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Encyclopedia > Maximilian Maria Kolbe
Saint Maximilian Kolbe
Martyr
Born 8 January 1894, Zduńska Wola, Poland
Died 14 August 1941, Auschwitz concentration camp, Poland
Venerated in Catholic Church
Beatified 17 October 1971
Canonized 10 October 1982
Major shrine Basilica of the Immaculate Mediatrix of Grace, Niepokalanów, Poland
Feast 14 August
Attributes Either a Franciscan friar's habit or a Nazi concentration camp prisoner's uniform, a rosary or a medallion with Virgin Mary in his hand
Patronage 20th century, power workers, journalists, political prisoners, drug addicts
O Lord Jesus Christ, who said, "greater love than this no man has that a man lay down his life for his friends," through the intercession of Saint Maximilian Kolbe whose life illustrated such love, we beseech you to grant us our petitions...

Through the Militia Immaculata movement, which Maximilian founded, he spread a fervent devotion to Our Lady throughout the world. He gave up his life for a total stranger and loved his persecutors, giving us an example of unselfish love for all men - a love that was inspired by true devotion to Mary. Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for their convictions or religious faith, such as during the persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... ZduÅ„ska Wola is a town in central Poland with 45,900 inhabitants (1995). ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... Auschwitz, Konzentrationslager Auschwitz-Birkenau, KL Auschwitz is the name used to identify the largest of the Nazi German extermination camps, along with a number of concentration camps, comprising two main camps and 40-50 sub-camps. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... In Catholicism, beatification (from Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Niepokalanów (City of the Immaculate) is a Catholic religious community near Warsaw, Poland founded in 1927 by Franciscan Friar Maximilian Kolbe. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... A concentration camp is a large detention center created for political opponents, enemy aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads The Rosary (from Latin rosarium, crown of roses), is an important and traditional devotion of the Catholic Church consisting of a set of prayer beads and a system of set prayers. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture sometimes displayed in homes. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Electric power is the amount of work done by an electric current in a unit time. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... A political prisoner is anyone held in prison or otherwise detained, perhaps under house arrest, because their ideas or image either challenge or pose a real or potential threat to the state. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ...


Grant, O Lord Jesus, that we too may give ourselves entirely without reserve to the love and service of our Heavenly Queen in order to better love and serve our fellow man in imitation of your humble servant, Saint Maximilian. Amen.


Novena to St. Maximilian Kolbe

Maximilian Kolbe (January 8, 1894August 14, 1941), also known as Maksymilian or Massimiliano Maria Kolbe and Apostle of Consecration to Mary, born as Rajmund Kolbe, was a Polish Franciscan friar who volunteered to die in place of a stranger in the German concentration camp at Auschwitz in Poland. January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Auschwitz, Konzentrationslager Auschwitz-Birkenau, KL Auschwitz is the name used to identify the largest of the Nazi German extermination camps, along with a number of concentration camps, comprising two main camps and 40-50 sub-camps. ...


He was canonized by the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Maximilian Kolbe on October 10, 1982 by Pope John Paul II, and declared a martyr of charity. He is the patron saint of drug addicts, families, imprisoned people, journalists, prisoners, and the pro-life movement. Catholic Church redirects here. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from October 16, 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate. ...

Contents


Biography

Kolbe was born in 1894 in Zduńska Wola, at that time part of Russia, as the second son of Juliusz Kolbe and Marianna Kolbe (née Dąbrowska). His parents moved to Pabianice, where they worked first as weavers, then ran a bookstore. Later, in 1914, his father joined Józef Piłsudski's Polish Legions and was captured and executed by the Russians for fighting for the independence of a partitioned Poland. ZduÅ„ska Wola is a town in central Poland with 45,900 inhabitants (1995). ... Pabianice is a town in central Poland with 75,700 inhabitants (1995). ... Genera Many:see text The Weavers are small passerine birds related to the finches. ... A bookstore. ... Office Chief of State Term of office from November 14, 1918 until December 9, 1922 Profession Statesman and military commander Political party none, see Sanacja for details Spouse Maria PiÅ‚sudska Date of birth December 5, 1867 Place of birth Zułów, in todays Lithuania Date of death May... Polish Legions (Polish Legiony Polskie) was the name of Polish armed forces created in August of 1914 in Galicia. ... The Partitions of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, commonly known as the Partitions of Poland (Polish: Rozbiór Polski or Rozbiory Polski; Lithuanian: Padalijimas) took place in the 18th century and ended the existence of the sovereign Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ...


In 1907, Kolbe and his elder brother Franciszek decided to join the Franciscan order. They illegally crossed the border between Russia and Austria-Hungary and joined the Franciscan junior seminary in Lwów. In 1910, Kolbe was allowed to enter the novitiate. He professed his first vows in 1911, adopting the name Maxsimilian, and the final vows in 1914, in Rome, adopting the names Maxsimilian Maria, to show his veneration of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students in religion, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... Lviv (Ukrainian: Львів, L’viv ; Polish: Lwów; Russian: Львов, Lvov; German: Lemberg; Latin: Leopolis; see also Cities alternative names) is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... A novitiate (also called a novice) is a member of a religious order who has not yet taken his/her vows. ... Monastic vows are the public vows of poverty, chastity and obedience professed by the monks in the Catholic and Orthodox tradition. ... Monastic vows are the public vows of poverty, chastity and obedience professed by the monks in the Catholic and Orthodox tradition. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture sometimes displayed in homes. ...


In 1912, he sent to Kraków, and, in the same year, to Rome, where he studied philosophy, theology, mathematics, and physics. He earned a doctorate in philosophy in 1915 at the Pontifical Gregorian University, and the doctorate in theology in 1919 at the Pontifical University of St. Bonaventure. During his time as a student, he witnessed vehement demonstrations against Popes St. Pius X and Benedict XV by the Freemasons in Rome and was inspired to organize the Militia Immaculata, or Army of Mary, to work for conversion of sinners and the enemies of the Catholic Church through the intercession of the Virgin Mary. In 1918, he was ordained a priest. In the conservative publications of the Militia Immaculatae, he particularly condemned Freemasonry, Communism, Zionism, Capitalism and Imperialism. Tomb of Kazimierz the Great St. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... The Philosopher (detail), by Rembrandt Philosophy is a study that includes diverse subfields such as aesthetics, epistemology, ethics, logic, and metaphysics. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... Euclid, detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ... A Superconductor demonstrating the Meissner Effect. ... The Pontifical Gregorian University The Pontifical Gregorian University is a Roman Catholic university in Rome. ... Pope Saint Pius X (Latin: ), born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto (June 2, 1835 – August 20, 1914), was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII (1878–1903). ... Pope Benedict XV Benedict XV, né Giacomo della Chiesa (November 21, 1854-January 22, 1922), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1914 to 1922; he succeeded Pope Saint Pius X. He was born in Genoa, Italy, of a noble family. ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... The Militia Immaculata, or Army of the Immaculate, is a worldwide Catholic evangelization movement founded by St. ... Holy Orders in the modern Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, and Independent Catholic Churches, includes three degrees: bishop, priest, and deacon. ... Roman Catholic priests in traditional clerical clothing. ... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Poster promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s: Toward a New Life (in Romanian),The Promised Land (in Hungarian), in small (down) text is written First Palestinian sound movie 1844 Discourse on the Restoration of the Jews by Mordecai Noah, page one. ... Capitalism has been defined in various ways by different theorists. ... Imperialism is a policy of extending control or authority over foreign entities as a means of acquisition and/or maintenance of empires, either through direct territorial conquest or settlement, or through indirect methods of exerting control on the politics and/or economy of other countries. ...


In 1919, he returned to the newly independent Poland, where he was very active in promoting the veneration of the Immaculate Virgin Mary, founding and supervising the monastery of Niepokalanów near Warsaw, a seminary, a radio station, and several other organizations and publications. Between 1930 and 1936, he took a series of missions to Japan, where he founded a monastery at the outskirts of Nagasaki, a Japanese paper, and a seminary. Second Polish Republic 1921-1939 The Second Polish Republic is an unofficial name applied to the Republic of Poland between World War I and World War II. When the borders of the state were fixed in 1921, it had an area of 388. ... Mary Immaculate This article refers to the dogma of the immaculate conception of Mary, Mother of Jesus. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture sometimes displayed in homes. ... Niepokalanów (City of the Immaculate) is a Catholic religious community near Warsaw, Poland founded in 1927 by Franciscan Friar Maximilian Kolbe. ... Warsaw (Polish: , (?), in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto StoÅ‚eczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and appeal to a wider international audience, this article may require cleanup. ... Since the Lausanne Congress of 1974, a widely-accepted definition of a Christian mission has been to form a viable indigenous church-planting movement. ... Megane-bashi (Spectacles Bridge) Nagasaki ) (help· info), literally long peninsula, is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture. ...


Auschwitz

During the Second World War, in the Niepokalanów friary, Kolbe provided shelter to refugees from Greater Poland, including 2,000 Jews. He was also active as a radio amateur, with Polish call letters SP3RN, vilifying Nazi activities by reporting the facts. On February 17, 1941, he was arrested by the German Gestapo and imprisoned in the Pawiak prison, and, on May 25, was transferred to Auschwitz I as prisoner #16670. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Greater Poland (also Great Poland; Polish: Wielkopolska, German: Grosspolen, Latin: Polonia Maior) is one of the historical regions of Poland. ... Mrs. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... The Deaths Head emblem similar to Skull and crossbones, often used as the insignia of the Gestapo The (help· info) (contraction of Geheime Staatspolizei; secret state police) was the official secret police of Nazi Germany. ... Pawiak Pawiak was a famous prison in Warsaw built by the tsarist authorities between 1829 and 1835. ...


In July 1941, a man from Kolbe's bunker had vanished, prompting Karl Fritzsch, the Lagerführer, to pick 10 men from the same bunker to be starved to death in the notorious torture block, Block 11, in order to deter further escape attempts. (The man who had disappeared was later found drowned in the camp latrine.) One of the selected men, Franciszek Gajowniczek, cried out, lamenting his family, and Kolbe volunteered to take his place.


After two weeks of starvation, only four of the ten men were still alive, including Kolbe. The cells were needed, and Kolbe and the other three were executed with an injection of carbolic acid in the heart. Phenol or carbolic acid is a white crystalline solid, with a chemical formula of C6H5OH, a melting point of 43 C, and a boiling point of 182 C at the pressure of 1 atmosphere (or 101080 Pa). ...


He was canonized by Pope John Paul II on 10 October 1982, in the presence of Gajowniczek. The canonization was controversial because some of Kolbe's writings were allegedly anti-Semitic (Rees 2005), [1] although this has been disputed. [2] Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from October 16, 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ...


Kolbe is one of ten 20th-century martyrs from across the world who are depicted in statues above the Great West Door of Westminster Abbey, London. The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... This article is about the British city. ...


See also

  • Holocaust theology

Holocaust theology refers to a body of theological and philosophical debate, soul-searching, and analysis, with the subsequent related literature, that attempts to come to grips with various conflicting views about the role of God in this human world and the dark events of the European Holocaust that occurred during...

References

  • Maximilian Kolbe Catholic-forum.com
  • Kolbe, Mt Maria College
  • Rees, Laurence. Auschwitz: A New History, Public Affairs, 2005. ISBN 1586483579

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maximilian Kolbe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (813 words)
Maximilian Kolbe (January 8, 1894–August 14, 1941), also known as Maksymilian or Massimiliano Maria Kolbe and "Apostle of Consecration to Mary," born as Rajmund Kolbe, was a Polish Franciscan friar who volunteered to die in place of a stranger in the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz in Poland.
He was canonized by the Catholic Church as Saint Maximilian Kolbe on October 10, 1982 by Pope John Paul II, and declared a martyr of charity.
Kolbe was born, to a family of German origin, in 1894 in Zduńska Wola, at that time part of Russia, as the second son of Juliusz Kolbe and Marianna Kolbe (née Dąbrowska).
+Via Rosa - St Maximilian Kolbe - Rosaries and Chaplets Devotional Prayers+ (3558 words)
Maximilian started a shortwave radio station and planned to build a motion picture studio--he was a true "apostle of the mass media." He established a City of the Immaculata in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1930, and envisioned missionary centers worldwide.
Maximilian Kolbe is considered a patron of journalists, families, prisoners, the pro-life movement and the chemically addicted.
Maximilian had a deep love for Mary Immaculate and a terrific devotion to the Miraculous Medal, and is founder of the Militia Immaculata.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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