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Encyclopedia > Mausolus

Mausolus (Greek: Μαύσωλος; also Maussollus) was a satrap of the Persian empire and virtual ruler of Caria (377-353/352 BC). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Location of Caria Caria (Greek Καρία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was a region of Asia Minor, situated south of Ionia, and west of Phrygia and Lycia. ... Events The Second Athenian Empire, a maritime self-defense league, is founded. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 358 BC 357 BC 356 BC 355 BC 354 BC 353 BC 352 BC 351 BC 350... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 357 BC 356 BC 355 BC 354 BC 353 BC 352 BC 351 BC 350 BC 349...


He took part in the revolt against Artaxerxes Mnemon (362), conquered a great part of Lycia, Ionia and several of the Greek islands and cooperated with the Rhodians and their ally in the Social War against Athens. He moved his capital from Mylasa, the ancient seat of the Carian kings, to Halicarnassus. This article is about revolution in the sense of a drastic change. ... Artaxerxes II (c. ... Lycia is a region on the southern coast of Turkey. ... Ionia (Greek Ιωνία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient region of southwestern coastal Anatolia (now in Turkey) on the Aegean Sea. ... Rhodes, Greek Ρόδος (pron. ... When spelt with a capital A, Allies usually denotes the countries supporting the Triple Entente who fought together against the Central Powers in World War I and against the Axis Powers in World War II. For more information, see the related articles: Allies of World War I and Allies of... Combatants Athens and its Second Athenian Empire Chios Rhodes Cos Byzantium Commanders Chares Chabrias Timotheus Iphicrates Numerous The Social War, also known as the War of the Allies, was fought from 357 BC to 355 BC between Athens and its Second Athenian Empire and between the allies of Chios, Rhodes... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα, Athína (IPA: )) is the capital of Greece and one of the most famous cities in the world, named after goddess Athena. ... In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Mylasa was a city in Asia Minor. ... For the span of recorded history starting roughly 5,000-5,500 years ago, see Ancient history. ... The Carians (Greek Καρες Kares, or Καρικοι Karikoi) were the eponymous inhabitants of Caria. ... Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A monarch (see sovereign) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... Map of the Aegean Sea, showing the location of Halicarnassus (modern Bodrum, Turkey) Halicarnassus (; modern Bodrum; see also List of traditional Greek place names), an ancient Greek city on the southwest coast of Caria, Asia Minor, on a picturesque and advantageous site on the Ceramic Gulf (Gulf of Cos, Gulf...


Mausolus was the eldest son of Hecatomnus of Mylasa, a native Carian who became Satrap of Caria, when Tissaphernes died, around 395 BC. These Carian rulers embraced Hellenic culture. Hecatomnus (in Greek Eκατoμνως; lived 4th century BC) was king or dynast of Caria in the reign of Artaxerxes II of Persia (404–358 BC). ... Mylasa was a city in Asia Minor. ... The Carians (Greek Καρες Kares, or Καρικοι Karikoi) were the eponymous inhabitants of Caria. ... Tissaphernes (Pers. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC Years: 400 BC 399 BC 398 BC 397 BC 396 BC - 395 BC - 394 BC 393 BC... The term Hellenistic (derived from Héllēn, the Greeks word for themselves) was established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of various ethnicities, and from the political dominance of...


He is best known from the tomb erected for him by his sister and widow Artemisia. The architects Satyrus and Pythis, and the sculptors Scopas, Leochares, Bryaxis and Timotheus, finished the work after her death. The term Mausoleum has come to be used generically for any grand tomb. Its site and a few remains can still be seen in the Turkish town of Bodrum. A tomb is a small building (or vault) for the remains of the dead, with walls, a roof, and (if it is to be used for more than one corpse) a door. ... Artemisia of Caria (in Greek Aρτεμισια; died 350 BC) was the sister, wife, and successor of the Carian prince Mausolus. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Satyrus is the name of a number of figures from the ancient world. ... Pythis, also known as Pytheos or Pythius, was one of the most noted Greek architects of the later age. ... Scopas (Σκόπας) (c. ... Leochares was an Greek sculptor, who lived in the 4th Century B.C. He is theorised as the creator of Apollo Belvedere, which is currently housed in Vatican City. ... Bryaxis (born c. ... The name Timotheus can refer to: Timothy, a first century bishop Timotheus, an Athenian statesman and general Timotheus (architect), - an architect, who took part in a building of Mausoleum of Maussollos Timotheus, a 5th century BCE Greek musician Timotheus Aelurus, a 5th century monophysite bishop Timotheus (Ammon), the Ammonite opponent... Death is the cessation of physical life in a living organism, or the state of the deceased. ... St. ... Bodrum Castle can be seen on the upper left corner, Bodrum marina is located on the right side of the bay Bodrum (as in Turkish), (ancient-Greek name: Αλικαρνασσός Halicarnassus; older English name: Budrum) is a Turkish port in Muğla Province in a part of Asia Minor known in ancient...


An inscription discovered at Mylasa (Philipp August Böckh, Inscr. gr. ii. 2691 c.) details the punishment of certain conspirators who had made an attempt upon his life at a festival in a temple at Labranda in 353. Philipp August Böckh (November 24, 1785 - August 3, 1867), was a German classical scholar and antiquarian. ... In Antiquity, Labraunda (alternatively Labranda) in the mountains near the coast of Caria in Asia Minor was held sacred by Carians and Mysians alike. ...


External links

  • Livius, Maussolus by Jona Lendering
  • Caria

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mausolus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (246 words)
Mausolus (Greek: Μαύσωλος; also Maussollus) was a satrap of the Persian empire and virtual ruler of Caria (377-353/352 BC).
He took part in the revolt against Artaxerxes Mnemon (362), conquered a great part of Lycia, Ionia and several of the Greek islands and cooperated with the Rhodians and their ally in the Social War against Athens.
Mausolus was the eldest son of Hecatomnus of Mylasa, a native Carian who became Satrap of Caria, when Tissaphernes died, around 395 BC.
Mausoleum of Maussollos - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2166 words)
Mausolus, though he was descended from the local people, spoke Greek and admired the Greek way of life and government.
There the images of Mausolus and his queen forever watch over the few broken remains of the beautiful tomb she built for him and that is now lost to eternity.
The Tomb of Mausolus (W. R. Lethaby's reconstruction of the Mausoleum, 1908)
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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