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Encyclopedia > Matthew Perry (naval officer)
Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858).
Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858).

Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who compelled the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. PD photo of Matthew C. Perry, collected from http://www. ... PD photo of Matthew C. Perry, collected from http://www. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 19th century Commodore stripes 20th century Commodore insignia Commodore is a rank of the United States Navy with a somewhat complicated history. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... On March 31, 1854, the Convention of Kanagawa (Japanese: 神奈川条約, Kanagawa Jōyaku, or 日米和親条約, Nichibei Washin Jōyaku) was used by Commodore Matthew Perry of the U.S. Navy to force the opening of the Japanese ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American trade and ended Japans 200 year policy... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents


Early life and naval career

Born in Rocky Brook, Rhode Island, he was the son of Captain Christopher R. Perry and the younger brother of Oliver Hazard Perry. Matthew Perry obtained a midshipman's commission in the Navy in 1809, and was initially assigned to Revenge, under the command of his elder brother. Official language(s) None Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ... Captain Christopher Raymond Perry (4 December 1761 – 1 June 1818) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (August 23, 1785 – August 23, 1819) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The third Revenge was a schooner in the United States Navy during the years preceding the War of 1812. ...


Perry's early career saw him assigned to several different ships, including the President, where he was aide to Commodore John Rodgers, which was in a victorious engagement over a British vessel, HMS Little Belt, shortly before the War of 1812 was officially declared. During that war Perry was transferred to USS United States, and consequently saw little fighting in that war afterward since the ship was trapped at New London, Connecticut. After the war he served on various vessels in the Mediterranean and Africa (notably aboard USS Cyane during its patrol off Liberia in 1819-1820), sent to suppress piracy and the slave trade in the West Indies. Later during this period, while in port in Russia, Perry was offered a commission in the Russian navy, which he declined. The first USS President of the United States Navy was a 44-gun sailing frigate built by Christian Bergh, East River, New York. ... John Rodgers (11 July 1772 - 1 August 1838), American naval officer, was born near present Havre de Grace, Maryland. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Strength United States Regular army : 99,000 Volunteers: 10,000* Rangers: 3,000 Militia: 458,000** Naval and marine: 20,000 Indigenous peoples New York Iroquois: 600 Northwestern allies: ? Southern allies: ? United Kingdom Regular army: 10,000+ Naval and marine: ? Canadian militia: 86,000+** Indigenous... USS United States was the first frigate in the United States Navy in 1797. ... View of New London from across the Thames River New London, Connecticut is a city in New London County, at the mouth of the Thames River and on the northeastern shore of Long Island Sound. ... Cyane was a sailing frigate built in 1796 at Frinsbury, England, for the Royal Navy. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Command assignments, 1820s-1840s

Opening of Key West

Perry commanded the Shark from 1821-1825. The first Shark was a schooner in the United States Navy. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


When England possessed Florida in 1763, the Spanish contended that the Florida Keys were part of Cuba and North Havana. The United States felt the island could potentially be the "Gibralter of the West" because Key West guarded the northern edge of the 90 mile wide Straits of Florida -- the deep water route between the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Palm trees in Islamorada The Florida Keys are an archipelago, a string of about 1700 islands in the southeast United States. ... The Straits of Florida, Florida Straits, or Florida Strait is a strait located south-southeast of the North American mainland, generally accepted to be between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, and between the Florida Keys and Cuba. ...


In 1815 the Spanish governor in Havana, Cuba deeded the island of Key West, Florida to Juan Pablo Salas of Saint Augustine, Florida. After Florida was transferred to the United States, Salas sold the island to U.S. businessman John W. Simonton for $2,000 in 1821. Simonton lobbied the U.S. Government to establish a naval base on the island, both to take advantage of the island's strategic location and to bring law and order to the town. This article is about the Cuban city. ... Key West monument marking the Southernmost point in the continental United States is located in Key West, Florida, at the intersection of South Street and Whitehead Street. ... St. ... ...


On March 25, 1822, Perry sailed the schooner Shark to Key West and planted the U.S. flag, physically claiming the Keys as United States property.


Perry renamed Cayo Hueso to "Thompson's Island" for the Secretary of the Navy Smith Thompson and the harbor "Port Rodgers" for the president of the Board of Navy Commissioners. Neither name was to stick. Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ...


From 1826-1827 he acted as fleet captain for Commodore Rodgers. Perry returned for shore duty to Charleston, South Carolina in 1828, and in 1830 took command of USS Concord. He spent the years of 1833-1837 as second officer of the New York Navy Yard (later the Brooklyn Navy Yard), gaining promotion to captain at the end of this tour. The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Naval Battle of Navarino by Carneray 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard , the New York Navy Yard and United States Navy Yard, New York, is located 1. ...


Father of the Steam Navy

Perry had a considerable interest in naval education, supporting an apprentice system to train new seamen, and helped establish the curriculum for the United States Naval Academy. He was also a vocal proponent of modernization of the Navy. Once promoted to captain, he oversaw construction of the Navy's second steam frigate, USS Fulton, which he commanded after its completion.. He was called "The Father of the Steam Navy." He organized America's first corps of naval engineers, and conducted the first U.S. naval gunnery school while commanding Fulton in 1839-1840 off Sandy Hook on the coast of New Jersey. The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is located in Annapolis, Maryland. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sandy Hook from the top of Twin Lights Lighthouse, Highlands, NJ. Sandy Hook is a narrow coastal spit of land, approximately 6 miles in length and 0. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ...


Promotion to commodore

Perry acquired the courtesy title of commodore in 1841, and was made chief of the New York Navy Yard in the same year. In 1843 he took command of the African Squadron, whose duty was to interdict the slave trade under the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, and continued in this endeavor through 1844. 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the New York Navy Yard and United States Navy Yard, New York, is located 1. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Africa Squadron was a unit of the United States Navy that operated from 1843 to 1859 to suppress the slave trade along the coast of West Africa. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Headline text The Webster-Ashburton Treaty, signed August 9, 1842, settled the dispute over the location of the Maine-New Brunswick border between the United States and Canada as well as the location of the border (at the 49th parallel) in the westward frontier up to the Rocky Mountains and... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The Mexican-American War

In 1845 Commodore David Connor's length of service in command of the Home Squadron had come to an end. However, the coming of the Mexican-American War persuaded the authorities not to change commanders in the face of the war. Perry, who would eventually succeed Connor, was made second-in-command and captained the USS Mississippi. Perry captured the Mexican city of Frontera and demonstrated against Tabasco and took part in the Tampico Expedition. He was forced to return to Norfolk, Virginia to make repairs and was still there when the amphibious landings at Vera Cruz took place. His return to the U.S. did give his superiors the chance to finally give him orders to succeed Commodore Connor in command of the Home Squadron. Perry returned to the fleet during the siege of Veracruz and his ship supported the siege from the sea. After the fall of Veracruz Winfield Scott moved inland and Perry moved against the remaining Mexican port cities. Perry assembled the Mosquito Fleet and captured Tuxpan in April, 1847. In July, 1847 he attacked Tabasco personally leading a 1,173 man landing force ashore and attacked the city from land. 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Commodore David Conner (1792 - 20 March 1856) was a officer of the United States Navy. ... The Home Squadron was part of the United States Navy in the mid 1800s. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 60,000 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government estimate) The Mexican-American... USS Mississippi, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy bear that name. ... There are places that have the name Frontera (Spanish meaning frontier) Argentina: Frontera, Santa Fe Canary Islands: Frontera, a municipality in the western and the southern ends of the island of El Hierro, Santa Cruz de Tenerife Spain (Cádiz, Andalusia): Arcos de la Frontera Jerez de la Frontera Vejer... Tabasco is a state in Mexico. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... See: Veracruz (city) (Mexico) Veracruz (state) (Mexico) Vera Cruz, Indiana Vera Cruz, Bahia, Brazil Vera Cruz, São Paulo, Brazil This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott (Army) David Conner (Navy) Matthew C. Perry (Navy) Juan Morales Strength 12,000 3,360 Casualties 18 killed 62 wounded 180 killed and wounded 100 civilian The Battle of Veracruz was a 20-day siege of the key Mexican seaport of Veracruz, Veracruz... Winfield Scott Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States Army general, diplomat, and presidential candidate. ... The Mosquito Fleet was a fleet of small steam vessels which plied the waters of the Puget Sound during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Matthew C. Perry Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength 1,519 400 Casualties 3 killed 11 wounded  ? The Battle of Tuxpan was a battle fought during the Mexican-American War. ... The Second Battle of Tabasco (also known as the Battle of Villahermosa) was a battle fought during the Mexican-American War as part of the U.S. blockade of Mexican Gulf ports. ...


The Opening of Japan: 1852-1854

Precedents

Perry's expedition to Japan was preceded by several naval expeditions by American ships:

  • From 1797 to 1809, several American ships traded in Nagasaki under the Dutch flag, upon the request of the Dutch who were not able to send their own ships because of their conflict against Britain during the Napoleonic Wars.
  • In 1837, an American businessman in Canton, named Charles W. King saw an opportunity to open trade by trying to return to Japan three Japanese sailors (among them, Otokichi) who had been shipwrecked a few years before on the coast of Oregon. He went to Uraga Channel with Morrison, an unarmed American merchant ship. The ship was attacked several times, and finally sailed back without completing its mission.
  • In 1846, Commander James Biddle, sent by the United States Government to open trade, anchored in Tokyo Bay with two ships, including one warship armed with 72 cannons, but his requests for a trade agreement remained unsuccessful.
  • In 1848, Captain James Glynn sailed to Nagasaki, leading at last to the first successful negotiation by an American with "Closed Country" Japan. James Glynn recommended to the United States Congress that negotiations to open Japan should be backed up by a demonstration of force, thus paving the way to Perry's expedition.

1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nagasaki City Hall Mayor {{{Mayor}}} Address 〒850-8685 Nagasaki-shi, Sakura-machi 2-22 Phone number 095-825-5151 Official website: www1. ... Combatants Allies: • Great Britain/United Kingdom, • Prussia, • Austria, • Sweden, • Russia, • France • Denmark-Norway • Poland Casualties Full list The Napoleonic Wars consisted of a series of wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule over France. ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... There are multiple Cantons in China Canton City : Guangzhou Canton Province : Guangdong This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Charles W. King was an American trader in Canton, who is famous for having tried to open trade with Japan, on the pretext of repatriating seven Japanese castaways, among them Otokichi, to their homeland, in 1837. ... Japanese drawing of Otokichi in 1849, as he visited Japan disguised as a Chinese man. ... Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Map of Tokyo Bay, 1917 The Uraga Channel (浦賀水道 Uraga-suido) is a waterway connecting Tokyo Bay to the Sagami Gulf. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... James Biddle (February 18, 1783 - October 1, 1848), of the Biddle family, brother of financier Nicholas Biddle and nephew of Captain Nicholas Biddle was an American commodore. ... Tokyo Bay from space, October 1993 Map of Tokyo Bay, 1917 Tokyo Bay (東京湾; Tōkyō-wan) is a bay in the southern Kanto region of Japan, surrounded by the Boso Peninsula (Chiba Prefecture) and the Miura Peninsula (Kanagawa Prefecture). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Glynn (1800-1871) was a U.S. Navy officer, who in 1848 distinguished himself by being the first American to negotiate successfully with the Japanese during the Closed Country period. ... Nagasaki City Hall Mayor {{{Mayor}}} Address 〒850-8685 Nagasaki-shi, Sakura-machi 2-22 Phone number 095-825-5151 Official website: www1. ... Sakoku (Japanese: 鎖国, literally country in chains) was the foreign relations policy of the Tokugawa shogunate, whereby nobody, whether foreign or Japanese, could enter or leave Japan on penalty of death. ... Seal of the Congress. ...

First visit, 1852-1853

Japanese 1854 print relating Perry's visit.
Japanese 1854 print relating Perry's visit.

In 1852, Perry embarked from Norfolk, Virginia for Japan, in command of a squadron in search of a Japanese trade treaty. Aboard a black-hulled steam frigate, he ported Mississippi, Plymouth, Saratoga, and Susquehanna at Uraga Harbor near Edo (modern Tokyo) on July 8, 1853, and was met by representatives of the Tokugawa Shogunate who told him to proceed to Nagasaki, where there was limited trade with the Netherlands and which was the only Japanese port open to foreigners at that time (see Sakoku). Perry refused to leave and demanded permission to present a letter from President Millard Fillmore, threatening force if he was denied. Japan had for centuries rejected modern technology, and the Japanese military forces could not resist Perry's modern weaponry; the "Black Ships" would then become, in Japan, a threatening symbol of Western technology and colonialism. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (944x421, 80 KB)Commodore Perrys fleet. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (944x421, 80 KB)Commodore Perrys fleet. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... USS Mississippi, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy bear that name. ... USS Plymouth, a sloop-of-war, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for a town in Massachusetts on Plymouth Bay, 18 miles southeast of Brockton, Massachusetts; founded by the Pilgrims in 1620. ... USS Saratoga, a sloop-of-war, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for the Battle of Saratoga of the American Revolutionary War. ... USS Susquehanna, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for a river which rises in Lake Otsego in central New York and flows across Pennsylvania and the northeast corner of Maryland to empty into the Chesapeake Bay. ... Edo (Japanese: 江戸, literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... Tokyo ) , literally eastern capital, is one of the 47 prefectures of Japan and includes the highly urbanized central area formerly known as the city of Tokyo which is the heart of the Greater Tokyo Area. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Nagasaki City Hall Mayor {{{Mayor}}} Address 〒850-8685 Nagasaki-shi, Sakura-machi 2-22 Phone number 095-825-5151 Official website: www1. ... Sakoku (Japanese: 鎖国, literally country in chains) was the foreign relations policy of the Tokugawa shogunate, whereby nobody, whether foreign or Japanese, could enter or leave Japan on penalty of death. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... This article is in need of attention. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Colonialism. ...


The Japanese government accepted Perry's coming ashore to avoid a naval bombardment. Perry proceeded ashore at Kurihama, (near modern-day Yokosuka) on July 14, presented the letter to delegates present and left for the Chinese coast, promising to return for a reply. Categories: Cities in Kanagawa Prefecture | Japan geography stubs ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ...


Second visit, 1854

Commodore Perry's fleet for his second visit to Japan in 1854.
Commodore Perry's fleet for his second visit to Japan in 1854.

Perry returned in February, 1854 with twice as many ships, finding that the delegates had prepared a treaty embodying virtually all the demands in Fillmore's letter. Perry signed the Convention of Kanagawa on March 31, 1854 and departed, mistakenly believing the agreement had been made with imperial representatives. Image File history File links Commodore Perrys second fleet. ... Image File history File links Commodore Perrys second fleet. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... On March 31, 1854, the Convention of Kanagawa (Japanese: 神奈川条約, Kanagawa Jōyaku, or 日米和親条約, Nichibei Washin Jōyaku) was used by Commodore Matthew Perry of the U.S. Navy to force the opening of the Japanese ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American trade and ended Japans 200 year policy... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Akihito of Japan Imperial Seal of Japan The Emperor (天皇 tennō, literally heavenly sovereign) is currently a constitutionally-recognized symbol of the Japanese nation and the unity of its people. ...


On his way to Japan, Perry anchored off of Keelung in Formosa, known today as Taiwan, for ten days. Perry and crew members landed on Formosa and investigated the potential of mining the coal deposits in that area. He emphasized in his reports that Formosa provided a convenient, mid-way trade location. The island was also very defensible. It could serve as a base for exploration in a similar way that Cuba had done for the Spanish in the Americas. Occupying Formosa could help the US counter European monopolization of the major trade routes. The United States government failed to respond to Perry's proposal to claim sovereignty over Formosa. Keelung (基隆 Pinyin: Jīlóng, Wade-Giles: Chi-lung) is a county-level city of Taiwan Province, Republic of China. ... Taiwan (Traditional Chinese: 臺灣 or 台灣; Simplified Chinese: 台湾; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Tai-wan; Taiwanese: Tâi-oân) is an island country in East Asia officially known as the Republic of China (Taiwan), but the term Taiwan is also commonly used to collectively refer to the territories governed by the... Formosa is a place name which comes from Portuguese and old Spanish word formosa (*from latin formosus, meaning beautiful). The following places bear the name: The geographically named island of Formosa, upon which the Taiwanese live, also sometimes called the Republic of China Formosa Strait (Taiwan Strait) Formosan languages, the...


Return to the United States, 1855

A map of Coal Mines distribution on Formosa Island in the Narrative of the Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry's Expedition to Japan.
Enlarge
A map of Coal Mines distribution on Formosa Island in the Narrative of the Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry's Expedition to Japan.

Upon Perry's return to the United States in 1855, Congress voted to grant him a reward of $20,000 in appreciation of his work in Japan. Perry used part of this money to prepare and publish a report on the expedition in three volumes, titled Narrative of the Expedition of an American Squadron to the China Seas and Japan. Download high resolution version (900x608, 72 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (900x608, 72 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the Congress. ... The China Sea can refer to the: South China Sea, or East China Sea This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Last years

Perry died three years later on March 4, 1858 in New York City. His remains were moved to the Island Cemetery in Newport, Rhode Island on March 21, 1866, along with those of his daughter, Anna, who died in 1839. Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ... Newport as seen from the International Space Station. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Trivia

31 Star US Flag
31 Star US Flag

Download high resolution version (1520x800, 17 KB)31-star US flag (1851-1858) File links There are no pages that link to this file. ... Download high resolution version (1520x800, 17 KB)31-star US flag (1851-1858) File links There are no pages that link to this file. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from January 1, 1877, until her death in 1901. ... Country of origin Japan Classification and breed standards In Japan, there are Inu (犬) (dogs) and there are Chin (狆). The Japanese Chin (also known as the Japanese Spaniel) is the dog of Japanese Royalty. ... Radars: AN/SPS-49 Air Search Radar AN/SPS-67 Surface Search Radar Fire control: 4 × Mk 37 Gun Fire Control 2 × Mk 38 Gun Director 1 × Mk 40 Gun Director EW: AN/SLQ-32 Other: AN/SLQ-25 NIXIE Decoy System 8 × Super Rapid Bloom Rocket Launchers (SRBOC) Armor... Satellite image of Pearl Harbor. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,941 sq mi (28,337 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... A bulkhead is an upright wall within the hull of a ship. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Surrender of Japan. ... Port is the nautical term (used on boats and ships) that refers to the left side of a ship, as perceived by a person facing towards the bow (the front of the vessel). ... John Slidell John Slidell (1793 – 1871) was born in New York City. ... Alexander Slidell Mackenzie (1803-1848) was a U.S. Navy officer who served during the first half of the 19th century. ... Rear Admiral Christopher Raymond Perry Rodgers (4 November 1819 – 8 January 1892) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... Montgomery C. Meigs Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (IPA: ) (May 3, 1816 – January 2, 1892) was a career U.S. Army officer, civil engineer, construction engineer for a number of facilities in Washington, D.C., and Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army during and after the American Civil War. ... John Rodgers Meigs was born in Washington, D.C. on February 9, 1841 and died October 3, 1864 during the Civil War. ... Return Jonathan Meigs (December 17, 1734 – January 28, 1823) was a colonel who served in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... John Rodgers (15 January 1881 – 27 August 1926) was an officer in the United States Navy and an early aviator. ... Rear Admiral John Rodgers John Rodgers (8 August 1812 – 5 May 1882), son of Commodore John Rodgers, was born near Havre de Grace, Maryland. ...

Fictional depictions

The story of the opening of Japan was the basis of Stephen Sondheim & John Weidman's Pacific Overtures. Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... John Weidman is an American librettist. ... Pacific Overtures was an ambitious 1976 musical by Stephen Sondheim, with a libretto by John Weidman, and additional material by Hugh Wheeler, set in 1853 Japan. ...


Actor Richard Boone played Perry in a highly fictionalized film called The Bushido Blade. Released in 1980, but produced earlier, it was marketed in such a way as to take advantage of the popularity of the Japanese-themed TV miniseries Shogun. It was not well received critically and did poorly at the box office.


In the 23rd episode of the anime Samurai Champloo, (Heart and Soul Into the Ball - Baseball Blues) a fictitious depiction of the black ships comes to the shores of Japan, several years earlier than Perry, to force trade with the Americans. However, they are distracted by the fact that they have a baseball and henceforth challenge them to a baseball game involving the main characters (much to their dismay), wagering the westernization of Japan. Though Perry does not physically appear, he is mentioned at the end of the episode. The Americans in the episode were given the march song, The Stars and Stripes Forever as their main theme. Samurai Champloo ) is an anime series consisting of twenty-six 24-minute episodes that began broadcasting on Fuji Television in Japan on May 19, 2004. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... The Stars and Stripes Forever is a patriotic American march. ...


The coming of Perry's ships is briefly mentioned in an episode of the anime series Rurouni Kenshin, and in the first episode of Hikaru no Go. Another anime series in which Perry briefly appears is Bokusatsu Tenshi Dokuro-chan. The manga Fruits Basket also refers to the event while the main character is studying. // A scene from Cowboy Bebop (1998) Anime ), which is short for the English word animation, in the western world most popularly refers (but not limited) to the medium of animation originating in Japan, with distinctive character and background aesthetics that visually set it apart from other forms of animation (e. ... Rurouni Kenshin ) is a set of manga and anime series created by mangaka Nobuhiro Watsuki, set during the early years of the early Meiji period in Japan. ... Hikaru no Go (ヒカルの碁) is a popular Japanese anime and manga coming of age story based on the board game Go written by Yumi Hotta and illustrated by Takeshi Obata. ... Bokusatsu Tenshi Dokuro-chan (撲殺天使ドクロちゃん) is a light novel by duo storyteller Okayu Masaki (おかゆまさき) and illustrator Torishimo (とりしも) serialized in the Dengeki hp magazine published by MediaWorks. ... For other uses, see Manga (disambiguation). ... Fruits Basket (フルーツバスケット) is a shōjo manga series created by Natsuki Takaya (pseudonym, real name unknown) serialized in the bi-weekly Japanese Hana to Yume (Flowers and Dreams) magazine, which is published by Hakusensha. ...


Perry's visit is also mentioned in the 1965 Hideo Gosha film "Sword of the Beast."


See also

The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ... The Meiji Restoration (Japanese: 明治維新, Meiji-ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ...

External links

  • A short timeline of Perry's life

 
 

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