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Encyclopedia > Maurice Ravel
Maurice Ravel.
Maurice Ravel.

Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875December 28, 1937) was a French composer and pianist of the impressionistic period, known especially for the subtlety, richness and poignancy of his music. His piano music, chamber music, vocal music and orchestral music have become staples of the concert repertoire. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... The impressionist movement in music is a movement in European classical music that had its beginnings in the late nineteenth century and continued into the middle of the twentieth century. ... This article is about the modern musical instrument. ... Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. ... Vocal music is music performed by one or more singers, with or without non-vocal instrumental accompaniment, in which singing provides the main focus of the piece. ... A philharmonic orchestra An orchestra is a musical ensemble used most often in classical music. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Ravel's piano compositions, such as Jeux d'eau, Miroirs and Gaspard de la Nuit, demand considerable virtuosity from the performer, and his orchestral music, including Daphnis et Chloé and his arrangement of Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, uses tonal color and variety of sound and instrumentation very effectively. The intro to Jeux deau contains the undulating phrases constant throughout the piece. ... Miroirs (Mirrors) is a solo piano work by Maurice Ravel written from 1904–1905. ... Gaspard de la nuit: Trois Poèmes pour Piano dapres Aloysius Bertrand (Treasurer of the Night: Three Poems for Piano after Aloysius Bertrand) is a piece for solo piano by Maurice Ravel. ... A virtuoso (from Italian virtuoso, late Latin virtuosus, Latin virtus meaning: skill, manliness, excellence) is an individual who possesses outstanding technical ability at singing or playing a musical instrument. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Daphnis et Chloé is a ballet with music by Maurice Ravel. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Instrumentation is the study and practice of writing music for a musical instrument. ...


To the general public, Ravel is probably best known for his orchestral work, Boléro, which he considered trivial and once described as "a piece for orchestra without music."[1] For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel. ...


According to SACEM, Ravel's estate earns more royalties than that of any other French musician. Ravel's works will enter public domain on January 1st, 2008. Société des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique (SACEM) is a French professional association collecting payments of artists’ rights and distributing the rights to the original authors, composers and publishers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Biography

Early Life

Ravel was born in Ciboure, France, near Biarritz, part of the French Basque region. His mother, Marie Delouart, was Basque, while his father, Joseph Ravel, was a Swiss inventor and industrialist. Some of the father's inventions were quite important, including an early internal-combustion engine and a notorious circus machine, the "Whirlwind of Death," an automotive loop-the-loop that was quite a hit in the early 1900s. After the family moved to Paris, Ravel's younger brother Edouard was born. At age seven, young Maurice began piano lessons and, five or six years later, began composing. His parents encouraged his musical pursuits and sent him to the Conservatoire de Paris, first as a preparatory student and eventually as a piano major. During his schooling in Paris, Ravel joined with a number of innovative young artists who referred to themselves as the "Apaches" (hooligans) because of their wild abandon. The group was well known for drunken revelries. Ciboure is a commune of France, in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, across the harbour from Saint_Jean_de_Luz. ... Biarritz (French: Biarritz, pronounced ; Gascon Occitan: Biàrritz; Basque: Miarritze) is a town and commune which lies on the Bay of Biscay, on the Atlantic coast, in southwestern France. ... Pays Basque) see Northern Basque Country. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Business magnate. ... An internal combustion engine is an engine that is powered by the expansion of hot combustion products of fuel directly acting within an engine. ... Former Conservatoire building (until 1911), still used as Théâtre du Conservatoire The Conservatoire de Paris (full contemporary name Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris) is a music school in Paris, France. ... The Apaches (Les Apaches or Societe des Apaches) was a group of French musicians, writers and artists which formed around 1900. ...


He studied music at the Conservatoire under Gabriel Fauré for a remarkable fourteen years. During his years at the Conservatoire, Ravel tried numerous times to win the prestigious Prix de Rome, but to no avail. After a scandal involving his loss of the prize in 1905 (to Victor Gallois — Ravel had been considered the favorite to win), Ravel left the Conservatoire. The incident —named the "Ravel Affair" by the Parisian press — also led to the resignation of the Conservatoire's director, Théodore Dubois. Gabriel Urbain Fauré (May 12, 1845 – November 4, 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist, and teacher. ... The Prix de Rome was a scholarship for art students. ... François Clément Théodore Dubois (August 24, 1837 – June 11, 1924) was a French composer, organist and music teacher. ...


Musical Influences

While many critics claim Ravel was influenced by composer Claude Debussy, Ravel himself claimed he was much more influenced by Mozart and Couperin, whose compositions are much more structured and classical in form. Ravel and Debussy were, however, clearly the defining composers of the impressionist movement. Ravel was also highly influenced by music from around the world, including American jazz, Asian music, and traditional folk songs from across Europe. Ravel had left the Roman Catholic Church and was a self-declared atheist, although he was also a spiritualist like many skeptics of his generation. He disliked the overtly religious themes of other composers, and instead preferred to look to classical mythology for inspiration. In 1907, after the premiere of Histoires Naturelles, a controversy erupted. Pierre Lalo, music critic of Le Temps, criticised the work as a plagiarism of Debussy. However, criticism was quickly silenced after the Rhapsodie espagnole was received with such high critical acclaim. Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... François Couperin. ... The impressionist movement in music is a movement in European classical music that had its beginnings in the late nineteenth century and continued into the middle of the twentieth century. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Asian music actually is a vague, loose term that encompasses numerous different musical styles originating from just as numerous Asian cultures. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Édouard (Victor Antoine) Lalo (January 27, 1823 - April 22, 1892) was a French composer of Spanish descent. ...


Work With Diaghilev

Ravel later worked with impressario Sergei Diaghilev who staged Ma Mère l'Oye and Daphnis et Chloé. The latter was commissioned by Diaghilev with the lead danced by the great Vaslav Nijinsky. Ravel continued his feud with the French musical establishment. In 1920, the French government awarded him the Légion d'honneur, but Ravel refused. Soon, he retired to the French countryside where he continued to write music, albeit less prolifically. Portrait of Sergei Diaghilev by Valentin Serov (1904) Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (Russian: / Sergei Pavlovich Dyagilev), also referred to as Serge, (March 31, 1872 – August 19, 1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes from which many famous dancers and choreographers would later arise. ... Ma Mère lOye (Mother Goose), is a musical work by French composer Maurice Ravel. ... Daphnis et Chloé is a ballet with music by Maurice Ravel. ... Vaslav Nijinsky as Vayou in Nikolai Legats revival of Marius Petipas The Talisman, St. ... Chiang Kai-sheks Légion dhonneur. ...


Diaghilev commissioned Ravel to write La Valse (1920), originally named Wien (Vienna), and Ravel was hurt by the fact that Diaghilev never used the composition. When the two men met again in 1925, Ravel refused to shake Diaghilev's hand, and Diaghilev challenged Ravel to a duel (friends talked Diaghilev out of it). The men never met again.[2] External links Maurice Ravels La Valse An analysis and history of Maurice Ravels La Valse Category: ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ...


In 1928, Ravel for the first time began a piano tour in America. In New York City, he received a moving standing ovation which he remarked was unlike any of his underwhelming premieres in Paris. He traveled as far west as San Francisco, where he conducted a concert of his orchestral music. That same year, Oxford University awarded him an honorary doctorate. He also met George Gershwin and the two became friends. Ravel's admiration of American jazz led him to include some jazz elements in a few of his later compositions, especially the two piano concertos. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...


Ravel is not known to have had any intimate relationships. Many of his friends have suggested that Ravel was known to frequent the bordellos of Paris, but the issue of his sexuality remains largely a mystery. Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


Although he considered his small stature and light weight an advantage to becoming an aviator, during the First World War Ravel was not allowed to enlist as a pilot because of his age and weak health. Instead, upon his enlistment, he became a truck driver. He named his truck "Adelaide". Most references to what he drove in the war indicate it was an artillery truck or generic truck. No primary source mentions him driving an ambulance. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... In historical scholarship, a primary source is a document, or other source of information that was created at or near the time being studied, by an authoritative source, usually one with direct personal knowledge of the events being described. ...


His few students included Maurice Delage, Manuel Rosenthal, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and Vlado Perlemuter. Maurice Delage - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Manuel Rosenthal (born June 18, 1904 in Paris, France, died June 5, 2003) was a French composer and conductor. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... Vlado Perlemuter (May 26, 1904–September 4, 2002) was a French pianist with Jewish origins born in Kovno (now Kaunas, Lithuania). ...


Ravel made one of his few recordings when he conducted his Boléro with the Lamoureux Orchestra in 1930. Ravel reportedly conducted a group of Parisian musicians following the world premiere of his second piano concerto, the Concerto in G, with Marguerite Long, who had been the soloist in the premiere. EMI later reissued the 1932 recording on LP and CD. Although Ravel was listed as the conductor on the original 78-rpm discs, this is now disputed and it's possible he merely supervised the recording. Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel. ... The Orchestre Lamoureux (officially known as the Société des Nouveaux-Concerts and also known as the Concerts Lamoureux) was an orchestral concert society which gave weekly concerts by its own orchestra, founded in Paris by Charles Lamoureux in 1881. ... Marguerite Long (November 13, 1874 - February 13, 1966) was a French pianist. ...


Illness and Death

In 1932 Ravel sustained an accidental blow to the head while riding in a taxi. The injury was considered minor, but soon thereafter he began to complain of aphasia-like symptoms similar to Pick's disease. He had begun work on music for a film version of Don Quixote (1933) featuring the Russian bass Feodor Chaliapin and directed by G. W. Pabst. When Ravel became unable to compose, since he could not write down the musical ideas he heard in his mind, Pabst hired Jacques Ibert. For other uses, see Aphasia (disambiguation). ... Picks disease has two meanings that are often confused: 1) Pathology: Neurologists currently use the term Picks disease to mean specifically one of the pathological subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). ... This article is about the fictional character and novel. ... Feodor Chaliapin Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin (Russian: Фёдор Ива́нович Шаля́пин) [a more accurate English transliteration is Fyódor Shalyápin] (born February 13 [O.S. February 1] 1873, Kazan – died April 12, 1938, Paris) was the most famous Russian opera singer, bass of the first half of the 20th century. ... Georg Wilhelm Pabst (August 25, 1885 - May 29, 1967) was a film director. ... Jacques François Antoine Ibert (August 15, 1890 – February 5, 1962) was a French composer of classical music. ...


In late 1937 Ravel consented to brain surgery. One hemisphere of his brain was re-inflated with serous fluid. He awoke from the surgery, called for his brother Edouard, lapsed into a coma, and died shortly after. He is buried in Levallois-Perret, a suburb of northwest Paris. In physiology, the term serous fluid is used for various bodily fluids that are typically pale yellow and transparent, and of a benign nature. ... For other uses, see Coma (disambiguation). ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ...

Ravel at the piano, accompanied by Canadian singer Éva Gauthier, during his American tour, March 7, 1928. At far right is George Gershwin.
Ravel at the piano, accompanied by Canadian singer Éva Gauthier, during his American tour, March 7, 1928. At far right is George Gershwin. [3]

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Éva Gauthier in a Javanese Headdress Éva Gauthier (September 20, 1885 — December 20, 1958) was a Canadian mezzo-soprano and voice teacher. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ...

Musical style

Ravel considered himself in many ways a classicist. He relied on traditional forms and structures as ways of presenting his new and innovative harmonies. He often masked the sections of his structure with transitions that disguised the beginnings of the motif. This is apparent in his Valses nobles et sentimentales — inspired by Franz Schubert's collections, Valses nobles and Valses sentimentales — where the seven movements begin and end without pause, and in his chamber music where many movements are in sonata-allegro form, hiding the change from developmental sections to recapitulation. Classicism door in Olomouc, The Czech Republic Teatr Wielki in Warsaw Church La Madeleine in Paris Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity, as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Both Franz Schubert and Maurice Ravel composed noble and/or sentimentalWaltzes (Valses). ... Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Though Ravel's music has tonal centers, it was innovative for the time period. In keeping with the French school pioneered by Chabrier, Satie, and Debussy (to name a few), Ravel's melodies are almost exclusively modal. Instead of using major or minor for his predominant harmonic language, he preferred modes with major or minor flavors – for example the Mixolydian, with its lowered leading tone, instead of major, and the Aeolian instead of harmonic minor. As a result, there are virtually no leading tones in his output. Melodically, he tended to favor two modes: the Dorian and the Phrygian. He was in no way dependent on the modes exclusively; he used extended harmonies and intricate modulations outside the realm of traditional modal practices. Ravel was fond of chords of the ninth and eleventh, and the acidity of his harmonies is largely the result of a fondness for unresolved appoggiaturas (listen to the Valses Nobles et Sentimentales). His piano music, some of which is noted for its technical challenges (for example Gaspard de la nuit), was an extension of Lisztian virtuosity. Even his most difficult pieces, however, are marked by elegance and refinement. He was inspired by various dances, his favorite being the minuet. Other forms from which Ravel drew material include the forlane, rigaudon, waltz, czardas, habanera, passacaglia, and the bolero. Emmanuel Alexis Chabrier (January 18, 1841 - September 13, 1894) was a French composer. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... This article is about modes as used in music. ... The Mixolydian mode is a musical mode or diatonic scale. ... The Aeolian mode comprises a musical mode or diatonic scale. ... In music theory, a leading-tone (called the leading-note outside the US) is a note or pitch which resolves or leads to a note one semitone higher or lower, being a lower and upper leading-tone, respectively. ... Due to historical confusion, Dorian mode can refer to two very different musical modes or diatonic scales. ... Due to historical confusion, Phrygian mode can refer to two very different musical modes or diatonic scales. ... In music, ornaments are musical flourishes that are not necessary to the overall melodic (or harmonic) line, but serve to decorate or ornament that line. ... A minuet, sometimes spelled menuet, is a social dance of French origin for two persons, usually in 3/4 time. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Rigaudon, rigadon, or rigadoon. ... A section from Johann Strauss Waltz from Die Fledermaus For other uses, see Waltz (disambiguation). ... Czardas or Csárdás (Hungarian csárdás, from csárda, a tavern, beer house) is a traditional Hungarian folk dance. ... The habanera is a musical style or genre from Cuba with a characteristic Habanera rhythm; it is one of the oldest mainstays of Cuban music and the first of the dances from Cuba to be exported all over the world. ... In music a passacaglia (French: passacaille, Spanish: pasacalle, German: passacalia; Italian: passacaglio, passagallo, passacagli, passacaglie) is a musical form and the corresponding court dance. ... The bolero is a type of dance and musical form. ...


Ravel has almost always been considered one of the two great French musical Impressionists (the other being Debussy), but in reality he is much more than just an Impressionist. In his A la maniere de...Borodine (In the manner of...Borodine), Ravel plays with the ability to both mimic and remain original. In a more complex situation, A la maniere de...Emmanuel Chabrier /Paraphrase sur un air de Gounod ("Faust IIème acte"), Ravel takes on a theme from Gounod's Faust and arranges it in the style of Emmanuel Chabrier. Even in writing in the style of others, Ravel's own voice as a composer remained distinct. The impressionist movement in music is a movement in European classical music that had its beginnings in the late nineteenth century and continued into the middle of the twentieth century. ... Categories: Stub | 1818 births | 1893 deaths | Opera composers | Romantic composers | French musicians ... Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carrés play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Goethes Faust, Part I. It debuted at the Théatre-Lyrique in Paris on March 19, 1859. ... Emmanuel Alexis Chabrier (January 18, 1841 - September 13, 1894) was a French composer. ...


Ravel had very meticulously crafted manuscripts. Unfortunately, early printed editions of his works were prone to errors. Painstakingly, he worked with his publisher, Durand, in correcting them. In a letter, Ravel wrote that when proofing L'enfant et les sortilèges, after many other editors had proofread the opera, he could still find ten errors per page. Each piece was carefully crafted, although Ravel wished that, like the historical composers he admired, he could write a great quantity of works. Igor Stravinsky once referred to Ravel as the "Swiss Watchmaker", a reference to the intricacy and precision of Ravel's works. Igor Stravinsky. ...


Musical Influence

On the surface, he was influenced by Debussy, but also the music of Russia, Spain and the jazz music of the United States, as reflected in the movement titled Blues from his G major violin sonata. Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...


Ravel wrote, in 1928, that composers should be aware of both individual and national consciousness. That year, Ravel had toured the United States and Canada by train performing piano recitals in the great concert halls of twenty-five cities. In their reluctance to take jazz and blues as a nationalistic style of music, he stated American composers' "greatest fear is to find themselves confronted by mysterious urges to break academic rules rather than belie individual consciousness. Thereupon these musicians, good bourgeois as they are, compose their music according to the classical rules of the European epoch." When American composer George Gershwin met Ravel, he mentioned that he would have liked to study with the French composer if that were possible. The Frenchman retorted, "Why do you want to become a second-rate Ravel when you are already a first-rate Gershwin?"[4] (This quote may actually belong to Arnold Schoenberg, who is credited with essentially the same quote in the Wikipedia article for George Gershwin.) A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (the anglicized form of Schönberg — Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he left Germany and re-converted to Judaism in 1933; September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ...


His two piano concertos in many ways reflect the style of Gershwin. Of the Concerto in G, Ravel said the concertos of Mozart and Saint-Saëns served as his model. He intended to write an earlier concerto, Zazpiak Bat, but it was never finished. The title reflects his Basque heritage: meaning 'The Seven Are One', it refers to the seven Basque regions, and was a motto often used in connection with the idea of a Basque nation. Surviving notes and fragments also confirm that this naturally was to be heavily influenced by Basque music. Instead, Ravel abandoned the piece, using its nationalistic themes and rhythms in some of his other pieces. A piano concerto is a concerto for solo piano and orchestra. ... Concerto in G major is a piano concerto by Maurice Ravel composed in the period of 1929–1931. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns () (9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor, and pianist, known especially for his orchestral works The Carnival of the Animals, Danse Macabre, and Symphony No. ...


Ravel commented that André Gédalge, his professor of counterpoint, was very important in the development of his skill as a composer. As an orchestrator, Ravel studied the ability of each instrument carefully in order to determine the possible effects. This may account for the success of his orchestral transcriptions, both of his own piano works and those of other composers, such as Mussorgsky, Debussy and Schumann. André Gedalge (December 27, 1856 - February 5, 1926), was an inflential French composer and teacher. ... For other uses, see Counterpoint (disambiguation). ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... For others with the same name see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ...


Notable compositions

For a complete list of works, see List of compositions by Maurice Ravel. Menuet antique is a piece for solo piano composed by Maurice Ravel. ... Pavane pour une infante défunte (English: Pavane for a Dead Princess) is a well-known piece for solo piano written by the French composer Maurice Ravel. ... The pavane is a processional dance common in Europe during the 16th century, whether named from an origin in Padua (padovano), from Sanskrit meaning wind, or from the stately sweep of a ladys train likened to a peacocks tail. ... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ... Jeux d’eau is a piece for solo piano by the French Impressionistic composer, Maurice Ravel. ... Ravel completed his Quartet in F major in early April of 1903 at the age of 28. ... ... Sonatine is a piano piece written by Maurice Ravel from 1903–1905. ... The pedal harp (also known as the concert harp) is large and technically modern harp, designed for classical music and played solo, as part of chamber ensembles, and in symphony orchestras. ... Miroirs (Mirrors) is a solo piano work by Maurice Ravel written from 1904–1905. ... Rapsodie espagnole (alternatively spelt Rhapsodie) is an orchestral rhapsody written by Maurice Ravel. ... A rhapsody in music is a one-movement work that is episodic yet integrated, free-flowing in structure, featuring a range of highly contrasted moods, color and tonality. ... LHeure espagnole (The Spanish Hour) is a one act opera buffa by Maurice Ravel to a French libretto by Franc Nohain, based on his comedy. ... Gaspard de la nuit: Trois Poèmes pour Piano dapres Aloysius Bertrand (Treasurer of the Night: Three Poems for Piano after Aloysius Bertrand) is a piece for solo piano by Maurice Ravel. ... Ma Mère lOye (Mother Goose), is a musical work by French composer Maurice Ravel. ... A page from a late 17th century handwritten and illustrated version of Charles Perraults Contes de ma mère lOye (Mother Goose Tales) depicting Puss in Boots. ... Daphnis et Chloé is a ballet with music by Maurice Ravel. ... Portrait of Stéphane Mallarmé by Édouard Manet. ... Both Franz Schubert and Maurice Ravel composed noble and/or sentimentalWaltzes (Valses). ... A waltz (German: , Italian: , French: , Spanish: , Catalan: ) is a ballroom and folk dance in   time, done primarily in closed position. ... Maurice Ravels Piano Trio in A minor is a chamber work for piano, violin and cello. ... Le Tombeau de Couperin is a suite for solo piano by Maurice Ravel, composed between 1914 and 1917. ... In instrumental music, tombeau signifies a musical tombstone (French le tombeau = tomb). ... François Couperin. ... External links Maurice Ravels La Valse An analysis and history of Maurice Ravels La Valse Category: ... Lenfant et les sortilèges: Fantaisie lyrique en deux parties (The Child and the Spells: A Lyric Fantasy in Two Parts) is an opera by Maurice Ravel with a libretto by Colette. ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... Colette Colette [1] [2] was the pen name of the French novelist Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954). ... Tzigane is a rhapsody type of composition by the French composer Maurice Ravel. ... Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel. ... The Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major (Concerto pour la main gauche en ré majeur) was composed by Maurice Ravel between 1929 and 1930, concurrently with his Piano Concerto in G Major. ... Paul Wittgenstein (May 11, 1887 – March 3, 1961) was an Austrian-born pianist. ... Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (IPA: ) (April 26, 1889 in Vienna, Austria – April 29, 1951 in Cambridge, England) was an Austrian philosopher who contributed several ground-breaking ideas to philosophy, primarily in the foundations of logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mind. ... Concerto in G major is a piano concerto by Maurice Ravel composed in the period of 1929–1931. ... Serenade by Judith Leyster. ... This article is about the fictional character and novel. ... Dulcinea (1957), sculpture by F. Coullaut-Valera, in Madrid (Spain). ... This is a list of compositions by Maurice Ravel. ...


Media

  • La Valse
    arrangement for two pianos
    Miroirs - Noctuelles
    Miroirs - Oiseaux tristes
    Miroirs - Une barque sur l'Océan (d'un rythme souple)
    Miroirs - Alborada del Gracioso
    Miroirs - La Vallée des cloches
    Pavane pour une Infante Défunte
    Sérénade Grotesque
    Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, movements 1 and 2
    Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, movements 3, 4 and 5
    Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, movements 6, 7 and 8
    Sonatine, 2nd movement
    Second movement from Sonatine
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_La_Valse. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Miroirs_-_Noctuelles. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Miroirs_-_Oiseaux_tristes. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Miroirs_-_Une_barque_sur_l'Ocean_d'un_rythme_souple. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Miroirs_-_Alborado_del_Gracioso. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Miroirs_-_La_Valee_des_cloches. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Pavane_pour_une_Infante_Defunte. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Serenade_Grotesque. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Valses_Nobles_et_Sentimentales,_movements_1_and_2. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Valses_Nobles_et_Sentimentales,_movements_3,_4_and_5. ... Image File history File links Maurice_Ravel_-_Valses_Nobles_et_Sentimentales,_movements_6,_7_and_8. ... Image File history File links Ravel_Sonatine_Mov_2_Brian_E_Young. ... Sonatine is a piano piece written by Maurice Ravel from 1903–1905. ...

See also

The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc Elbe Bridge I by Rolf Nesch On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... The impressionist movement in music is a movement in European classical music that had its beginnings in the late nineteenth century and continued into the middle of the twentieth century. ... Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel. ...

References

  • The Cambridge Companion to Ravel (Cambridge Companions to Music) Publisher: Cambridge University Press (August 24, 2000) ISBN 0-521-64856-4
  • "Maurice Ravel." Contemporary Musicians, Volume 25. Gale Group, 1999. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thomson Gale. 2005.

Notes

  1. ^ Kavanaugh, Patrick (1996). "Orchestra Music", Music of the Great Composers: A Listener's Guide to the Best of Classical Music. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan, p. 56. ISBN 0310208076. 
  2. ^ Schonberg, Harold C. (1981). The Lives of the Great Composers, Revised, W. W. Norton & Company, New York, London, 486. ISBN 0-393-01302-2. 
  3. ^ Source : Bibliothèque et Archives Canada.
  4. ^ The Gift of Music: Great Composers and Their Influence. Publisher: Crossway Books; 3 edition (November 1, 1995), p. 272 ISBN 089107869X

Grand Rapids redirects here. ... Zondervan is an international Christian media and publishing company, one of the four businesses founded by Dutch-Americans that have made Grand Rapids, Michigan into the USAs Christian Publishing Capital, alongside Eerdmans, Baker Books, and Kregel. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Maurice Ravel
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Maurice Ravel
Persondata
NAME Ravel, Maurice
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Ravel, Joseph-Maurice
SHORT DESCRIPTION French composer and pianist
DATE OF BIRTH March 7, 1875
PLACE OF BIRTH Ciboure, France near Biarritz
DATE OF DEATH December 28, 1937
PLACE OF DEATH

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP) is a project for the creation of a virtual library of public domain music scores, based on the wiki principle. ... WorldCat is the worlds largest bibliographic database, the merged catalogs of over 50,000 OCLC member libraries in over 90 countries. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Ciboure is a commune of France, in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, across the harbour from Saint_Jean_de_Luz. ... Biarritz (French: Biarritz, pronounced ; Gascon Occitan: Biàrritz; Basque: Miarritze) is a town and commune which lies on the Bay of Biscay, on the Atlantic coast, in southwestern France. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Maurice Ravel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1952 words)
Ravel's piano compositions, such as Miroirs and Gaspard de la Nuit are virtuosic, and his orchestrations, such as in Daphnis et Chloé and his orchestral arrangement of Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, are notable for the effective use of tonal color and variety of sound and instrumentation.
The incident—named the Ravel Affair by the Parisian press—also led to the resignation of the Conservatoire's director, Théodore Dubois.
Ravel was fond of chords of the ninth and eleventh, and the acidity of his harmonies is largely the result of a fondness for unresolved appoggiaturas (listen to the Valses Nobles et Sentimentales).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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