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Encyclopedia > May 2004


2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli-Palestinian... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 Czesław Miłosz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert Bootzin • 8 Fay... -1... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16...

< May 2004 >
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Deaths in May

28 Gerald Anthony
27 Umberto Agnelli
22 Richard Biggs
20 Len Murray
17 Tony Randall
17 Ezzedine Salim
9 Alan King
9 Akhmad Kadyrov
8(?) Nick Berg
7 Waldemar Milewicz
Other recent deaths 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli-Palestinian... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... Gerald Anthony (July 31, 1951 - May 28, 2004) was an American actor. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... Umberto Agnelli, (November 1, 1934 - 28 May 2004) was the chairman of Italian carmaker Fiat from early 2003 until his death. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... Categories: 1960 births | 2004 deaths | American actors | Actor stubs ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... Lionel Murray, Baron Murray of Epping Forest, PC, known as Len Murray (August 2, 1922 - May 20, 2004) was a British Labour politician and union leader. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Tony Randall (February 26, 1920 - May 17, 2004) was an American actor. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Ezzedine Salim, Arabic عزالدين سليم, also known as Abdelzahra Othman Mohammed (1943 - 17 May 2004), was an Iraqi politician. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Alan King (December 26, 1927 - May 9, 2004), born Irwin Alan Kniberg, was an American comedian known for his biting wit and often angry humorous rants. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Akhmat Abdulkhamidovich Kadyrov ( Russian: Ахмат Абдулхамидович Кадыров, August 23, 1951 - May 9, 2004) was the president of the Chechen Republic (elected on October 5, 2003). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... Berg in October 2003 Nicholas Evan Berg (April 2, 1978 – May 2004) was an American businessman seeking telecommunications work in Iraq during the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... Waldemar Milewicz (August 20, 1956 - May 7, 2004) was a Polish journalist and war correspondent. ... The following is a list of figures who died in 2005. ...

Ongoing events

Reconstruction of Iraq
Occupation & Resistance
Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Liberal Party of Canada scandal
War on Terrorism
USA 9-11 Commission
Same-Sex Marriage in the USA
Darfur genocide in the Sudan
Ongoing wars
Afghanistan timeline May 2004
This article is in need of attention. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The sponsorship scandal is an ongoing scandal that has affected the government of Canada, and particularly the ruling Liberal Party of Canada for a number of years, but rose to especially great prominence in 2004. ... The War on terrorism or War on terror (abbreviated in policy circles as GWOT for global war on terror) is a global effort by the governments of several countries (primarily the United States and its principal allies) to destroy international groups it deems as terrorist (primarily radical Islamist terrorist groups... Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response to the... The push by some civil rights supporters to create legal recognition of same-sex marriage in the United States has been taking shape since the early 1970s. ... The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... This is a list of wars. ... Timeline of Afghan history May 29, 2004 Four U.S. soldiers were killed when their Humvee hit a landmine in the Sorie district of Zabul province, Afghanistan. ...

Election results in May

02 Panama (general)
07 Iran (Majlis, 2nd round)
10 Philippines (general)
13 India (general)
16 Dominican Rep. (president)
20 Malawi (general)
23 Germany (president)
May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... The Republic of Panama held a general election on Sunday, 2 May 2004, electing both a new President of the Republic and a new Legislative Assembly. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... Politics of Iran Categories: Stub | 2004 elections | Elections in Iran ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... Presidential elections, legislative elections and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 10, 2004. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... (Redirected from 2004 elections to the Lok Sabha) Legislative elections were held in India, the worlds largest democracy, in four phases between April 20 and May 10, 2004. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... The Dominican Republic held a presidential election on Sunday, 16 May 2004. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... Presidential elections and legislative elections were held in Malawi on May 20, 2004. ... May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... The President of Germany (Bundespräsident) is the titular head of state of the Federal Republic of Germany. ...

Related pages

About this page
Year in...
Wikipedia Announcements The following is a list of articles devoted to events from 2004 in narrow subject areas: Culture 2004 in architecture 2004 in film 2004 in games 2004 in literature 2004 in music 2004 in television 2004 in video gaming 2004 in Art People Deaths in 2004 State leaders in 2004...

May 31, 2004

May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining, as the last day of May. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Relatives and others traditionally place flags near veterans headstones on Memorial Day Memorial Day is a United States public holiday that takes place on the last Monday of May. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... The Peoples Action Party (PAP) is a political party in Singapore. ... Lee Hsien Loong (Hanzi: 李显龙/李顯龍; pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎnlóng; born February 10, 1952) is the third Prime Minister of Singapore. ... Lee Kuan Yew (born September 16, 1923) (Chinese: 李光耀, Pinyin: Lǐ Guāng Yào), also known as Harry Lee Kuan Yew, was the first Prime Minister of the Republic of Singapore from 1959 to 1990. ... The Prime Minister of Singapore is the elected head of government of the Republic of Singapore (and prior of August 9, 1965, the State of Singapore), being the leader of the largest party in the unicameral Parliament. ... Shia Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 10-15% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The Karachi Port Trust Building Karachi (کراچي) is the largest city of Pakistan and the capital of the province of Sindh. ... US,Us or us may stand for the United States of America us, the oblique case form of the English language pronoun we. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Benjamin Netanyahu Benjamin Netanyahu (Hebrew בִּנְיָמִין נְתַנְיָהוּ Binyamin Netanyahu, nicknamed Bibi) (born October 21, 1949, Tel Aviv) was the 9th Prime Minister of Israel. ...

May 30, 2004

  • Thousands of people in Hong Kong take to the streets to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, and to protest Beijing's recent moves to limit their autonomy. (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=63E57B00-8EFA-4040-977A3D3D18CAAF50&title=Hong%20Kong%20Marks%20Tiananmen%20Anniversary&catOID=45C9C78B-88AD-11D4-A57200A0CC5EE46C&categoryname=Asia%20Pacific) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3761867.stm)
  • Pakistan test-fires a ballistic missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, but claims it will not increase tensions with India. (PakistanLink) (http://www.pakistanlink.com/headlines/May04/30/03.html)
  • Saudi commandos storm the Khobar housing compound where Islamic militants were holding several dozen hostages, ending with 22 dead. (BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3762423.stm))
  • Thousands of Pakistani Sunni Muslims riot in Karachi, ransacking property, setting fire to four banks, and stoning vehicles after Mufti Nizamuddin Shamzai, an influential pro-Taliban cleric, is killed in a drive-by shooting. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/international/AP-Pakistan-Cleric-Killed.html) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3761409.stm)
  • Buddy Rice wins the 2004 Indianapolis 500 driving for Rahal Letterman Racing. (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=37601F40-66FA-4895-A919F0BFCFC07A8F) (Sports Illustrated) (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/racing/05/30/bc.car.irl.indy500.fini.ap/)

May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Unknown Rebel — This famous photo, taken by Associated Press photographer Jeff Widener, depicts a lone protester whose actions halted the progress of a column of advancing tanks for over half an hour. ... ... One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yī guó liǎng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai) is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then paramount leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ... Polish missile wz. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... A warhead is an explosive device used in military conflicts, used to destroy enemy vehicles or buildings. ... al-Khobar is a small city located in the Eastern Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ... Islamist terrorism, sometimes called Islamic terrorism, is terrorism that is carried out to further the political and religious ambitions of a segment of the Muslim community. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The Karachi Port Trust Building Karachi (کراچي) is the largest city of Pakistan and the capital of the province of Sindh. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... A drive-by shooting (sometimes referred to merely as a drive-by) is an attack on a person carried out with a firearm discharge from a moving vehicle (or a momentarily stopped vehicle). ... Buddy Rice (born January 31, 1976 in Phoenix, Arizona) is an auto racing driver best known for winning the 2004 Indianapolis 500 as part of Rahal Letterman Racing. ... -1... The Indianapolis 500 is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Bobby Rahal (born January 10, 1953 in Medina, Ohio) is an auto racing team owner and former driver. ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947) is an American talk show host, comedian, and television producer. ...

May 29, 2004

  • The World War II Memorial is dedicated in Washington, DC, with around 200,000 people attending the ceremony. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5294161) (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/05/29/war.memorial/index.html)
  • Islamist militants attack two oil industry installations and a foreign workers' housing complex in Khobar, Saudi Arabia, killing at least 11 people and taking some 50 hostages. Saudi police attempt to storm the housing complex but withdraw after taking casualties. A previously unknown militant group styling itself "The Jerusalem Squadron" claims responsibility and says they are attacking "zionists and crusaders" who are there to "steal our oil and resources". (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/05/29/saudi.shooting/index.html) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3760287.stm)
  • U.S. District Judge Nancy Gertner (in Massachusetts) rules that stating that someone is homosexual does not constitute libel or slander. (AP) (http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/apus_story.asp?category=1110&slug=Gay%20Defamation)
  • India flies its first multi-purpose civilian aircraft Saras in Bangalore. (Times of India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow/708600.cms))
  • An earthquake measuring 4.4 on the Richter scale occurs in the border area between Haiti and the Dominican Republic. (BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3761171.stm))

May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Panorama of the Memorial, seen from the east. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... al-Khobar is a small city located in the Eastern Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... Saras is the first Indian multi-purpose civilian aircraft in the Light Transport Aircraft category designed by the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) with cooperation from Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL). ... Bangalore (ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು in Kannada) is the capital and largest city of the state of Karnataka in India. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...

May 28, 2004

May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... Immunity confers a status on a person or body that makes that person or body free from otherwise legal obligations such as, for example, liability for damages or punishment for criminal acts. ... A human rights abuse is abuse of people in a way that violates any fundamental human rights. ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution... Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... Caspian Sea viewed from orbit The Caspian Sea or Mazandaran Sea is a landlocked sea between Asia and Europe (European Russia). ...

May 27, 2004

  • NASA announces the first Spitzer Space Telescope find: a planet that appears to be less than a million years old. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/28/science/28planet.html)

May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (established 1958) is the government agency responsible for the United States of Americas space program and long-term general aerospace research. ... The Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)) is an infrared space observatory, the fourth and final of NASAs Great Observatories. ...

May 26, 2004

  • A signed peace accord marks an end to the 21-year civil war in Sudan. The Darfur conflict continues. (AP) (http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/world/8773195.htm?1c)
  • Archaeologists discover what they term the 'world's oldest university' in Alexandria, Egypt. It dates from the 5th century AD. (Toronto Star) (http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1085609411132&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968705899037)
  • FBI Director Robert Mueller and United States Attorney General John Ashcroft state that Al Qaeda may be planning a terrorist strike over the coming months. Multiple FBI officials contend that there is no recent intelligence to suggest a significant change in the USA's security situation, and critics question the validity and timing of the public warning.(NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/27/politics/27terror.html?th) Seven people wanted for questioning are also named.
  • Journalist Peter Hounam, who had revealed Israel's secret nuclear program, is arrested in Jerusalem and denied access to a lawyer. He is released and expelled from the country the following day. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3752043.stm) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3759119.stm)
  • A man armed with a knife enters the mansion of Puerto Rican governor Sila María Calderón and takes a secretary hostage. Calderón negotiates with him for the hostage's release, and he is arrested soon after. (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/americas/05/27/puertorico.hostage.ap/index.html)
  • Football: FC Porto defeat AS Monaco FC 3-0 in the final of the UEFA Champions League (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/champions_league/3718645.stm)

May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The history of Sudan is marked by its location between the largely Middle Eastern influences of Egypt and its close connections with the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Importance and applicability Most of human history is not described by any written records. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport Located on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Alexandria (in Arabic, الإسكندرية — al-Iskandariyah) is the chief seaport in Egypt, and that countrys second largest city, and the capital of the Al Iskandariyah governate. ... (4th century - 5th century - 6th century - other centuries) Events Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. ... Official FBI Seal The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Robert Swan Mueller III (born August 7, 1944) is the current Director of the FBI. Mueller was born in New York City and grew up outside of Philadelphia. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة - al-Qāidah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network and alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... Peter Hounam (born 1944) is a British journalist who interviewed Mordechai Vanunu for the Sunday Times in 1986, revealing Israels secret nuclear program. ... Israel is very widely believed to possess a substantial arsenal of nuclear weapons and intermediate-range ballistic missiles to deliver them. ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Sila María Calderón Serra (born September 23, 1942) was the seventh Democratically elected Governor of Puerto Rico from 2001 to 2005. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... FC Porto emblem (Larger version) Futebol Clube do Porto (short: FC Porto, FCP) is a Portuguese sports club, best known for its football section. ... The Association Sportive de Monaco Football Club is a Monegasque football club, founded in 1924. ... UEFA logo The Union of European Football Associations, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced you-AY-fuh), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ...

May 25, 2004

  • As many as 1,000 people are killed in floods in the Dominican Republic and Haiti. (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/WEATHER/05/25/caribbean.storms/index.html) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3756621.stm)
  • France bans the use of Bayer CropScience Gaucho (insecticide) on maize seeds. Gaucho is claimed to be harmful to bees. (Rtrs)  (http://www.agriculture.com/worldwide/IDS/2004-05-25T172003Z_01_L25197546_RTRIDST_0_FOOD-FRANCE-GAUCHO-UPDATE-1.html)
  • Viacom's MTV Networks unit announces plans for the LOGO channel, the first LGBT-themed major cable television service in the United States, set for a February 17, 2005 debut. (Bloomberg) (http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000087&sid=aff59Spo3R3A&refer=top_world_news) (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=domesticNews&storyID=5253784) (CNN) (http://money.cnn.com/2004/05/25/news/fortune500/mtv_gay_network/)
  • The Abel Prize is awarded in a ceremony in Oslo for the Atiyah-Singer index theorem. (AP)  (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=624&ncid=753&e=10&u=/ap/20040525/ap_on_sc/norway_abel_prize)
  • Tennis: At the French Open, a new world record for the longest match in the sport's recorded history is set when Frenchman Fabrice Santoro beats Arnaud Clement 6-4, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 3-6, 16-14 after playing for 6 hours and 33 minutes, split over two days. (ESPN) (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/french04/news/story?id=1809151)

May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... For the South American cattle herder see gaucho. ... Species Zea diploperennis Zea luxurians Zea nicaraguensis Zea perennis References ITIS 42268 2002-09-22 Sorting Zea names This article is about the staple food. ... Families Andrenidae Anthophoridae Apidae Colletidae Ctenoplectridae Halictidae Heterogynaidae Megachilidae Melittidae Oxaeidae Sphecidae Stenotritidae bee or bees, see bee (disambiguation). ... Viacom (short for Video & Audio Communications) [pronunciation: pre-Redstone/pre-1987: vee-a-com; post-Redstone acquisition: vi-a-com] (NYSE: VIA), (NYSE: VIAB) is an international media conglomerate. ... MTV Networks is the corporate division of media conglomerate Viacom that oversees the operation of the following cable television networks: Black Entertainment Television (BET) Country Music Television (CMT) Comedy Central LOGO MTV MTV2 mtvU Nickelodeon / Nick at Nite Nickelodeon GAS NickToons TV Noggin / The N Spike TV TV Land TMF... Categories: Stub | MTV Networks | LGBT media | Television networks ... LGBT (or GLBT) is an acronym used as a collective term to refer to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Cable television or Community Antenna Television (CATV) (and often shortened to cable) is a system of providing television, FM radio programming and other services to consumers via radio waves transmitted directly to people’s televisions through fixed coaxial cables as opposed to the over-the-air method used in traditional... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ... County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... In the mathematics of manifolds and differential operators, the Atiyah-Singer index theorem is an important unifying result that connects topology and analysis. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Fabrice Santoro (September 9, 1972) is a French professional male tennis player. ... Arnaud Clément is a professional tennis player from France. ...

May 24, 2004

  • A fire consumes the Momart building in London, destroying works owned by several museums and collectors. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/arts/3748179.stm)
  • Saudi Arabian Oil Minister Ali Naimi declares that USD $30-$34 per barrel is a 'fair and reasonable price', denies any differences within the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), and vouchsafes to increase crude oil supply by 2 million barrels per day (4 m³/s) if the market demands it. Previous reports of a deal between US President George W. Bush and Saudi Arabia are not discussed. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-OPEC-Oil.html) (Syd. Herald) (http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/04/27/1082831569615.html?from=storyrhs)
  • Copyright infringement: The Recording Industry Association of America sues 493 more individuals under US copyright law and intends to discover their identities. Nearly 3000 people have now been sued by the RIAA since September 2003. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=musicNews&storyID=5239798)
  • Pakistan: Police arrest six more members of militant Islamic group Harkat-ul Mujahideen al-Alami after a gun-battle in southern Karachi. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=5235605&section=news)
  • South Korean politics: South Korean Prime Minister Goh Kun resigns as announced last month. His successor has not yet been named by President Roh Moo-hyun. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=5234339&section=news)
  • Philippine general election, 2004: Incumbent Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo wins another term according to a senior election official who leaks the narrow winning margin of about 3% or 900,000 votes. An independent watchdog group confirms the figures. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=5236654&section=news)
  • The popular singer Madonna cancels three concerts in Israel after receiving letters in which her two young children's lives were threatened. The letters contained intimate details regarding the children's routines and security staff. (The Sun) (http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2004240450,00.html)
  • Football management changes:
  • Tennis: In one of the biggest upsets in Grand Slam history, sixth-seeded American Andre Agassi is eliminated from the first round of the French Open by world 271st-ranked French qualifier Jerome Haehnel. (VOA News) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectid=2726B0DB-A264-456B-A8855F862519576D&title=Agassi%20Loses%20in%20First%20Round%20of%20French%20Open&catOID=45C9C788-88AD-11D4-A57200A0CC5EE46C&categoryname=Sports)

May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Momart is a British company specialising in the storage, transportation, and installation of works of art. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Saudi Arabian Airlines (also known as Saudia) is Saudi Arabias domestic and international airline, and one of the largest airlines of the Middle East. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is made up of Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela; since 1965, its international headquarters have been in Vienna, Austria. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is a trade group representing the U.S. recording industry. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... United States copyright law is rooted in Article One of the United States Constitution, which states: The Congress shall have the power. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Karachi Port Trust Building Karachi (کراچي) is the largest city of Pakistan and the capital of the province of Sindh. ... Government South Korea is a republic with powers shared between the President of South Korea and the legislature called the National Assembly. ... The Prime Minister of South Korea (국무총리 ; Gukmuchongri) is appointed by the President of South Korea with the National Assemblys approval. ... Goh Kun (born January 2, 1938) is a South Korean politician. ... The President is head of state of South Korea. ... Roh Moo-hyun (born September 1 (August 6 in lunar calendar), 1946) has been the President of South Korea since February 25, 2003. ... Presidential elections, legislative elections and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 10, 2004. ... The President is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Madonna Ciccone Ritchie Madonna Ciccone Ritchie (born Madonna Louise Ciccone in Bay City, Michigan, August 16, 1958), simply known by the stage name Madonna, is an American singer frequently referred to as the Queen of Pop music. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... Liverpool Football Club are the most successful English football team. ... Gérard Houllier (born September 3, 1947 at Therouanne, northern France) is a football coach and manager. ... Real Madrid Club de Fútbol is a Spanish football club, ranked as the worlds most successful club for the 20th century by the governing body of international football (FIFA), just ahead of Manchester United. ... Carlos Queiróz is a Portuguese football coach. ... José Antonio Camacho José Antonio Camacho (born June 8, 1955 in the village of Cieza, Murcia) is a former Spanish football (soccer) player and manager. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... Andre Kirk Agassi (born April 29, 1970, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA) is an American professional tennis player (1986-). As of 2004, he has won over $25 million in prize money and achieved a World No. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ...

May 23, 2004

May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Janjaweed The Janjaweed (variously spelled Janjawid, Jingaweit, Jinjaweed, Janjawiid, Janjiwid, etc. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Kufa (الكوفة al-Kufa in Arabic) is a city in Iraq, about 170 km south of Baghdad, and 10 km northeast of Najaf. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... The Mashad al-Husain, Karbala Karbalā (كربلاء; also transliterated as Kerbala or Kerbela) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... The Mashad al-Husain, Karbala Karbalā (كربلاء; also transliterated as Kerbala or Kerbela) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... Najaf (نجف in the Arabic language) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Kufa (الكوفة al-Kufa in Arabic) is a city in Iraq, about 170 km south of Baghdad, and 10 km northeast of Najaf. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... Jiutepec is a municipality in the Mexican state of Morelos. ... Other Mexican States Capital Cuernavaca Other major cities Cuautla list of municipalities Area 4,950 km² Ranked 30th Population (2000 census) 1,552,880 Ranked 22nd Governor (2000-06) Sergio Estrada Cajigal Ramírez (PAN) Federal Deputies (4) PAN = 2 PRI = 2 Federal Senators PAN = 2 PRI = 1 ISO 3166... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LL.B, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... The Governor General and Commander-in-Chief in and over Canada, normally simply known as the Governor General of Canada in French, Gouverneur(e) général(e) is the Canadian representative of the monarch (presently Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II). ... Adrienne Clarkson Her Excellency The Right Honourable Adrienne Louise Clarkson, CC, CMM, COM, CD (born February 10, 1939), is the current Governor General of Canada. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... (Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... A bottle and a syringe containing the influenza vaccine. ... Jammu and Kashmir (Hindi जम्मू और कश्मीर, Jammū ôr Kašmīr; Urdu جموں و کشمیر, Jammūn va Kašmīr; Kashmiri جۄم تٕ کٔشېر, जॅम तु कशीर, Jọm tụ Kạšīr) is a historic state in Asia which is currently split into regions administered by India, Pakistan, and to a lesser extent, China. ... The Bus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... U.S. Army soldier removes fuse from a Russian-made mine to clear a mine field outside of Fallujah, Iraq. ... The Hizbul Mujahideen (created 1989) is a militant group active in Kashmir. ... This article is about explosive devices. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... Bogota is also a town in New Jersey, see Bogota, New Jersey. ... The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) was established in 1964 as the paramilitary wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias oldest, largest, most capable, and best-equipped insurgent force. ... A paramilitary is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Nablus also (rarely) spelled Nabulus ( Arabic نابلس; Hebrew שכם, Shechem) is a major city (pop. ... Italian barque Amerigo Vespucci in New York harbor, 1976. ... The Hyundai Group, founded by Chung Ju-yung in 1947 as a construction company, was once South Koreas biggest conglomerate (chaebol). ... A small variety of cars, the most popular kind of automobile. ... A tanker is usually a vehicle carrying large amounts of liquid fuel. ... Volunteers cleaning up the aftermath of the Prestige oil spill An oil spill is the release of oil (generally, petroleum) into the natural environment, usually the ocean. ... Insurance is a system to alleviate financial losses by transferring risk of loss from one entity to another. ... Horst Köhler (  listen, born 22 February 1943) is the President of Germany. ... The President of Germany (Bundespräsident) is the titular head of state of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... The Federal President (German: Bundespräsident, formerly Reichspräsident) is Germanys head of state. ... The Reichstag building (April 2004) The Reichstag building in Berlin was constructed as the place where the Reichstag, the parliament of the German Empire, would convene. ... An airport terminal is a building at an airport where passengers transfer from ground transportation to the facilities that allow them to board airplanes. ... A roof is the top covering of a building that prevents the ingress of weather into the building interior. ... Charles de Gaulle International Airport (French: Aéroport de Roissy-Charles de Gaulle), also known as Roissy Airport (or just Roissy in French), serving Paris, is one of Europes principal aviation centers, as well as Frances main international airport. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Pride of Burgundy, a P&O Ferries car ferry on the Dover-Calais route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and sometimes their vehicles, on short-distance, regularly-scheduled services. ... Categories: Stub ... Colonel Muammar al-Qaddafi Muammar Abu Minyar al-Qaddafi 1 (Arabic: معمر القذافي Mu`ammar al-Qadhdhāfī) (born 1942), leader of Libya since 1970 and a controversial Arab statesman. ... Flag of the League of Arab States The Arab League or League of Arab States (Arabic: جامعة الدول العربية), is an organization of Arab states. ... Yosef Tommy Lapid ( יוסף טומי לפיד ) is an Israeli politician and a minister. ... The definition of who an Arab is has three main aspects: Political: whether they live in a country which is a member of the Arab League (or, more vaguely, the Arab world); this definition covers more than 300 million people. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II, starting in 1941 and continuing through 1945. ... Jarno Trulli driving for the Renault F1 team in 2004 Jarno Trulli (born 13 July 1974 in Pescara, Italy) is an Italian Formula One auto racing driver currently in the employ of the Toyota team. ... The principality of Monaco holds one of the oldest races on the Formula One automobile racing circuit. ... Renault S.A. is a French vehicle manufacturer producing small to upper-midsize cars, vans, buses and trucks. ...

May 22, 2004

May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Moore with his Oscar award after Bowling for Columbine won the 2003 Academy Award for Documentary Feature. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is a high-grossing, award-winning documentary film by American filmmaker Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004. ... The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... The palace in which the festival takes place. ... His Royal Highness Felipe, Prince of Asturias (Felipe Juan Pablo Alfonso de Todos los Santos de Borbón y de Grecia), styled HRH The Prince of Asturias (born January 30, 1968), is the third child of King Juan Carlos of Spain and Queen Sofía. ... HRH The Princess of Asturias Her Royal Highness The Princess of Asturias, (Letizia Ortiz Rocasolano), born September 15, 1972), is the wife of Felipe, Prince of Asturias, the heir apparent to the Spanish throne. ... Coat of arms Plaza de España (Spain square) Madrid, the capital of Spain, is located in the center of the country at 40°25′ N 3°45′ W. Population of the city of Madrid proper was 3,093,000 (Madrilenes, madrileños) as of 2003 estimates. ... Flag of the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations is an association of independent sovereign states, most of which are former colonies once governed by the United Kingdom as part of the British Empire. ... Manmohan Singh (ਮਨਮੋਹਨ ਸਿੰਘ in Gurmukhi script मनमोहन सिंह in Devnagari Punjabi) (born September 26, 1932, Gah, West Punjab (now in Pakistan)) is the fourteenth prime minister of India. ... The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the government of India. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Premier League The FA Premier League (which, for sponsorship reasons, is often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in the UK and the Barclays English Premier League internationally) comprises the top 20 football clubs in the league system of English football. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... Manchester United is an English football club based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... Millwall Football Club is a football team based at the 20,146 capacity New Den Stadium in south-east London, England. ... From the 1992-1993 to the 2003-2004 season, the Football League First Division was the highest division of The Football League and the second-highest division in the overall English football league system. ... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ...

May 21, 2004

May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... List of Presidents of Russia Boris Yeltsin1 ( July 10, 1991 – December 31, 1999) two terms. ... Term of office: December 31, 1999 – Preceded by: Boris Yeltsin Succeeded by: Date of birth: October 7, 1952 Place of birth: Leningrad, U.S.S.R. First Lady: Liudmila Putina Political party: None Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин  pronunciation; born October 7, 1952) is a Russian politician and... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... The Supreme Court Building in Ottawa The Supreme Court of Canada is Canadas highest court and is located in the capital city of Ottawa. ... Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Monsanto Company (NYSE: MON) is a multinational agricultural biotechnology corporation. ... Percy Schmeiser (born January 5, 1931) is a farmer from Bruno, Saskatchewan, Canada. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a government to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of an invention. ... Roundup is the brand name of a family of herbicides produced by the American chemical manufacturer Monsanto. ... This stylistic schematic diagram shows a gene in relation to the double helix structure of DNA and to a chromosome (right). ... Alberta Canola field near Red Deer, Alberta In agriculture, Canola is a cultivar of the rapeseed plant from which rapeseed oil is obtained. ... A SeeD is a term given to mercenaries trained and employed by Balamb Garden in the Final Fantasy VIII video game. ... Divisions Green algae Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) Seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongues Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering plants... Lifeform is the physical entity which encompasses a life. ... ... This article is about Mark Thompson, the director of the BBC. For the Australian Rules footballer, see Mark Thompson (footballer). ... Channel 4 is a television broadcaster in the United Kingdom (see British television). ... The Director-General is chief executive and editor-in-chief of the BBC. The position is appointed by Board of Governors of the BBC. Sir John Reith (1927-1938) Sir Frederick Ogilvie (1938-1942) Sir Cecil Graves and Robert W. Foot (joint Director-Generals, 1942-1943) Robert W. Foot (1942... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was formed in 1927 by means of a royal charter. ... A volcano is a geological landform (usually a mountain) where magma (rock of the earths interior made molten or liquid by high pressure and temperature) erupts through the surface of the planet. ...

May 20, 2004

May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The President of the Republic of China (中華民國總統) is the head of state of the Republic of China, the government which administered part or all of Mainland China from 1917 to 1949 and has administered Taiwan and several outlying islands from 1945 until the present. ... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... Ahmed Chalabi Ahmed Abdel Hadi Chalabi1 (Arabic: احمد الجلبي) (born October 30, 1944) is the interim minister for oil and a deputy prime minister in Iraq, as of April 28, 2005 [1]. He is also part of a three-man executive council for the umbrella Iraqi opposition group, the Iraqi... The Iraqi National Congress (INC) is an umbrella Iraqi opposition group led by Ahmed Chalabi. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ...

May 19, 2004

  • Citing "insufficient evidence", US Federal Judge Adalberto Jordan acquits environmental group Greenpeace on charges under the "sailormongering" statute. A record total of more than 100,000 people worldwide sent protest messages to George W. Bush and US Attorney General John Ashcroft demanding that the case be dropped. (Greenpeace) (http://www.greenpeaceusa.org/index.fpl/10386/article/1131.html) (OneWorld.net) (http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/0520-12.htm) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3731003.stm)
  • US Army kills 40 and wounds 117 others during an attack in Iraq near the border with Syria. Brigadier General Mark Kimmitt, deputy director of operations for the US military in Iraq, tells Reuters the attack was within the military's rules of engagement, denying reports that the victims were members of a wedding party. He says a large amount of money, Syrian passports and satellite communications equipment was found at the site after the attack. (Guardian) (http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/0521-01.htm) (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5197140) (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/20/international/middleeast/20IRAQ.html?hp)
  • At least ten Palestinians are killed in Rafah, Gaza Strip, by an explosion following warning shots fired by the IDF. The road used by the Palestinians was strewn with explosives. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3728681.stm) (CNN) (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/05/19/mideast/index.html) (FOX) (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,120331,00.html)
  • Iraqi abuse scandal at Abu Ghraib prison:
    • The Denver Post has uncovered Pentagon documents that show more than twice as many allegations of detainee abuse (75) are being investigated by the military than previously known. Twenty-seven of the abuse cases involve deaths; at least eight are believed to be homicides. (Denver Post) (http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36%7E11676%7E2157003,00.html)
    • The first U.S. soldier is sentenced after pleading guilty: Spc. Jeremy Sivits receives one year in prison, demotion and a dishonorable discharge. (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/05/19/court.martial.sivits/index.html)
    • At least one British soldier is arrested for creating the faked British abuse photos. (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/05/19/iraq.abuse.uk/index.html)
  • The British House of Commons is temporarily suspended after purple flour thrown by a Fathers 4 Justice protester hits Tony Blair during Prime Minister's Questions. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3728617.stm)
  • The Nationalist Party of China (KMT) and the People First Party announce plans to merge after a unanimous vote by the KMT Central Standing Committee. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3727439.stm)
  • A third outspoken Hong Kong radio talk show host, Allen Lee, quits his program, questioning the status of media freedom in the special administrative region; he also resigns from his seat in the Chinese National People's Congress. (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=06C1C7DD-EA55-470B-85C8D5096899B578&title=Another%20Hong%20Kong%20Radio%20Host%20Leaves%20Airwaves&catOID=45C9C78B-88AD-11D4-A57200A0CC5EE46C&categoryname=Asia%20Pacific) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/3727539.stm)
  • Rudy Giuliani testifies before the 9/11 panel. He defends the work of his commissioners before the September 11th Commission. (AP) (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/S/SEPT_11_COMMISSION?SITE=NYNYP&SECTION=HOME)
  • Manmohan Singh is asked by India's Congress party to become Prime Minister and form new government. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5194611)
  • In football, Valencia wins the UEFA Cup, defeating Olympique Marseille 2-0. (UEFA.com) (http://www.uefa.com/competitions/UEFACup/fixturesresults/round=1724/match=75432/Report=RP.html)

May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Greenpeace protest. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Brigadier General Mark T. Kimmitt, US Army, is the spokesman for the US military in Iraq. ... Reuters is a company supplying global financial markets and news media with a range of information products and transactional solutions, including real-time and historical market data, research and analytics, financial trading platforms, investment data and analytics plus news in text, video, graphics and photographs. ... The title page of European Union passports bears the name of the issuing country, then the name European Union, in the languages of all EU countries. ... U.S. military MILSTAR communications satellite A communications satellite (sometimes abbreviated to comsat) is an artificial satellite stationed in space for the purposes of telecommunications using radio at microwave frequencies. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... The Denver Post is a daily newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ... The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... Sivits Jeremy C. Sivits, (born 1979 or 1980), is a former U.S. Army reservist, one of several soldiers charged and convicted by the U.S. Army in connection with the 2003-2004 Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal in Baghdad, Iraq during and after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... Tony Blair being hit by one of the missiles The Fathers 4 Justice House of Commons protest, also dubbed The Fun Powder Plot, is an incident that took place on May 19, 2004. ... Fathers 4 Justice (sometimes abbreviated to F4J) is a campaigning group in the United Kingdom which works for fathers rights. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Tony Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Prime Ministers Questions is a Parliamentary practice in the United Kingdom where every Wednesday when the House of Commons is sitting, the Prime Minister spends half an hour answering questions from MPs. ... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... The Honourable Allen Lee Peng-fei CBE Hong Kong politician. ... A Special Administrative Region (SAR) (Simplified Chinese: 特别行政区; Traditional Chinese: 特別行政區; pinyin: tèbié xíngzhèngqū; Cantonese IPA: /tɐk6piːt6 hɐŋ4tsɪŋ3kʰɵy1/; Jyutping: dak6bit6 hang4zing3keoi1; Yale: dahkbiht hàhngjingkeūi) is a political subdivision of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response to the... Manmohan Singh (ਮਨਮੋਹਨ ਸਿੰਘ in Gurmukhi script मनमोहन सिंह in Devnagari Punjabi) (born September 26, 1932, Gah, West Punjab (now in Pakistan)) is the fourteenth prime minister of India. ... The Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party) is the largest subscription-based organisation in the world. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... Valencia Club de Fútbol (also known as Valencia, CF or just Valencia or Los Ches) is a team in the first division of the Spanish Football League. ... UEFA Cup logo The UEFA Cup is a football competition for European club teams. ... Olympique de Marseille is a football team that plays in Ligue 1, the top level of the French Football League, based in Marseille. ...

May 18, 2004

May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sonia Gandhi Sonia Gandhi (सोनिया गाँधी) (born December 9, 1946), is an Italian-born Indian politician and the president of the Indian National Congress (Congress Party). ... The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the government of India. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... Sarin or GB (O-Isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is an extremely toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous weapons of war. ... The nervous system of an animal coordinates the activity of the muscles, monitors the organs, constructs and processes input from the senses, and initiates actions. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... Operation Rainbow מבצע קשת בענן is a controversial military operation which began on May 18, 2004 in the Gaza Strip. ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization, the stated purpose of which is to promote all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The West Bank The Gaza Strip The term Palestinian territories is used by mainstream Western journalists as a collective name for the West Bank and the Gaza Strip - two disputed territories in Palestine. ... The wreckage of a commuter bus in West Jerusalem after a suicide bombing on Tuesday, 18 June, 2002. ... The International Olympic Committee is an organisation based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organise this sports event every four years. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Coat of arms Plaza de España (Spain square) Madrid, the capital of Spain, is located in the center of the country at 40°25′ N 3°45′ W. Population of the city of Madrid proper was 3,093,000 (Madrilenes, madrileños) as of 2003 estimates. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronunciation: Maskvá  listen) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ... City nickname: The Big Apple Location in the state of New York Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - Land  - Water 1,214. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Nine cities submitted bids for the 2012 Summer Olympics, and five have made it to the shortlist for hosting the Games of the XXX Olympiad. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Randall David Randy Johnson (born September 10, 1963 in Walnut Creek, California) is a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Since 1991, a perfect game has been defined by Major League Baseball as a game in which a pitcher pitches a complete game victory that lasts a minimum of nine innings and in which no opposition player reaches first base. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Arizona Diamondbacks National League AAA Tucson Sidewinders AA Tennessee Smokies A Lancaster JetHawks South Bend Silver Hawks Yakima Bears R Missoula Osprey The Arizona Diamondbacks are a Major League Baseball team based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Atlanta Braves National League AAA Richmond Braves AA Mississippi Braves A Myrtle Beach Pelicans Rome Braves R Danville Braves Orlando Braves The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ...

May 17, 2004

  • Civilian Space Xploration Team (CSXT) 21-foot GoFast amateur rocket is launched, carrying a ham radio, and reaches the edge of space at 100 km altitude. (AARL) (http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2004/05/17/100/?nc=1)
  • Hamas leader Khaled Meshal rejects talk of cease-fire with Israel. Hamas has sent scores of suicide bombers into Israeli towns since the Palestinian uprising began in September 2000, killing hundreds of Israelis. "Our choice is between death and death," he said. "Our people will defend themselves until the last breath. The world left us no other choice." (Haaretz) (http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/428620.html)
  • Ceremonies in Topeka, Kansas commemorate the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Both President George W. Bush and presidential candidate John Kerry attend separate ceremonies. (AP) (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=694&e=3&u=/ap/20040517/ap_on_el_pr/brown_at50)
  • Iraqi WMD: Brigadier General Mark Kimmitt says that an artillery shell with sarin agent was found after it exploded. Two members of an explosives team are exposed to it, and have been treated. Hans Blix doubts that this was part of a current Iraq WMD, and doubts have been cast as to the accuracy of the field tests.(Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/printerFriendlyPopup.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5166415) (Melbourne HS) (http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,9593577%255E1702,00.html)
  • Police in London foil an armed robbery at the Heathrow Cargo Centre, which attempted to steal £40 million (some USD 70 million) in gold and £30-£40 million in cash. Six men are arrested and another is being sought by police. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3721333.stm)
  • Massachusetts issues the first fully legal same-sex marriage licences in the United States. This follows a November 18, 2003 ruling of the Massachusetts Supreme Court requiring the state to issue same-sex marriage licences. The first licence is issued at Cambridge to Marcia Hams and Susan Shepherd at the stroke of midnight. See Same-sex marriage in the United States.(365Gay) (http://www.365gay.com/newscon04/05/051704licenseBegins.htm)
  • Ezzedine Salim, head of the Iraqi Governing Council, is killed by a car bomb in Baghdad. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3720161.stm)
  • Stock markets in India fall sharply following frenetic panic selling minutes after opening business. Owing to uncertainties over the proposed economic policies of the impending Sonia Gandhi government, Bombay Stock Exchange loses 800 points in the first 23 minutes, or almost 15%, in the biggest ever intra-day slippage in its history. Regulators freeze the trading twice, in an attempt to shelve the damage. Markets recover some ground after public assurances by the Indian National Congress party that the fears are unfounded. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/3721203.stm)
  • Over 100 inmates – mostly Mara Salvatrucha gang members – perish in a pre-dawn prison fire in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3721635.stm)

May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. ... Amateur radio, commonly called ham radio, is a hobby enjoyed by many people throughout the world (as of 2004 about 3 million worldwide, 70,000 in Germany, 5,000 in Norway, 57,000 in Canada, and 700,000 in the USA). ... Layers of Atmosphere (NOAA) The Karman Line is an internationally designated altitude commonly used to define outer space. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum, called zero level. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Khaled Mashal, also known as Khaled Mashaal (b. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... Holding Racial segregation in public education violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment; separate facilities are “inherently unequal. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... This article is about the presidential campaign of John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and the nominee of the Democratic Party to challenge Republican incumbent President George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential election on November 2, 2004. ... Office: Junior Senator, Massachusetts Political party: Democratic Term of office: January 1985 – Present Preceded by: Paul Tsongas Succeeded by: Incumbent (2009) Date of birth: December 11, 1943 Place of birth: Aurora, Colorado Marriage: (1) Julia Thorne, divorced (2) Teresa Heinz Kerry John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the... Introduction The government of Iraq used, possessed and intended to acquire weapons of mass destruction (WMD) during the reign of Saddam Hussein. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Brigadier General Mark T. Kimmitt, US Army, is the spokesman for the US military in Iraq. ... Sarin or GB (O-Isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is an extremely toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous weapons of war. ... Hans Blix Hans Blix  listen (born June 28, 1928 in Uppsala in Sweden) is a Swedish politician. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA airport code: LHR, ICAO airport code: EGLL, and often simply Heathrow) is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ... People of all ages celebrated the first legal same sex marriages in the United States in Cambridge, Massachusetts Same-sex marriage in the U.S. state of Massachusetts became legal on May 17, 2004. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... Harvard Square, May 2000 Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area in Massachusetts, United States. ... The push by some civil rights supporters to create legal recognition of same-sex marriage in the United States has been taking shape since the early 1970s. ... Ezzedine Salim, Arabic عزالدين سليم, also known as Abdelzahra Othman Mohammed (1943 - 17 May 2004), was an Iraqi politician. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... A stock market is a market for the trading of publicly held company stock and associated financial instruments (including stock options, convertibles and stock index futures). ... Sonia Gandhi Sonia Gandhi (सोनिया गाँधी) (born December 9, 1946), is an Italian-born Indian politician and the president of the Indian National Congress (Congress Party). ... The Bombay Stock Exchange is located in Dalal Street, Mumbai. ... The Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party) is the largest subscription-based organisation in the world. ... Mara Salvatrucha, MS-13 or MS or M-18, are street gangs from El Salvador that emerged in the 1980s during that countrys violent civil war. ... A gang is a group of individuals who share a common identity and, in current usage, engage in illegal activities. ... San Pedro Sula is a city in the nation of Honduras. ...

May 16, 2004

  • Voters in the Dominican Republic go to the polls to elect a new president; with 79% of the vote counted, former president Leonel Fernández is declared the winner. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3718541.stm)
  • The Israeli army announces its intention to demolish hundreds of additional houses in the Rafah refugee camp in the Gaza Strip along the border with Egypt after the Supreme Court rejects a petition against the demolitions. In the past, the IDF has found dozens of tunnels hidden underneath homes allegedly used to smuggle guns, ammunition, explosives, fugitives, drugs and other illegal materials into Gaza. The court had previously issued a temporary injunction after 88 homes had been destroyed leaving more than 1000 people homeless (UNRWA figures disputed by the Israeli army). (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3719111.stm) (Haaretz) (http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/spages/427997.html) (Maariv) (http://www.maarivintl.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=article&articleID=7387)
  • French European Union parliamentarian Paul Marie Couteax declares: "I have no hesitation in saying that we must consider giving the Arab side a large enough force, including a large enough nuclear force, to persuade Israel that it cannot simply do whatever it wants. That is the policy my country (France) pursued in the 1970s when it gave Iraq a nuclear force."(JPost)  (http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1085721253715&p=1006953079897)

May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dominican Republic held a presidential election on Sunday, 16 May 2004. ... Dr. Leonel Antonio Fernández Reyna (born 26 December 1953) is a politician from the Dominican Republic. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces, comprising the Israel army, Israel air force and Israel navy. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... IDF may refer to: the International Diabetes Federation the Israel Defense Forces the AIDC Ching-kuo Indigenous Defence Fighter of Taiwan. ... The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) was established to provide assistance to Palestinian refugees. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ...

May 15, 2004

May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... A shell is a projectile, which, as opposed to a bullet, is not solid but contains an explosive or other filling. ... This article is about explosive devices. ... Eurovision Song Contest 2004 logo. ... Running since 1956, the Eurovision Song Contest (in French: Concours Eurovision de la Chanson) is an annual televised song contest with participants from numerous countries whose national television broadcasters are members of the European Broadcasting Union. ... FIFA logo (usage restricted): For the Good of the Game Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) is the international governing body of the sport of association football (called simply football or soccer). ... The 2010 Football World Cup will take place in South Africa. ... Smarty Jones (born February 28, 2001) is a thoroughbred race horse, and winner of the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ...

May 14, 2004

  • Vatican foreign minister Archbishop Giovanni Lajolo says torture of prisoners is a "more serious" blow for U.S. than September 11 (Al Jazeerah) (http://www.aljazeerah.info/News%20archives/2004%20News%20archives/May/13n/Abuse,%20beheading%20dogs%20US.htm). American reaction is negative. (Catholic News) (http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/20040514c.htm)
  • The British tabloid newspaper The Daily Mirror, which published photos allegedly depicting British Army soldiers abusing Iraqi prisoners, concedes that it was hoaxed, apologises, and sacks its editor Piers Morgan. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3716151.stm) (Al Bawaba) (http://www.albawaba.com/news/index.php3?sid=276819&lang=e&dir=news) (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5151422)
  • Danish Crown Prince Frederik marries Australian Mary Donaldson in Copenhagen. The service is attended by royalty and dignitaries from around the world, amidst very high security in the face of terrorism fears. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3711837.stm)
  • Roh Moo-hyun is reinstated as President of South Korea after that country's Constitutional Court overturns the National Assembly's March 12 impeachment vote against him. (KBS News) (http://english.kbs.co.kr/news/newsview_sub.php?menu=2&key=2004051411)
  • Polish Prime Minister Marek Belka looses a parliamentary vote of confidence, less than two weeks after he was appointed to the post. He will continue in a caretaker capacity until a new candidate is appointed. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3716461.stm) (PolitInfo) (http://www.politinfo.com/articles/article_2004_05_15_5312.html)
  • The impact crater of the "Great Dying" — the end-Permian event, the largest extinction event in the history of life on Earth — appears to be a 125 mile (200 km)-wide crater called "Bedout" off the northwestern coast of Australia. (UCSB Press release) (http://beckeraustralia.crustal.ucsb.edu/)
  • Iraqi Occupation and resistance:
    • Mohammad's Army, in an interview with IWPR, states "We want to inform America that its attempt to stir up sectarian discord is a failure." (IWPR) (http://www.iwpr.net/index.pl?archive/irq/irq_63_1_eng.txt)
  • FMDC Coinarama World Championships held. Robert "Hog" Little defeats Alex "Fat" Malcolm

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... Giovanni Lajolo Born January 3, 1935 in Novara, Italy. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on September 11, 2001. ... A tabloid is a newspaper — especially in the United Kingdom — that uses the tabloid format, which is roughly 23½ by 14¾ inches (597 by 375 mm) per spread. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British military. ... Piers Stefan Pughe-Morgan (born March 20, 1965 in Newick, East Sussex) was editor of The Daily Mirror, a British tabloid newspaper, from 1995 until he was sacked in 2004. ... Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark Crown Prince Frederik in soldier uniform HRH Crown Prince Frederik André Henrik Christian of Denmark (born May 26, 1968) is the eldest son of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark and Prince Henrik. ... Crown Princess Marys cypher Her Royal Highness The Crown Princess of Denmark (née Mary Elizabeth Donaldson, born Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 5 February 1972) is the wife of Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark. ... City nickname: none Location in Denmark Area  - Total  - Water 526 km² xxx km² xx% Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density 502,204 1,116,979 954/km2 [including water] xxx/km2 [land only] Time zone Eastern: UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 55°43 N 12°34 W Copenhagen (Danish: København) is... Roh Moo-hyun (born September 1 (August 6 in lunar calendar), 1946) has been the President of South Korea since February 25, 2003. ... The President is head of state of South Korea. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in Leap years). ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Marek Belka Marek Belka (b. ... ... Bedout, off the northwestern coast of Australia, is a large depression in the ocean basin approximately 200 km across. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Mohammads Army (Jaish-e-Mohammad) is a guerilla organization that has been operating in Iraq against U.S.-led occupying forces since at least mid 2003. ... Institute for War and Peace Reporting is an international media development charity, established in 1991. ... The FMDC (Federation Mondiale de Coinarama) is the worlds governing body for the ever expanding game of Coinarama. ... Coinarama is a modern-day version of many coin-based games of physical skill which have been seen throughout history, such as shove hapenny. ...

May 13, 2004

May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Scaled Composites (often abbreviated as Scaled) was founded in 1982 in Mojave, California by famous aircraft designer Burt Rutan out of what used to be the Rutan Aircraft Factory. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer, symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... SpaceShipOne is small, having a three-person cabin and short but wide wings. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Mojave Desert The Mojave or Mohave Desert occupies a significant portion of Southern California and parts of Utah, Nevada, and Arizona. ... The X prize logo shows a stylised letter X representing a spacecraft trajectory and containing a starfield. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Tony Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Peter Gerald Hain (born February 16, 1950) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Geneva Conventions consist of treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... The seal of the CPA in Iraq History of the CPA Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Office for Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA) was the organization established by the United States Government that acted as a caretaker administration in Iraq until civilian rule resumed on June 28, 2004. ... Yang Jianli is a Chinese dissident with U.S. residency. ... Legislative elections were held in India, the worlds largest democracy, in four phases between April 20 and May 10, 2004. ... Sonia Gandhi Sonia Gandhi (सोनिया गाँधी) (born December 9, 1946), is an Italian-born Indian politician and the president of the Indian National Congress (Congress Party). ... The Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party) is the largest subscription-based organisation in the world. ... The Lok Sabha (House of the People) is the lower house of Parliament of India. ... The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP; Indian Peoples Party) is one of the largest political parties in India. ... The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the government of India. ... Atal Bihari Vajpayee (often wrongly spelt Behari; अटल बिहारी वाजपेयी in Devnagari) (born December 25, 1924) was the Prime Minister of India in 1996 and again from 1998 until May 19, 2004. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Frasier was an American TV situation comedy. ... Kelsey Grammer as Frasier Crane on Frasier. ... Dr. Frasier Crane was first introduced on Cheers in 1984. ... Importance and applicability Most of human history is not described by any written records. ... The Royal Library of Alexandria was once the largest in the world. ... The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Ontario Cooperative Commonwealth Federation) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. ... Andrea Horwath is a politician in Canada. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Area: 1,117. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... Dominic Agostino ( October 14, 1959 - March 24, 2004) was a Canadian politician, who represented the riding of Hamilton East for the Liberal Party in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. ...

May 12, 2004

May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The Cray-2; worlds fastest computer 1985–1989. ... The numeral trillion refers to one of two number values, depending on the context of where and how it is being used. ... In computing, FLOPS is an abbreviation of floating point operations per second. ... ESC cabinets The Earth Simulator Computer (ESC) was the fastest supercomputer in the world from 2002 to 2004, located at the Earth Simulator Center in Kanazawa-ku (ward), Yokohama-shi, Japan. ... IBM ASCI White is a supercomputer at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multiprogram science and technology national laboratory managed for the United States Department of Energy by UT-Battelle, LLC. ORNL is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, near Knoxville. ... The Mexican Air Force was created on February 5 1915 by the leader of the Mexican Constitutionalist Army, Venustiano Carranza, naming it Arma de Aviación Militar (Military Air Weapon). ... A UFO -- posed or genuine? A UFO or unidentified flying object in the original, literal sense is any airborne object or optical phenomenon, detected visually or by radar, whose nature is not readily known. ... Campeche is the name of a city and a state in Mexico. ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... Image of a small dog taken in mid-infrared (thermal) light (false color) Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength longer than visible light, but shorter than microwave radiation. ... The National Autonomous University of Mexico (Spanish: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; abbreviation: UNAM) was founded in 1551, and is now the largest university in Latin America and it is considered the best University of this region based on the Beijing University and the London Times suplemments. ... The War on terrorism or War on terror (abbreviated in policy circles as GWOT for global war on terror) is a global effort by the governments of several countries (primarily the United States and its principal allies) to destroy international groups it deems as terrorist (primarily radical Islamist terrorist groups... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة - al-Qāidah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network and alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... Wikiquote quotations related to: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... ...

May 11, 2004

May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Glasgows location in Scotland Glasgow or Ghlaschu is Scotlands largest city, on the River Clyde in west central Scotland. ... Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Alba) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... An aerial view of the remains of the four-storey factory the day after the explosion On May 11, 2004 the Stockline Plastics factory, in the Woodlands district of Glasgow in western Scotland, exploded, killing nine people, including two company directors, and injuring 37, of whom around 15 were seriously... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... East German BRDMs on parade during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of East Germany in 1989 Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are light armoured fighting vehicles for the transport of infantry. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... This article is about particular organizations known as Islamic Jihad. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Najaf (نجف in the Arabic language) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... Video is the technology of processing electronic signals representing moving pictures. ... Beheading. ... Berg in October 2003 Nicholas Evan Berg (April 2, 1978 – May 2004) was an American businessman seeking telecommunications work in Iraq during the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... Thaksin Shinawatra Thaksin Shinawatra (ทักษิณ ชินวัตร) (born July 26, 1949), Thai politician, is the current prime minister of Thailand and the leader of the populist Thai Rak Thai party. ... Liverpool Football Club are the most successful English football team. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ...

May 10, 2004

  • Turkey begins construction of a tunnel under the Bosporus. (Moscow Times) (http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2004/05/11/050.html)
  • A judicial recount in the 2004 Taiwanese presidential election begins. (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=B02E172B-B50A-431E-B1F02862D4A9A19C) (CNA) (http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/eastasia/view/84175/1/.html)
  • The Arab League agrees to hold a summit in Tunis. The summit originally scheduled for March of this year was scrapped over differences between the participants. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/international/AP-Egypt-Arab-League.html)
  • At the Commonwealth military cemetery in Gaza City where 3000 WWI casualties are buried, Palestinian vandals desecrate 32 graves, breaking headstones and affixing photographs of Iraqi POW abuse to others. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/international/AP-Israel-Palestinians.html)
  • The Palestinian Cabinet announces plans to hold municipal elections, starting with Jericho and followed by some Gaza Strip municipalities. The elections, starting in August, will replace mayors appointed by the Palestine Authority. The previous elections, for president and legislature, were held in 1996. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/international/AP-Israel-Palestinians.html), (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=BB8BB139-EFB2-4CB1-B8D32491C1A449D5)
  • President George W. Bush is expected to impose economic sanctions on Syria, alleging support of terrorism and failure to stop guerrillas from entering Iraq. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/politics/politics-syria-usa.html), (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=politicsNews&storyID=5095804)
  • The United States Armed Forces destroy the Baghdad headquarters of Moqtada al-Sadr. The building had been evacuated by al-Sadr's forces. There were no casualties. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/10/international/middleeast/10CND-IRAQ.html)
  • Philippine elections: About 40 million Filipinos go to the polls to elect candidates for national and local positions from the President down to municipal councilors. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3699283.stm)
  • Canadian bureaucrat Chuck Guite and GroupeAction president Jean Brault have been arrested and charged with six counts each of fraud in connection with the Liberal sponsorship scandal. (CTV) (http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/1084204352744_45/?hub=TopStories)
  • The Department of Justice reopens an investigation into the 1955 murder of Emmett Till, an important event during the American civil rights movement. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/10/national/10CND-TILL.html?ex=1084852800&en=94feeb3c6f280f5b&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE)
  • Voting concludes in the marathon elections in India. (IHT) (http://www.iht.com/articles/519230.html)
  • The first Dutch soldier dies in the occupation of Iraq. (Radio Netherlands) (http://www.rnw.nl/hotspots/html/irq040511.html)

May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An underground pedestrian tunnel between buildings at MIT. Note the utility pipes running along the ceiling. ... Fatih Sultan Mehmed Bridge over the Bosporus seen from over Rumelihisarı This article is about the strait; Bosphorus is also a university in Turkey. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... Flag of the League of Arab States The Arab League or League of Arab States (Arabic: جامعة الدول العربية), is an organization of Arab states. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... Flag of the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations is an association of independent sovereign states, most of which are former colonies once governed by the United Kingdom as part of the British Empire. ... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Pvt. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Jericho (Arabic أريحا ʾArīḥā; Hebrew יְרִיחוֹ, Standard Hebrew Yəriḥo, Tiberian Hebrew Yərîḫô, Yərîḥô) is a town in the West Bank, near the west bank of the Jordan River. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 Czesław Miłosz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert Bootzin • 8 Fay... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... (Redirected from 2004 Philippine elections) Presidential elections, legislative elections and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 10, 2004. ... The President is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... A municipality (bayan in Filipino) is a local government unit in the Philippines. ... J. Charles (Chuck) Guit is a Canadian civil servant who was in charge of the federal sponsorship program, and is one of the main figures in the sponsorship scandal. ... Jean Brault was the president of Groupaction, a Montreal advertising firm implicated in the Canadian sponsorship scandal. ... The sponsorship scandal is an ongoing scandal that has affected the government of Canada, and particularly the ruling Liberal Party of Canada for a number of years, but rose to especially great prominence in 2004. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... A detective is an officer of the police who performs criminal or administrative investigations, in some police departments, the lowest rank among such investigators (above the lowest rank of officers and below sergeants), a civilian licensed to investigate information not readily available in public records (a private investigator, also called... 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emmett Louis Bobo Till (July 25, 1941 – August 28, 1955) was an African-American youth native to Chicago, Illinois whose brutal murder in Mississippi was one of the key events leading up to the American Civil Rights Movement. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all Americans. ... Legislative elections were held in India, the worlds largest democracy, in four phases between April 20 and May 10, 2004. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ...

May 9, 2004

  • Chechen president Akhmad Kadyrov is killed in a landmine bomb blast under a VIP stage during a World War II memorial victory parade in Grozny, Chechnya. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5081717&section=news) (AP)  (http://customwire.ap.org/dynamic/stories/R/RUSSIA_EXPLOSION?SITE=CAWOO&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3697715.stm)
  • The scandal about U.S. torture in Iraq widens as The New Yorker reports about guards setting dogs against naked prisoners. (newyorker) (http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/?040517fa_fact2)
  • Twenty-two passengers, two stoweaways and crew are injured when an American Eagle ATR 42, flight 1450, crash-lands in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (AP)  (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=589&e=1&u=/ap/20040510/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/puerto_rico_crash_landing)

May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chechen Republic (Russian: Чеченская Республика; Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn Respublika), also known as Chechnya (Russian: Чечня, Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö), Chechnia or Chechenia, is a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Akhmat Abdulkhamidovich Kadyrov ( Russian: Ахмат Абдулхамидович Кадыров, August 23, 1951 - May 9, 2004) was the president of the Chechen Republic (elected on October 5, 2003). ... U.S. Army soldier removes fuse from a Russian-made mine to clear a mine field outside of Fallujah, Iraq. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Grozny (Russian: Гро́зный, Chechen: Djovkhar Ghaala) is the capital of Chechnya and in 2002 had a population of 223,000 people. ... The Chechen Republic (Russian: Чеченская Республика; Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn Respublika), also known as Chechnya (Russian: Чечня, Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö), Chechnia or Chechenia, is a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... The New Yorkers first cover, which is reprinted each year on the magazines anniversary. ... American Eagle is a commuter subsidiary of American Airlines, operating from hubs in Dallas-Fort Worth, Chicago-OHare, Miami, Los Angeles, New York-JFK, Boston-Logan, Raleigh-Durham, and San Jose. ... Categories: Stub | International airliners 1980-1989 ... American Eagle flight 5401 was a flight between Mayag ezs Eugenio Maria de Hostos Airport and Luis Munoz Marin International Airport in San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... San Juan is the capital city of Puerto Rico. ...

May 8, 2004

  • Israel makes the first permanent appointment of an Arab to its Supreme Court as Salim Jubran is selected unanimously; Esther Hayut and Elyakim Rubinstein are also selected unanimously. Edna Arbel, the former state prosecutor who recommended indicting Prime Minister Ariel Sharon on bribery charges, is selected amongst considerably more controversy and opposition. (Haaretz) (http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/424730.html)
  • Computer security: German authorities arrest an 18-year-old high school student on suspicion that he is responsible for creating the Sasser worm, which has infected hundreds of thousands of computers worldwide by exploiting a flaw in the Windows 2000 and Windows XP operating systems. According to CNET, a US$5 million reward from Microsoft was instrumental in leading investigators to the suspect. (AP)  (http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/world/wire/sns-ap-germany-computer-worm,0,1719391.story?coll=sns-ap-world-headlines) (CNET) (http://news.com.com/2100-7349_3-5208762.html?tag=nefd.top)
  • Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan wraps up a landmark visit to Greece. Both sides pledge cooperation—Erdoğan visits the Turkish minority in Thrace and urges reconciliation, and his Greek counterpart Costas Karamanlis says Greece will support Turkey's EU bid, marking a high point in Greco-Turkish relations. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3689687.stm) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3697293.stm) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3694221.stm)

May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The definition of who an Arab is has three main aspects: Political: whether they live in a country which is a member of the Arab League (or, more vaguely, the Arab world); this definition covers more than 300 million people. ... Salim Jubran is a judge on the Israeli Supreme Court. ... Elyakim Rubinstein (born 1947) was the Attorney General of Israel from 1997 to 2004. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... This article about computer security describes how security can be achieved through design and engineering. ... The Sasser worm is a computer worm that spreads on computers running the Microsoft operating systems Windows XP and Windows 2000. ... A computer worm is a self-replicating computer program, similar to a computer virus. ... Windows 2000 (also referred to as Win2K, W2K or Windows NT 5. ... Windows XP (codename Whistler, also known as Windows NT 5. ... In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... CNET Networks Inc. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT) headquartered in Redmond, Washington, USA, was founded in 1975 by Bill Gates and Paul Allen. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Recep Tayyip Erdoğan (born February 26, 1954) became prime minister of Turkey on March 14, 2003. ... Thrace is a historical and geographic area in south-east Europe spread over southern Bulgaria, north-eastern Greece, and European Turkey. ... Costas Caramanlis Costas Caramanlis (in Greek Kostas or Konstantinos Karamanlis, Κωστας or Κωνσταντινος Καραμανλης) (born September 14, 1956) became Prime Minister of Greece on March 10, 2004 following his partys victory in the March 7 parliamentary elections. ... Relations between Greece and Turkey have been marked by mutual hostility ever since Greece won its independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1832. ...

May 7, 2004

  • Japan's longest-serving chief cabinet secretary, Yasuo Fukuda, resigns to take responsibility for not making pension payments. (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=441EEFF5-552F-4F27-89AE2CCBDF968092&title=Japan%27s%20Cabinet%20Secretary%20Resigns&catOID=45C9C78B-88AD-11D4-A57200A0CC5EE46C&categoryname=Asia%20Pacific)
  • A report from the UN's High Commissioner for Human Rights describes a "reign of terror" imposed by government-backed militias in Sudan's western province of Darfur. (UN) (http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=10664&Cr=sudan&Cr1=)
  • A bomb blast during Friday prayers at a Shia mosque in Karachi, Pakistan kills 10 people and injures 100. A suicide bombing is suspected. The head cleric of the mosque is among the dead. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/07/international/asia/07CND-STAN.html) (National Post) (http://www.canada.com/national/story.html?id=4344b709-0578-463d-9248-095fc73ff773)
  • Vladimir Putin is sworn in for his second (and final) four-year term as Russian president. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3692719.stm)
  • Iraq Occupation and resistance:
    • Shieik Abdul-Satar al-Bahadli, a senior aide to Muqtada al-Sadr, is offering a reward of 250,000 dinars (~ USD 170) to any Iraqi who captures a British woman soldier; he says the captive will be kept as a concubine. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsPackageArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=506669&section=news)
    • United States Armed Forces encounter heavy fighting in Karbala, Iraq where at least 24 gunmen of Moqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army are killed and in Najaf where another 12 gunmen are killed. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/07/international/middleeast/07CND-IRAQ.html)
    • Three Polish journalists are killed and a third wounded by Iraqi gunmen on the road between Baghdad and Karbala. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3693389.stm)
    • U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld testifies before the U.S. Congress, taking "full responsibility" and apologizing for the abuse of Iraqi detainees at the Abu Ghraib Prison. The hearing highlights a split between how the abuses are perceived either as "isolated incidents" or as part of the "chain of command". (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3692507.stm)
    • The International Committee of the Red Cross states that on some of its inspection visits to Coalition detention centres in Iraq, it observed "incidents tantamount to torture". (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5077399)
  • Chilean President Ricardo Lagos signs legislation legalizing divorce. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3693627.stm)
  • U.S. attorney Brandon Mayfield is detained in the investigation of the 11 March Madrid attacks. (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/West/05/06/spain.us.arrest/index.html) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3692741.stm)
  • The Prime Minister of Nepal Surya Bahadur Thapa resigns amid protests by oppostion parties. Prime Minister Thapa was appointed by King Gyanendra eleven months ago. The opposing parties are demanding formation of an all party government with a Prime Minister of their choice. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3693233.stm)
  • The FDA blocks the Over-the-counter sale of a morning-after pill despite the (23-4) recommendation of a federal advisory panel. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/08/politics/08FDA.html)

May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The purpose of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights involves the promotion and protection of human rights worldwide through direct contact with individual governments and the provision of technical assistance where appropriate. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... The Karachi Port Trust Building Karachi (کراچي) is the largest city of Pakistan and the capital of the province of Sindh. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Term of office: December 31, 1999 – Preceded by: Boris Yeltsin Succeeded by: Date of birth: October 7, 1952 Place of birth: Leningrad, U.S.S.R. First Lady: Liudmila Putina Political party: None Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин  pronunciation; born October 7, 1952) is a Russian politician and... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Sheikh Abdul-Satar al-Bahadli is a senior Iraqi Shia cleric and confederate of Muqtada al-Sadr. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... A five-dinar note featuring Saddam Hussein The Iraqi dinar (ISO 4217: IQD, pronounced: di-när) is the legal currency of Iraq. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Concubinage is either the state of a couple living together as lovers with no obligation created by vows, legal marriage, or religious ceremony, or the state of a woman supported by a male lover who is married to, and usually living with, someone else. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The Mashad al-Husain, Karbala Karbalā (كربلاء; also transliterated as Kerbala or Kerbela) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish-i-Mahdi, is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... Najaf (نجف in the Arabic language) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... The Mashad al-Husain, Karbala Karbalā (كربلاء; also transliterated as Kerbala or Kerbela) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is the current Secretary of Defense of the United States, since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... Seal of the Congress. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrent or punishment, or as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is a committee of Swiss nationals and probably will be so as long as the ICRC exists. ... The President of Chile is both the chief of state and the head of government. ... Ricardo Froilán Lagos Escobar (born March 2, 1938) is a Socialist politician and the president of Chile since 2000. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage, which can be contrasted with an annulment which is a declaration that a marriage is void, though the effects of marriage may be recognized in such unions, such as spousal support, child custody and distribution of property. ... Brandon Mayfield (born 1966) is an attorney at law with a practice in Washington County, Oregon and is best known for being erroneously linked to the 11 March, 2004 Madrid attacks. ... (Redirected from 11 March Madrid attacks) The scene of one of the Madrid bombings. ... Surya Bahadur Thapa (born March 21, 1928) has been Prime Minister of Nepal five times, under three different kings, in a political career lasting nearly 50 years. ... King Gyanendra King Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev of Nepal (born July 7, 1947) has been the king of Nepal since June 2001. ... The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the government agency responsible for regulating food (human and animal), dietary supplements, drugs (human and animal), cosmetics, medical devices (human and animal), biologics and blood products in the United States. ... The morning-after pill, or emergency contraception, is a pill regimen that a woman can take up to three days after she has had sexual intercourse to prevent the implantation of a fertilized egg in her uterus. ...

May 6, 2004

May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... John D. Negroponte John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939) (IPA ) is a career diplomat currently serving as Director of National Intelligence for the United States. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Wikiquote quotations related to: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... United Nations General Assembly The United Nations General Assembly is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The West Bank The Gaza Strip The term Palestinian territories is used by mainstream Western journalists as a collective name for the West Bank and the Gaza Strip - two disputed territories in Palestine. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Six-Day War, also known as the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, Six Days War, or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... One of the most contentious issues in the Arab-Israeli Conflict has been the Israeli policy of sponsoring, supporting, and/or tolerating the establishment of Jewish communities in areas that came under Israeli control as a result of the 1967 Six Day War. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is a committee of Swiss nationals and probably will be so as long as the ICRC exists. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Thomas Richard Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is the current Secretary of Defense of the United States, since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Friends was a long-running American television situation comedy centered on lives of six twenty-somethings (eventually thirty-somethings) (3 male, 3 female) living in Manhattan. ... John McLeod Scarlett (born August 18, 1948) is head of the British Secret Intelligence Service, commonly known as MI6. ... Sir Richard Dearlove is a career intelligence officer and, until May 6, 2004, head of Britains Secret Intelligence Service (MI6). ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence [section] 6), or Her Majestys Secret Service or just the Secret Service, is the British external security agency. ... Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Pembroke Street Undergraduates ~420 Graduates 194 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a college... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An occupied territory is a region that has been taken over by a sovereign power after a military intervention (see military occupation). ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ...

May 5, 2004

  • Parliament grounds and adjoining footpaths in New Zealand host 15,000 people (many of whom have participated in several days of route march - "hīkoi") protesting about the proposed law that is expected to change the ownership of foreshore and seabed.
  • The Dalai Lama ends his visit to Canada with a ceremony initiating thousands in Tibetan Buddhism. (Toronto Star) (http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1083751689544&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968705899037)
  • Israeli company Givot Olam announces that from a previously known oil reserve near Kfar Sava believed to contain 980 million barrels (156 million m³) of oil, 20% of it is extractible. (INN) (http://www.israelnn.com/news.php3?id=61904) (Haaretz) (http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/423668.html)
  • During a raid in Gaza Israeli troops kill a police captain and wound 15 people, in an area that is used to fire Qassam rockets into Israeli towns. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=5043281&section=news)
  • Maya artifacts are discovered in Cival, a ruined city in the Peten region of Guatemala, suggesting an earlier development of dynastic customs than previously known. (Washington Post) (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2151-2004May4.html)
  • Three bombs explode in Athens outside a single police station, 100 days before the start of the Olympic Games. One policeman was injured. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3684967.stm) (Boston Herald) (http://news.bostonherald.com/international/view.bg?articleid=19242)
  • George W. Bush speaks on the Al Arabiya and Alhurra Arabic-language television networks, stating he was 'appalled' at the conduct of U.S. soldiers in Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. (Toronto Star) (http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1083751689557&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154)
  • Houston Astros baseball pitcher Roger Clemens records his 4,137th career strikeout to place him second on the all-time list behind Nolan Ryan. (AP)  (http://customwire.ap.org/dynamic/stories/B/BBN_PIRATES_ASTROS?SITE=APWEB&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT) (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5054135)
  • A judge of the Ontario Superior Court, overseeing the bankruptcy and reorganization of Air Canada, approved an amended "standby purchase agreement" from Deutsche Bank, which stands to become a major owner of equity in the revived airline. (Globe and Mail) (http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040505.wairca0505/BNStory/Business/)
  • President of the breakaway Georgian republic of Ajaria, Aslan Abashidze is forced to resign by Georgian president Mikhail Saakashvili. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3688435.stm) (Independent) (http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/story.jsp?story=518592) (Guardian) (http://www.guardian.co.uk/georgia/story/0,14065,1210367,00.html) (Washington Post) (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A5642-2004May5.html)

May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ... The foreshore, also called the intertidal or littoral zone, is that part of a beach that lies between average high tide and average low tide. ... The seabed is the bottom of the ocean. ... The 14th and current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (born 1935) The 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso (1876-1933) His Holiness the 14th the Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso, is the head of state and spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. ... Tibetan Buddhism, (formerly also called Lamaism after their religious gurus known as lamas), is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet and the Himalayan region. ... Kefar Sava (כפר סבא; unofficially also spelled and pronounced Kfar Saba) is a city in the Sharon area, Center District of Israel in Israel. ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian organization Hamas. ... The Maya are people of southern Mexico and northern Central America (Guatemala, Belize, western Honduras, and El Salvador) with some 3,000 years of history. ... This article is about the archaeological concept of artifacts (or artefacts). ... Cival is an archaeological site in the Petén department of Guatemala, formerly a major city of the Pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... El Petén is a department of the nation of Guatemala. ... A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... Alhurra or Al Hurra (الحرّة, United States-based satellite TV channel, sponsored by the U.S. government, that began broadcasting on February 14, 2004 in 22 countries across the Middle East. ... Arabic (العربية) is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... Houston Astros National League AAA Round Rock Express AA Corpus Christi Hooks A Salem Avalanche Lexington Legends Tri-City Valley Cats R Greeneville Astros The Houston Astros are a Major League Baseball team based in Houston, Texas. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in St. ... Roger Clemens pitching for the Houston Astros in 2004, his first season in the National League William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962 in Dayton, Ohio), nicknamed The Rocket, is among the preeminent Major League baseball pitchers of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. ... In baseball, a strikeout or strike out (denoted by K or SO) occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. ... Missing image Nolan Ryan Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th)  - Land 917,741 km²  - Water 158,654 km² (14. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Air Canada (TSX: ACE.RV) is Canadas flag air carrier, headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ... Deutsche Bank AG (NYSE: DB) (German for German Bank) is a multinational bank operating worldwide and employing almost 70,000 people (2004). ... Official language Georgian Capital Batumi Chairman of Interim Council Levan Varshalomidze Area  - Total  - % water 2,900 km² n/a Population  - Total (1989)  - Density 392,432 135. ... Aslan Abashidze (Georgian: ასლან აბაშიძე) (born July 20, 1938) was the leader of the Georgia from 1991 to May 5, Georgian (Ajarian) family. ... Mikhail Saakashvili briefing the press at UN headquarters Mikhail Saakashvili (Georgian: მიხეილ სააკაშვილი) (born Thursday, December 21, 1967), Georgian jurist and politician, is the President of Georgia. ...

May 4, 2004

  • The Legislative Yuan in Taiwan passes a bill mandating that official documents in Chinese be written from left to right instead of right to left, ending centuries of tradition. (Straits Times) (http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/asia/story/0,4386,249302,00.html?) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/3683825.stm)
  • The United Nations Commission on Human Rights elects thirteen countries to serve on it for 3-year terms. Sudan is elected unopposed to represent the African bloc, prompting a walk-out by the U.S. delegation. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/international/international-un-rights-elections.html) (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/africa/05/03/un.human.rights.ap/index.html)
  • Hundreds of Muslim cattle herders are killed by Christian farmers in central Nigerian town of Yelwa. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsPackageArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=504383&section=news)
  • U.S. Democratic and Republican leaders in Congress condemn the alleged mistreatment of Iraqi detainees in the strongest terms and call for a congressional investigation. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=politicsNews&storyID=5038835&section=news) (PolitInfo) (http://www.politinfo.com/articles/article_2004_05_4_5255.html)
  • Iraq Occupation and resistance:
    • The Pentagon announces that it plans to keep as many as 138,000 U.S. troops in Iraq through the end of 2005. (Bloomberg) (http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=a7blD21HSPzc) (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/international/middleeast/05TROO.html)
    • The U.S. Department of Defense announces that 37,000 National Guardsmen and 10,000 active duty Army and Marine Corps troops are to be called up to serve a one-year tour of duty in Iraq by early 2005. (AP) (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-4053336,00.html)
  • A Chicago laboratory announces they helped choose embryos by genetic testing to yield five babies who could donate stem cells to sick siblings. (CNN) (http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/05/05/donor.babies.ap/index.html)
  • William Krar, a Texan with ties to white supremacists, is sentenced to 11 years in prison after he pled guilty to building and possessing chemical weapons in what has been described as one of the most serious cases of domestic terrorism since the Oklahoma City bombing. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=5039866) (KRT) (http://www.sanluisobispo.com/mld/sanluisobispo/news/nation/8589208.htm) (AP)  (http://www.napanews.com/templates/index.cfm?template=story_full&id=9D892811-4D6D-42DE-BE5E-3CD674CE1E7C)

May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yùan, literally law-establishing court) is the legislative body of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy, and Matsu Islands. ... The United Nations Commission on Human Rights, a commission supervised by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, is composed of representatives from 53 member states, and meets each year in regular session in March/April for six weeks in Geneva. ... A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Wikiquote quotations related to: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The term Christian means belonging to Christ and is derived from the Greek noun Χριστός Khristós which means anointed one, which is itself a translation of the Hebrew word Moshiach (Hebrew: משיח, also written Messiah), (and in Arabic it is pronounced Maseeh مسيح). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated as DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... The United States National Guard is a significant component of the United States armed forces military reserve. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... Biochemistry laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... A human infant The word Infant derives from the Latin in-fans, meaning unable to speak. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... White supremacy is the variety of white nationalism that believes the white race should rule over other races. ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... Domestic terrorism is a phrase used to describe some acts of political violence within a state that are carried out or commissioned by forces inside or originating from that state, as opposed to external attacks. ... Damage to the Murrah building before cleanup began. ...

May 3, 2004

  • The USA is starting to lose its dominance in the sciences; "the rest of the world is catching up", according to John E. Jankowski of the National Science Foundation. Scientists from Europe and now other countries are now publishing more papers in major professional journals than scientists from the US. New York Times p.A1.
  • An Egyptian court rejects the petition of an Egyptian movie producer seeking to establish an Egyptian-Israeli friendship organization stating: "Egyptian society does not need a friendship association with Israel. The Egyptian public and Arabs do not need such false friendships, as demonstrated by the attacks on the Palestinian people."" (INN) (http://www.israelnn.com/news.php3?id=61801)(HaAretz) (http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/spages/423598.html)
  • French police seek 500 kg (1,100 lb) of ammonium nitrate fertilizer stolen from the port of Honfleur at the mouth of the Seine River. The fertilizer can be converted easily into a powerful explosive. Such an explosive was used in the 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing. AZF recently suspended operations inside France while the group seeks to upgrade its arsenal. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/04/international/europe/04CND-FRAN.html?hp)
  • Mexico and Peru recall their ambassadors from Cuba, citing recent "offensive" comments by Cuban head of state Fidel Castro. The Cuban ambassador to Mexico is also expelled, for "activities incompatible with his diplomatic status". (VOA) (http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=F41057E8-EFC6-4319-9FBFA4BF033FA9DB) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3679469.stm)
  • At US$38.21 per barrel of crude, oil prices hit their highest level since 1990. (AP) (http://apnews.myway.com/article/20040504/D82BDU4G0.html)
  • In an open letter to George W. Bush more than 50 former high-ranking United States diplomats (including former ambassadors to Saudi Arabia and Qatar) complain about the Bush administration's policy towards the Middle East claiming that the President's approach, and specifically his endorsement of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's disengagement plan, is losing the U.S. "credibility, prestige and friends". The letter follows a similar one written by 52 former British diplomats sent to Tony Blair a few days ago. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3681641.stm)

May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... What is science? There are different theories of what science is. ... The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency responsible for supporting basic science research mainly by providing research funding. ... World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... US,Us or us may stand for the United States of America us, the oblique case form of the English language pronoun we. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... The chemical compound ammonium nitrate, the nitrate of ammonia with chemical formula NH4NO3, is commonly used in agriculture as a high_nitrogen fertilizer. ... Honfleur is a harbour commune in the Norman (département of the Calvados) located on the southern bank of the estuary of the Seine, very close to the exit of the Pont de Normandie. ... This article is about the river in France; it should not be confused with the Senne, a much smaller river that flows through Brussels. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Damage to the Murrah building before cleanup began. ... AZF was the name of a chemical factory near Toulouse, France, which exploded on September 21, 2001. ... Fidel Castro Fidel Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926), has led Cuba since 1959, when, leading the 26th of July Movement, he overthrew the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista, and transformed Cuba into the first Communist-led state in the Western Hemisphere. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petrus – rock and oleum – oil), mineral oil, or crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish flammable liquid, which exists in the upper strata of some areas of the Earths... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Order: 43rd President Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present Preceded by: Bill Clinton Succeeded by: Incumbent Date of birth: July 6, 1946 Place of birth: New Haven, Connecticut First Lady: Laura Welch Bush Political party: Republican George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ...

May 2, 2004

  • Investment banker Frank Quattrone of Credit Suisse First Boston is convicted of obstructing justice and witness tampering. Quattrone played a significant role in the Initial Public Offerings of Amazon, Netscape, Intuit and other Internet companies. (NYT) (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Star-Banker-Trial.html)
  • Polish Prime Minister Leszek Miller resigns one day after Poland becomes a member of the European Union. His government was the most unpopular of the nine that have ruled Poland since the fall of the communist regime in 1989. Miller's Left Democratic Alliance party, plagued by a series of corruption scandals (including the Rywin affair), hit a record low in popularity rankings in the last months which led some of its members to break away and form a new party, the Social Democracy of Poland. President Aleksander Kwaśniewski announces he will designate Marek Belka, a liberal economist, as new prime minister. (Reuters) (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=5008662)
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict:
    • Israel's Likud Party votes in a referendum not to pull out of the Gaza Strip unilaterally. The referendum's defeat is seen as a major blow to the Sharon government. Sharon subsequently says that he will not resign and may modify the plan. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3680679.stm)
    • Palestinian gunmen kill an Israeli mother, Tali Hatuel, and four of her young children near the Kissufim Crossing in the Gaza Strip. The killers are shot dead by security forces. The incident is believed to have influenced voting intentions in the referendum held the same day. (INN) (http://www.israelnn.com/news.php3?id=61758) (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3678031.stm)
  • Martín Torrijos wins Panama's presidential election. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3677499.stm)
  • U.S. civilian contractor Thomas Hamill, who was taken hostage by Iraqi insurgents on April 9, is found by U.S. forces south of Tikrit after escaping his captors. (MSNBC) (http://msnbc.msn.com/ID/4884602/)
  • The Sasser worm is spreading. It has the chance of becoming as big as the Blaster worm epidemic because it can infect computers running Microsoft Windows directly without user interaction. (AP) (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=1512&ncid=1512&e=2&u=/afp/20040501/wl_afp/internet_virus_finland_040501203913)
  • A government report has found that secret searches in the U.S. are up 85% since 2001. (Baltimore Sun) (http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/nationworld/bal-te.patriot02may02,0,3416237.story?coll=bal-nationworld-headlines)
  • A shell containing mustard gas, was found in the middle of street west of Baghdad. Officials from the Defense Department commented that this was part of an Improvised Explosive Device (IED). It was not certain that use was to be made as a bomb. (Fox News) (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,120137,00.html) (Seattle Post-Intelligencer) (http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/173793_sarin18.html)

May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Investment banks assist corporations in raising funds in the public markets (both equity and debt), as well as provide strategic advisory services for mergers, acquisitions and other types of transactions. ... Categories: Corporation stubs | Banks of the United States | Investment banks ... In financial markets, an initial public offering (IPO) is the first sale of a companys common shares to public investors. ... Amazon. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... To intuit has the definition to know or grasp by intuition or feeling. Intuit, Inc. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Poland. ... Leszek Miller Leszek Miller (born 3 July 1946) was Prime Minister of Poland from September 2001 to May 2, 2004. ... States colour-shaded according to entry (darkest being earliest) The European Union originally consisted of six member states. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alliance of the Democratic Left (Polish: Sojusz Lewicy Demokratycznej, SLD) is one of the main Polish social democratic political parties, established on April 15, 1999. ... Lew Rywin (born November 10, 1945 in a Siberian village) is a Polish film producer associated with Heritage Films (est. ... Social Democracy of Poland (Socjaldemokracja Polska, SDPL) is a new leftist political party in Poland founded in April 2004 as splinter group from Sojusz Lewicy Demokratycznej (it should not be confused with a former party Socialdemocracy of the Republic of Poland - SdRP). ... . Term of Office from December 23, 1995 until Incumbent Profession Journalist Political Party SLD First Lady Jolanta Kwaśniewska Date of Birth November 15, 1954 Place of Birth Białogard, Poland Date of Death Place of Death Aleksander Kwaśniewski (pronounce: [alεksandεr kʋaɕɲefskʲi]) is a Polish politician and the current President of... Marek Belka Marek Belka (b. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Likud party logo Likud or ליכוד literally means consolidation. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Tali Hatuel Tali Hatuel, was an Israeli social worker who was killed with her four daughters, Hila (11), Hadar (9), Roni (7), and Meirav (2), on May 2, 2004, by armed Palestinian militants. ... Pres. ... The Republic of Panama held a general election on Sunday, 2 May 2004, electing both a new President of the Republic and a new Legislative Assembly. ... Wikiquote quotations related to: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... The Iraqi insurgency (also called the Iraqi resistance) comprises the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the Government of Iraq. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... Tikrit (تكريت, also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... The Sasser worm is a computer worm that spreads on computers running the Microsoft operating systems Windows XP and Windows 2000. ... The Blaster worm (a. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chemical Structure of Mustard Gas Compound Mustard gas (HD) is a chemical compound that was first used as a chemical weapon in World War I. In pure form, it is a colourless, odourless, viscous liquid at room temperature and causes blistering of the skin. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated as DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... IED is also an abbreviation for the Indo-European Etymological Dictionary by Julius Pokorny. ...

May 1, 2004

  • EU enlargement: Ten new member states (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia) join the European Union, increasing the EU's population by 75 million people to a total of roughly 455 million. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3672813.stm) (Guardian) (http://www.guardian.co.uk/eu/0,7368,396838,00.html)
  • In Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, gunmen kill five Westerners and a Saudi security guard in a shooting spree and car chase. (BBC) (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3675891.stm)
  • A fire at the Parco dei Principe hotel in Rome kills three, and forces the evacuation of a number of professional tennis stars, including Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Mariano Zabaleta, and Max Mirnyi. (AP)  (http://home.peoplepc.com/psp/newsstory.asp?cat=sports&referrer=welcome&id=501110605_5309_lead_story.xml)
  • Smarty Jones wins the Kentucky Derby. (AP) (http://sports.yahoo.com/rah/news;_ylc=X3oDMTBpZTVxN2k3BF9TAzk2MDY4Mzc1BHNlYwN0bQ--?slug=ap-derby-winningowner&prov=ap&type=lgns)
  • The separatist region of Ajaria attempts to sever its links from Georgia by blowing up the three bridges connecting it to the rest of the country over the Choloki River. (AP) (http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040502.waszh0502/BNStory/International/)

May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Enlargement of the European Union is the growth in size of the European Union, from the six founding member states in 1952, to the 25 current member states. ... NASA photograph of Yanbu al Bahr Yanbu al Bahr (arabic: ينبع البحر spring by the sea), also known simply as Yanbu, Yambo, or Yenbo, is a major Red Sea port in the Al Madinah province of western Saudi Arabia. ... The term Western world can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... A hotel is an establishment that provides lodging, usually on a short-term basis. ... Location within Italy The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin: Roma) is the capital city of Italy and of its Latium region. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Roddick at the 2000 US Open Andrew Andy Stephen Roddick, nicknamed A-Rod (born August 30, 1982), is an American tennis player. ... Marat Mikhailovich Safin (Russian: Марат Михайлович Сафин; Tatar: Marat Mixail ulı Safin pron. ... Max Mirnyi (Belarusian: Максім Мірны, Maksim Mirny; born July 6, 1977) is a tennis player from Belarus. ... Smarty Jones (born February 28, 2001) is a thoroughbred race horse, and winner of the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. ... The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... Official language Georgian Capital Batumi Chairman of Interim Council Levan Varshalomidze Area  - Total  - % water 2,900 km² n/a Population  - Total (1989)  - Density 392,432 135. ... The Choloki River in Georgia forms the border between the autonomous province of Adzharia and the province of Guria. ...

Past events by month

2004: January February March April
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli-Palestinian... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ...

Logarithmic timeline of current events

  Results from FactBites:
 
May - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (574 words)
May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days.
In Japan, there is the so-called May sickness, a kind of sickness where new students or workers start to be tired of their new schoolwork or jobs.
May's flower is the lily of the valley.
May 2004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5257 words)
FBI Director Robert Mueller and United States Attorney General John Ashcroft state that Al Qaeda may be planning a terrorist strike over the coming months.
Philippine general election, 2004: Incumbent Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo wins another term according to a senior election official who leaks the narrow winning margin of about 3% or 900,000 votes.
Preliminary field tests suggest that the shell found near Baghdad on May 15 contained about four liters of the chemical agent sarin, which attacks the nervous system.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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