her magnum opus.[4] Her volume of poetry, Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Die (1971) was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.[5] is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... As a literary genre, a memoir (from the French: mémoire from the Latin memoria, meaning memory), or a reminiscence, forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ... For music albums named Autobiography, see Greek eauton = self, bios = life and graphein = write) is a form of biography, the writing of a life story. ... I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a 1969 autobiographical novel about the early years of author Maya Angelous life. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Angelou recited her poem, "On the Pulse of Morning" at President Bill Clinton's inauguration in 1993.[6] She has been highly honored for her body of work, including being awarded over 30 honorary degrees.[3] William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

Contents

Personal life

Early years

Maya Angelou was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 4, 1928 to Bailey Johnson, a doorman and naval dietitian, and Vivian Baxter Johnson, a nurse, real estate agent, and, later, merchant marine. Angelou's brother, Bailey Jr., gave her the nickname "Maya".[7] The details of Angelou's life, although described in her six autobiographies and in numerous interviews, speeches, and articles, tend to be inconsistent. Her biographer, Mary Jane Lupton, explains that when Angelou speaks about her life, she does so eloquently but informally and "with no time chart in front of her".[8] Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2008, Angelou's family history was profiled on the PBS series African American Lives 2. A DNA test showed that she was descended from the Mende people of West Africa.[9] The program's research showed that Angelou's maternal great-grandmother, Mary Lee, emancipated after the Civil War, cut all ties with her slave past and renamed herself "Kentucky Shannon" because "she liked how it sounded". Little was known about Lee's background because she prohibited anyone from knowing about it. Angelou learned that Lee became pregnant out of wedlock by her former owner, a white man named John Savin, and that he forced Lee to sign a false statement accusing another man of being the father. A grand jury indicted Savin for forcing Lee to commit perjury, and despite discovering that Savin was the father, found him not guilty. Lee was sent to the Clinton County, Missouri poorhouse with her daughter, who became Angelou's grandmother, Marguerite Baxter. Angelou's reaction after learning this information was, "That poor little black girl, physically and psychologically bruised."[10] Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... The Mende are an ethnic group living in Sierra Leone, primarily in the Southern Province. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In the American common law legal system, a grand jury is a type of jury which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offense. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ... Clinton County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ... A poorhouse is a publicly maintained facility for the support and housing of dependent or needy persons, typically run by a local government entity such as a county or municipality. ...


When Angelou was three and her brother four, their parents' "calamitous marriage" ended, and their father sent them alone by train to live with his mother, Mrs. Annie Henderson, in Stamps, Arkansas.[11] Angelou's first book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, recounts the first 17 years of her life. Four years later, the children's father "came to Stamps without warning"[12] and returned them to their mother's care in St. Louis. At age eight, Angelou was sexually abused and raped by her mother's boyfriend, Mr. Freeman. She confessed it to her brother, who told the rest of their family. Mr. Freeman was jailed for one day but was found kicked to death four days after his release. Angelou became mute, believing, as she has stated, "I thought if I spoke, my mouth would just issue out something that would kill people, randomly, so it was better not to talk." She remained nearly mute for five years.[13] Stamps is a city located in Lafayette County, Arkansas. ... I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a 1969 autobiographical novel about the early years of author Maya Angelous life. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Child sexual abuse is an umbrella term describing criminal and civil offenses in which an adult engages in sexual activity with a minor or exploits a minor for the purpose of sexual gratification. ... For the domesticated crop plant called rape, see rapeseed. ... Look up mute in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Angelou and her brother were sent back to their grandmother once again. Angelou credits a close friend in Stamps, teacher Bertha Flowers, for helping her speak again, as well as introducing her to classic literature. When she was thirteen, she and her brother returned to live with her mother in San Francisco, California; during World War II, she attended George Washington High School and studied dance and drama on a scholarship at the California Labor School. Before graduating, she worked as the first black female streetcar conductor in San Francisco.[14] Three weeks after completing school, she gave birth to her son, initially called "Clyde Johnson". At the end of Angelou's third autobiography, Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas, she recounts that Clyde announced that he wanted to be called "Guy Johnson" and trained his friends and family to accept it.[15] Guy also became a poet.[16] Angelou's second autobiography, Gather Together in My Name, recounts her life from the ages of 17-19. As feminist Mary Jane Lupton states, this book "depicts a single mother's slide down the social ladder into poverty and crime."[17] In those years, Angelou went through a series of relationships, occupations, and cities as she attempted to raise her son without the benefit of job training or advanced education. As Lupton states, "Nevertheless, she was able to survive through trial and error, while at the same time defining herself in terms of being a black woman."[18] A turning point in this book occurred when a lover seduced her into becoming a prostitute and her son was kidnapped. San Francisco redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... George Washington High School is a public high school in San Francisco, California. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ...


Adulthood and early career

Book cover illustration, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Book cover illustration, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Angelou married Greek sailor Tosh Angelos in 1952; the marriage ended in divorce one-and-half years later. (Ms. Angelou tends not to admit how many times she has been married, "for fear of sounding frivolous.")[19] Known by "Rita Johnson" up to that point, she changed her name when her managers at The Purple Onion, a San Francisco night club, strongly suggested that she adopt a "more theatrical" name that captured the feel of her Calypso dance performances.[20] She toured Europe with a production of the opera Porgy and Bess in 1954–1955, studied modern dance with Martha Graham, danced with Alvin Ailey on television variety shows, and recorded her first record album, Miss Calypso, in 1957. By the end of the 1950s, Angelou moved to New York City, where she acted in off-Broadway productions and met artists and writers active in the Civil Rights Movement. From 1959 to 1960, Angelou held the position of Northern Coordinator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference at the request of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In the early 1960s, Angelou briefly lived with South African freedom fighter Vusumi Make, and moved with him and her son Guy to Cairo, Egypt, where she became an associate editor at the weekly newspaper The Arab Observer. In 1962, her relationship with Make ended, and she and Guy moved to Ghana. She became an assistant administrator at the University of Ghana's School of Music and Drama, was a feature editor for The African Review, acted, and wrote plays.[14] Image File history File links IKnowWhy. ... Image File history File links IKnowWhy. ... The Purple Onion is a celebrated cellar club in the North Beach area of San Francisco, California located at 140 Columbus (between Jackson and Pacific). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... Modern dance is often performed in bare feet. ... For the supercentenarian, see Martha Graham (supercentenarian). ... Alvin Ailey, Jr. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Various movements seeking civil rights, human rights and social justice since the Second World War have become known as a civil rights movement. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Look up South Africa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Government South Africa Government Online official government site Parliament of South Africa official site Statistics South Africa official government site News AllAfrica. ... Freedom fighter is a relativistic local term for those engaged in rebellion against an established organization that is thought to be oppressive. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... The University of Ghana is the oldest and largest of the five Ghanaian public universities. ...


Angelou became close friends with Malcolm X in Ghana and returned to America in 1964 to help him build a new civil rights organization, the Organization of African American Unity.[21] King was assassinated on her birthday (April 4) in 1968. (She did not celebrate her birthday for many years for that reason.)[22] Inspired by a meeting with her friend James Baldwin, cartoonist Jules Feiffer, and Feiffer's wife Judy, she dealt with her grief by writing her first autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,[23] which catapulted her to international fame and critical acclaim. Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, poet, and essayist, best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Jules Feiffer (1958) Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is an American syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a 1969 autobiographical novel about the early years of author Maya Angelous life. ...


Later career

In 1973, Angelou married Paul du Feu, an English-born carpenter and remodeler, and moved with him and her son to Sonoma, California. The years to follow were some of Angelou's most productive years as a writer and poet. She composed music for movies, wrote articles, short stories, and poetry for several magazines, continued to write autobiographies, produced plays, lectured at universities all over the country, and served on various committees. She appeared in a supporting role in the television mini-series Roots in 1977, wrote for television, and composed songs for Roberta Flack.[24] Her screenplay, Georgia, Georgia, was the first original script by a black woman to be produced.[25] It was during this time when Angelou met Oprah Winfrey and became her mentor.[26] Angelou has used the same editor throughout her writing career Sonoma City Hall in the town plaza Sonoma is a historically significant town in Sonoma Valley, Sonoma County, California, USA. Sonoma is centered around its historic town plaza, a remnant of the towns Spanish colonial past. ... A theatrical producer is the person ultimately responsible for overseeing all aspects of mounting a theatrical production. ... Roots is a 1977 American television miniseries based on Alex Haleys work Roots: The Saga of an American Family, his critically acclaimed genealogical novel. ... Roberta Flack Roberta Flack (born February 10, 1937 in Asheville, North Carolina) is an American singer. ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ...


Maya Angelou in her later years.

, Robert Loomis, an executive editor at Random House, who has been called "one of publishing's hall of fame editors."[27] Robert Loomis (born 1926) is an executive book editor at Random House, where he has worked since 1957. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ...


Angelou divorced de Feu and returned to the southern United States in 1981, where she accepted the first lifetime Reynolds Professorship of American Studies at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.[28] In 1993, she recited her poem, "On the Pulse of Morning" at President Bill Clinton's inauguration, the first poet to do so since Robert Frost at John F. Kennedy's inauguration in 1961.[6] Also in 1993, Angelou's poems were featured in the Janet Jackson/John Singleton film Poetic Justice. (She also made a brief appearance in the film).[29] In 2006 Angelou became a radio talk show host for the first time, hosting a weekly show for XM Satellite Radio's Oprah & Friends channel.[30] In 2007, she became the first African-American woman and living poet to be featured in the Poetry for Young People series of books from Sterling Publishing.[31] American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is an American singer, actress, songwriter, record producer, dancer, activist, pop icon, and younger sister of the King of Pop, Michael Jackson. ... John Daniel Singleton (born January 6, 1968 in Los Angeles, California) is an American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Poetic Justice is a 1993 drama/romance film starring Janet Jackson, Tupac Shakur, Regina King and Joe Torry. ... “XM” redirects here. ... Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. ...


Since the 1990s, Angelou has been a busy participant in the lecture circuit. In 1993, she was making about eighty speaking appearances a year;[6] in 2008, she charged approximately $43,000 per engagement.[32] By the early 2000s, Angelou traveled to her speaking engagements and book tours stops by tour bus. She "gave up flying, unless it is really vital .. not because she was afraid, but because she was fed up with the hassle of celebrity."[19] In 1998, Angelou went on her first cruise, given by her friend Oprah Winfrey, in celebration of her 70th birthday. Over 150 people were in attendance.[22] Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ...


In 2002, Angelou lent her name and writings to a line of products from the Hallmark Greeting Card Company.[33] This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


Works

Literature

Autobiographies

  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, 1969.
  • Gather Together in My Name, 1974.
  • Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas, 1976.
  • The Heart of a Woman, 1981.
  • All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes, 1986.
  • A Song Flung Up To Heaven, 2002.
  • The Collected Autobiographies of Maya Angelou, 2004.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a 1969 autobiographical novel about the early years of author Maya Angelous life. ...

Children's books

  • Mrs. Flowers: A Moment of Friendship (selection from I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings), illustrated by Etienne Delessert, 1986.
  • Life Doesn't Frighten Me (poem), edited by Sara Jane Boyers, illustrated by Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1993.
  • Soul Looks Back in Wonder (with others), illustrated by Tom Feelings, 1993.
  • My Painted House, My Friendly Chicken and Me, photographs by Margaret Courtney-Clarke, 1994.
  • Kofi and His Magic, photographs by Margaret Courtney-Clarke, 1996.
  • Maya's World series, illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell, 2004.

Publicity photo of Jean-Michel Basquiat by photographer William Coupon Jean-Michel Basquiat (IPA: ) (December 22, 1960, Brooklyn - August 12, 1988, New York, New York) was an American artist. ...

Poetry

Maya Angelou's plaque at San Francisco's Jack Kerouac Alley.
Maya Angelou's plaque at San Francisco's Jack Kerouac Alley.
  • Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Die, 1971.
  • Oh Pray My Wings are Gonna Fit Me Well, 1975.
  • And Still I Rise, 1978.
  • Shaker, Why Don't You Sing, 1983.
  • Now Sheba Sings the Song, 1987.
  • I Shall Not Be Moved, 1990.
  • "On the Pulse of Morning", 1993.[34]
  • The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou, 1994.
  • Phenomenal Woman: Four Poems for Women, 1995.
  • "A Brave and Startling Truth", 1995.
  • "From a Black Woman to a Black Man", 1995.
  • "Amazing Peace", 2005.
  • "Mother, a Cradle to Hold Me", 2006.
  • "Celebrations, Rituals of Peace and Prayer", 2006
  • Poetry for Young People, 2007.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 911 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 911 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Jack Kerouac Alley (formerly Adler Street) is an alleyway in San Franciscos Chinatown. ...

Screenplays

Films
  • Georgia, Georgia, 1972.
  • All Day Long, 1974.

Television
  • Writer, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, 1979.
  • Writer, Brewster Place, 1990-1991.
  • Writer, Angelou on Burns, 1996.
  • Guest appearance on That's So Raven

Directing

  • Down in the Delta, 2007.[35]

Acting

Television appearances

Roots is a 1977 American television miniseries based on Alex Haleys work Roots: The Saga of an American Family, his critically acclaimed genealogical novel. ... Sister, Sister is the name of several works. ... This section contains a list of trivia items. ... Moesha is also the title of a song by former Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio, frequently performed by his first solo band. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... The Oprah Winfrey Show (also known as Oprah) is a United States syndicated talk show, hosted and produced by its namesake Oprah Winfrey, and is the highest-rated talk show in American television history. ... Thats So Raven is an American Emmy Award-nominated[1] sitcom television series broadcast on the Disney Channel. ...

Films and plays

The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... The Blacks: A Clown Show (Les Nègres) is a play by the French dramatist and novelist Jean Genet. ... Mother Courage (German Mutter Courage) is a character from a Grimmelshausen novel Lebensbeschreibung der Ertzbetrügerin und Landstörtzerin Courasche (The Runagate Courage) dating from around 1670. ... Poetic Justice is a 1993 drama/romance film starring Janet Jackson, Tupac Shakur, Regina King and Joe Torry. ... How to Make an American Quilt is a 1995 movie which was directed by Jocelyn Moorhouse and stars Winona Ryder. ... Madeas Family Reunion is a film adaptation of the acclaimed stage production written by Tyler Perry and sequel to Diary of a Mad Black Woman. ...

Radio

“XM” redirects here. ...

Recordings

Scores

  • Miss Calypso, 1957.
  • For the Love of Ivy, 1968.
  • Georgia, Georgia, 1972.
  • All Day Long, 1974.

Spoken word albums

  • The Poetry of Maya Angelou, 1969.
  • Women in Business, 1981.
  • Phenomenal Woman, 1995.
  • Been Found, 1996.

Honors and awards

Main article: List of honors and awards for Maya Angelou

Angelou has been honored by universities, literary organizations, government agencies, and special interest groups. Her honors include a National Book Award nomination for I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, a Pulitzer Prize nomination for her book of poetry, Just Give Me A Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Die,[5] a Tony Award nomination for her role in the 1973 play Look Away[37], and three Grammys for her spoken word albums.[25] In 1995, Angelou's publishing company, Bantam Books, recognized her for having the longest-running record (two years) on The New York Times Paperback Nonfiction Bestseller List.[38] She has served on two presidential committees,[39] and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Arts in 2000.[40] Musician Ben Harper has honored Angelou with his song "I'll Rise," which includes words from her poem, "And Still I Rise."[41] She has been awarded over thirty honorary degrees.[3] Main Article: Maya Angelou Chubb Fellowship Award, Yale University, 1970. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a 1969 autobiographical novel about the early years of author Maya Angelous life. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Benjamin Chase Ben Harper (born October 28, 1969) is an American musician. ...


References

  1. ^ See SwissEduc: pronunciation of Maya Angelou
  2. ^ Maya Angelou. Poets.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-25.
  3. ^ a b c Moore, Lucinda (2003-04-01). A Conversation with Maya Angelou at 75. Smithsonian.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  4. ^ About the novel: Critical assessment. Cliffs Notes. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  5. ^ a b Moyer, Homer E. (2003). The R.A.T. real-world aptitude test: Preparing yourself for leaving home. Sterling, VA: Capital Books. ISBN 1-931868-42-5. 
  6. ^ a b c Manegold, Catherine S.. "An afternoon with Maya Angelou; A wordsmith at her inaugural anvil", New York Times, 1993-01-20. Retrieved on 2007-10-02. 
  7. ^ Kellaway, Kate. "Poet for the new America", The Guardian, 1993-01-23. Retrieved on 2007-10-15. 
  8. ^ Lupton, Mary Jane (1998). Maya Angelou: A critical companion. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2. ISBN 0-313-30325-8. 
  9. ^ Henry L. Gates, Jr. (host). (2008). African American lives 2: The past is another country (Part 4) [Documentary]. PBS. Retrieved on 2008-03-15.
  10. ^ Henry L. Gates, Jr. (host). (2008). African American lives 2: A way out of no way (Part 2) [Documentary]. PBS. Retrieved on 2008-03-15.
  11. ^ Angelou, Maya (1969). I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. New York: Random House, 6. ISBN 0-375-50789-2. 
  12. ^ Angelou, Maya (1969). I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. New York: Random House, 52. ISBN 0-375-50789-2. 
  13. ^ Healy, Sarah (2001-02-21), "Maya Angelou Speaks to 2,000 at Arlington Theater", Daily Nexus 81 (82), <http://www.dailynexus.com/article.php?a=456>
  14. ^ a b Maya Angelou (1928- ). Retrieved on 2007-10-25.
  15. ^ Lupton, Mary Jane (1998). Maya Angelou: A critical companion. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 6. ISBN 0-313-30325-8. 
  16. ^ Long, Richard (2005-11-01). 35 who made a difference: Maya Angelou. Smithsonian.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-25.
  17. ^ Lauret, Maria (1994). Liberating literature: Feminist fiction in America. New York: Routledge, 120. ISBN 0415065151. 
  18. ^ Lupton, Mary Jane (1998). Maya Angelou: A critical companion. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 6. ISBN 0-313-30325-8. 
  19. ^ a b Younge, Gary. "No surrender", The Guardian, 2002-05-25. Retrieved on 2007-10-10. 
  20. ^ Lupton, Mary Jane (1998). Maya Angelou: A critical companion. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 4. ISBN 0-313-30325-8. 
  21. ^ Rose, Kira. "At B-School reunion, it's Maya Angelou, not a CEO", The Michigan Daily, 2007-10-07. Retrieved on 2007-10-25. 
  22. ^ a b Van Gelder, Lawrence. "Winfrey's Gift", The New York Times, 1998-04-08. Retrieved on 2007-10-12. 
  23. ^ Smith, Dinitia. "A career in letters, 50 years and counting", The New York Times, 2007-01-23. Retrieved on 2007-10-23. 
  24. ^ About the author: Angelou in print. Cliffs Notes. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  25. ^ a b Maya Angelou: A Brief Biography. African Overseas Union. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  26. ^ Winfrey, Oprah. Oprah's cut with Maya Angelou. Oprah.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  27. ^ Arnold, Martin. "Making books; Familiarity breeds content", New York Times, 2001-04-12. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. 
  28. ^ About the author: Angelou in print. Cliffs Notes. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  29. ^ Canby, Vincent. "Review/Film: Poetic Justice; On the road to redemption", New York Times, 1993-07-23. Retrieved on 2008-01-09. 
  30. ^ a b Waggoner, Martha. "Maya Angelou to host show on XM Radio", Fox News, 2006-09-13. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  31. ^ "Maya Angelou still rises", CBS News, 2007-10-22. Retrieved on 2007-10-22. 
  32. ^ McLaughlin, Katie. "Angelou speaks to a diverse crowd in Burruss", Collegiate Times, 2008-01-24. Retrieved on 2008-01-10. 
  33. ^ Williams, Jeannie. "Maya Angelou pens her sentiments for Hallmark", USA Today, 2002-01-10. Retrieved on 2007-10-10. 
  34. ^ Angelou, Maya. On the Pulse of Morning. Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library. Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  35. ^ Kennedy, Dana. "Holiday Films; A Poet, at 70, ventures into the unknown", The New York Times, 1998-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-10-12. 
  36. ^ Maya Angelou. Muppet Wiki. Retrieved on 2007-09-28.
  37. ^ Past Winners. Official Website of the Tony Awards. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  38. ^ Biography Information. Maya Angelou Official Website. Retrieved on 2007-10-24.
  39. ^ Woolley, John T.; Gerhard Peters (1977-03-28). National Commission on the observance of International Women's Year, 1975 appointment of members and presiding officer of the commission. The American Presidency Project. Retrieved on 2007-10-06.
  40. ^ "Sculptor, painter among National Medal of Arts winners", CNN.com, 2000-12-20. Retrieved on 2007-10-12. 
  41. ^ Lopez, Luciana. "Music review: Love fills Keller as Ben Harper shares mix of folk, rock, more", The Oregonian, 2007-11-14. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Maya Angelou
  • Official website
  • Maya Angelou on Oprah & Friends Radio
  • Maya Angelou reciting her inaugural poem, 1993 (YouTube)
  • Maya Angelou's poem in praise of Hillary
  • Maya Angelou at the Internet Movie Database
  • 1987 interview with Maya Angelou by Don Swaim at Wired for Books.
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Don Swaim is an American journalist, writer, and broadcaster. ... Wired for Books <http://wiredforbooks. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maya Angelou (1816 words)
By the time she was in her early twenties, Maya Angelou had been a Creole cook, a streetcar conductor, a cocktail waitress, a dancer, a madam, and an unwed mother.
Angelou tells us about the time she was expelled from school for being afraid to speak–and her mother baked a delicious maple cake to brighten her spirits.
Maya Angelou is renowned in her wide and generous circle of friends as a marvelous chef.
Maya Angelou - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1750 words)
Maya Angelou (born Marguerite Johnson April 4, 1928) is an American poet, memoirist, actress and an important figure in the American Civil Rights Movement.
Maya Angelou was born Marguerite Ann Johnson in St.
Angelou greets him at the door, she begins a heart-wrenching monologue that continues as she watches him collapse on the couch into a drunken sleep (the crowd can even be heard laughing as she begins, not expecting the turn it takes).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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