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Encyclopedia > May 2003

2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ...



A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. This article is about the month of May. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also:

Contents

(Redirected from 2003 invasion of Iraq timeline) This is the ongoing timeline of the 2003 Iraq war, principally the military actions and consequences of the US-led invasion. ... The following is a timeline of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). ... Afghanistan timeline May 31, 2003 Attackers fired a rocket toward the U.S. base in Asadabad in Kunar province, Afghanistan. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Shuttle debris falling over Texas The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster was the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-107) over Texas on February 1, 2003, during reentry into the Earths atmosphere. ... North Korea has been attempting to obtain nuclear weapons since the late 1970s. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terrorism[1][2]) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies, the aim of which, they have declared, is to destroy groups deemed to... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ...


May 31, 2003

May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining, as the last day of May. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966) is an extreme right-wing American terrorist who committed a series of bombings across the southern United States, resulting in the deaths of three people and injuries to at least 150 others. ... The Centennial Olympic Park bombing is one of a series of terrorist bombings committed by Eric Robert Rudolph. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... City nickname(s): The A-T-L, The Horizon City, The Capital of the South, The Phoenix City, The City Too Busy to Hate, Hotlanta, A-Town, The Big A, The New York of the South, The Big Peach, City of a Hundred Hills County Fulton County, Georgia Area  - Total... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley (D) Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Order: 43rd President of United States Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present (Current Term will end on January 20, 2009. ... A death camp is a concentration camp which has been deliberately set up in order to kill those imprisoned there; such camps are not intended as punishment for criminal actions, rather, they are intended to facilitate genocide. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ... Order: 38th President Vice President: Nelson A. Rockefeller Term of office: August 9, 1974 – January 20, 1977 Preceded by: Richard Nixon Succeeded by: Jimmy Carter Date of birth: July 14, 1913 Place of birth: Omaha, Nebraska First Lady: Betty Ford Political party: Republican Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Air France Boeing 747 Air France (Compagnie Nationale Air France) is a subsidiary of Air France-KLM. Before the take-over of KLM, it was essentially the national airline of France, employing over 64,000 people. ... The Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde supersonic transport (SST) was one of only two models of supersonic passenger airliners to have seen commercial service. ... Charles de Gaulle International Airport (French: A roport de Roissy-Charles de Gaulle), also known as Roissy Airport (or just Roissy in French), serving Paris, is one of Europes principal aviation centers, as well as Frances main international airport. ... British Airways is the largest airline of the United Kingdom. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Peter G. MacKay The Honourable Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, MP, (born September 27, 1965) was the final leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC Party). ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Right Honourable Charles Joseph Clark, PC , CC , AOE , MA , BA , LL.D. (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 2, 1980. ...

May 30, 2003

BLack Friday In Burma Depayin Massacre May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a group of workers who act collectively to address common issues. ... The Transport and General Workers Union, also known as the TGWU and the T&G, is one of the largest general trade unions in the United Kingdom and Ireland - where it is known as the Amalgamated TGWU - with 900,000 members (and was once the largest trade union in the... Tony Woodley (born 2 January 1948) is a British Trade Union leader who came to prominence in June 2003 when he was elected to succeed Bill Morris as General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers Union (T&G). ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Iraqi Airways is an airline based in Baghdad, Iraq. ... Burmas Black Friday By Simon Montlake In northern Burma [[1]] Our correspondent is one of the few journalists to have visited a remote part of northern Burma that was the scene of a violent clash leading to the latest detention of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. ... Depayin Massacre Attacks Peoples Democratic Aspirations Asia Legal Resource Centre (Ed. ...

  • Burma: Massacre at Depayin Report See:UN Report[3][4] [5][6][7]

May 29, 2003

  • Space Shuttle Columbia disaster: NASA officials release experimental findings proving that the insulation known to have hit the leading edge of Columbia's left wing could have created a gap in between protective heat panels. [8]
  • A Russian nuclear energy company founded a branch to promote its bid for Finland's new nuclear power plant. Competing bids have been submitted by French-German company Framatome and General Electric. Finnish power company TVO will make its selection in the autumn at the earliest, but by the end of the year at the latest.
  • The Indian Ministry of Defence announced its purchase of Phalcon early warning radar systems from Israel. The contract is worth 1.2 billion US dollars.
  • Legendary entertainer Bob Hope celebrates his 100th birthday, quipping "I'm so old, they've canceled my blood type." [9]

May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shuttle debris falling over Texas The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster was the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-107) over Texas on February 1, 2003, during reentry into the Earths atmosphere. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (established 1958) is the government agency responsible for the United States of Americas space program and long-term general aerospace research. ... A nuclear power plant in Cattenom, France. ... The General Electric Company, or GE, (NYSE: GE) is a multinational technology and services company. ... TVO is an acronym with several different significations: TVOntario (Canadian TV station) Óptima Televisión (Chilean TV station) TV Osaka (Japanese TV station) Total Value of Ownership This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This long range radar antenna (approximately 40m (130ft) in diameter) rotates on a track to observe activities near the horizon. ... Leslie Townes Hope KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), best known as Bob Hope, was a famous entertainer, having appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, movies and in army concerts. ...

May 28, 2003

May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The chemical compound nitrogen trichloride (trichloramine) is a chloramine, with chemical formula NCl3. ... A chemical reaction is a process involving one, two or more substances (called reactants), characterized by a chemical change and yielding one or more product(s) which are different from the reactants. ... Link titleAn organic compound is any member of a large class of chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon, with exception of carbides, carbonates and carbon oxides. ... General Name, Symbol, Number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Atomic mass 35. ... 50 meter indoor swimming pool A swimming pool, swimming bath, or wading pool is an artificially enclosed body of water intended for recreational or competitive swimming, or for other bathing activities that do not involve swimming, e. ... The CBS Evening News is the flagship nightly television news program of the American television network CBS. Early history It originally competed against the Camel News Caravan on NBC, and was anchored by Douglas Edwards. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... The Miami skyline, as it is seen from the northeast on Biscayne Bay. ... Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966, New York City, USA) is a former professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion and is considered by some to be one of greatest heavyweight boxers of all time. ... Greta Van Susteren, on FOX News. ... Desiree Washington was an 18-year-old Miss Black America beauty pageant contestant who claimed she was raped by boxer Mike Tyson in an Indianapolis, Indiana hotel room on July 19, 1991. ... AC Milan is an Italian football club. ... UEFA logo The Union of European Football Associations, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced you-AY-fuh), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... Juventus F.C. (Latin for Youth) is one of Italys oldest and most successful football clubs, based in Turin. ... In Association Football (soccer), a penalty kick is a free kick from twelve yards (eleven metres) out with only the goalkeeper of the defending team between the penalty taker and the goal. ... Old Trafford (2001) Old Trafford football stadium (given the nickname The Theatre of Dreams by Bobby Charlton) is the home of Manchester United F.C., one of the most famous football clubs in the world. ... Manchester is a city in the north-west of England. ... In economics, a monetary union is a situation where several countries have agreed to share a single currency among them. ...

May 27, 2003

  • Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon states that the "occupation" of Palestinian territories is "a terrible thing for Israel and for the Palestinians" and "can't continue endlessly." Sharon's phraseology prompts shock from many in Israel, leading to a clarification that by "occupation," Sharon meant control of millions of Palestinian lives rather than actual physical occupation of land. [12]
  • SCO v. IBM Linux lawsuit: Novell enters the lawsuit between the SCO Group and IBM with a press release concerning the SCO Group's ownership of UNIX. "To Novell's knowledge, the 1995 agreement governing SCO's purchase of UNIX from Novell does not convey to SCO the associated copyrights," a letter to the SCO Group's CEO Darl McBride said in part. "We believe it unlikely that SCO can demonstrate that it has any ownership interest whatsoever in those copyrights. Apparently you share this view, since over the last few months you have repeatedly asked Novell to transfer the copyrights to SCO, requests that Novell has rejected."

May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... The West Bank The Gaza Strip The term occupied Palestinian territories was first adopted by the United Nations in 1974 and in different variations (eg. ... The term Palestine and the related term Palestinian have several overlapping (and occasionally contradictory) definitions. ... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... Novell, Inc. ... The SCO Group, Inc. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) (NYSE: IBM) (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Darl McBride Darl McBride (born about 1960) became the CEO of The SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera) on June 28, 2002. ...

May 26, 2003

May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... The Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD – Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands) is the second oldest political party of Germany still in existence and also one of the oldest and largest in the world, celebrating its 140th anniversary in 2003. ... Greens are people who support some or all of goals of a Green Party without necessarily working with or voting for that or any party. ... Windows NT is an operating system produced by Microsoft. ... SUSE (properly pronounced , but often pronounced /suzi/) is a major retail Linux distribution, produced in Germany. ... Tux, a cartoon penguin frequently featured sitting, is the official Linux mascot. ... In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Steve Ballmer, CEO, Microsoft Steven Anthony Ballmer (born March 24, 1956) is the Chief Executive Officer of Microsoft since January 2000. ... Tux, a cartoon penguin frequently featured sitting, is the official Linux mascot. ... OpenOffice. ... Dr Peter Hollingworth The Right Reverend Dr Peter Hollingworth (born April 10, 1935), Australian clergyman and 23rd Governor-General of Australia, became the first Governor-General to resign his office as a result of criticism of his conduct, when on 28 May 2003 he resigned following the release of an... Flag of the Governor General of Australia The Governor-General of Australia is a position established by the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act to sign legislation into law, appoint judges and ministers and perform many other important duties. ...

May 25, 2003

May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Proposals for a Palestinian state vary depending on ones views of Palestinian statehood, as well as various definitions of Palestine and Palestinian (see also State of Palestine). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Gus Van Sant Gus Van Sant Jr. ... The palace in which the festival takes place. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... Movie poster for Elephant Elephant (2003) is a film by director Gus Van Sant, an account of a school shooting in fictional Watt High School, in Portland, Oregon. ...

May 24, 2003

May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Rudy Giuliani Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... Judith Stish Nathan (Judy Nathan) was the press secretary for New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. ... Lafayette Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Derrick Todd Lee, dubbed the Baton Rouge Serial Killer, has been linked by DNA to the deaths of five women in the Baton Rouge and Lafayette areas in Louisiana. ...

May 23, 2003

May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the Congress. ... Order: 43rd President of United States Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present (Current Term will end on January 20, 2009. ... -1... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney, is an American politician and businessman affiliated with the U.S. Republican Party. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelveEuropean Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...

May 22, 2003

May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz is an American academic and political figure. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has a related story: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ... General Tommy R. Franks (USCENTCOM photo) Tommy Ray Franks, (born June 17, 1945) is a retired General in the United States Army, previously serving as the Commander-in-Chief of United States Central Command, overseeing United States Armed Forces operations in a 25-country region, including the Middle East. ... Retirement is the status of a worker who has stopped working. ... For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Gaetan Boucher training for the 1976 Olympics Speed skating or speedskating is a form of ice skating in which the competitors attempt to travel a certain distance over the ice as quickly as possible. ... Catriona Ann LeMay Doan (born December 23, 1970), born LeMay, is a Canadian speed skater and a double Olympic champion in the 500 m. ... WNBA logo The Womens National Basketball Association or WNBA is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 21, 2003

May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... This article is about the institution of higher learning in the United States. ... John William Sterling (May 12, 1844 - July 5, 1918) was a philanthropist, corporate attorney, and major benefactor to Yale University. ... City nickname: The Elm City Location in the state of Connecticut Founded April 24, 1638 County New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... The Joint Terrorism Task Force is a section of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation charged with taking action against terrorism. ... A pipe bomb is a simple type of improvised explosive device favored by criminals, a piece of pipe filled with an explosive material. ... Mary Flora Bell (born in 1957 in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne England) is a child-killer, in both senses of the term: she killed children, but did so as a child herself. ... The term High Court could refer to one of the following institutions: High Court of England and Wales High Court of Australia The Four Courts of Ireland The High Court of Justiciary in Scotland And the 18 High Courts of India The High Court of Andhra Pradesh The High Court... Anonymity is the state of not being identifiable within a set, called the anonymity set. When referring to human beings, we say that a person is anonymous when the identity of that person is not known. ...

May 20, 2003

May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christine Todd Whitman Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American politician. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... EPA redirects here. ... The Chelsea Flower Show is a garden show held each year for four days in May by the Royal Horticultural Society, Chelsea, London, England. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Look up Cow in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Cow may refer to: Female dairy cattle, other bovines, or other large mammals including elephants and whales. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th)  - Land 642,317 km²  - Water 19,531 km² (2. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has a related story: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. ... The Information Awareness Office is a branch of the United States Department of Defenses Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. ... The Information Awareness Office is a branch of the United States Department of Defenses Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. ...

May 19, 2003

  • White House spokesman Ari Fleischer announces he will resign from his job in the summer, citing his desire to see his new wife more and to work in the private sector as reasons for his decision.

May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... Ari Fleischer Lawrence Ari Fleischer (born October 13, 1960) was the press secretary for U.S. President George W. Bush from January 2001 to July 2003. ...

May 18, 2003

  • The Guardian reporter Andrew Meldrum, the last foreign journalist in Zimbabwe, is forcibly deported after covering the country for the last 23 years.
  • In Belgium federal elections take place. The main winners are the social-democratic cartel SP.a-Spirit and the extreme right wing Vlaams Blok. The biggest losses are for the green party Agalev.
  • A nationwide referendum on record nine issues takes place in Switzerland. Abolishment of nuclear power is rejected. Reduction and modernization of army is approved. It ends requirement of nuclear bunker in every home and famous bicycle brigade. [22], [23], [24]
  • Indonesian president Megawati Sukarnoputri declares martial law in the breakaway republic of Aceh.
  • In Slovakia, voters approve a referendum on joining the European Union. The referendum is only advisory, the decision is in the hands of the national legislature, but it is expected to be approved.

May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian has used this logo on its masthead since its last major redesign in 1988. ... Socialist Party - Different or Social Progressive Alternative (Dutch: Socialistische Partij - Anders or Sociaal Progressief Alternatief (sp. ... Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | Liberal parties | Belgian political parties-Flanders ... Note that Flemish Block turned themselves into Flemish Interest (Vlaams Belang) since their condamnation in 2004 The Flemish Block (Dutch: Vlaams Blok) was a Flemish far-right nationalist political party which rejects the state of Belgium, calling for political independence for the Flemish half of the country. ... Green! (Groen!) is the Flemish green party in Belgium. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Nuclear power is the industry and method of energy production from nuclear fission. ... A nations army is its military, or more specifically, all of its land forces. ... A bunker is a defensive warfare fortification to protect oneself. ... This racing bicycle is built using lightweight, shaped aluminum tubing and carbon fiber stays and forks. ... Brigade is a term from military science which refers to a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). ... Megawati Sukarnoputri Diah Permata Megawati Setiawati Sukarnoputri (born 23 January 1947), was President of Indonesia from July 2001 to 20 October 2004. ... Aceh (pronounced Ah-chay) is a special territory (daerah istimewa, or special area) of Indonesia, located on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...

May 17, 2003

May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) is a football club from north London, and one of the most successful clubs in English football. ... Southampton F.C. (originally St. ... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... align=center[[ colspan=2 | National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English(100%), Welsh(20. ... Cardiff (Welsh: Caerdydd, from caer, fort, and dydd, Aulus Didius) is the capital and largest city of Wales. ... Millennium Stadium The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm) in Cardiff is the national stadium of Wales, used primarily for rugby union and football. ... Horse racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Funny Cide (born April 20, 2000) is a Thoroughbred race horse bred at McMahon of Saratoga Thoroughbreds in the town of Saratoga, New York, from sire Distorted Humor and dam Belles Good Cide. ... The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ... Look up Flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ...

May 16, 2003

May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The following is a timeline of acts and failed attempts that can be considered terrorism. ... For the 1942 film, see Casablanca (movie). ... The Casablanca Attacks were a series of suicide bombings on May 16, 2003, in Casablanca, Morocco that were the deadliest terrorist attacks in that country’s history. ... Astronomy is one of the few sciences where amateurs can still play an active role, especially in the discovery and monitoring of transient phenomena. ... An eclipse occurs whenever the Sun, Earth and Moon line up exactly. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... The Americas (sometimes referred to as America) is the area including the land mass located between the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, generally divided into North America and South America. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and 3rd most populous . ... For alternate meanings of GMT, see GMT (disambiguation). ... The Guardian has used this logo on its masthead since its last major redesign in 1988. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting Americas people from harm and its property from damage. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article deals with the legal definition of quorum. ... NBA logo, depicting former star Jerry West The National Basketball Association, more popularly known as simply the NBA, is the worlds premier mens professional basketball league. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Antonio Spurs are a National Basketball Association team based in San Antonio, Texas. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ...

May 15, 2003

  • The journal Nature reports that all species of large fish in the world's oceans have been so thoroughly overfished that just 10% of the population that there was in 1950 remains. The scientists who authored the report conclude that the world's oceans are no longer even close to their natural state. Sharks, Atlantic cod, and Pacific sardines are tapped as particularly imperilled with extinction. The scientists recommend drastic measures to reduce ocean fishing. Nature, Environment News, BBC
  • The United States Senate approves a tax-cut bill designed to cut revenues by a total of $350 billion over ten years. The Senate takes a compromise position on the controversial issue of taxing stock dividends; the dividend tax is temporarily reduced, then eliminated, and reinstated for 2007. The bill will now go to a conference committee to resolve differences with a $550 billion tax cut passed by the House on May 10.
  • China announces a new series of measures to combat SARS. Foreign adoptions of Chinese babies are now suspended. The penalties for knowingly spreading the disease have been increased, and now include execution.
  • United States federal prosecutors indict Jamal Ahmed Ali al-Badawi and Fahd al-Quso, in absentia, in connection with the USS Cole bombing in Yemen on October 12, 2000.

May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nature is one of the oldest and most reputable general-purpose scientific journals, first published on November 4, 1869. ... Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, the most abundant fish species in the world. ... Ocean (from Okeanos, a Greek god of sea and water; Greek ωκεανός) covers almost three quarters (71%) of the surface of the Earth. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Orders See Classification and Shark taxonomy Sharks are a group (superorder Selachimorpha) of fish, with a full cartilaginous skeleton, a streamlined body plan with between 5 and 7 gill slits along the sides (most often) or side of the head (the first modified slit is behind the eye and called... Species Gadus morhua Gadus macrocephalus Gadus ogac This article is about codfish; for other meanings, see COD. Cod is the common name for the genus Gadus of fish, belonging to the family Gadidae, and is also used in the common name of a variety of other fishes. ... Sardines or pilchards are a group of several types of small oily fish related to herrings, family Clupeidae. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of species. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... Categories: Stub | Al-Qaida members ... Damage to USS Cole The USS Cole bombing was a suicide bombing attack against the guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) on October 12, 2000. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 14, 2003

  • DARPA's Information Processing Technology Office solicits bids for the LifeLog project, an extremely ambitious effort to create a massive searchable computer database, "an ontology-based (sub)system that captures, stores, and makes accessible the flow of one person's experience in and interactions with the world ... The objective ... is to be able to trace the 'threads' of an individual's life in terms of events, states, and relationships". [27], [28]
  • SCO v. IBM Linux lawsuit: Apparently noticing the incongruity of their selling a Linux distribution while suing IBM for stealing their intellectual property and giving it to the developers of that operating system, the SCO Group (formerly Caldera) announces they will no longer distribute Linux. According to their press release, "SCO will continue to support existing SCO Linux and Caldera OpenLinux customers and hold them harmless from any SCO intellectual property issues regarding SCO Linux and Caldera OpenLinux products."
  • Carlos Menem quits the Argentinian presidential race; fellow Peronist Néstor Kirchner is consequently expected to win.
  • The bodies of 17 Hispanics, suspected Mexican illegal immigrants, were found by police in Victoria, Texas. One more person, a man, died in a hospital, raising the death total to 18. 13 of the bodies were found inside a locked truck, and four of them outside it. A man was later arrested in Houston on suspicion of being the smuggler who led the 18 persons to their deaths.

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. ... The Information Processing Technology Office is an agency of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency whose stated mission is: [To] create a new generation of computational and information systems that possess capabilities far beyond those of current systems. ... LifeLog is a project of the Information Processing Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. ... A database is a collection of data elements (facts) stored in a computer in a systematic way, such that a computer program can consult it to answer questions. ... In philosophy, ontology (from the Greek ον = being and λόγος = word/speech) is the most fundamental branch of metaphysics. ... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... Tux, a cartoon penguin frequently featured sitting, is the official Linux mascot. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) (NYSE: IBM) (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... In law, particularly in common law jurisdictions, intellectual property or IP refers to a legal entitlement which sometimes attaches to the expressed form of an idea, or to some other intangible subject matter. ... In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... Crater Lake, Oregon A caldera is a volcanic feature formed by the collapse of a volcano into itself. ... Carlos Saúl Menem (born July 2, 1930) was President of Argentina from 8 July 1989 to 10 December 1999 for the Justicialist Party (Peronist). ... Motto: En Unión y Libertad (English: In Union and Liberty) Anthem: Himno Nacional Argentino Capital Buenos Aires 34°20′ S 58°30′ W Largest city Buenos Aires Official languages Spanish Government President Democratic Republic Néstor Kirchner Independence - May Revolution - Declared - Recognised from Spain May 25, 1810 July 9... Peronism is an Argentine political ideology based on the ideas and programs associated with former president Juan Perón. ... Néstor Carlos Kirchner (born 25 February 1950) is the current President of Argentina. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize native and naturalized U.S. citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from Spain, the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or the original settlers of the traditionally Spanish-held Southwestern United... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... Victoria is a city located in Victoria County, Texas. ... Downtown Houston City nickname: Space City Location in the state of Texas Founded   â€” Incorporated 1836 1837 Counties Harris County Fort Bend County Montgomery County Mayor Bill White Area   â€” Land   â€” Water 601. ...

May 13, 2003

  • The Bureau of Engraving and Printing of the Treasury Department of the United States releases a new 20 dollar note, aimed at defeating the technological advances of counterfeiters. The note is expected to begin circulating in the fall of 2003; which is 5 years since the last $20 note was released in 1998. New designs for the $50 and $100 notes will follow in 2004 and 2005. The most distinctive change in the new currency design is in color. It is the first U.S. currency since 1905 to include colors other than green and black. Different colors for different denominations will make it easier to tell one note from another, and more difficult to counterfeit. The New Color of Money Web site (includes images)
  • Much of France comes to a standstill in a general strike of the public and private sectors. [29]
  • Russian officials identify Arab militant Abu Walib as the mastermind behind the May 12 bombing in Znamenskoye, Chechnya, and claim links between that incident and the bombings in Riyadh 14 hours later. [30]
  • A suicide bombing occurs at a religious festival in the town of Iliskhan-Yurt, in southeastern Chechnya. At least 14 people are killed by the bombing. The attack is apparently an attempt to assassinate Akhmad Kadryov, the Moscow-appointed chief administrator of Chechnya. Kadryov escaped injury. [31], [32]

May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Znamenskoye is a village in northern Chechnya, in Russia. ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn (Nokhchiyn) Respublika), (Russian: Чеченская Республика) also known as Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno), (Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Riyadh from space, April 1994 Minestry of interior Faisaliah Centre King Fahad Int. ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn (Nokhchiyn) Respublika), (Russian: Чеченская Республика) also known as Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno), (Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ...

May 12, 2003

May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Riyadh Compound Bombings took place on May 12, 2003, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Riyadh from space, April 1994 Minestry of interior Faisaliah Centre King Fahad Int. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qā‘idah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to an international alliance of militant Islamist organizations. ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... The FSB (ФСБ) is a state security organisation in Russia. ... Znamenskoye is a village in northern Chechnya, in Russia. ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn (Nokhchiyn) Respublika), (Russian: Чеченская Республика) also known as Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno), (Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Dr. Rihab Taha Dr. Rihab Rashid Taha al-Azawi is a British-educated Iraqi microbiologist who worked in Saddam Husseins biological weapons program and is known as Dr. Germ and Toxic Taha by the propaganda of U.S. and British governments. ... Biological warfare, also known as germ warfare, is the use of any organism (bacteria, virus or other disease_causing organism) or toxin found in nature, as a weapon of war. ... In April 2003, the United States drew up a list of most-wanted Iraqis, consisting of the 55 members of the deposed Iraqi regime whom they most wanted to capture. ... The Right Honourable Clare Short (born February 15, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. ... In British politics, the Cabinet is comprised of the most senior government ministers, most of them heads of government departments with the title Secretary of State. The Cabinet is actually a committee of the Privy Council and all Cabinet members are also Privy Councillors and therefore use the style, The... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, PC (born 13 March 1954), is a British Labour Party politician and life peer, currently serving as Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council. ...

May 11, 2003

  • Ponds on the north side of Catoctin Mountain, near Gambrill Park Road and Tower Road in Frederick, Maryland, are under investigation by the FBI, in connection with the 2001 anthrax attacks. FBI investigators found anthrax spores and other evidence in their search of ponds in the area during December and January, 2002. Divers retrieved a "clear box" with holes that could accommodate protective biological safety gloves, as well as vials wrapped in plastic from a pond in the Frederick Municipal Forest. A new theory has been developed suggesting how a criminal could have packed anthrax spores into envelopes without harming (him/her)self. Officials from Fort Detrick have stated that the water is safe because once in water anthrax spores cluster together and descend to the bottom. The water in the pond has been tested several times over the course of the investigation, and all indications are that the water is safe.
  • A number of newspapers have published the alleged identity of the British Force Research Unit's most senior informer within the Provisional IRA, code-named Steakknife, who is thought to have been head of the Provisional IRA's internal security force, charged with routing out informers like himself. The person named has fled.
  • The Governor-General of Australia Peter Hollingworth has stood down from his post whilst investigations into his past are proceeding. Tasmanian Governor Sir Guy Green is appointed as Commonwealth Administrator.
  • The first confirmed SARS case is reported in Finland. A man who had been visiting Toronto is now being treated at Turku University Hospital.
  • Filip Vujanovic, a former Prime Minister who favors independence, was elected President of Montenegro. This was the third attempt at electing a President in five months; the first two votes did not attract enough voters to make the vote valid. This time the legislature had eliminated the turnout requirement.
  • Voters in Lithuania vote to join the European Union.
  • Rafael Palmeiro of the Texas Rangers hits the 500th home run of his career in a game against the Cleveland Indians.

May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A pond is a body of water smaller than a lake. ... Scenic vista Catoctin Mountain Park is located near Thurmont in Frederick County, Maryland ( 39°39′ N 77°28′ W). ... {{{{{2|{{{2}}}}}}|1{{{motto=void|2={{{3}}}}}}|city motto|{{{motto}}}}} Location in the state of Maryland Founded  -Incorporated 1745  {{{incorporated}}} County Frederick County Mayor Jennifer Dougherty Area  - Total  - Water 59. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... (Redirected from 2001 anthrax attack) A letter sent to Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle containing weaponised anthrax powder caused the deaths of two postal workers. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The term spore has several different meanings in biology. ... December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An envelope is a packaging product, usually made of flat, planar material such as paper or cardboard, designed to contain a flat object such as a letter. ... Fort Detrick is a United States Army medical installation located in Frederick, Maryland. ... The Force Research Unit is alleged to be a covert military intelligence organization established by the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence under the British Armys Special Intelligence Wing (SIW). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... Steakknife (sometimes written as Steak knife or incorrectly as Stakeknife[1]) is the code name of a spy who infiltrated the Provisional IRA, at a high level, as a double agent working for the top secret British Force Research Unit. ... Flag of the Governor General of Australia The Governor-General of Australia is a position established by the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act to sign legislation into law, appoint judges and ministers and perform many other important duties. ... Dr Peter Hollingworth The Right Reverend Dr Peter Hollingworth (born April 10, 1935), Australian clergyman and 23rd Governor-General of Australia, became the first Governor-General to resign his office as a result of criticism of his conduct, when on 28 May 2003 he resigned following the release of an... Sir Guy Green was the Governor of Tasmania from 1995 to 2003. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... }|135px|City of Toronto, Ontario Official Flag]]|Coat Image=[[Image:{{{Coat Image}}}|135px|City of Toronto, Ontario Coat of Arms]]}} {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Diversity Our Strength {{Canadian City/Location Image is:{{{Location Image Type}}}|[[Image:{{{Location Image}}}|thumbnail|250px|City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Location. ... Location within Finland Turku (Swedish: Åbo  listen?, Latin: Aboa) is a city in Finland, founded in the 13th century. ... Filip Vujanović is a politician and the president of Montenegro as of 2004. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian Capital Podgorica Former Royal Capital Cetinje President Filip Vujanović Prime Minister Milo Đukanović Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  13,812 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ Density  616,258  48. ... Rafael Palmeiro Corrales (born September 24, 1964 in Havana, Cuba) is a Major League Baseball player, currently playing for the Baltimore Orioles. ... Texas Rangers American League AAA Oklahoma RedHawks AA Frisco RoughRiders A Bakersfield Blaze Clinton LumberKings Spokane Indians R Arizona Rangers The Texas Rangers are a Major League Baseball team based in Arlington, Texas, a suburb in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... For other uses of the phrase see Home run (disambiguation) In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run himself (along with a run for each runner who was already on... The Cleveland Indians are a Major League Baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ...

May 10, 2003

May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 9, 2003

  • As many as 129 are feared dead after a door opens on a plane flying from Kinshasa to Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The victims were sucked from the plane, which returned to Kinshasa after the incident. Although the airline to which the plane belongs to is unknown, the plane involved in the tragedy has a logo of Ukrainian Cargo Airlines.
  • The United States Senate Armed Services Committee votes to lift a 10-year-old ban on the research and development of low-yield nuclear weapons as part of its 2004 defense-spending bill. The majority of the committee and the Bush administration argue that such weapons may in the future become necessary to deal with terrorist threats, and to effectively incinerate biological or chemical weapons installations. The move is criticized by Democrats who fear that it will increase the risks of nuclear proliferation and nuclear escalation in warfare. [36], [37]
  • The National Association of Evangelicals, a group of evangelical Christians, condemns Franklin Graham, Jerry Falwell, Jerry Vines, Pat Robertson and other evangelical ministers for anti-Islamic statements.
  • The United States House of Representatives approves a tax-cut measure for $550 billion over 10 years. This is $176 billion less than President George W. Bush originally proposed, but $200 billion more than the Senate's version of the same measure. One highly controversial aspect of the President's initial proposal that the House removed is the repeal of the tax on dividends paid by corporations to shareholders. There are also important differences between the House and Senate bills, and great difficulty is foreseen in reconciling them before they may be sent to the President for approval.

May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kinshasa (formerly Léopoldville) is the capital and largest city of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... Lubumbashi is the second largest city in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... A Boeing 747-400 of Virgin Atlantic Airways, one of the UKs largest airlines. ... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... The term terrorism is controversial and has many definitions, none of which are universally accepted. ... Nuclear proliferation is the spread from nation to nation of nuclear technology, including nuclear power plants but especially nuclear weapons. ... The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) is an agency dedicated to coordinating cooperative ministry for evangelical denominations of Christians in the United States. ... Evangelicalism, in a strictly lexical, but rarely used sense, refers to all things that are implied in belief that Jesus is the savior. ... William Franklin Graham, III (born July 14, 1952), best known as Franklin Graham, is a American evangelical Christian preacher and missionary. ... Jerry L. Falwell (born August 11, 1933) is an American Baptist pastor, televangelist, founder of the Moral Majority & Liberty University, and a prominent Conservative activist. ... Jerry Vines is the pastor of the First Baptist Church of Jacksonville, Florida. ... Pat Robertson Marion Gordon Robertson, better known as Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930), is an American Christian televangelist, entrepreneur, humanitarian, and right wing political activist. ... Islam   listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... Order: 43rd President of United States Vice President: Dick Cheney Term of office: January 20, 2001 – Present (Current Term will end on January 20, 2009. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... A dividend is the distribution of profits to a companys shareholders. ...

May 8, 2003

  • 30 German passengers and the driver of a tourist bus are killed by a train collision at a railroad crossing near Siofok, Hungary. 12 people are injured. Most of the passengers came from Lower Saxony or Schleswig-Holstein.
  • A vulnerability in the Microsoft Passport Internet authentication system is announced which allows an attacker to change a victim's password and thereby hijack their account. This affects Hotmail and other Passport-enabled systems, allowing an attacker to use a victim's email account and obtain other personal data such as credit card numbers. [38], [39]
  • The Russian mathematician Dr Grigori Perelman claims to have resolved the Poincaré conjecture. [40]
  • In New York City, the World Boxing Council declares itself bankrupt, to avoid paying a former world champion 30 million dollars after the former boxer wins a lawsuit against the organization.
  • King Mohammed VI of Morocco releases 9459 prisoners from Morocco's prisons in celebration of the birth of his first son and heir, who was named Prince Hassan.

May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Hungarian city and municipality on the southern bank of Lake Balaton in Somogy County. ... With an area of 47,618 km and nearly eight million inhabitants, Lower Saxony (German Niedersachsen) lies in north-western Germany and is second in area and fourth in population among the countrys sixteen Bundesl nder (federal states). ... Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 Bundesländer in Germany. ... Microsoft Passport Network is a universal-login service provided by Microsoft that allows users to log in to many websites using one account. ... Hotmails login page Hotmail is one of the most popular free webmail e-mail services, which are accessible from anywhere on the planet via a standard web browser. ... Grigori Grisha Yakovlevich Perelman (Russian: Григорий Яковлевич Перельман) (born 13 June 1966) is a Russian Jewish mathematician who is an expert on Ricci flow. ... In mathematics, the Poincaré conjecture is a conjecture about the characterisation of the three-dimensional sphere amongst 3-manifolds. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... The World Boxing Council (WBC) has operated since 1963 as a competitor to the World Boxing Association and, according to its founders, a way to improve professional boxings standards. ... US President George W. Bush talks with His Majesty King Mohammed VI of Morocco in the Oval Office Tuesday, April 23 2002 His Majesty King Mohammed VI (Arabic: الملك محمد السادس للمغرب) a. ...

May 7, 2003

  • Nearly 40,000 manuscripts and 700 artifacts belonging to the National Museum of Iraq in Baghdad are recovered by U.S. Customs agents working with museum experts in Iraq. Some looters had returned items after promises of rewards and amnesty, and many items previously reported missing had actually been hidden in secret storage vaults at the museum prior to the outbreak of war.
  • A five-hour transit of Mercury takes place, an event that occurs roughly 12 times per century.

May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... An artifact (also artefact) is a term coined by Sir Julian Huxley meaning any object or process resulting from human activity. ... The National Museum of Iraq is located in Baghdad, Iraq. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has a related story: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... A transit of Mercury across the Sun takes place when the planet Mercury comes between the Sun and the Earth, and Mercury is seen as a small black dot moving across the face of the Sun. ...

May 6, 2003

May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria memorial. ... HRH The Earl of Wessex His Royal Highness The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor), styled HRH The Earl of Wessex (born March 10, 1964), is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title... HRH The Countess of Wessex Her Royal Highness The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen Mountbatten-Windsor, née Rhys-Jones), (born January 20, 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of HRH The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II. The... December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith. ... HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, KG, KT, OM, GBE, AC, QSO, PC, (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark) (born 10 June 1921) is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... [[Im? Henry Jan age:LocationAsia. ... A country, a land, or a state, is a geographical area that connotes an independent political entity, with its own government, administration, laws, often a constitution, police, military, tax rules, and population, who are one anothers countrymen. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... Child abuse is the physical or psychological mistreatment of a child by his or her parents (including adoptive parents), guardians, or other adults. ...

May 5, 2003

  • Boeing unveils a drawing of a proposed airplane of the future and launches a public contest to name the airplane.

May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA) is a leading American aircraft and aerospace manufacturer, headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, with its largest production facilities in Everett, Washington, near Seattle, Washington. ...

May 4, 2003

May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Manchester United is an English football club, based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... FA Premier League logo The FA Premier League (which, for sponsorship reasons, is often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in the UK and the Barclays English Premier League internationally) is a league competiton for English football (soccer) clubs located at the top of the English football league system (above... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) is a football club from north London, and one of the most successful clubs in English football. ... Leeds United F.C. is the only professional association football club in Leeds. ... A tornado over land. ... This is the article on the state. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... Missouri, named after the Missouri Siouan Indian tribe meaning canoe, is a Midwestern state in the United States with Jefferson City as its capital. ...

May 3, 2003

May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... State nickname: The Granite State Other U.S. States Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch Official languages English Area 24,239 km² (46th)  - Land 23,249 km²  - Water 814 km² (3. ... This article is about the New Hampshire landmark. ... Funny Cide (born April 20, 2000) is a Thoroughbred race horse bred at McMahon of Saratoga Thoroughbreds in the town of Saratoga, New York, from sire Distorted Humor and dam Belles Good Cide. ... A gelding is a castrated animal—specifically, a castrated male horse. ... The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Geneva (French: Genève) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland located where Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman, but the Genevois are fond of calling it Lac de Genève) empties into the Rhône River. ... Diarmuid Martin is the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland. ... Primate of Ireland is a title possessed by the Roman Catholic and Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishops of Dublin. ... The Servant of God Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making him the third-longest in the history of the... St. ... His Eminence Desmond Cardinal Connell is a cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church, and formerly Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland. ...

May 2, 2003

  • U.S. economic indicators: The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics announces that the unemployment rate rose to 6% in April as employers cut 48,000 jobs, smaller than the consensus estimate of 75,000. This followed a revised decline of 124,000 jobs in March.

May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 1, 2003

  • The Labour Party under the leadership of Rhodri Morgan win a landslide victory in the Welsh Assembly elections.
  • President Bush safely lands in an S-3B Viking jet on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln returning from operations in Iraq while 100 miles off the coast of San Diego, California. It is the first time a sitting president has arrived on the deck of an aircraft carrier by plane. Bush makes a primetime address, surrounded by hundreds of sailors, in which he declares major combat operations in Iraq over.
  • A magnitude 6.4 earthquake hits Bingol, Turkey, killing at least 87 people and injuring 400.
  • United States Navy forces start moving out of Vieques. A big celebration erupts on Vieques' streets at 12:01 AM EST, to celebrate the military's move out of the island.
  • The British Columbia Supreme Court becomes the third provincial supreme court to rule that the Canadian government must legally recognize same-sex marriage.
  • The Canadian dollar exceeds 70 cents US for the first time in five years, reaching $0.7044 US.

  Results from FactBites:
 
May 2003 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3676 words)
2003 occupation of Iraq: The United Nations Security Council votes to lift its sanctions on Iraq and to give the United States and United Kingdom control over the country indefinitely until a democratic government is formed.
The note is expected to begin circulating in the fall of 2003; which is 5 years since the last $20 note was released in 1998.
Manchester United F.C. win the 2003 FA Premier league due to Arsenal F.C.s failure to beat Leeds United F.C. At least 19 people are killed in a series of tornadoes in the states of Colorado, Kansas and Missouri.
Belmont Club: May 2003 (13329 words)
Since the Belgian Army has an average age of 40 and employs hundreds of hairdressers, despite a shortage of equipment, the world will may soon be regaled by the sight of platoons of middle-aged hairdressers attempting to serve subpoenas on cannibals in the Congo for the crime of eating pygmies.
On May 18, 2003 Belmont Club followed the fate of UN peacekeepers missing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
In other words, there may be a conflict of interest on the part of Malaysia, and it may be self-serving on their part to maintain the status quo of not having peace in Mindanao.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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