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Encyclopedia > Matthew Cox
Matthew Cox
Born July 2, 1969 (age 37)
Flag of United States Florida
Charge(s) mortgage fraud, money laundering, mail fraud, wire fraud, social security number fraud, conspiracy
Status incarcerated
Occupation Mortgage broker

Matthew Bevan Cox (born July 2, 1969), commonly known as Matthew Cox, also sometimes known as Matthew B. Cox and Matt Cox, is an American convicted felon and con man who has been convicted of conspiracy and grand theft.[1] Cox, also an aspiring author, wrote an unpublished manuscript entitled The Associates.[2] In the manuscript a character, which was most likely based upon himself, travelled the country committing mortgage fraud. Cox later committed crimes in almost exactly the same manner as the character in the novel had.[3] Cox was able to falsify documents to make it appear as though he owned properties which he did not, and then was able to fraudulently attain several mortgages on the properties for 5–6 times their actual worth.[1] Throughout his criminal career Cox is estimated to have acquired over $15 million in this manner.[4] He also enlisted the help of several female accomplices, some of whom are now in prison or have served time in prison. Cox was apprehended by authorities on November 16, 2006. He currently is indicted on 42 counts, with prison sentences of potentially 400 years if convicted. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Mortgage fraud is a term used to describe a broad variety of actions where the intent is to materially misrepresent information on a mortgage loan application, in order to obtain the loan. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Wire fraud is a legal concept in the United States Code which provides for enhanced penalty of any criminally fraudulent activity if it is determined that the activity involved electronic communications of any sort, at any phase of the event. ... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... Look up Conspiracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Conspiracy, as a legal term, is an agreement of two or more people either to commit a crime or to achieve a lawful end by unlawful means: see conspiracy (crime), and conspiracy (civil). ... A prison is a place in which people are confined and deprived of a range of liberties. ... A mortgage broker acts as an intermediary who sources mortgages on behalf of individuals or businesses. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short, (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... Look up Conspiracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Conspiracy, as a legal term, is an agreement of two or more people either to commit a crime or to achieve a lawful end by unlawful means: see conspiracy (crime), and conspiracy (civil). ... Grand theft is a felony crime in the United States defined as the theft of objects exceeding a certain monetary value, as set by statute or court ruling. ... Mortgage fraud is a term used to describe a broad variety of actions where the intent is to materially misrepresent information on a mortgage loan application, in order to obtain the loan. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Florida, Cox struggled with dyslexia as a youth and as a result his teachers advised him to get a job working with his hands.[1] In response to this, Cox took up art and sculpture and attended from the University of South Florida where he majored in Art.[1] Immediately after college Cox abandoned his career as an artist, instead taking a job as an insurance agent. However, he quickly became unsatisfied with his income and began seeking a different, more high–paying job. Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... It has been suggested that Reading Difficulties and Dyslexia be merged into this article or section. ... The University of South Florida (USF) is a public university system located in Tampa, Florida, USA, with an autonomous campus in St. ... Agency is an area of law dealing with a contractual or quasi-contractual relationship between at least two parties in which one, the principal, authorizes the other, the agent, to represent her or his legal interests and to perform legal acts that bind the principal. ...


Adult life and criminal career

Cox left his job as an insurance agent to take a job as a mortgage broker with a local company.[5] While there he developed an unscrupulous reputation, which was heightened by his authorship of an unpublished 317 page manuscript entitled The Associates.[2] The novel detailed a character, written obviously as a copy of himself,[1] who travels the country committing mortgage fraud. Cox even went so far as to tell co-workers of the novel and elaborate on the novel's details.[6] After being fired from the company when he was convicted of mortgage fraud, Cox was able to fake a good credit history and used that to buy dozens of homes and properties.[1] He even used his skills as an artist to decorate the properties with elaborate art deco murals. Cox then charmed a young local married woman, Alison Arnold, into believing that he would be able to provide a wealthy and luxurious life for her.[1] While courting Arnold he repeatededly took her to crime films such as The Italian Job and in particular Catch Me if You Can—which he reportedly adored and watched several times—and began to detail his criminal plans to her. Cox often filed fraudulent mortgage documents and was, in several cases, able to mortgage properties by 5–6 times their actual worth.[1] After Arnold refused to get breast implants and abandon her son, Cox began to court another woman. A mortgage broker acts as an intermediary who sources mortgages on behalf of individuals or businesses. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Italian Job is a 2003 action-adventure film, directed by F. Gary Gray. ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Breast implant diagram A breast implant is a prosthesis used in cosmetic surgery to enhance the size and shape of ones breasts or to reconstruct the breast (for example, after a mastectomy). ...

Photograph of a mural Cox painted in one of the Tampa apartments he fraudulently obtained.
Photograph of a mural Cox painted in one of the Tampa apartments he fraudulently obtained.

Rebecca Hauck, unlike Arnold, was willing to leave her 13 year old son Bryce. After being tipped off by a reporter that a local newspaper, the St. Petersburg Times, was investigating him, Cox fled town with Hauck. Two days later, on December 14, 2003, a story entitled "Dubious housing deals line avenue" hit the newstand.[1][7] Cox fled to Atlanta, Georgia where he settled with Hauck. During this time, Cox travelled to Mobile, Alabama, and using the identity of a former co-worker, acquired credit cards and enough credit to rent a home. After filing false documents that indicated he owned the home, Cox took out several mortgages on the property in the amount of several hundred thousand dollars. He was so bold in these activities that he even took out one mortgage in the name of "C. Montgomery Burns", in an homage to The Simpsons television character.[1] Cox then did the same for several other properties, after which the couple moved to the Tallahassee, Florida area and continued their criminal practices. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Logo of the St. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Mobile has several different meanings. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Mr. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Location in Leon County and the state of Florida. ...


Authorities in the Atlanta area began to discover Cox's criminal activities and then ascertained his identity. On August 6, 2004 authorities issued arrest warrants for conspiracy, stolen identification documents, mail and wire fraud, money laundering and social security number fraud.[8] News broadcasts aired showing photos of Cox and Hauck, and requesting viewers to provide information as to their whereabouts.[1] By the Spring of 2005, Cox and Hauck had eluded authorities for eighteen months, using dozens of identities including ones stolen from former co-workers and acquaintances. Additionally, Cox obtained a number of stolen identities from the homeless by posing as a survey–taking Red Cross worker.[9] At this point, due to remorse and anxiety, Arnold called the FBI and confessed. She was sentenced to two years in prison for numerous charges, including conspiracy to commit bank fraud and identity theft. Arnold was also ordered to pay $300,000 dollars in restitution to her victims.[1] Shortly thereafter, Cox mortgaged several properties on two houses in a few days in Columbia, South Carolina. A local clerk noticed this and a fraud alert was issued on one of Cox's money laundering bank accounts. Cox was then arrested when he returned to the bank to make a transaction. However, he told authorities that his name was Gary Lee Sullivan, one of approximately thirty aliases Cox had at the time, and due to the fact that Sullivan had no open warrants the police released him.[1] Shortly thereafter, Cox and Hauck broke up, and after receiving some money from Cox, Hauck moved to Houston, where she lived in hiding under an assumed name. One year later Hauck was found and arrested by the Secret Service.[1] Convicted on numerous counts, Hauck was sentenced to six years in prison and five years of supervised release.[10] August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the criminal law, a conspiracy is an agreement between two or more natural persons to break the law at some time in the future, and, in some cases, with at least one overt act in furtherance of that agreement. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Wire fraud is a legal concept in the United States Code which provides for enhanced penalty of any criminally fraudulent activity if it is determined that the activity involved electronic communications of any sort, at any phase of the event. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Identity theft is a term first appearing in U.S. literature in the 1990s, leading to the drafting of the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act. ... Nickname: The Big Friendly, The Capital of Southern Hospitality, The Metro Location in Richland County, South Carolina Country United States State South Carolina Counties Richland and Lexington Government  - Mayor Bob Coble (D) Area  - City  133. ... Look up Alias in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term alias may refer to— an assumed name, or pseudonym. ... Secret Service redirects here. ...


The week that Hauck was sentenced to prison, Cox, who at the time was living in Nashville, Tennessee under the name Joseph Carter, narrowly escaped arrest again. Cox, who was dating a single mother, was reported by the couple's babysitter after the babysitter became suspicious of Cox and discovered his identity while researching him online.[11] Cox escaped capture this time due to a chance series of events—he had moved himself and the woman he was living with, Amanda Gardner, to a Hotel temporarily after their home had been burglarized.[1] On November 16, 2006, Cox was finally arrested by a half dozen Secret Service agents—who had been pursuing him for over two years—when he and Gardener returned home from the hotel.[1][11] Cox currently faces 42 counts of fraud, in addition to felony charges for fleeing while on probation from a previous conviction.[6] If convicted on all counts he faces potential prison sentences of 400 years.[4] Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... Day care is the care of a child during the day by a person other than the childs parents or legal guardians, often someone outside the childs immediate family. ... Online means being connected to the Internet or another similar electronic network, like a bulletin board system. ... Burglars attempted to break into an apartment by pulling away the lock. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Similarities between unpublished novel and actual life

Authorities were amazed by the similarities with the manuscript, which they found several years before apprehending Cox, and his actual crimes.[2] To begin with, there are physical similarities. The fictional character is 5 ft 7 in, and has brown hair and blue eyes.[2] Cox is 5 ft 6 in, and has brown hair and green eyes.[2] The fictional character drove a silver Audi TT, illegally acquired $2.7 million dollars of Tampa real estate, was an alumni of the University of South Florida, and formerly worked as an insurance salesman. Cox did the same thing in each case—he is even accused of using fake identities to borrow exactly $2.7 million on Tampa homes and properties.[2] The Audi TT is a sports car produced by Audi since 1998 in GyÅ‘r, Hungary. ...


In the novel, the fictional character rents a home with a female accomplice, similar to the one Cox rented with Rebecca Hauck in Atlanta.[3] The character then opens accounts at several banks in the area so that he can use them for money laundering purposes. Cox did exactly the same thing.[3] Then, Cox, exactly as his character had done, forged a document, claiming that the mortgage on the home—which he did not even own—was paid off.[3] After which the character in the novel found lenders and told them he owned the property outright. Cox is currently in prison under accusations that he did the exact same thing.[3]


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Morrison, Keith. Fraud by the book, msnbc.msn,com, April 2, 2007, accessed April 4, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Testerman, Jeff. Fraud by the book: Novelist becomes his own hero, St. Petersburg Times, December 19, 2004, accessed April 4, 2007.
  3. ^ a b c d e 'The Associates', msnbc.msn.com, April 1, 2007, accessed April 4, 2007.
  4. ^ a b Vickers, Marcia. Mortgage scam suspect arrested, Fortune, November 17, 2006, accessed April 4, 2007.
  5. ^ Vickers, Marcia. The Bonnie and Clyde of mortgage fraud, Fortune, November 4, 2006, accessed April 4, 2007.
  6. ^ a b Umberger, Mary. A mortgage scam you can make book on, Chicago Tribune, December 3, 2006, accessed April 4, 2007.
  7. ^ Testerman, Jeff. Dubious housing deals line avenue, St. Petersburg Times, December 15, 2003, accessed April 4, 2007.
  8. ^ Most wanted poster Matthew Cox, United States Secret Service, accessed April 5, 2007.
  9. ^ Nahmias, David E. Hauck Pleads Guilty to Mortgage Fraud; Cox Still at Large, United States Department of Justice, May 15, 2006, accessed April 5, 2007.
  10. ^ U.S Department of Homeland Security. Secret Service Most Wanted Fugitive Captured in Nashville, Tennessee, secretservice.gov, November 16, 2006, accessed April 4, 2007.
  11. ^ a b Testerman, Jeff. Sitter's fears set arrest in motion, St. Petersburg Times, November 17, 2006, accessed April 4, 2007.

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