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Encyclopedia > Maurice Pialat

Maurice Pialat (August 21, 1925 - January 11, 2003) was a French film director and actor.


Pialat won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1987 for Sous le soleil de Satan (Under the Sun of Satan).


Filmography as director includes

Le GarÁu (1995)
Van Gogh (1991)
Sous le soleil de Satan (1987)
Police (1985)
ņ nos amours (1983)
Loulou (1980)
Passe ton bac d'abord (1979)
La Gueule ouverte (1974)
Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble (1972)
L'Enfance nue (1970)
Village d'enfants (1969)
Byzance (1964)
Pehlivan (1964)
Jardins d'Arabie (1963)
MaÓtre Galip (1962)
Janine (1961)
L'Amour existe (1960)

  Results from FactBites:
 
World Cinema: Directors -- Maurice Pialat (211 words)
Originally a painter, Pialat worked for the stage and television, acted, and shot documentaries.
Pialat's potent, bleak realism combines a demanding, quasi-cinéma-vérité approach - some non-professional actors, very long takes, improvisation, colloquial language - with the reworking of personal issues such as marital breakdown.
But it is in his earlier work that Pialat's cinematic power is most in evidence.
Movies | Broken lines, interrupted movements (1279 words)
Pialat’s work is remarkable for the gravity and soberness it achieves while building up a richness of lived reality, both in the documentation of the real cities and towns where the films are set and in the thorough compiling of information about how people’s habits create their dŽcor.
Pialat deals in a hopeless intimacy: we can go only so far with his people before a barrier rises, formed partly out of their self-protective concealments (which also separate them from one another) and partly out of the director’s refusal to compromise his sense of the opacity of existence.
The gestural quality of these films is crucial: the human body in Pialat is always a source of disruption, and perhaps he considers violence a particular category of gesture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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