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Encyclopedia > Maurice Wilkins
Maurice Wilkins

Maurice Wilkins
Born December 15, 1916(1916-12-15)
Pongaroa, Wairarapa, New Zealand
Died October 5, 2004 (aged 87)
Blackheath, London, United Kingdom
Fields molecular biologist,
Known for X-ray diffraction, DNA
Notable awards Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1962)
Religious stance none

Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins CBE FRS (15 December 19165 October 2004) was a New Zealand-born British molecular biologist, and Nobel Laureate who contributed research in the fields of phosphorescence, radar, isotope separation, and X-ray diffraction. He was most widely known for his work at King's College London on the structure of DNA. In recognition of this work, he, Francis Crick and James Watson were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material."[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 275 × 381 pixelsFull resolution (275 × 381 pixel, file size: 15 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From http://www. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The small township of Pongaroa lies in The Wairarapa, in the southeast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Wairarapa (often known as The Wairarapa) is a geographical region of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Blackheath is a village in London, centred on an area of open grassland (the heath) and straddling the boundary of the London Borough of Lewisham and the London Borough of Greenwich. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Image File history File links Nobel_prize_medal. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... In common use, phosphorescence also refers to the emission of light by bioluminescent plankton, and some other forms of chemoluminescence. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... Isotope separation is the process of concentrating specific isotopes of a chemical element by removing other isotopes, for example separating natural uranium into enriched uranium and depleted uranium. ... X-ray crystallography is a technique in crystallography in which the pattern produced by the diffraction of x-rays through the closely spaced lattice of atoms in a crystal is recorded and then analyzed to reveal the nature of that lattice. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Birth and education

Wilkins was born in Pongaroa, north Wairarapa, New Zealand where his father was a medical doctor. His family moved to Birmingham, England when he was 6, where he subsequently attended Wylde Green College, King Edward's High School and then King Edward's School at the age of 12. He later studied physics at St John's College, Cambridge, then in 1940 he received his Ph.D. in physics at the University of Birmingham with a dissertation on phosphors. During World War II he developed improved radar screens at Birmingham, then worked on isotope separation at the Manhattan Project at the University of California, Berkeley for two years before returning to King's College London. "After the war I wondered what I would do, as I was very disgusted with the dropping of two bombs on civilian centres in Japan," he told Britain's Encounter radio programme in 1999. The small township of Pongaroa lies in The Wairarapa, in the southeast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Wairarapa (often known as The Wairarapa) is a geographical region of New Zealand. ... This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... King Edwards School (KES) (grid reference SP052836) is an independent secondary school in Birmingham, England, founded by King Edward VI in 1552. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Website http://www. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


Academic career

In 1946 the physicist John Randall was placed in charge of a new biophysics laboratory at King's College. The plan was to hire physicists such as Wilkins to work on problems in biology. When Francis Crick first met Wilkins he was not convinced that the King's College laboratory had anything like a clear plan of attack. There seemed to be a vague hope that by applying techniques like Ultraviolet light microscopy (Wilkins) and electron microscopy (Randall), new insights could be gained into cell structure and function. By 1950, Randall was gearing up the laboratory for work on proteins. His original plan for Rosalind Franklin was that she do X-ray diffraction studies on proteins. Wilkins' work on DNA changed that. By 1951, Randall had established a major effort to solve the structure of collagen and Wilkins and Franklin represented a parallel effort to determine the structure of DNA. In the meantime, Maurice Wilkins' friend Francis Crick had joined forces with James Watson under the supervision of Max Perutz at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge and under the overall direction of Lawrence Bragg. Sir John Randall Sir John Randall (March 23, 1905 – June 16, 1984) was a British physicist, credited with radical improvement of the cavity magnetron, an essential component of the centimetre radar, which was one of the keys to the Allied victory in the Second World War. ... For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ... Microscopy is any technique for producing visible images of structures or details too small to otherwise be seen by the human eye. ... An electron microscope is a type of microscope that uses electrons as a way to illuminate and create an image of a specimen. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 Kensington, London – 16 April 1958 Chelsea, London) was an English biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made important contributions to the understanding of the fine structures of DNA, viruses, coal and graphite. ... Tropocollagen triple helix. ... Max Ferdinand Perutz, OM (May 19, 1914 – February 6, 2002) was an Austrian-British molecular biologist. ... William Lawrence Bragg William Lawrence Bragg (March 31, 1890 - July 1, 1971) was a physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1915. ...


DNA

Maurice Wilkins

Discovery of the DNA Double Helix The Molecular structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid was an article published by James D. Watson and Francis Crick in the scientific journal Nature in its 171st volume on page 737-738 (dated April 25, 1953). ...


Maurice Wilkins Image File history File links Size of this preview: 275 × 381 pixelsFull resolution (275 × 381 pixel, file size: 15 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From http://www. ...

Francis Crick
Rosalind Franklin
James Watson
Maurice Wilkins
Cavendish Laboratory
King's College London
Photo 51

At King's College Wilkins pursued, among other things x-ray diffraction work on DNA that had been obtained from calf thymus by the Swiss scientist Rudolf Signer. The DNA from Signer's lab was much more intact than the DNA which had previously been isolated. Wilkins discovered that it was possible to produce thin threads from this concentrated DNA solution that contained highly ordered arrays of DNA suitable for the production of x-ray diffraction patterns.[2] Using a carefully bundled group of these DNA threads and keeping them hydrated, Wilkins and a graduate student Raymond Gosling obtained x-ray photographs of DNA that showed that the long, thin DNA molecule in the sample from Signer had a regular, crystal-like structure in these threads. This initial x-ray diffraction work at Kings College was done in May or June of 1950. It was one of the x-ray diffraction photographs taken in 1950, shown at a meeting in Naples a year later, that sparked James Watson’s interest in poopie. Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 Kensington, London – 16 April 1958 Chelsea, London) was an English biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made important contributions to the understanding of the fine structures of DNA, viruses, coal and graphite. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ... Plaque, at old site Entrance, old site, Free School Lane The Cavendish Laboratory is the University of Cambridges Department of Physics, and is part of the universitys School of Physical Sciences. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Photo 51, an X-ray diffraction image of sodium salt of DNA. B configuration Photo 51 is the name given to an X-ray diffraction image of DNA taken by Rosalind Franklin in 1952[1] that was critical evidence[2] in identifying the structure of DNA.[3] The photo was... X-ray crystallography is a technique in crystallography in which the pattern produced by the diffraction of x-rays through the closely spaced lattice of atoms in a crystal is recorded and then analyzed to reveal the nature of that lattice. ... Rudolf Signer (1903-1990) contributed to the discovery of the DNA double helix. ... The joke funeral card in the names of Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Gosling Raymond Gosling is a distinguished scientist who worked with both Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin at Kings College London in deducing the structure of DNA. He was born in 1926 and attended school in Wembley. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ...


At that time Wilkins also introduced Francis Crick to the importance of DNA. Wilkins knew that proper experiments on the threads of purified DNA would require better x-ray equipment. Wilkins ordered a new x-ray tube and a new microcamera. Before the DNA sample from Signer was available, Gosling had been trying to make x-ray diffraction images of sperm. However, Franklin did not start using the new equipment until September 1951. By the summer of 1950 Randall had arranged for a three year research fellowship that would fund Rosalind Franklin in his laboratory. Franklin was delayed in finishing her work in Paris. Late in 1950, Randall wrote to Franklin to inform her that rather than work on protein, she should take advantage of Wilkin's preliminary work and that she should do x-ray studies of DNA fibers made from Signer's DNA. Early in 1951 Franklin finally arrived. Wilkins was away on holiday and missed an initial meeting at which Raymond Gosling stood in for him along with Alexander R. Stokes, who, like Crick, would solve the basic mathematics that make possible a general theory of how helical structures diffract x-rays. No work had been done on DNA in the laboratory for several months; the new x-ray tube sat unused, waiting for Franklin. Franklin ended up with the DNA from Signer, Gosling became her PhD student and she had the expectation that DNA x-ray diffraction work was her project. Wilkins returned to the laboratory expecting that Franklin would be his collaborator and that they would work together on the DNA project that he had started. Franklin felt that DNA was now her project and would not collaborate with Wilkins, who then pursued parallel studies. Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ...


By November 1951 Wilkins had evidence that DNA in cells as well as purified DNA had a helical structure.[3] Alex Stokes had solved the basic mathematics of helical diffraction theory and thought that Wilkin's x-ray diffraction data indicated a helical structure in DNA. Wilkins met with Watson and Crick and told them about his results. This information from Wilkins along with additional information gained by Watson when he heard Franklin talk about her research during a King's College research meeting, stimulated Watson and Crick to create their first molecular model of DNA, a model with the phosphate backbones at the center. Upon viewing the model of the proposed structure, Franklin told Watson and Crick that it was wrong. Franklin knew that because of basic chemical principles the hydrophilic backbones should go on the outside of the molecule where they could interact with water. Crick tried to get Wilkins to continue with additional molecular modeling efforts, but Wilkins did not take this approach. During 1952, Franklin also refused to participate in molecular modeling efforts and continued to work on step-by-step detailed analysis of her x-ray diffraction data (Patterson synthesis). By Spring of 1952, Franklin had received permission from Randall to request permission to transfer her fellowship so that she could leave King's College and work in John Bernal's laboratory. However, Franklin remained at King's College for another year. The adjective hydrophilic describes something that likes water (from Greek hydros = water; philos = friend). ... The Patterson Function, P(u,v,w) is defined as which is essentially the Fourier transform of the intensities rather than the structure factors. ... John Desmond Bernal (1901–1971) was an Irish-born scientist (from Nenagh, County Tipperary), known for pioneering X-ray crystallography. ...


By early 1953, it was clear that Franklin would simply drop her DNA work at the end of her fellowship that summer, or even sooner due to illness. Linus Pauling had published a proposed but incorrect structure of DNA, making the same basic error that had been made by Watson and Crick a year earlier. Some of those working on DNA in the United Kingdom, feared that Pauling would quickly solve the DNA structure once he recognized his error and put the backbones of the nucleotide chains on the outside of a model of DNA. After March 1952 Franklin concentrated on the x-ray data for the A-form of less hydrated DNA while Wilkins tried to work on the B-form. Wilkins was handicapped because Franklin had all of the good DNA. Wilkins got new DNA, but it was not as good as the original sample he had used in 1950 and which Franklin continued to use. About his only new results were for biological samples like sperm cells, which seemed to also suggest a helical structure for DNA. In the middle of 1952 Wilkins had for a time abandoned further DNA work when Franklin reported to him that her results made her doubt the helical nature of the A-form. Wilkins feared, the data suggesting a helical structure might just be an artifact. Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American scientist, peace activist, author and educator of German ancestry. ...


In early 1953 Watson visited King's College and Wilkins showed him a high quality image of the B-form x-ray diffraction pattern that had been produced by Franklin in March 1952. This image was Photo 51. With the knowledge that Pauling was working on DNA and had submitted a model of DNA for publication, Watson and Francis Crick mounted one more concentrated effort to deduce the structure of DNA. Crick gained access to a progress report from King's College that included useful information from Franklin about the features of DNA she had deduced from her x-ray diffraction data from Max Perutz, his thesis supervisor. Watson and Crick published their proposed DNA double helical structure in a paper in the journal Nature in April of 1953. In this paper Watson and Crick acknowledged that they had been "stimulated by.... the unpublished results and ideas" of Wilkins and Franklin. Photo 51, an X-ray diffraction image of sodium salt of DNA. B configuration Photo 51 is the name given to an X-ray diffraction image of DNA taken by Rosalind Franklin in 1952[1] that was critical evidence[2] in identifying the structure of DNA.[3] The photo was... Max Ferdinand Perutz, OM (May 19, 1914 – February 6, 2002) was an Austrian-British molecular biologist. ...


In recognition of the contribution from King's College, Watson and Crick agreed that Wilkins, Stokes and Wilson[4] and Franklin and Gosling should each publish their x-ray diffraction work, which supported the proposed Crick-Watson model, in separate articles in the same issue of Nature.


Wilkins and others went on to repeat and extend much of Franklin's work, and produced much evidence to support the helical model of Crick and Watson. The Double-Helix are an alien race in the Wing Commander science fiction series. ...


Wilkins married his second wife Patricia Ann Chidgey in 1959. They had four children, Sarah, George, Emily and William; he had a son by his previous marriage, to an art student called Ruth in California. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


In 1960 he was presented with the American Public Health Association's Albert Lasker Award, and in 1962 he was made a Companion of the British Empire. Also in 1962 he shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Watson and Crick. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ...


He published his autobiography, "The Third Man of the Double Helix," in 2003, but does not specifically credit Stokes and Wilson as co-authors of their paper in "Nature". Whether this was deliberate on his part or just down to rather poor sub-editing by OUP is not known. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The wording on the new DNA sculpture (which was donated by James Watson) outside Clare College's Thirkill Court, Cambridge, England is


a) on the base:


i) "These strands unravel during cell reproduction. Genes are encoded in the sequence of bases."


ii) "The double helix model was supported by the work of Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins."


b) on the helices:


i) "The structure of DNA was discovered in 1953 by Francis Crick and James Watson while Watson lived here at Clare."


ii) "The molecule of DNA has two helical strands that are linked by base pairs Adenine - Thymine or Guanine - Cytosine."


References

  1. ^ The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1962. Nobel Prize Site for Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1962.
  2. ^ See Figure 1 of the Nobel lecture by Wilkins. See other examples at the King's College website for DNA structure.
  3. ^ See Chapter 2 of The Eighth Day of Creation: Makers of the Revolution in Biology by Horace Freeland Judson published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (1996) ISBN 0-87969-478-5.
  4. ^ "Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids" by M. H. F. Wilkins, A.R. Stokes A.R. and H. R. Wilson in Nature (1953) volume 171 pages 738-740. Download the full text in PDF format.
  1. Watson, James D. "The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA"; The Norton Critical Edition, which was published in 1980, edited by Gunther S. Stent.

Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ...

Books featuring Maurice Wilkins

  • Robert Olby; 'Wilkins, Maurice Hugh Frederick (1916-2004), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edn, Oxford University Press, Jan 2008
  • Robert Olby; "Francis Crick: A Biography", Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, ISBN 9780879697983, to be published in late 2008.
  • Robert Olby; "The Path to The Double Helix: Discovery of DNA"; first published in 0ctober 1974 by MacMillan, with foreword by Francis Crick; ISBN 0-486-68117-3; the definitive DNA textbook, revised in 1994, with a 9 page postscript.
  • Horace Freeland Judson, "The Eighth Day of Creation. Makers of the Revolution in Biology"; CSHL Press 1996 ISBN 0-87969-478-5.
  • Watson, James D. The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA; The Norton Critical Edition , which was published in 1980, edited by Gunther S. Stent:ISBN 0-393-01245-X.
  • Chomet, S. (Ed.), D.N.A. Genesis of a Discovery, 1994, Newman- Hemisphere Press, London; NB a few copies are available from Newman-Hemisphere at 101 Swan Court, London SW3 5RY (phone: 07092 060530).
  • Maddox, Brenda, Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA, 2002. ISBN 0-06-018407-8.
  • Sayre, Anne 1975. Rosalind Franklin and DNA. New York: W.W. Norton and Company. ISBN 0-393-32044-8.
  • Wilkins, Maurice, The Third Man of the Double Helix: The Autobiography of Maurice Wilkins ISBN 0-19-860665-6.
  • Crick, Francis, 1990. What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (Basic Books reprint edition) ISBN 0-465-09138-5
  • Watson, James D., The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA, Atheneum, 1980, ISBN 0-689-70602-2 (first published in 1968)
  • Krude, Torsten (Ed.) DNA Changing Science and Society: The Darwin Lectures for 2003 CUP 2003, includes a lecture by Sir Aaron Klug on Rosalind Franklin's involvement in the determination of the structure of DNA.
  • Ridley, Matt; "Francis Crick: Discoverer of the Genetic Code (Eminent Lives)" was first published in June 2006 in the USA and then in the UK September 2006, by HarperCollins Publishers; 192 pp, ISBN 0-06-082333-X; this short book is in the publisher's "Eminent Lives" series.
  • * "Light Is A Messenger, the life and science of William Lawrence Bragg" by Graeme Hunter, ISBN 0-19-852921-X; Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • "Designs For Life: Molecular Biology After World War II" by Soraya De Chadarevian; CUP 2002, 444 pp; ISBN 0-521-57078-6; it includes James Watson's "well kept open secret" from April 2003!
  • Tait, Sylvia & James "A Quartet of Unlikely Discoveries" (Athena Press 2004) ISBN 184401343X

Robert Olby is a professor in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. ... Robert Olby is a professor in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. ... Robert Olby is a professor in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. ...

External links

But for the 'second' DNA story in the New York Times, see [5] - for reproduction of the original text in June 1953.

DNA structure research at King's College London 1947-1959
Rosalind Franklin | Raymond Gosling | John Randall | Alec Stokes | Maurice Wilkins | Herbert Wilson
Persondata
NAME Wilkins, Maurice
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION molecular biologist,
DATE OF BIRTH December 15, 1916
PLACE OF BIRTH Pongaroa, Wairarapa, New Zealand
DATE OF DEATH October 5, 2004
PLACE OF DEATH Blackheath, London, United Kingdom
Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The small township of Pongaroa lies in The Wairarapa, in the southeast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Wairarapa (often known as The Wairarapa) is a geographical region of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Blackheath is a village in London, centred on an area of open grassland (the heath) and straddling the boundary of the London Borough of Lewisham and the London Borough of Greenwich. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maurice Wilkins - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2168 words)
Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins (December 15, 1916 – October 5, 2004) was a New Zealand-born physicist and Nobel Laureate who contributed research in the fields of phosphorescence, radar, isotope separation, and X-ray diffraction.
Wilkins was born in Pongaroa, north Wairarapa, New Zealand where his father was a medical doctor.
Wilkins and others went on to repeat and extend much of Franklin's work to prove that the double-helical structure was indeed correct, a process that took many years.
MSN Encarta - Maurice Wilkins (495 words)
Maurice Wilkins (1916-2004), British biophysicist and cowinner of the 1962 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.
Wilkins shared the prize with American biochemist James Watson and British biophysicist Francis Crick for their studies on the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the genetic molecule found in all organisms.
Wilkins was born in Pongaroa, New Zealand, and moved to England as a child.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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