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Encyclopedia > Maurice Sendak
Maurice Sendak

Born: June 10, 1928
Brooklyn, New York
Occupation: artist, illustrator, writer
Nationality: American
Writing period: 1947 - 2006
Genres: Children's literature
Debut works: Atomics for the Millions
(1947) as illustrator
Kenny's Window
(1956) as author
Influences: William Blake
Antoine Watteau
Francisco Goya

Maurice Bernard Sendak (born June 10, 1928) is an American writer and illustrator of children's literature who is best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, published in 1963. An elementary school (from kindergarten to grade five) in North Hollywood, California is named in his honor. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... NY redirects here. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... Jean-Antoine Watteau (October 10, 1684 - July 18, 1721) was a French Rococo painter. ... Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (March 30, 1746 – April 16, 1828) was a Spanish painter and printmaker. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... An illustrator is a graphic artist who specializes in enhancing written text by providing a visual representation that corresponds to the content of the associated text. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is a childrens picture book originally published by Harper & Row which describes the imaginary adventures of a young boy named Max, who is angry after being sent to his room without supper. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... North Hollywood is a district in the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Sendak was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Polish-Jewish immigrant parents, and decided to become an illustrator after viewing Walt Disney's film Fantasia at the age of twelve. His illustrations were first published in 1947 in a textbook titled Atomics for the Millions. He spent much of the 1950s working as an artist for children's books, before beginning to write his own stories. This article is about the borough of New York City. ... NY redirects here. ... From the Middle Ages until the Holocaust, Jews were a significant part of the Polish population. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, the third in the Disney animated features canon, which was a Walt Disney experiment in animation and music. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ...

Contents

Acclaim

Sendak gained international acclaim after writing and illustrating Where the Wild Things Are, though the book's depictions of fanged monsters concerned parents when it was first released, as his characters were somewhat grotesque in appearance. Sendak's seeming attraction to the forbidden or nightmarish aspects of children's fantasy have made him a subject of controversy. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is a childrens picture book originally published by Harper & Row which describes the imaginary adventures of a young boy named Max, who is angry after being sent to his room without supper. ... Mother Nature is surrounded by grottesche in this fresco detail from Villa dEste When commonly used in conversation, grotesque means strange, fantastic, ugly or bizarre, and thus is often used to describe weird shapes and distorted forms such as Halloween masks or gargoyles on churches. ...


Sendak’s book In the Night Kitchen, first published in 1970, has often been subjected to censorship for its drawings of a young boy prancing naked through the story. The book has been challenged, and in some instances banned, in several American states including Illinois, New Jersey, Minnesota, and Texas. In the Night Kitchen is a popular and controversial childrens book by Maurice Sendak. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Censorship is defined as the removal and/or withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


In the Night Kitchen regularly appears on the American Library Association's list of "frequently challenged and banned books." It was listed as number 25 on the "100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000."[1] ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


Beyond illustration

Sendak was an early member of the National Board of Advisors for the Children's Television Workshop during the development stages of the television series Sesame Street. He also wrote and designed an animated sequence for the series, Bumble Ardy, based on his own book, and with Jim Henson as the voice of Bumble Ardy. Sesame Workshop, formerly known as the Childrens Television Workshop (or CTW), is a non-profit organization behind the production of several educational childrens programs that have run on public broadcasting around the world (including PBS in the United States), as well as Noggin, a joint venture with Viacom... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... Jim Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990) was the most widely known American puppeteer in modern American television history. ...


Sendak produced an animated television production based on his work entitled Really Rosie, featuring Carole King, which was broadcast in 1975 and is available on video (usually as part of video compilations of his work). An LP and later a CD of the songs were also produced. He adapted his book Where the Wild Things Are for the stage in 1979. Additionally, he has designed sets for many operas and ballets, including the award-winning (1983) Pacific Northwest Ballet production of Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker , Houston Grand Opera's productions of Mozart's The Magic Flute (1981) and Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel (1997), Los Angeles County Music Center's 1990 production of Mozart's Idomeneo, and New York City Opera's 1981 production of The Cunning Little Vixen. The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Really Rosie is a musical with a book and lyrics by Maurice Sendak and music by Carole King. ... Carole King (born February 9, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An LP Long playing (LP), either 10 or 12-inch diameter, 33 rpm (actually 33. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article is about opera as an art form. ... A performance of The Nutcracker ballet Ballet is the name given to a specfic dance form and technique. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pacific Northwest Ballet is a ballet company and based in Seattle, Washington in the United States. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr (Peter) Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian: Пётр Ильич Чайкoвский, Pëtr Il’ič ÄŒajkovskij;  )[1] (7 May [O.S. 25 April] 1840 – 6 November [O.S. 25 October] 1893), was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... (left to right) Sergei Legat, as the Nutcracker, an unidentified child as a gingerbread soldier, and Lydia Rubtsova as Marianna in Vsevolozhskys costumes for the Ivanov/Petipa/Tchaikovsky The Nutcracker, St. ... The Houston Grand Opera (HGO) is a Houston, Texas-based opera company. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Die Zauberflöte, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For the pop singer of this name, see Engelbert Humperdinck (singer) Engelbert Humperdinck (September 1, 1854 – September 27, 1921) was a German composer, best known for his opera, Hänsel und Gretel (1893). ... Artwork by Arthur Rackham, 1909. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Idomeneo, re di Creta ossia Ilia e Idamante (Italian: Idomeneo, King of Crete, or, Ilia and Idamante; usually referred to simply as Idomeneo, K. 366) is an Italian opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... The New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza New York State Theater The New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, interior, as seen from the stage The New York City Opera (NYCO) is based in Philip Johnsons New York State Theater at Lincoln Center. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The Cunning Little Vixen (Příhody LiÅ¡ky BystrouÅ¡ky, literally The Adventures of Vixen Sharp-Ears, in Czech) is an opera by LeoÅ¡ Janáček, with a libretto adapted by the composer from a serialized novella (daily comic) by Rudolf TÄ›snohlídek, which was first published in newspaper...


In the 1990s, Sendak approached playwright Tony Kushner to write a new English version of the Czech composer Hans Krása's children's opera Brundibar. Kushner wrote the text for Sendak's illustrated book of the same name, published in 2003. The book was named one of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Illustrated Books of that year. Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Hans Krása, (November 30, 1899 – October 17, 1944), was a Bohemian composer. ... Brundibar is the name of an opera by Jewish Czech composer Hans Krása. ...


In 2003, Chicago Opera Theatre produced Sendak and Kushner's adaptation of Brundibar. In 2005 Berkeley Repertory Theatre, in collaboration with Yale Repertory Theater and Broadway's New Victory Theater, produced a substantially reworked version of the Sendak-Kushner adaptation. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ...


He illustrated Else Holmelund Minarik's Little Bear series of books, which were also made into a successful television series. Else Holmelund Minarik, born in 1920, wrote a series of childrens books, Little Bear, which were both successful on their own, and made into a successful childrens TV series. ... Little Bear is a series of childrens books, originally published in 1957, written by Else Holmelund Minarik and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. ... Little Bear (1995-2000) was a childrens television series. ...


Awards

Where the Wild Things Are won the 1964 Caldecott Medal. In 1970 he won the Hans Christian Andersen Award for children's book illustration, and in 2003 he shared the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award with Christine Nöstlinger, the first time it was awarded. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Caldecott Medal was designed by Rene Paul Chambellan in 1937. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Hans Christian Andersen Award, sometimes known as the Little Nobel Prize, is an international award given bianually by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) in recognition of a lasting contribution to childrens literature. There are two categories of award winners: authors, and illustrators. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award is the worlds largest childrens and youth literature award. ... Christine Nöstlinger (born October 13, 1936 at Vienna) is an Austrian writer. ...


Film

A live-action feature-length film of Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are is planned for 2008, to be directed by Spike Jonze and a screenplay by Dave Eggers, Michael Goldenberg and Spike Jonze In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by human actors, as opposed to animation. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... Spike Jonze (born Adam Spiegel on October 22, 1969), is an American director of music videos and commercials, and an Academy Award-nominated director and producer in film and television, most notably the 1999 film Being John Malkovich and the 2002 film Adaptation. ... Dave Eggers at the 2005 Hay Festival Dave Eggers (born March 12, 1970) is an American writer, editor, and publisher. ... Michael Goldenberg is a playwright and more recently a Hollywood screenwriter and director. ... Spike Jonze (born Adam Spiegel on October 22, 1969), is an American director of music videos and commercials, and an Academy Award-nominated director and producer in film and television, most notably the 1999 film Being John Malkovich and the 2002 film Adaptation. ...


Partial bibliography

  • Kenny's Window (1956)
  • Very Far Away (1957)
  • The Sign On Rosie's Door (1960)
  • The Nutshell Library (1962)
    • Chicken Soup with Rice (A Book of Months)
    • Alligators All Around (An Alphabet)
    • One Was Johnny (A Counting Book)
    • Pierre (A Cautionary Tale)
  • Where the Wild Things Are (1963)
  • In the Night Kitchen (1970)
  • Ten Little Rabbits: A Counting Book With Mino The Magician (1970)
  • Some Swell Pup or Are You Sure You Want a Dog? (written by Maurice Sendak & Matthew Margolis and illustrated by Maurice Sendak) (1976)
  • Seven Little Monsters' (1977)
  • Higglety Pigglety Pop!, Or: There Must be More to Life (1967) ISBN 0-06-028479-X
  • Fantasy Sketches (1981)
  • Outside Over There (1985)
  • We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy: Two Nursery Rhymes with Pictures (Harper Collins) (1983)
  • Singing Family of the Cumberlands (written by Jean Ritchie)
  • Maurice Sendak's Christmas Mystery (1995) (a box with a Book and a Jigsaw Puzzle)
  • Hector Protector and As I Went Over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes
  • Caldecott and Co: Notes on Books and Pictures (1990)
  • Mommy? (Maurice Sendak's first Pop-up book) (2006)

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is a childrens picture book originally published by Harper & Row which describes the imaginary adventures of a young boy named Max, who is angry after being sent to his room without supper. ... In the Night Kitchen is a popular and controversial childrens book by Maurice Sendak. ... Collins was a Scottish printing company founded by a schoolmaster, William Collins, in Glasgow in 1819. ... Jean Ritchie (born 1922) is an American folk singer. ... A pop-up book is a book whose pages fold out, or pop up, when they are opened and turned. ...

Partial bibliography as illustrator

Marcel Aymé (March 29, 1902 - October 14, 1967) was a French novelist, childrens writer and humour writer. ... Robert Garvey (1908-1983) was a Jewish author. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... Edward Tripp is a childrens literature author. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... Betty MacDonald (1908-1958), born Betty Bard, was an American author who specialized in humorous autobiography, but who is now perhaps best known for the Mrs. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... Beatrice Schenk de Regniers (1914-2000) was a childrens literature author. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... Little Bear is a series of childrens books, originally published in 1957, written by Else Holmelund Minarik and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. ... Else Holmelund Minarik, born in 1920, wrote a series of childrens books, Little Bear, which were both successful on their own, and made into a successful childrens TV series. ... Little Bear (1995-2000) was a childrens television series. ... Little Bear is a series of childrens books, originally published in 1957, written by Else Holmelund Minarik and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... Else Holmelund Minarik, born in 1920, wrote a series of childrens books, Little Bear, which were both successful on their own, and made into a successful childrens TV series. ... Sesyle Joslin is a childrens literature author. ... Eva Le Gallienne Eva Le Gallienne (January 11, 1899 – June 3, 1991) was a well-known actress, producer, and director, during the first half of the 20th century. ... Janice May Udry (1928-) is an American author. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... Dorothy Aldis (1896-1966) was a childrens literature author and poet. ... The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real is a classic childrens story written by Margery Williams and illustrated by William Nicholson. ... Margery Williams (1881-1944) was the author of The Velveteen Rabbit and many other books, mostly for children. ... Hans Christian Andersen or simply H.C. Andersen , (April 2, 1805 – August 4, 1875) was a Danish author and poet, most famous for his fairy tales. ... Sesyle Joslin is a childrens literature author. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Charlotte Zolotow (born Charlotte Gertrude Shapiro June 26, 1915) is an American author, poet, and editor of many books for children. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... Wilhelm Hauff Lichtenstein Castle Wilhelm Hauff is buried in Stuttgart, Germany. ... Doris Orgel (1929 - ) is a childrens literature author. ... Frank Stockton, from an illustration in the 1903 publication of The Captains Toll-Gate Frank R. Stockton (April 5, 1834 - April 20, 1902), was an American writer and humorist, best known today for a series of innovative childrens fairy tales that were widely popular during the last decades... Amos Vogel (*1921 in Vienna, Austria) had to leave Austria in 1938. ... Robert Keeshan (June 27, 1927 – January 23, 2004) was an actor who was the original Clarabell the Clown on the Howdy Doody television program, but who is most famous as the star and title character of the childrens show Captain Kangaroo. ... Captain Kangaroo was a childrens television series which aired weekday mornings on the American television network CBS from 1955 until 1984, then moved to the American Program Service (now American Public Television, Boston) to air syndicated reruns of past episodes in 1992. ... Cover of the March 1911 issue McCalls was a monthly American womens magazine that enjoyed great popularity through much of the 20th century, peaking at a readership of six million in 1960. ... Andrejs Upits (sometimes listed as Andrei Upits) is a Latvian teacher, poet, short story writer, Communist polemicist. ... Frank Stockton, from an illustration in the 1903 publication of The Captains Toll-Gate Frank R. Stockton (April 5, 1834 - April 20, 1902), was an American writer and humorist, best known today for a series of innovative childrens fairy tales that were widely popular during the last decades... Photograph of Jarrell in 1956 Randall Jarrell (May 6, 1914 - October 15, 1965), was a United States author, writer and poet. ... Alec Wilder (born Alexander Lafayette Chew Wilder in Rochester, New York, February 16, 1907; d. ... William Engvick is a lyricist, Many of his songs were collaborations with Alec Wilder. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Photograph of Jarrell in 1956 Randall Jarrell (May 6, 1914 - October 15, 1965), was a United States author, writer and poet. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903 The Saturday Evening Post was a weekly magazine published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hyman Chanover (1920 - ) is a Jewish author. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... Photograph of Jarrell in 1956 Randall Jarrell (May 6, 1914 - October 15, 1965), was a United States author, writer and poet. ... For information about the other uses of the name, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Jan Boyer Wahl (born April 1, 1933, Columbus, Ohio) is an American childrens book author. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ... George MacDonald George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... Meindert De Jong sometimes spelled as Meindert de Jong or Dejong (4 March 1906 - 16 July 1991) was an award winning author of childrens books. ... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ... Frank Corsaro (born December 22, 1924, in New York City) is one of Americas foremost stage directors of opera and theatre. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Серге́й Серге́евич Проко́фьев) (April 271, 1891 – March 5, 1953) was one of the Soviet Unions greatest composers. ... Jack Sendak (1924-1995) was a childrens literature author. ... Philip Sendak is a childrens literature author. ... Rudolf TÄ›snohlídek (July 7, 1882 - January 12, 1928, suicide) was a Czech writer, journalist and translator. ... The Brothers Grimm on a 1000DM banknote. ... Beatrice Schenk de Regniers (1914-2000) was a childrens literature author. ... Iona Opie (b. ... Peter Mason Opie (1918 - 1982) was an English specialist in childrens literature, and the customs of schoolchildren. ... George MacDonald George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... Arthur Yorinks is a writer/librettist for theater and opera as well as the author of over two dozen books for children, including the Caldecott Medal winner, Hey, Al. ... Arthur Yorinks is a writer/librettist for theater and opera as well as the author of over two dozen books for children, including the Caldecott Medal winner, Hey, Al. ... Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist (October 18, 1777 – November 21, 1811) was a German poet, dramatist and novelist. ... James Marshall, or Jim Marshall could be James W. Marshall, who discovered gold in California in 1848 James Marshall the soldier James Marshall the director James Marshall the childrens writer James Marshall the actor This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. ... Doris Orgel (1929 - ) is a childrens literature author. ... Jack Sendak (1924-1995) was a childrens literature author. ... Ruth Krauss (b. ...

Collections

  • The Art Of Maurice Sendak (By Selma G. Lanes) (1980)
  • The Art Of Maurice Sendak: From 1980 to the Present (by Tony Kushner) (2003)

Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–2000 American Library Association

External links

  • Maurice Sendak biography
  • Interview with Maurice Sendak from the Northwestern University Library in free streaming video (RealVideo)
  • PBS: American Masters A one-minute video clip
  • NPR: Conversation with Maurice Sendak A seventeen-minute audio interview
  • The Rosenbach Museum and Library Exhibition space for Sendak drawings

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maurice Sendak - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (390 words)
Maurice Sendak (born June 10, 1928) is an artist and creator of children's literature who is best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, published in 1963.
A sickly child, Sendak decided to become an illustrator for children after he was influenced by Walt Disney's film Fantasia at the age of twelve.
Sendak produced an animated TV production based on his work entitled Really Rosie, featuring Carole King, which was broadcast in 1975 and is available on video (usually as part of video compilations of his work).
MSN Encarta - Maurice Sendak (286 words)
Sendak, Maurice, born in 1928, American writer and illustrator, born in Brooklyn, New York, creator of the children's classic Where the Wild Things Are.
Sendak established his reputation as an illustrator with his drawings for A Hole Is to Dig (1952), by Ruth Krauss.
Sendak won the Hans Christian Andersen International Medal in 1970 and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award in 1983.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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