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Encyclopedia > Max Hoffmann
Max Hoffmann
Max Hoffmann
Max Hoffman (one "n") is the name of an Austrian-born car importer in 1950s New York - see Hoffmann for others.

Max Hoffmann (January 25, 1869 - July 8, 1927) was a German officer and military strategist during World War I. He is widely regarded as one of the finest staff officers of the imperial period. General Max Hoffmann This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... General Max Hoffmann This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... :Max Hoffmann was a German WW I officer Max Hoffman was an Austrian-born automobile importer in the 1950s USA who was inducted into the International Automotive Hall of Fame. ... People Arthur Hoffmann August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben E.T.A. Hoffmann, German writer Felix Hoffmann (1868-1946), German chemist (Aspirin) Friedrich Hoffmann Johann Joseph Hoffmann Josef Hoffmann, Austrian architect and designer Max Hoffmann Nelson Hoffmann Roald Hoffmann Roy Hoffmann Other uses Hoffmanns anodyne (compound spirit of ether) Hoffmann... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First...


Life

He was born in Homberg (Efze). He studied at the Berlin war academy and joined the Prussian Army in 1887. Hoffmann also attended the Staff College and graduated in 1889. He spent six months in Russia as an interpreter and five years in the Russian section of the General Staff where he became a specialist in Russian affairs and was tasked with trying to determine Russia's plan of attack in the eventuality of war between Germany and Russia. During the Russo-Japanese War, Hoffmann served as Germany's military observer. At the outbreak of the war he was the deputy chief of staff of the German Eighth Army stationed in East Prussia. Homberg is a small town in northern Hesse with a population of about 15,000. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Insert non-formatted text here Combatants Imperial Russia Empire of Japan Strength 500,000 Soldiers 400,000 Soldiers Casualties 25,331 Killed 146,032 Wounded 47,387 Killed 173,425 Wounded Greater Manchuria, Russian (outer) Manchuria is region to upper right in lighter Red; Liaodong Peninsula is the wedge extending... East Prussia (German: Ostpreu en; Polish: Prusy Wschodnie; Russian: Восточная Пруссия — Vostochnaya Prussiya) was a province of Kingdom of Prussia, situated on the territory of former Ducal Prussia. ...


During the opening months of the war the Eighth Army was the only German military unit defending East Prussia from a Russian attack. The remainder of the German Army, as prescribed by the Schlieffen Plan, was massed in the west attempting to gain the decisive victory that would knock France out of the war. The Russian First and Second Armies scored an early victory against the Germans at the Battle of Gumbinnen. The alarmed Eighth Army commander, Maximilian von Prittwitz, ordered the army to retreat to the River Vistula. This would effectively abandon East Prussia to the Russians, and so von Prittwitz was relieved in favour of Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff. A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... Alfred Graf von Schlieffen The Schlieffen Plan was the German General Staffs overall strategic plan for victory on the Western Front against France, and was executed to near victory in the first month of World War I; however, a French counterattack on the outskirts of Paris, the Battle of... The Battle of Gumbinnen was fought on August 19 and August 20 of 1914 between Germany and Russia. ... Maximilian von Prittwitz (1848-1917) was a German general of Silesian descent. ... The Vistula (Polish: Wisła) is the longest river in Poland. ... Paul Ludwig Hans Anton von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg, known universally as Paul von Hindenburg (2 October 1847 – 2 August 1934) was a German Field Marshal and statesman. ... Ludendorff in 1918 Erich Ludendorff (sometimes given incorrectly as Erich von Ludendorff) (April 9, 1865 – December 20, 1937, Tutzing, Bavaria, Germany) was a German Army officer, noted as a general during World War I. Ludendorff was born in Kruszewnia near Posen, Prussia (now Poznań, Poland). ...


In the interim, the two Russian armies had drifted so far apart that neither could come to the aide of the other if it were attacked. Hoffman knew this from intercepted radio messages. He also knew of the deep mutual dislike the two Russian commanders felt which would further disincline them from helping each other. Hoffmann was then able to craft a plan for an encirclement victory over Alexander Samsonov's Second Army in the south which Hindenburg quickly put into action upon his arrival leading to the Battle of Tannenberg. After the victory, the Eighth Army turned north and defeated Paul von Rennenkampf's First Army at the First Battle of the Masurian Lakes driving the Russians out of East Prussia for the remainder of the war. Russian General Aleksander Samsonov, 1913. ... Combatants Imperial Russia German Empire Commanders General Alexander Samsonov General Paul von Rennenkampf General Field Marshall Paul von Hindenburg General Erich Ludendorff Strength 150,000 210,000 Casualties 30,000 killed or wounded; 95,000 captured 20,000 The Battle of Tannenberg in 1914 was a decisive conflict between the... Russian General Paul von Rennenkampf, 1905. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


After Hindenburg and Ludendorff returned to Berlin in 1916, Prince Leopold of Bavaria assumed command of all German armies on the Eastern front with Hoffmann (now a General) as his chief of staff. Hoffmann was able to bring all of the forces on the Eastern front (including Austrian units) under his command. He also led the offensive that knocked Russia out of the war and led to the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. In December 1918 he withdrew his forces from the Ober-Ost former frontline to Germany, thus involuntarily preparing the stage for the Polish-Soviet War. This article is about the capital city of Germany. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A General is an officer of high military rank. ... The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was a peace treaty signed on March 3, 1918, at Brest, formerly Brest-Litovsk, between Russia and the Central Powers, marking Russias exit from World War I. The treaty was practically obsolete before the end of the year but is significant as a chief... Combatants Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic Second Polish Republic Commanders Mikhail Tukhachevsky Józef Piłsudski Edward Rydz-Śmigły Strength 950,000 including reserves 5 million 360,000 including reserves 738,000 Casualties Unknown, dead estimated at 100,000 - 150,000 Unknown, dead estimated at 60,000 The Polish...


In his post-war memoirs, Hoffmann was critical of the German High Command including Hindenburg and Ludendorff. Hoffmann was resentful that his two superiors had received the credit for the victories of Tannenberg and the Masurian Lakes when it was really his strategy that allowed the victories to occur. A memoir, as a literary genre, forms a sub-class of autobiography. ...


Max Hoffmann died at Bad Reichenhall on July 8, 1927. Alte Saline (old salt refinery) former Townhall Bad Reichenhall is a spa town, and administrative center of the Berchtesgadener Land district in Upper Bavaria, Germany. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
First World War.com - Who's Who - Max Hoffmann (328 words)
Max Hoffmann (1869-1927), a brilliant strategist widely regarded as the architect of the German Eighth Army's sweeping victory at Tannenberg, and to a lesser extent at the Masurian Lakes, was born in Homberg an der Efze on 25 January 1869.
Hoffmann's fame primarily rests upon his brilliantly conceived strategy of double-enveloping the Russian Second Army, under Samsonov, at Tannenberg in August 1914, effectively bringing about its entire destruction.
Following these initial successes in the East Hoffmann was promoted to Oberst and attached to headquarters in Brest-Litovsk; his background in the East both prior to and during the early stages of the war rendered him the primary authority on Eastern matters.
Max Hoffmann - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (580 words)
Hoffmann was then able to craft a plan for an encirclement victory over Alexander Samsonov's Second Army in the south which Hindenburg quickly put into action upon his arrival leading to the Battle of Tannenberg.
Hoffmann was able to bring all of the forces on the Eastern front (including Austrian units) under his command.
Max Hoffmann died at Bad Reichenhall on July 8, 1927.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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