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Encyclopedia > Maxillary sinus

The maxillary sinus is the largest paranasal sinus. It is intimately related to the upper teeth, tear duct, and the floor of the orbital cavity. The paranasal sinuses are eight (four pairs) air-filled spaces, or sinuses, within the bones of the skull and face. ... Tears trickling down the cheeks Lacrimation is the bodys process of producing tears, which are a liquid to clean and lubricate the eyes. ...


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Sinusitis (2781 words)
For example, maxillary sinusitis indicates an infection of the maxillary sinus, which is located in the mid-face.
Each sinus -- or group of sinuses in the case of the ethmoids -- is represented on the right and left side of the head.
The bony wall between the roots of the molars and the floor of the maxillary sinus may be quite thin, and an infection that begins in your teeth can travel to the adjacent sinus.
Ethmoid bone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1249 words)
On either side of the crista galli, the cribriform plate is narrow and deeply grooved; it supports the olfactory bulb and is perforated by foramina for the passage of the olfactory nerves.
A curved lamina, the uncinate process, projects downward and backward from this part of the labyrinth; it forms a small part of the medial wall of the maxillary sinus, and articulates with the ethmoidal process of the inferior nasal concha.
The middle ethmoidal cells open into the central part of this meatus, and a sinuous passage, termed the infundibulum, extends upward and forward through the labyrinth and communicates with the anterior ethmoidal cells, and in about 50 per cent.
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