FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Maxentius" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Maxentius
Maxentius
Augustus in the west
Bust of Maxentius at the Louvre Museum
Reign 28 October 306 -
28 October 312

(in competition with Severus, then Galerius then Constantine - jointly with his father 306-8) Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... The Western Roman Empire is the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1120x1700, 1181 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Maxentius Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... The main courtyard of the Louvre. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Events October 28 - Battle of Milvian Bridge: Constantine defeats Maxentius in the fight to become emperor of Rome. ... Flavius Valerius Severus as caesar. ... Galerius Maximianus ( 250–5 May 311), formally Gaius Galerius Valerius Maximianus was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311. ... Bronze statue of Constantine I in York, England, near the spot where he was proclaimed Emperor in 306 For other uses, see Constantine I (disambiguation). ... Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... Events November 11 - The Congress of Carnuntum: Attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, the leaders of the Tetrarchy declare Maxentius Augustus, and rival contender Constantine I is declared Caesar (junior emperor of Britain and Gaul) Births Deaths Categories: 308 ...

Full name Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius
Born c.278
Died 28 October 312
Rome
Predecessor Constantius Chlorus
Successor Constantine
Wife/wives Valeria Maximilla
Issue Valerius Romulus,
1 other son of unknown name
Father Maximian
Mother Eutropia

Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius (c. 278-28 October 312) was Western Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. He was the son of former emperor Maximian, and the son-in-law of Galerius, also an emperor. Events Births Deaths Categories: 278 ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Events October 28 - Battle of Milvian Bridge: Constantine defeats Maxentius in the fight to become emperor of Rome. ... Battle of the Milvian Bridge Conflict Date October 28, 312 Place Milvian Bridge (Saxa Rubra), Rome Result Defeat of Maxentius The Battle of Milvian Bridge took place on October 28, 312 between the Roman Emperors Constantine the Great and Maxentius. ... On the reverse of this argenteus struck in Antioch under Constantius Chlorus, the tetrarcs are sacrificing to celebrate a victory against the Sarmatians. ... Bronze statue of Constantine I in York, England, near the spot where he was proclaimed Emperor in 306 For other uses, see Constantine I (disambiguation). ... Valerius Romulus (c. ... Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ... Events Births Deaths Categories: 278 ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Events October 28 - Battle of Milvian Bridge: Constantine defeats Maxentius in the fight to become emperor of Rome. ... The Western Roman Empire is the name given to the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian. ... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ... Galerius Maximianus ( 250–5 May 311), formally Gaius Galerius Valerius Maximianus was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311. ...

Contents

Life

Birth and early life

Maxentius' exact date of birth is unknown; it was probably around 278. He was the son of the emperor Maximian and his wife Eutropia. Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ...


As his father became emperor in 285, he was regarded as crown prince who would eventually follow his father on the throne.i love dillon he rox my world!!!!!!!!!!!<33333 He seems not to have served in any important military or administrative position during Diocletian's and his father's reign, though. Early (the exact date is unknown) he married Valeria Maximilla, the daughter of Galerius. He had two sons, Valerius Romulus (c. 295 – 309) and an unknown one. Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus ( 245– 312), born Diocles (Greek Διοκλής) and known in English as Diocletian,[1] was Roman Emperor from November 20, 284 to May 1, 305. ... Galerius Maximianus ( 250–5 May 311), formally Gaius Galerius Valerius Maximianus was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311. ... Valerius Romulus (c. ...


In 305, Diocletian and Maximian resigned, and the former caesares Constantius and Galerius became Augusti. Although with Constantine and Maxentius two sons of emperors were available, they were left out from the new tetrarchy, and Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars. Some sources (Lactantius, Epitome) state that Galerius hated Maxentius and used his influence on Diocletian that Maxentius be ignored in the succession; maybe Diocletianus also thought that he was not qualified for the military duties of the imperial office. Maxentius retired to an estate some miles from Rome. Events May 1 - Diocletian and Maximian, emperors of Rome, retire from office. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... Gaius Flavius Valerius Constantius (March 31, 250&#8211;July 25, 306) was an emperor of the Western Roman Empire (305&#8211;306). ... Galerius Maximianus ( 250–5 May 311), formally Gaius Galerius Valerius Maximianus was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311. ... Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... Head of Constantines colossal statue at Musei Capitolini Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[1] (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic[2] Christians) Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor, proclaimed Augustus by his troops on... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... Flavius Valerius Severus as caesar. ... This article deals with 4th century Roman Emperor. ... Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (c. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban...


When Constantius died in 306, his son Constantine was crowned emperor on July 25 and subsequently accepted by Galerius into the tetrarchy as caesar. This set the precedent for Maxentius' accession later in the same year. Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ...


Accession

The Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. Completed by his enemy Constantine, it was one of the most impressive edifices of ancient times.
The Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. Completed by his enemy Constantine, it was one of the most impressive edifices of ancient times.

When rumours reached the capital that the emperors tried to subject the Roman population to the capitation tax like every other city of the empire, and wanted to dissolve the remains of the Praetorian Guard which were still stationed at Rome, riots broke out. A group of officers of the city's garrisons (Zosimus calls them Marcellianus, Marcellus and Lucianus) turned to Maxentius to accept the imperial purple, probably judging that the official recognition which was granted to Constantine would not be withheld from Maxentius, son of an emperor as well. Maxentius accepted the honour, promised donations to the city's troops, and was publicly acclaimed emperor on October 28, 306. The usurpation obviously went largely without bloodshed (Zosimus names only one victim); the prefect of Rome went over to Maxentius and retained his office. Apparently the conspirators turned to Maximian as well, who had retired to a palace in Lucania, but he declined to resume power for the time being. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 2133 KB) it: Roma, area archeologica del Foro Romano, Basilica di Massenzio, veduta dal Palatino. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 2133 KB) it: Roma, area archeologica del Foro Romano, Basilica di Massenzio, veduta dal Palatino. ... Remains of the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine in Rome. ... This page refers to the main forum in the centre of Rome. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the pope of this name see Pope Zosimus Zosimus, Greek historical writer, nourished at Constantinople during the second half of the 5th century A.D. According to Photius, he was a count, and held the office of advocate of the imperial treasury. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... For the mountain in Canada named after Lucania, see Mount Lucania. ...


Maxentius managed to be recognized as emperor in central and southern Italy, the islands of Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily, and the African provinces. Northern Italy remained under the control of the western Augustus Severus, who resided in Milan. (Territorial collectivity flag) (Territorial collectivity logo) Location Administration Capital Ajaccio President of the Executive Council Ange Santini (UMP) (since 2004) Departments Corse-du-Sud Haute-Corse Arrondissements 5 Cantons 52 Communes 360 Statistics Land area1 8,680 km² Population (Ranked 25th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: Sardegna; Sardinian: Sardigna or Sardinna) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian, Latin, Sicilian and Spanish, Σικελία in Greek, Sqallija Maltese) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 km² and 5 million inhabitants. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... Flavius Valerius Severus as caesar. ... Milano redirects here. ...


Maxentius refrained from using the titles Augustus or Caesar at first and styled himself princeps invictus (Undefeated Prince), in the hope of obtaining recognition of his reign by the senior emperor Galerius. However, the latter refused to do so. Apart from his alleged antipathy towards Maxentius, Galerius probably wanted to deter others from following the examples of Constantine and Maxentius and declaring themselves emperors. Constantine firmly controlled his father's army and territories, and Galerius could pretend that his accession was part of the regular succession in the tetrarchy, but neither was the case with Maxentius: he would be the fifth emperor, and he had only few troops at his command. Galerius reckoned that it would be not too difficult to quell the usurpation, and early in 307, the Augustus Severus marched on Rome with a large army. The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... March 31 - After divorcing his wife Minervina, Constantine marries Fausta, the daughter of the retired Emperor Maximian. ...


The majority of this army consisted of soldiers who had fought under Maxentius' father Maximian for years, and as Severus reached Rome, the majority of his army went over to Maxentius, rightful heir of their former commander, who dealt out a large amount of money. When Maximian himself finally left his retreat and returned to Rome to assume the imperial office once again and support his son, Severus with the rest of his army retreated to Ravenna. Shortly after he surrendered to Maximian, who promised that his life be spared. Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ... Ravenna is a city and commune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ...


After the defeat of Severus, Maxentius took possession of northern Italy up to the Alps and the Istrian peninsula to the east, and assumed the title of Augustus, which (in his eyes) had become vacant with the surrender of Severus. The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... Coat of arms Istria (Istra, pronounced in Croatian and Slovenian; Istria, pronounced in Italian, Istrien, pronounced in German) is the biggest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ...


Emperor

Maxentius as Augustus on a coin.
Maxentius as Augustus on a coin.

The joint rule of Maxentius and Maximian in Rome was tested further when Galerius himself marched to Italy in the summer of 307 with an even larger army. While negotiating with the invader, Maxentius could repeat what he did to Severus: by the promise of large sums of money, and the authority of Maximian, many soldiers of Galerius defected to him. Galerius was forced to withdraw, plundering Italy on his way. Some time during the invasion, Severus was put to death by Maxentius, probably at Tres Tabernae near Rome (the exact circumstances of his death are not certain). After the failed campaign of Galerius, Maxentius' reign over Italy and Africa was firmly established. Beginning in 307 already, he tried to arrange friendly contacts with Constantine, and in the summer of that year, Maximian travelled to Gaul, where Constantine married his daughter Fausta and was in turn appointed Augustus by the senior emperor. However, Constantine tried to avoid breaking with Galerius, and did not openly support Maxentius during the invasion. Image File history File links Follis-Maxentius-s3776. ... Image File history File links Follis-Maxentius-s3776. ... Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... Gaul in the Roman Empire Roman Gaul consisted of an area of provincial rule in what would become modern day France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and western Germany. ... Fausta, as Salus, holding her two sons, Constantine II and Constantius II. Fausta Flavia Maxima was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Maximianus. ...


In 308, probably April, Maximian tried to depose his son in an assembly of soldiers in Rome; surprisingly to him, the present troops remained faithful to his son, and he had to flee to Constantine. Events November 11 - The Congress of Carnuntum: Attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, the leaders of the Tetrarchy declare Maxentius Augustus, and rival contender Constantine I is declared Caesar (junior emperor of Britain and Gaul) Births Deaths Categories: 308 ...


In the conference of Carnuntum in the autumn of 308, Maxentius was once again denied recognition as legitimate emperor, and Licinius was appointed Augustus with the task of regaining the usurper's domain. // Heidentor (pagan gate). ... As of Licinius Aureus of Licinius, celebrating his tenth year of reign and the fifth year of his son Licinius (on the obverse). ...


Late in 308, Domitius Alexander was acclaimed emperor in Carthage, and the African provinces seceded from Maxentian rule. This produced a dangerous situation for Maxentius, as Africa was critical to Rome's food supply. Under the command of his praetorian prefect Rufius Volusianus, he sent a small army to Africa which defeated and executed Alexander in 310 or 311; Maxentius used the opportunity to seize the wealth of Alexander's supporters, and to bring large amounts of grain to Rome. Also in 310, he lost Istria to Licinius, who could not continue the campaign, however, as Galerius fell mortally ill and died the next year. Domitius Alexander on a follis. ... Ruins of Roman-era Carthage For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... Praetorian prefect (Latin Praefectus praetorio) was the constant title of a high office in the Roman state that changed fundamentally in nature. ... Events While Constantine was campaigning against the Bructeri, Maximian attempted to make himself emperor at Arles. ... Events By Place Roman Empire May 5 - Galerius issues his Edict of Toleration, ending persecution of Christians in his part of the Roman Empire. ... Coat of arms Istria (Istra, pronounced in Croatian and Slovenian; Istria, pronounced in Italian, Istrien, pronounced in German) is the biggest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ...


Maxentius' eldest son Valerius Romulus died in 309, at the age of c. 14, was consecrated and buried in a mausoleum in the Villa of Maxentius at the Via Appia. Valerius Romulus (c. ... Apotheosis means glorification, usually to a divine level, coming from the Greek word apotheoun, to deify. ... Remains of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy The Appian Way (Latin: Via Appia) is a famous road built by the Romans. ...


After the death of Maximian in 309 or 310, relations with Constantine rapidly deteriorated, and Maxentius allied with Maximinus to counter an alliance between Constantine and Licinius. He allegedly tried to secure the province of Raetia north of the Alps, thereby dividing the realms of Constantine and Licinius (reported by Zosimus); the plan was not carried out, as Constantine acted first. This article deals with 4th century Roman Emperor. ... The Roman Empire ca. ...


Domestic policy as emperor

The internal affairs of Maxentius' rule are obscure to a large extent, as there is no source dealing with his reign explicitly and not influenced by later Constantinian propaganda. The main support of his rule was his acceptance in the city of Rome, still theoretically recognized as capital of the Empire, and (as with every emperor) the army; until 308, also the authority of his father.


At first, he commanded only few troops, especially the remains of the Praetorian Guard and the emperor's horse guard, and the urban cohorts at Rome. During the invasions of Severus and Galerius his army was enlarged by the defectors, and after the reconquest of Africa he withdraw some of the border garrisons to Italy. Still, his military power was never great, and he had to rely on the advantage of his position behind the Alps and the fortress of Rome. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


His standing in the city of Rome varied. He tried to secure his position there by granting privileges and demonstrating the renewed role of the city as capital by an extensive building programme (including the Circus of Maxentius). On the other hand, he could not entirely avoid drawing upon the financial resources of the Roman populace, and he probably had to levy taxes on Rome, too. When the Roman corn supply was cut short after the rebellion of Africa, famine broke out in the city, further undermining his rule, and riots seem to have claimed about 6,000 lives. Circus built as part of a funerary complex by the emperor Maxentius. ...


Relations to the Senate were good at the beginning, but probably deteriorated when senators were obliged to support his rule with donations. Many of the high-ranking senators went over to Constantine after Maxentius' death and continued their careers without interruption.


In religious affairs, Maxentius tolerated the Christians in his realm, though he himself supported the traditional pagan religion, which reminded adherents of Rome's glorious past. He especially revered Mars, who was also a deity often associate with his father Maximian. During his reign, the aftermaths of the persecution of Christians under Diocletian led to conflict in the church under the bishops Marcellus I and Eusebius, resulting in the banishment of both by the emperor. Heathen redirects here. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus ( 245– 312), born Diocles (Greek Διοκλής) and known in English as Diocletian,[1] was Roman Emperor from November 20, 284 to May 1, 305. ... Marcellus I, pope, succeeded Marcellinus, after a considerable interval, most probably in May 307; under Maxentius he was banished from Rome in 309 on account of the tumult caused by the severity of the penances he had imposed on Christians who had lapsed under the recent persecution. ... Eusebius (Greek word: euseves=pious) was a Pope in the year 309 or 310. ...


Discovery of Imperial insignia

 This section documents a current event.
Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.

In December 2006, archeologists announced that an excavation under a shrine near the Palatine Hill had unearthed several items in wooden boxes covered in silk, including 3 rare complete lances, 4 javelins and several objects believed to be the base for his imperial standards. The most important find was a scepter, which is believed to have belonged to the Emperor himself because of its intricate worksmanship (it is adorned with a carved flower and a globe). Found alongside the sceptre in its linen-wrapped box was a series of glass spheres, believed to represent the earth. These are the only known royal insignias belonging to this Emperor. Clementina Panella, the archaeologist who made the discovery states that "These artifacts clearly belonged to the emperor, especially the scepter, which is very elaborated, it's not an item you would let someone else have." Panella notes that the insignia was likely hidden by Maxentius' supporters in an attempt to preserve the emperor's memory after he was defeated in the 312 A.D. Battle of Milvian Bridge by Constantine.[1] Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... Combatants Constantinian forces Maxentian forces Commanders Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius† Strength ~50000 men ~75000-120000 men Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Milvian Bridge took place on October 28, 312 between the Roman Emperors Constantine the Great and Maxentius. ...


Death

Early in 312, Constantine crossed the Alps into Italy. He defeated Maxentius' forces in several battles, and reached Rome late in October. It was expected that Maxentius would try the same strategy as against Severus and Galerius earlier; that is, remaining in the well-defended city of Rome, and sit out a siege which would cost his enemy much more. For somewhat uncertain reasons, he abandoned this plan, however, and offered battle to Constantine near the Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. Ancient sources usually attribute this action to superstition or (if pro-Constantinian) divine providence. Maxentius of course had consulted soothsayers before battle, as was customary practice, and it can be assumed that they reported favourable omens, especially as the day of battle would be his dies imperii, the day of his accession to the throne (which was October 28, 306). What else may have motivated him, is open to speculation. Events October 28 - Battle of Milvian Bridge: Constantine defeats Maxentius in the fight to become emperor of Rome. ... Combatants Constantinian forces Maxentian forces Commanders Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius† Strength ~50000 men ~75000-120000 men Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Milvian Bridge took place on October 28, 312 between the Roman Emperors Constantine the Great and Maxentius. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Events October 28 - Battle of Milvian Bridge: Constantine defeats Maxentius in the fight to become emperor of Rome. ... now. ...


The armies of Maxentius and Constantine met north of the city, some distance outside the walls, beyond the Tiber river on the Via Flaminia. Christian tradition, especially Lactantius and Eusebius of Caesarea, claims that Constantine fought under the labarum in that battle, revealed to him in a dream. Of the battle itself, not much is known – Constantine's forces defeated Maxentius's troops, who retreated to the Tiber, and in the chaos of the fleeing army trying to cross the river, Maxentius fell into the water and drowned. His body was found the next day and paraded through the city, and later sent to Africa, as a sign that he had surely perished. Tiber River in Rome The Tiber (Italian Tevere, Latin Tiberis), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs... The Via Flaminia was a Roman road leading from Rome to Ariminum (Rimini), and was the most important route to the north. ... Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (c. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... The Labarum An image of the labarum, with the Greek letters Alpha and Omega inscribed. ...


Overview and legacy

After Constantine's victory, Maxentius was systematically vilified and presented as a cruel, bloodthirsty and incompetent tyrant. While he was not counted under the persecutors of the Christians by early sources like Lactantius, under the influence of the official propaganda later Christian tradition framed Maxentius as hostile to Christianity as well. This image has left its traces in all of our sources and has dominated the view of Maxentius well into the 20th century, when a more extensive use and analysis of non-literary sources like coins and inscriptions have led to a more balanced image. Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (c. ...


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Maxentius

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maxentius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1866 words)
Maxentius accepted the honour, promised donations to the city's troops, and was publicly acclaimed emperor on October 28, 306.
Maxentius managed to be recognized as emperor in central and southern Italy, the islands of Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily, and the African provinces.
Maxentius of course had consulted soothsayers before battle, as was customary practice, and it can be assumed that they reported favourable omens, esp. as the day of battle would be his dies imperii, the day of his accession to the throne (which was October 28, 306).
RCC/Maxentius Folly (1508 words)
Maxentius was the heir apparent for leadership in the west.
Maxentius was a brash young man and although he commanded a numerically superior force, he was a poor general in charge of inexperienced (largely civilian) troops.
Maxentius did fancy himself to protector of Rome and its traditions, and with his death, Rome withered as well and when Constantine took control of the empire he moved the seat of governmental power totally from Rome and placed it in the east at Constantinople in 333 AD.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m