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Encyclopedia > May Day

May Day occurs on May 1 and refers to any of several public holidays.[1] In many countries, May Day is synonymous with International Workers' Day, or Labour Day, which celebrates the social and economic achievements of the labour movement. As a day of celebration the holiday has ancient origins, and it can relate to many customs that have survived into modern times. Many of these customs are due to May Day being a cross-quarter day, meaning that (in the Northern Hemisphere where it is almost exclusively celebrated) it falls approximately halfway between the spring equinox and summer solstice. is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... International Workers Day (a name used interchangeably with May Day) is a celebration of the social and economic achievements of the international labour movement. ... Mayday is an emergency code word used internationally as a distress signal in voice procedure radio communications. ... Look up mayday in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries, with the exception of the United States where usage differs greatly. ... International Workers Day (a name used interchangeably with May Day) is a celebration of the social and economic achievements of the international labour movement. ... Labour Day is an annual holiday celebrated all over the world that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ... The labour movement or labor movement is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments, in particular through the implementation of specific laws governing labor relations. ... A cross-quarter day is a day falling halfway between one of the four main solar events (two solstices and two equinoxes) and the next one. ... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... Illumination of Earth by the sun on the northern hemisphere summer solstice The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the sun in relation to the celestial equator. ...

Contents

Origins

The earliest May Day celebrations appeared in pre-Christian Europe, Walpurgis Night of the Germanic countries. Many pre-Christian indigenous celebrations were eventually banned or Christianized during the process of Christianization in Europe. As a result, a more secular version of the holiday continued to be observed in the schools and churches of Europe well into the 20th century. In this form, May Day may be best known for its tradition of dancing the Maypole and crowning of the Queen of the May. Today various Neopagan groups celebrate reconstructed (to varying degrees) versions of these customs on 1 May. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Walpurgis Night in Sweden. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... Dancing around the maypole, in Ã…mmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), sometimes erected with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top, festooned with flowers, draped in greenery and strapped with large circular wreaths, depending on local and regional variances. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The day was a traditional summer holiday in many pre-Christian European pagan cultures. While February 1 was the first day of Spring, May 1 was the first day of summer; hence, the summer solstice on June 25 (now June 21) was Midsummer. In the Roman Catholic tradition, May is observed as Mary's month, and in these circles May Day is usually a celebration of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In this connection, in works of art, school skits, and so forth, Mary's head will often be adorned with flowers. Fading in popularity since the late 20th century is the giving of "May baskets," small baskets of sweets and/or flowers, usually left anonymously on neighbours' doorsteps.[2] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... Illumination of Earth by the sun on the northern hemisphere summer solstice The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the sun in relation to the celestial equator. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Midsummer may refer to the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the diverse celebrations of it around the world, but more often refers to European celebrations that accompany the summer solstice, or to Western festivals that take place in June and are usually related to Saint John... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept...


International Workers' Day

Approximately 700,000 people at a May Day concert in Rome
Approximately 700,000 people at a May Day concert in Rome [3]

May Day can refer to various labour celebrations conducted on May 1 that commemorate the fight for the eight hour day. May Day in this regard is called International Workers' Day, or Labour Day. The idea for a "workers holiday" began in Australia in 1856. With the idea having spread around the world, the choice of May 1st became a commemoration by the Second International for the people involved in the 1886 Haymarket affair.[4] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 577 pixelsFull resolution (2469 × 1782 pixel, file size: 754 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source self-made Date 1st May 2007 Author Alessio Damato Permission See below. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 577 pixelsFull resolution (2469 × 1782 pixel, file size: 754 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source self-made Date 1st May 2007 Author Alessio Damato Permission See below. ... International Workers Day (a name used interchangeably with May Day) is a celebration of the social and economic achievements of the international labour movement. ... labor may refer to: Work of any kind Wage labor, in which a worker sells their labor and the employer buys it Manual labor, physical work done by people Childbirth, especially from the start of uterine contractions to delivery Labor (economics), one of the three main factors of production Labor... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eight-hour day banner, Melbourne, 1856 The Eight-hour day movement, also known as the Short-time movement, had its origins in the Industrial Revolution in Britain, where industrial production in large factories transformed working life and imposed long hours and poor working conditions. ... International Workers Day (a name used interchangeably with May Day) is a celebration of the social and economic achievements of the international labour movement. ... Labour Day is an annual holiday celebrated all over the world that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ... The phrase Second International has two meanings: For the international association of socialist parties of the late 19th century, see Second International (politics) and a successor organization, the Socialist International For one of the Merriam-Webster dictionaries of American English, see Websters New International Dictionary, Second Edition This is... The Haymarket Riot on May 4, 1886 in Chicago is generally considered to have been an important influence on the origin of international May Day observances for workers. ...


The Haymarket affair occurred during the course of a three-day general strike in Chicago, Illinois that involved common laborers, artisans, merchants, and immigrants.[5] Following an incident in which police opened fire and killed four strikers at the McCormick Harvesting Machine Co. plant, a rally was called for the following day at Haymarket Square. The event remained peaceful, yet towards the end of the rally, as police moved in to disperse the event, an unknown assailant threw a bomb into the crowd of police. The bomb and resulting police riot left at least a dozen people dead, including seven policemen.[6] A sensational show trial ensued in which eight defendants were openly tried for their political beliefs, and not necessarily for any involvement in the bombing.[7] The trial lead to the eventual public hanging of four anarchists.[8] The Haymarket incident was a source of outrage from people around the globe. In the following years, memory of the "Haymarket martyrs" was remembered with various May Day job actions and demonstrations.[9] A general strike is a strike action by an entire labour force in a city, region or country. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Cyrus Hall McCormick, Sr. ... On May 1, 1886 (on May Day), labor unions organized a strike for an eight hour work day in Chicago, Illinois, United States. ... Police riot is a pejorative term that became increasingly more common through the late 20th century, implying the wrongful, disproportionate, unlawful and illegitimate use of force by a group of police against a group of civilians. ... The term show trial serves most commonly to label a type of public trial in which the judicial authorities have already determined the guilt of the accused: the actual trial has as its only goal to present the accusation and the verdict to the public as an impressive example and... // Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the governmental use of execution as punishment for a crime often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Anarchists can refer to several things, among which: The movie Anarchists Supporters of the principles of anarchism The Anarchists (Les Anarchistes), a famous song from Léo Ferré A List of anarchists This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


As such, May Day has become an international celebration of the social and economic achievements of the labour movement. Although May Day received its inspiration from the United States, the U.S. Congress designated May 1 as Loyalty Day in 1958 due to the day's appropriation by the Soviet Union.[10] Alternatively Labor Day traditionally occurs sometime in September in the United States. People often use May Day as a day for political protest, such as the million people who demonstrated against far-right candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen in France, or as a day for protest against government actions, such as pro-immigrant rallies across the United States.[11][12][13] The labour movement or labor movement is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments, in particular through the implementation of specific laws governing labor relations. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Loyalty Day is observed on May 1 in the United States. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... Jean-Marie Le Pen (born June 20, 1928, La Trinité-sur-Mer, France) is a French far-right nationalist politician, founder and president of the Front National (National Front) party. ...


Traditional May Day celebrations

May Day marks the end of the uncomfortable winter half of the year in the Northern hemisphere, and it has traditionally been an occasion for popular and often raucous celebrations, regardless of the locally prevalent political or religious establishment. For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ...


As Europe became Christianized the pagan holidays lost their religious character, They either morphed into popular secular celebrations, as with May Day, or were replaced by new Christian holidays as with Christmas, Easter, and All Saint's Day. In the start of the twenty-first century, many neopagans began reconstructing the old traditions and celebrating May Day as a pagan religious festival again. Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ... Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ...


United Kingdom

Roodmas was an explicitly Christian Mass celebrated in England at midnight on May 1, presumably to diminish the popularity of traditional Walpurgis Night celebrations. Roodmas (from Old English rod pr. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Walpurgis Night in Sweden. ...


England

Morris dancing on May Day in Oxford, England 2004.
Morris dancing on May Day in Oxford, England 2004.

Traditional English May Day rites and celebrations include Morris dancing, crowning a May Queen and celebrations involving a Maypole. Much of this tradition derive from the pagan Anglo-Saxon customs held during "Þrimilci-mōnaþ"[14] (the Old English name for the month of May meaning Month of Three Milkings). Cotswold Morris dance with handkerchiefs, Oxford, 2004-05-01. ... Cotswold Morris dance with handkerchiefs, Oxford, 2004-05-01. ... Cotswold morris with handkerchiefs A morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied with music. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A celebration is a joyous observation on the occasion of a special event: - Personal Level birth, etc. ... Cotswold morris with handkerchiefs A morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied with music. ... May Queen is a term which has two distinct but related meanings. ... Dancing around the maypole, in Ã…mmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), sometimes erected with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top, festooned with flowers, draped in greenery and strapped with large circular wreaths, depending on local and regional variances. ... Anglo-Saxon polytheism refers to the Migration Period Germanic paganism practiced by the Anglo-Saxons in 5th to 7th century England. ... see also Runic calendar The Germanic calendars were the regional agricultural almanacs in use amongst the Germanic peoples, prior to the adoption of the Julian and later the Gregorian calendar. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ...


May Day has been a traditional day of festivities throughout the centuries. With Christianity came agricultural feasts like Plough Sunday (the first Sunday in January), Rogationtide, Harvest Festival and May Day. It is most associated with towns and villages celebrating springtime fertility and revelry with village fetes and community gatherings. Since May 1st is the Feast of St Philip & St James, they became the patron Saints of workers. Seeding has been completed by this date and it was convenient to give farm labourers a day off. Perhaps the most significant of the traditions is the Maypole, around which traditional dancers circle with ribbons. Fertility is the natural capability of giving life. ... Dancing around the maypole, in Ã…mmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), sometimes erected with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top, festooned with flowers, draped in greenery and strapped with large circular wreaths, depending on local and regional variances. ...


The May Day Bank Holiday was traditionally the only one to affect the state school calendar, although new arrangements in some areas to even out the length of school terms mean that the Good Friday and Easter Monday Bank Holidays, which vary from year to year, may also fall during term time. For the Bank Holiday declared in the USA during the Great Depression, see Emergency Banking Act. ... State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures, especially Roman Catholic cultures. ... For the book by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ...


Also, 1 May 1707 was the day the Act of Union came into effect, joining England and Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain. is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ...


In Oxford, it is traditional for revellers to gather below Magdalen College tower to listen to the college's choir for what is called May Morning. It is then thought to be traditional for some students to jump off Magdalen Bridge into the River Cherwell. However this has actually only been fashionable since the 1970s. In recent years the bridge has been closed on 1 May to prevent people from jumping, as the water under the bridge is only 2 feet (61 cm) deep and jumping from the bridge has resulted in serious injury in the past yet there are still students who insist on climb the barriers and leaping into the water, causing injury. [15] This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... May Morning is an annual event in Oxford on May Day (1 May). ... Punting from the wrong end of the boat at Magdalen Bridge Magdalen Bridge spans the divided stream of the River Cherwell just to the east of the City of Oxford, and next to Magdalen College, whence it gets its name and pronunciation. ... The River Cherwell is a river which flows through the midlands of England. ...


Maydayrun

Maydayrun is an annual event held in England among countries that celebrate their bank holidays on the first Monday in May. It is also referred to as "MayDay Run" or "May Day Run". The event involves thousands of motorbikes taking a 55-mile (89 km) trip from the south of London (Locksbottom, Farnborough, Kent) to Hastings Seafront (Hastings, East Sussex). The event has been taking place for almost 30 years now and has grown in interest from around the country, both commercially and publicly. The event is not officially organised; the police only manage the traffic, while volunteers manage the parking.


Hastings fills up with tourists and bikes by about 11 AM, and the A21 from Kent to East Sussex is the road the bikers travel. However, this road should be avoided if traveling in a car.


A good example of more traditional May Day festivities is still witnessed in Whitstable, Kent where the Jack in the Green festival was revived in 1976 and continues to lead an annual procession of morris dancers through the town on the May Bank Holiday. A separate revival occurred in Hastings in 1983 and has become a major event in the town calendar. Padstow also holds its annual 'Obby 'Oss festival. A traditional Sweeps Festival is performed over the May bank holiday in Rochester, Kent where the Jack In the Green is woken at dawn on the 1st of May by Morris dancers. Cotswold morris with handkerchiefs A morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied with music. ... , For the Sydney suburb, see Padstow, New South Wales. ... The Old Oss capturing a passing maiden during the Mayday festival. ... , Rochester is a town in Kent, England, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... Jack-in-the-Green, also known as the Green Man, in faerie mythology, was the nature spirit of the greenwood, celebrated throughout Europe. ...


Cornwall

Padstow in Cornwall holds its annual 'Obby-Oss' day of festivities. This is believed to be one of the oldest fertility rites in the UK; revellers dance with the Oss through the streets of the town and even through the private gardens of the citizens, accompanied by accordion players and followers dressed in white with red or blue sashes who sing the traditional 'May Day' song. The whole town is decorated with springtime greenery, and every year thousands of onlookers attend. Prior to the 19th century distinctive May day celebrations were widespread throughout West Cornwall and have recently been revived in St. Ives and in 2008 will be revived in Penzance. , For the Sydney suburb, see Padstow, New South Wales. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... The Old Oss capturing a passing maiden during the Mayday festival. ... The West Cornwall May Day celebrations are an example folk practices found in the Western part of Cornwall,United Kingdom associated with the coming of spring. ... , St Ives (Cornish: ) is a seaside town, civil parish and port in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and...


Kingsand, Cawsand and Millbrook in Cornwall celebrate Black Prince Day on the May Day bank holiday. A model of the ship The Black Prince is covered in flowers and is taken in procession from the Quay at Millbrook to the beach at Cawsand where it is cast adrift. The houses in the villages are decorated with flowers and people traditionally wear red and white clothes. There are further celebrations in Cawsand Square with Morris dancing and May pole dancing. Kingsand-Cawsand village. ... Cawsand is a small village in Cornwall overlooking Plymouth Sound. ... Millbrook, Bedfordfshire is a village in Bedfordshire, United Kingdom Millbrook, Greater Manchester is an area of Stalybridge in Greater Manchester, United Kingdom Millbrook, New York is a village in the United States Millbrook is a district of Southampton, United Kingdom This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... Edward the Black Prince - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Effigy on the Black Princes tomb in Canterbury Cathedral Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince (June 15, 1330 – June 8, 1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England... A Morris dance is a form of folk dance. ... Dancing around the maypole, in Åmmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top. ...


Scotland

Students gather on Castle Sands, St Andrews for the may dip in 2007
Students gather on Castle Sands, St Andrews for the may dip in 2007

St Andrews has a similar student tradition — some of the students gather on the beach late on April 30 and run into the North Sea at sunrise on the 1st, occasionally naked. This is accompanied by torchlit processions and much elated celebration. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ...


Both Edinburgh and Glasgow organize Mayday festivals and rallies. In Edinburgh, the Beltane Fire Festival is held on the evening of May eve and into the early hours of May Day on the city's Calton Hill. For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Beltane Fire Festival is an annual event, held on April 30th on Calton Hill in Edinburgh to celebrate the coming of the Gaelic cross-quarter day of Beltane (May 1). ...


Mainland Europe

France

On May 1st, 1561, French King Charles IX of France received a lily of the valley as a lucky charm. He decided to offer a lily of the valley each year to the ladies of the court. At the beginning of the 20th century, it became custom on the 1st of May, to give a sprig of lily of the valley, a symbol of springtime. The government permits individuals and workers' organisations to sell them free of taxation. It is also traditional for the lady receiving the spray of lilly of valley to give a kiss in return. Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... Binomial name Convallaria majalis Lily of the valley is a flowering plant of the Convallaria genus. ... Binomial name Convallaria majalis Lily of the valley is a flowering plant of the Convallaria genus. ...


Germany

A stamp from East Germany celebrating its 100 year anniversary on the 1st of May from 1990.
A stamp from East Germany celebrating its 100 year anniversary on the 1st of May from 1990.

In rural regions of Germany, especially the Harz Mountains, Walpurgisnacht celebrations of Pagan origin are traditionally held on the night before May Day, including bonfires and the wrapping of maypoles, and young people use this opportunity to party, while the day itself is used by many families to get some fresh air. Motto: "Tanz in den Mai!" ("Dance into May!"). In the Rhineland, a region in the western part of Germany, May 1 is also celebrated by the delivery of a tree covered in streamers to the house of a girl the night before. The tree is typically from a love interest, though a tree wrapped only in white streamers is a sign of dislike. On leap years, it is the responsibility of the females to place the maypole, though the males are still allowed and encouraged to do so. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x1521, 185 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x1521, 185 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ... The Harz is a mountain range in northern Germany. ... Walpurgis Night (Valborgsmässoafton in Swedish, Vappu in Finnish, Volbriöö in Estonian, Valpurģu nakts or Valpurģi in Latvian, Walpurgisnacht in German) is a holiday celebrated on April 30, in Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Germany. ... For the AC/DC box set, see Bonfire (album). ... Dancing around the maypole, in Ã…mmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), sometimes erected with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top, festooned with flowers, draped in greenery and strapped with large circular wreaths, depending on local and regional variances. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing an extra day or month in order to keep the calendar year in sync with an astronomical or seasonal year. ...


Berlin

Berlin, with a population of 3.4 million people, is a collection of mostly socially and politically liberal groups. These groups use Mayday to protest and bring attention to social, political and environmental causes. These groups clash with the conservative groups on Mayday.


Pacific

In Hawaii, May Day is also known as Lei Day, and is normally set aside as a day to celebrate island culture in general and native Hawaiian culture in particular. While it was invented by a poet and a local newspaper columnist in the 1920s, it has since been adopted by state and local government as well as by the residents, and has taken on a sense of general spring celebration there. The first Lei Day was proposed in 1927 in Honolulu. Leonard "Red" and Ruth Hawk composed "May Day is Lei Day in Hawai'i," the traditional holiday song. Originally it was a contemporary fox trot, later rearranged as the Hawaiian hula song performed today. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Woman wearing a lei and making the shaka sign Lei is a Hawaiian word for a garland or wreath. ... This article is about a horses gait. ... This article is about the Hawaiian dance. ...


Americas

May Day festivities at National Park Seminary in Maryland, 1907.
May Day festivities at National Park Seminary in Maryland, 1907.

May Day was also celebrated by some early European settlers of the American continent. In some parts of the United States, May Baskets are made. These baskets are small and usually filled with flowers or treats and left at someone's doorstep. When you ring the bell, you are supposed to run away. The person receiving the basket would try to catch the person running away. If they caught the person, a kiss was to be exchanged. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (834x636, 167 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): May Day National Park Seminary ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (834x636, 167 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): May Day National Park Seminary ... May Day festivities at National Park Seminary in 1907. ... World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...


Modern May Day ceremonies in the U.S. vary greatly from region to region and many unite both the holiday's "Green Root" (pagan) and "Red Root" (labor) traditions[16]. Among the largest is the May Day Parade and Pageant created by In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre, an event that has happened every year since 1974 in Minneapolis and now attracts some 35,000 people. A beauty contest, or beauty pageant, is a competition between people, based largely, though not always entirely, on the beauty of their physical appearance. ... In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre (a. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ...


In 1984, Ronald Regan restated that, in the United States, May 1st would be know as "Law Day, ... a celebration of our 200-year-old partnership between law and liberty, ... one day after announcing that the United States would disregard the proceedings of the International Court of Justice that later condemned the U.S. government for its 'unlawful use of force' and violation of treaties in its attack against Nicaragua." [17]


See also

Holidays Portal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... May crowning is a traditional Roman Catholic ritual that occurs on or about 1 May every year. ... Walpurgis Night in Sweden. ... May Queen is a term which has two distinct but related meanings. ... Dancing around the maypole, in Ã…mmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), sometimes erected with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top, festooned with flowers, draped in greenery and strapped with large circular wreaths, depending on local and regional variances. ... This article is about the Gaelic holiday. ... In Neopaganism, the Wheel of the Year is the natural cycle of the seasons, commemorated by the eight Sabbats. ... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ Anthony Aveni, "May Day: A Collision of Forces," The Book of the Year: A Brief History of Our Seasonal Holidays (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), 79-89.
  2. ^ Charming May Day Baskets
  3. ^ Concert a Roma, Repubblica
  4. ^ What Are the Origins of May Day?, Rosa Luxemburg, Sprawa Robotnicza, 1894
  5. ^ Green, James (2007). "A Storm of Strikes", Death In the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Anchor, pg. 163. ISBN 1400033225. 
  6. ^ Green, James (2007). "Prologue", Death In the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Anchor, pg. 10. ISBN 1400033225. 
  7. ^ Green, James (2007). "Every Man on the Jury Was an American", Death In the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Anchor, pp. 209-230. ISBN 1400033225. 
  8. ^ Green, James (2007). "You Are Being Weighed in the Balance", Death In the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Anchor, pg. 231. ISBN 1400033225. 
  9. ^ Green, James (2007). "Prologue", Death In the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Anchor, pg. 305. ISBN 1400033225. 
  10. ^ Roots of May Day are in Chicago
  11. ^ Anti-Le Pen Protests Draw a Million Into Streets of France
  12. ^ Business joins May Day reform cry in L.A.
  13. ^ May Day is rally day in Seattle
  14. ^ Caput XV: De mensibus Anglorum from De mensibus Anglorum. Available online: [1]
  15. ^ May Day revellers party on bridge
  16. ^ Colleen J. Sheehy (Ed.), Theatre of Wonder: 25 Years in the Heart of the Beast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999), 79-89.
  17. ^ Noam Chomsky, "Necessary Illusions," (Boston: South End Press, 1989), 29.

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  Results from FactBites:
 
May Day - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3099 words)
May Day received the official endorsement of the Soviet Union early on, and and was a major holiday there.
The May Day Riots of 1894 and May Day Riots of 1919 occurred subsequently.
May Day is a cross-quarter day, associated with the Celtic festival of Beltane and the Germanic festival of Walpurgis Night.
May Day - definition of May Day in Encyclopedia (651 words)
May Day is a name for various holidays celebrated on May 1 (or in the beginning of May).
May Day rallies, such as this one in Mumbai, are common.
May Day is celebrated as Labour Day in most countries around the world, including the United Kingdom where the bank holiday isn't fixed at May 1st but instead the first Monday of May.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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