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Encyclopedia > Maximilian I of Bavaria
King Maximilian I of Bavaria.
King Maximilian I of Bavaria.

Maximilian I (also known as Maximilian Joseph) (May 27, 1756October 13, 1825) was prince-elector of Bavaria (as Maximilian IV Joseph) from 1799 to 1805, king of Bavaria (as Maximilian I) from 1805 to 1825. Image File history File links Maxi. ... Image File history File links Maxi. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Maximilian was the son of the count palatine Frederick Michael of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld and Maria Francisca Sulzbach, and was born at Schwetzingen - between Heidelberg and Mannheim. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Maria Francisca Sulzbach, Pfalzgräfin von Sulzbach. ... Schwetzingen is a German city lying in the northwest of Baden-Württemberg, around 10 km southwest of Heidelberg and 15 km southeast of Mannheim. ... A view of the city from the castle (Schloss) The castle (Schloss) above the town Shopping district Heidelberg and the other cities of the Neckar valley View from the so called alley of philosophers (Philosophenweg) towards the Old Town, with Heidelberg Castle, Heiliggeist Church and the Old Bridge Heidelberg is... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ...


He was carefully educated under the supervision of his uncle, Duke Christian IV of Zweibrücken, took service in 1777 as a colonel in the French army and rose rapidly to the rank of major-general. From 1782 to 1789 he was stationed at Strasbourg, but at the outbreak of the French Revolution he exchanged the French for the Austrian service, taking part in the opening campaigns of the revolutionary wars. Zweibrücken is a city of Germany in Rhineland-Palatinate, on the Schwarzbach river at the border of the Palatine Forest. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Alsace Département Bas-Rhin (67) Intercommunality Urban Community of Strasbourg Mayor Fabienne Keller  (UMP) (since 2001) City Statistics Land area¹ 78. ... The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, Spain, Russia, Sardinia France The French Revolutionary Wars occurred between the outbreak of war between the French Revolutionary government and Austria in 1792 and the Treaty of Amiens in 1802. ...


Duke of Zweibrücken and Elector of Bavaria and the Palatinate

Bavarian Royalty
House of Wittelsbach

Maximilian I
Children
   Ludwig I
   Princess Augusta
   Princess Amalie Marie
   Princess Charlotte
   Prince Karl Theodor
   Prince Karl Friedrich
   Elisabeth Ludovika, Queen of Prussia
   Princess Amalie Auguste
   Archduchess Sophie of Austria
   Princess Anne
   Princess Ludovika
   Princess Maximiliana
Ludwig I
Children
   Maximilian II
   Mathilde, Grand Duchess of Hesse and by Rhine
   Otto, King of the Hellenes
   Princess Theodelinde
   Prince Regent Luitpold
   Adelgunde, Duchess of Modena
   Archduchess Hildegarde of Austria
   Prince Adalbert
Grandchildren
   Ludwig II
   Ludwig III
   Prince Leopold
   Princess Therese
   Prince Arnulf
Great Grandchildren
   Princess Elisabeth Marie
   Archduchess Auguste of Austria
   Prince Georg
   Prince Konrad
   Prince Heinrich
Maximilian II
Children
   Ludwig II
   Otto I
Ludwig II

Otto I The Wittelsbach family were the ruling dynasty of the German duchy of Bavaria from 1180 to 1918 and of the Rhine Palatinate from 1214 until 1805; in 1815 the latter territory was incorporated into Bavaria, which had been elevated to a kingdom by Napoleon in 1806. ... Image File history File links Armoiries_Bavière. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name, his godfather was Louis XVI of France) (August 25, 1786, Strasbourg – February 29, 1868, Nice) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. ... Elisabeth Ludovika of Bavaria (November 13, 1801- December 14, 1873) was a Princess of Bavaria and later Queen consort of Prussia. ... Sophie of Austria Sophie Friederike Dorothee Wilhelmine, Princess of Bavaria (27 January 1805 – 28 May 1872) was born to King Maximilian I of Bavaria and his second wife, Karoline of Baden. ... Marie Ludovika Wilhelmine (or Louise), Princess of Bavaria (August 30, 1808 - January 25, 1892) was the sixth child of King Maximilian I of Bavaria and his second wife, Fredricka Caroline Willemina of Baden. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name, his godfather was Louis XVI of France) (August 25, 1786, Strasbourg – February 29, 1868, Nice) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. ... King Maximilian II of Bavaria Maximilian II of Bavaria (November 28, 1811 – March 10, 1864) was king of Bavaria from 1848 until 1864. ... A Youthful Portrait of King Otto of Greece King Otto of Greece, (Greek: Όθων, Βασιλεύς της Ελλάδος) also Prince of Bavaria (June 1, 1815 - July 26, 1867) was made the first modern king of Greece in 1832 under the Convention of London, whereby Greece became a new independent kingdom under the protection of the... Prince Regent Luitpold celebrating his 90th birthday in 1911 Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria (German: Luitpold Karl Joseph Wilhelm Ludwig Prinzregent von Bayern) (12 March 1821—12 December 1912), was the de facto ruler of Bavaria from 1886 to 1912. ... Louis Ferdinand, German: Ludwig Ferdinand; Spanish: Luis Fernando (1859-1949), Duke of Bavaria, was a Bavarian and Spanish royal prince. ... Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm; sometimes known in English as Mad King Ludwig and as the Märchenkönig (Fairy-tale King) in German. ... Ludwig III of Bavaria Ludwig III, HM Ludwig III Leopold Joseph Maria Aloys Alfred King of Bavaria, (7 January 1845 - 18 October 1921) was briefly Prince Regent of Bavaria and was the last King of Bavaria from 1913 to 1918. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Georg Franz Joseph Luitpold Maria, Prince of Bavaria (born April 2, 1880 - died May 31, 1943) was a member of the Bavarian Royal House of Wittelsbach. ... King Maximilian II of Bavaria Maximilian II of Bavaria (November 28, 1811 – March 10, 1864) was king of Bavaria from 1848 until 1864. ... Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm; sometimes known in English as Mad King Ludwig and as the Märchenkönig (Fairy-tale King) in German. ... Postcard photograph from 1916 of King Ottos body in repose. ... Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm; sometimes known in English as Mad King Ludwig and as the Märchenkönig (Fairy-tale King) in German. ... Postcard photograph from 1916 of King Ottos body in repose. ...

Ludwig III
Children
   Crown Prince Rupprecht
   Princess Adelgunde
   Maria, Duchess of Calabria
   Prince Karl
   Prince Franz
   Princess Mathilde of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
   Prince Wolfgang
   Princess Hildegarde
   Princess Notburga
   Wiltrud, Duchess of Urach
   Princess Helmtrud
   Princess Dietlinde
   Princess Gundelinde
Children of Crown Prince Rupprecht
   Prince Luitpold
   Princess Irmingard
   Albrecht, Duke of Bavaria
   Prince Rudolf
   Prince Heinrich
   Princess Irmingard
   Princess Editha
   Princess Hilda
   Gabrielle, Duchess of Cröy
   Sophie, Duchess of Arenberg
Children of Duke Albrecht
   Princess Marie Gabrielle
   Princess Marie Charlotte
   Franz, Duke of Bavaria
   Prince Max
Children of Prince Max
   Princess Sophie, Hereditary Princess of Liechtenstein
   Princess Marie-Caroline
   Princess Hélène
   Princess Elizabeth
   Princess Maria Anna

On April 1, 1795 he succeeded his brother, Charles II, as duke of Zweibrücken, and on February 16, 1799 became Elector of Bavaria and Count Palatine of the Rhine, the Arch-Steward of the Empire on the extinction of the Sulzbach line with the death of the elector Charles Theodore. Ludwig III of Bavaria Ludwig III, HM Ludwig III Leopold Joseph Maria Aloys Alfred King of Bavaria, (7 January 1845 - 18 October 1921) was briefly Prince Regent of Bavaria and was the last King of Bavaria from 1913 to 1918. ... Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria or Crown Prince Rupert of Bavaria (German: Kronprinz Rupprecht von Bayern) (18 May 1869 – 2 August 1955) was the last Bavarian Crown Prince. ... Albrecht, Duke of Bavaria (May 3, 1905 - July 8, 1996). ... Princess Irmingard of Bavaria (born 1923), is the daughter of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria and his second wife, Princess Antonia of Luxembourg. ... His Royal Highness the Duke of Bavaria Franz Bonaventura Adalbert Maria Herzog von Bayern (born July 14, 1933), styled as His Royal Highness The Duke of Bavaria, is head of the Wittelsbach family, the former ruling family of the Kingdom of Bavaria. ... Prince Max, Duke in Bavaria Prince Max, Duke in Bavaria, born 21 January 1937 is the heir presumptive to both the Bavarian Royal House and the Jacobite Succession. ... Her Royal Highness Hereditary Princess Sophie von und zu Liechtenstein (born October 28, 1967), née Her Royal Highness Princess Sophie of Bavaria, Duchess in Bavaria is the wife of HSH Hereditary Prince Alois of Liechtenstein. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... A palatinate is a territory administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign, but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... Sulzbach can refer to: places in Germany: Sulzbach-Rosenberg, a town in the district Amberg-Sulzbach, Bavaria. ... Karl Theodor (born in 1724) reigned as Duke of Bavaria from 1777 until his death in 1799. ...


The sympathy with France and with French ideas of enlightenment which characterized his reign was at once manifested. In the newly organized ministry Count Max Josef von Montgelas, who, after falling into disfavour with Charles Theodore, had acted for a time as Maximilian Joseph's private secretary, was the most potent influence, an influence wholly "enlightened" and French. Agriculture and commerce were fostered, the laws were ameliorated, a new criminal code drawn up, taxes and imposts equalized without regard to traditional privileges, while a number of religious houses were suppressed and their revenues used for educational and other useful purposes. He closed the University of Ingolstadt in May 1800 and moved it to Landshut. The Age of Enlightenment refers to the 18th century in European philosophy, and is often thought of as part of a larger period which includes the Age of Reason. ... Maximilian Josef Montgelas. ... The University of Ingolstadt was founded in 1472 by Louis the Rich, duke of Bavaria at the time. ... Landshut is a city in Bavaria, Germany, the capital of the Niederbayern region. ...


In foreign politics Maximilian Joseph's attitude was from the German point of view less commendable. With the growing sentiment of German nationality he had from first to last no sympathy, and his attitude throughout was dictated by wholly dynastic, or at least Bavarian, considerations. Until 1813 he was the most faithful of Napoleon's German allies, the relation being cemented by the marriage of his daughter to Eugene Beauharnais. His reward came with the Treaty of Pressburg (December 26, 1805), by the terms of which he was to receive the royal title and important territorial acquisitions in Swabia and Franconia to round off his kingdom. The style of king he actually assumed on January 1, 1806. Nationalism is an ethno- political ideology that sustains the concept of a nation- identity for an exclusive group of people. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Eugène Rose de Beauharnais (September 3, 1781 - February 21, 1824) was the first child and only son of Joséphine de Tascher de la Pagerie and Alexandre, Vicomte de Beauharnais. ... The Treaty of Pressburg was signed on December 26, 1805 between France and Austria as a consequence of the Austrian defeats by France at Ulm (September 25 - October 20) and Austerlitz (December 2). ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Germany. ... The Franconian Rake is originally is a heraldic symbol of the bishops of Würzburg, who - though nominally Dukes of Franconia - only ruled in parts of Franconia. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


King of Bavaria

The new king of Bavaria was the most important of the princes belonging to the Confederation of the Rhine, and remained Napoleon's ally until the eve of the Battle of Leipzig, when by the Treaty of Ried (October 8, 1813) he made the guarantee of the integrity of his kingdom the price of his joining the Allies. By the first Treaty of Paris (June 3, 1814), however, he ceded Tirol to Austria in exchange for the former duchy of Würzburg. The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... The Confederation of the Rhine or Rhine Confederation (Rheinbund in German; in French officially États confédérés du Rhin but in practice Confédération du Rhin) lasted from 1806 to 1813 and was formed from sixteen German states by Napoleon after he defeated Habsburgs Francis II... Combatants France, Poland, Saxony and other states of Confederation of the Rhine Russia, Austrian Empire, Prussia, Sweden Commanders Napoleon I of France, prince Jozef Antoni Poniatowski, King Frederick Augustus of Saxony Karl Philipp, prince of Schwarzenberg Gebhard von Blücher Crown Prince Charles of Sweden Strength 191,000 330,000... The Treaty of Ried of October 8, 1813 was a treaty that was signed between Bavaria and Austria. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... The 1814 Treaty of Paris, signed on May 30, 1814, ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition of the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, Sweden and Prussia. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Tyrol (Tirol in German) is a federal state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... Würzburg is a city in the region of Franconia which lies in the northern tip of Bavaria, Germany. ...


At the Congress of Vienna too, which he attended in person, Maximilian had to make further concessions to Austria, ceding Salzburg and the quarters of the Inn and Hausruck in return for a part of the old Palatinate. The king fought hard to maintain the contiguity of the Bavarian territories as guaranteed at Ried but the most he could obtain was an assurance from Metternich in the matter of the Baden succession, in which he was also doomed to be disappointed. The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ... Flag of Salzburg Salzburg (population 145,000 in 2005) is a city in western Austria and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg (population 520,000 in 2003). ... The Inn is a river in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. ... Klemens Wenzel von Metternich Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar Fürst von Metternich-Winneberg-Beilstein (May 15, 1773 - June 11, 1858) (sometimes rendered in English as Prince Clemens Metternich) was an Austrian politician and statesman and perhaps the most important diplomat of his era. ...


At Vienna and afterwards Maximilian sturdily opposed any reconstitution of Germany which should endanger the independence of Bavaria, and it was his insistence on the principle of full sovereignty being left to the German reigning princes that largely contributed to the loose and weak organization of the new German Confederation. The Federal Act of the Vienna Congress was proclaimed in Bavaria, not as a law but as an international treaty. It was partly to secure popular support in his resistance to any interference of the federal diet in the internal affairs of Bavaria, partly to give unity to his somewhat heterogeneous territories, that Maximilian on May 26, 1818 granted a liberal constitution to his people. Montgelas, who had opposed this concession, had fallen in the previous year, and Maximilian had also reversed his ecclesiastical policy, signing on October 24, 1817 a concordat with Rome by which the powers of the clergy, largely curtailed under Montgelas's administration, were restored. The new parliament proved to be more independent than he had anticipated and in 1819 Maximilian resorted to appealing to the powers against his own creation; but his Bavarian "particularism" and his genuine popular sympathies prevented him from allowing the Carlsbad Decrees to be strictly enforced within his dominions. The suspects arrested by order of the Mainz Commission he was accustomed to examine himself, with the result that in many cases the whole proceedings were quashed, and in not a few the accused dismissed with a present of money. The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was the association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... In politics, a Diet is a formal deliberative assembly. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Particularism is exclusive devotion to ones own groups interests. ... The Carlsbad Decrees were a set of social restrictions introduced in Germany by Prince Klemens Wenzel von Metternich of Austria on September, 20 1819. ...


Maximilian died at Nymphenburg Palace, near Munich, on October 13, 1825 and was succeeded by his son Ludwig I. Maximilian is buried in the crypt of the Theatinerkirche in Munich. View from the Park Schloss Nymphenburg, around 1760, as painted by Canaletto. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München, pronounced listen) is the capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria (German: Freistaat Bayern). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name, his godfather was Louis XVI of France) (August 25, 1786, Strasbourg – February 29, 1868, Nice) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. ... The Theatiner Church in Munich was built from 1663 to 1690, it was founded by Elector Ferdinand Maria and his wife, Henriette Adelaide of Savoy, as a gesture of thanks for the birth of the long-awaited heir to the Bavarian crown, Prince Max Emanuel, in 1662. ...


Private life and family

In private life Maximilian was kindly and simple. He loved to play the part of Landesvater, walking about the streets of his capital en bourgeois and entering into conversation with all ranks of his subjects, by whom he was regarded with great affection.


Maximilian married twice and had a total of thirteen children:

April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in leap years). ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Darmstadt is a city in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hessen in Germany. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name, his godfather was Louis XVI of France) (August 25, 1786, Strasbourg – February 29, 1868, Nice) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Eugène Rose de Beauharnais (September 3, 1781 - February 21, 1824) was the first child and only son of Joséphine de Tascher de la Pagerie and Alexandre, Vicomte de Beauharnais. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Karlsruhe (population 283,959 in 2005) is a city in the south west of Germany, in the Bundesland Baden-Württemberg, located near the French-German border. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Elisabeth Ludovika of Bavaria (November 13, 1801- December 14, 1873) was a Princess of Bavaria and later Queen consort of Prussia. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sophie Friederike Dorothee Wilhelmine, Archduchess of Austria and Princess of Bavaria (27 January 1805 – 28 May 1872) was born to King Maximilian I of Bavaria and his second wife, Karoline of Baden. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Marie Ludovika Wilhelmine (or Louise), Royal Princess of Bavaria (August 30, 1808 - January 25, 1892) was the sixth child of King Maximilian I of Bavaria and his second wife, Catharine of Baden. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

External links

  • The King's portrait

See also

Preceded by:
Karl II
Duke of Zweibrücken
1795-1803
Succeeded by:
Preceded by:
Karl (IV) Theodor
Elector of Bavaria
1799-1805
Succeeded by:
Elector Palatine
1799-1805
Preceded by:
King of Bavaria
1805-1825
Succeeded by:
Ludwig I

The following is a list of rulers during the history of Bavaria: // Dukes of Bavaria, 548-1623 Agilolfing Dynasty (see also Bavarii) ca. ... // Early settlements and Roman Raetia There are numerous palaeolithic finds in Bavaria. ... The town of Zweibrücken was mentioned for the first time in 1170, and in 1182 it became an independent county. ... Karl Theodor (born in 1724) reigned as Elector and Prince of the Palatinate from 1742 until his death 1799, and also as Duke of Bavaria from 1777 (until his death in 1799). ... The following is a list of rulers of Bavaria: Dukes of Bavaria, 889_1623 Liutpolding Dynasty Liutpold 889-907 Arnulf the Bad 907_937 Eberhard 937 Berthold 938_947 Liudolfing (Ottonian) Dynasty Henry I 947_955 Henry II the Quarrelsome 955_976 Otto I 976_982 Liutpolding Dynasty Henry III the Younger 983_985 Liudolfing Dynasty Henry... A palatinate is an area administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... King of Bavaria was a title held by the hereditary rulers of Bavaria from 1805 till 1918, when the kingdom was abolished. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name, his godfather was Louis XVI of France) (August 25, 1786, Strasbourg – February 29, 1868, Nice) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

 
 

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