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Encyclopedia > Matt Groening
Matt Groening

Matt Groening
Born February 15, 1954 (1954-02-15) (age 53)
Portland, Oregon, U.S.
Known for The Simpsons
Futurama
Life in Hell
Bongo Comics
Occupation Cartoonist
Religious stance Agnostic
Spouse Deborah Caplan (1986-1999)
Children Homer, Abe
Website www.MattGroening.com

Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. Simple Plan This work is copyrighted. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ... Life in Hell is a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Agnosticism (from the Greek a, meaning without, and gnosticism or gnosis, meaning knowledge) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims—particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality—is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism... Life in Hell is a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening. ... An Emmy Award. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ...

Contents

Early life

Groening was born on February 15, 1954[1] in Portland, Oregon[2] USA. His family name is pronounced 'greɪnɪŋ' (rhymes with raining). is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Portland has many meanings. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... A family name or surname is the part of a persons name indicating the family to which the person belongs. ...


He grew up in Portland,[3] the middle child of five children. His mother, Margaret Ruth Wiggum, was once a teacher, and his father, Homer Philip Groening, was a filmmaker, advertiser, writer and cartoonist.[4] Homer, born in Main Centre, Saskatchewan, Canada, grew up in a Mennonite family.[5] Matt's grandfather Abram Groening was a professor at Tabor College, a Mennonite Brethren liberal arts college in Hillsboro, Kansas before moving to Albany College (now known as Lewis and Clark College) in Oregon in 1930.[6] The phrase birth order is defined as a persons rank by age among his or her siblings. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Tabor College, Kansas is a four-year Christian liberal arts institution in Hillsboro, Kansas. ... The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptist denominations named after and influenced by the teachings and tradition of Menno Simons. ... Hillsboro is a city in Marion County, Kansas, United States. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... // College History and Location Lewis and Clark College, a private liberal arts college in Portland, Oregon, was founded in 1867 as Albany Collegiate Institute by a group of Presbyterian pioneers in the Willamette Valley town of Albany 46 miles south of Portland. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ...


From 1972[7] to 1977, Groening attended The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington,[8] a progressive school which he described as "a hippie college, with no grades or required classes, that drew every weirdo in the Northwest."[9] He served as the editor of the campus newspaper, The Cooper Point Journal, for which he also wrote articles and drew cartoons.[7] He befriended fellow cartoonist Lynda Barry after discovering that she had written a fan letter to Joseph Heller, one of Groening's favorite authors, and had gotten a reply back.[10] Groening has credited Barry with being "probably [his] biggest inspiration." [11] He has also cited the Disney animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians as the film that got him into cartoons.[12] The Evergreen signature clock tower The Evergreen State College is an accredited public liberal arts college and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. ... Coordinates: , County Incorporated January 28, 1859 Government  - Mayor Mark Foutch Area  - City 48. ... Lynda Barry (born January 2, 1956) is an American cartoonist and author. ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... Walt Disney Animation Studios is the animation studio that makes up a key element of The Walt Disney Company, and the oldest surviving animation studio in the world. ... This article is about the 1961 film. ...


Career

In 1977, at the age of 23, Groening moved to Los Angeles to become a writer. He went through what he described as "a series of lousy jobs," including being an extra in the film When Everyday Was The Fourth of July,[13] busing tables,[14] washing dishes at a nursing home, landscaping in a sewage treatment plant,[15] and chauffeuring and ghostwriting for a retired Western director.[16][17] Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... For other uses, see Ghostwriter (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Cover of Life In Hell No. 4, published in 1978.
Cover of Life In Hell No. 4, published in 1978.

Groening described life in Los Angeles to his friends in the form of a self-published comic book entitled Life in Hell, which was loosely inspired by a chapter entitled "How to Go to Hell" in Walter Kaufmann's book Critique of Religion and Philosophy.[18] Groening distributed the comic book in the book corner of Licorice Pizza, a record store in which he worked. He made his first professional cartoon sale to the avant-garde Wet magazine in 1978.[18] The strip, entitled "Forbidden Words," appeared in the September/October issue of that year.[14][19] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Walter Arnold Kaufmann (July 1, 1921 - September 4, 1980) was a 20th-century Jewish German philosopher, scholar, and poet. ... A Record Shop (AKA Record Store) is an outlet that sells recorded music. ... Wet magazine was an avant-garde Los Angeles-based magazine that revolved around the idea of gourmet bathing, which later evolved to gourmet bathing and beyond. Its publisher and creator was Leonard Koren, an architecture school graduate. ...


Groening gained employment at the Los Angeles Reader, a newly formed alternative newspaper, delivering papers,[7] typesetting, editing and answering phones.[15] He showed his cartoons to the editor, James Vowell, who was impressed and eventually gave him a spot in the paper.[7] Life in Hell made its official debut as a comic strip in the Reader on April 25, 1980.[14][20] Los Angeles Reader was a weekly paper established in 1978 and distributed in Los Angeles, USA. It followed the format of the (still active) Chicago Reader. ... An alternative weekly, alternately referred to as an alternative newsweekly or alternative newspaper, is a form of alternative media newspaper found in many centres in the United States and Canada. ...


Vowell also gave Groening his own weekly music column, "Sound Mix," in 1982. However, the column would rarely actually be about music, as he would often write about his "various enthusiasms, obsessions, pet peeves and problems" instead.[9] In an effort to add more music to the column, he "just made stuff up,"[13] concocting and reviewing fictional bands and non-existent records. In the following week's column, he would confess to fabricating everything in the previous column and swear that everything in the new column was true. Eventually, he was finally asked to give up the "music" column.[21] A pet peeve is a minor annoyance that can instill extreme frustration in an individual. ...


Life in Hell became popular almost immediately.[22] In November 1984, Deborah Caplan, Groening's then-girlfriend and co-worker at the Reader, offered to publish "Love is Hell", a series of relationship-themed Life in Hell strips, in book form.[23] Released a month later, the book was an underground success, selling 22,000 copies in its first two printings. Work is Hell soon followed, also published by Caplan.[7] “Publisher” redirects here. ...


Soon afterward, Caplan and Groening left the Reader and put together the Life in Hell Co., which handled merchandising for Life in Hell.[14] Groening also started a syndicate, Acme Features Syndicate, which syndicated Life in Hell, Lynda Barry and John Callahan, but now only syndicates Life in Hell.[7] Life in Hell is still carried in 250 weekly newspapers and has been anthologized in a series of books, including School is Hell, Childhood is Hell, The Big Book of Hell and The Huge Book of Hell.[3] A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common example of product merchandising. ... This article is about the association term. ... Lynda Barry (born January 2, 1956) is an American cartoonist and author. ... John Callahan, born in Portland, Oregon, is a cartoonist noted for dealing with macabre subjects or physical handicaps, maiming and dismemberment. ... An anthology, literally a garland or collection of flowers, is a collection of literary works, originally of poems. ...


The Simpsons

Main article: The Simpsons
An early drawing of the Simpsons by Matt Groening, circa 1987.
An early drawing of the Simpsons by Matt Groening, circa 1987.

Life in Hell caught the attention of Hollywood writer-producer and Gracie Films founder James L. Brooks, who had been shown the strip by fellow producer Polly Platt.[22][24] In 1985, Brooks contacted Groening with the proposition of working in animation on an undefined future project,[4] which would turn out to be developing a series of short animated skits, called "bumpers," for the FOX variety show The Tracey Ullman Show. Originally, Brooks wanted Groening to adapt his Life in Hell characters for the show. Fearing the loss of ownership rights, Groening decided to create something new and came up with a cartoon family, the Simpsons.[25] He allegedly designed the five members of the family in only ten minutes.[26] Simpsons redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Life in Hell is a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening. ... ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... Gracie Films logo Gracie Films is an American film and television production company, created by James L. Brooks in 1986. ... James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is a three-time Academy Award, nineteen-time Emmy and Golden Globe-winning American producer, writer, and film director. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... The Tracey Ullman Show was a weekly American television variety show, hosted by British comedian and onetime pop singer Tracey Ullman. ... The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening. ...

Groening on the Simpsons panel at Comic Con International in San Diego.

Groening storyboarded and scripted every short (now known as The Simpsons shorts), which were then animated by a team including David Silverman and Wes Archer, both of whom would later become directors on the series.[27] The shorts premiered on The Tracey Ullman show on April 19, 1987. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Comic-Con International is an annual comic book convention held in San Diego, California. ... Storyboards are graphic organizers such as a series of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of previsualizing a motion graphic or interactive media sequence, including website interactivity. ... The Simpsons made their TV debut on The Tracey Ullman Show in 1987 The Simpsons shorts is a series of one-minute shorts that ran on the variety show The Tracey Ullman Show for three seasons, before the characters spun off into their own half-hour prime time show called... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... David Silverman (born on 15 March 1957 in New York City, New York) is an animator best known for directing numerous episodes of the animated TV series The Simpsons, where he would go on to be the supervising director of animation for several years, as well as animating on all... Wesley Wes Archer (born November 26, 1961) is a television animation director. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


Although The Tracey Ullman Show was not a big hit,[22] the popularity of the shorts led to a half-hour spin-off in 1989. The series quickly became a worldwide phenomenon, to the surprise of many. Groening said: "Nobody thought The Simpsons was going to be a big hit. It snuck up on everybody."[9] A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...


The Simpsons was co-developed by Groening, Brooks, and Sam Simon, a writer-producer with whom Brooks had worked with on previous projects. Groening and Simon, however, did not get along[22] and were often in conflict over the show;[14] Groening once described their relationship as "very contentious."[25] Simon eventually left the show in 1993 over creative differences.[28] Sam Simon is an American television producer and writer, most notable as one of the original developers of The Simpsons, along with Matt Groening and James L. Brooks. ...


Although Groening has pitched a number of spin-offs of The Simpsons, those attempts have been unsuccessful. In 1994, Groening and other Simpsons producers pitched a live-action spin-off about Krusty the Clown (with Dan Castellaneta playing the lead role), but were unsuccessful in getting it off the ground.[17][29] Groening has also pitched "Young Homer" and a spin-off about the non-Simpsons citizens of Springfield.[30] A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by human actors, as opposed to animation. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... “Krusty” redirects here. ... Daniel Louis Castellaneta (born October 29, 1957) is an Emmy award winning American voice actor, actor and comedian best known for providing the voice of Homer Simpson and other characters on the long-running FOX animated series The Simpsons. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Springfield is the fictional city in which the animated American sitcom The Simpsons is set. ...


In 1995, Groening got into a major disagreement with Brooks and other Simpsons producers over A Star Is Burns, a crossover episode with The Critic, an animated show also produced by Brooks and staffed with many former Simpsons crew members. Groening claimed that he feared viewers would "see it as nothing but a pathetic attempt to advertise The Critic at the expense of The Simpsons," and was concerned about the possible implication that he had created or produced The Critic.[31] He requested his name be taken off the episode.[32] James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is a three-time Academy Award, nineteen-time Emmy and Golden Globe-winning American producer, writer, and film director. ... A Star is Burns is the 18th episode of The Simpsons sixth season. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... For the play by Sheridan, see The Critic (play). ...


Groening is credited with writing or co-writing the episodes "Some Enchanted Evening", "The Telltale Head", "Colonel Homer" and "22 Short Films About Springfield", as well as The Simpsons Movie, released in 2007.[33] He has had several cameo appearances in the show, with a speaking role in the episode "My Big Fat Geek Wedding". He currently serves at The Simpsons as an executive producer and creative consultant. This article is about the Simpsons episode; for other uses see Some Enchanted Evening (disambiguation). ... The Telltale Head was the eighth episode of The Simpsons. ... Colonel Homer is the 20th episode of The Simpsons third season. ... 22 Short Films About Springfield is the twenty-first episode of The Simpsons seventh season, airing on April 21, 1996. ... The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... My Big Fat Geek Wedding is the 17th episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, first aired on April 18, 2004. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Creative consultant is a credit that has - particuarly in the past - been given to screenwriters who have “doctored” a movie screenplay. ...


The Simpsons character names

Groening famously named the main Simpson characters after members of his own family: his parents, Homer and Margaret (Marge or Marjorie in full), and his younger sisters, Lisa and Margaret (Maggie). Claiming that it was a bit too obvious to name a character after himself, he chose the name "Bart," an anagram of brat.[34][35] However, he stresses that aside from some of the sibling rivalry, his family is nothing like the Simpsons.[36] Groening also has an older brother and sister, Mark and Patty, but their names were not used,[4] although he divulged that Mark "is the actual inspiration for Bart" in a 1995 interview.[31] When it came time to give Grampa Simpson a first name, Groening says he refused to name him after his own grandfather, Abraham Groening, leaving it to other writers to choose a name. By coincidence, the writers chose the name Abraham, unaware that it was also the name of Groening's grandfather.[37] Maggie Groening has co-written a few Simpsons books featuring her cartoon namesake.[38] For the game, see Anagrams. ... This article is about the human condition. ... Abraham J. Simpson also known as Grampa Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated cartoon television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ...


The name "Wiggum" for police chief Clancy Wiggum is Groening's mother's maiden name.[39] The names of a few other characters were taken from major street names in Groening's hometown of Portland, Oregon, including Flanders, Lovejoy, Powell, Quimby and Kearney.[40] Despite common fan belief that Sideshow Bob Terwilliger was named after SW Terwilliger Boulevard in Portland, he was actually named after the character Dr. Terwilliker from the film The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T.[41] Police Chief Clancy Wiggum is a fictional character from the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Hank Azaria. ... The following is a list of characters featured in the American animated television series The Simpsons. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... The following is a list of characters featured in the American animated television series The Simpsons. ... The following is a list of characters featured in the American animated television series The Simpsons. ... Herbert Anthony Herb Powell is a fictional character on The Simpsons, voiced by Danny DeVito. ... Joseph Fitzpatrick Fitzgerald Fitzhenry Joe Quimby,[1] a. ... Springfield Elementary School This is a list of the students who attend the fictional Springfield Elementary School from The Simpsons. ... Robert Underdunk Terwilliger, better known by his stage name Sideshow Bob, is a recurring fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, who is voiced by Kelsey Grammer, and first appeared briefly in the episode The Telltale Head, although his first major appearance was in Krusty Gets Busted. Sideshow... The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T. is a 1953 musical fantasy film. ...


Futurama

Main article: Futurama

After spending a few years researching science fiction, Groening got together with Simpsons writer/producer David X. Cohen (still known as David S. Cohen at the time) in 1997 and developed Futurama, an animated series about life in the year 3000.[11][42] By the time they pitched the series to Fox in April 1998, Groening and Cohen had composed many characters and storylines; Groening claimed they had gone "overboard" in their discussions.[42] Groening described trying to get the show on the air as "by far the worst experience of [his] grown-up life."[11] This article is about the television series. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... David X. Cohen (born 1966), born David Samuel Cohen, is an American television writer. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... // Regular Context The line of a story. ...


The show premiered on March 28, 1999. After four years on the air, the show was cancelled by Fox. However, in a similar situation to Family Guy, strong DVD sales and very stable ratings on Cartoon Network and Teletoon have brought Futurama back to life, which is slated for four direct-to-DVD movies, as confirmed by Groening in an April 2006 interview.[17] Comedy Central commissioned 16 new episodes (edited from the four movies) to be aired in 2008.[43] Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... For the French-Canadian version of this television channel, see Télétoon (Canada). ... A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ...


Groening's sole writing credit for the show was the premiere episode, "Space Pilot 3000", co-written with Cohen. Space Pilot 3000 is the first episode of Futuramas first season, which originally aired in North America on March 28, 1999. ...


Other pursuits

In 1994, Groening formed Bongo Comics Group (named after the character Bongo from Life in Hell[44]) with Steve Vance, Cindy Vance and Bill Morrison, which publishes comic books based on The Simpsons and Futurama (including Futurama Simpsons Infinitely Secret Crossover Crisis, a crossover between the two), as well as a few original titles. According to Groening, the goal with Bongo is to "[try] to bring humor into the fairly grim comic book market."[31] He also formed Zongo Comics in 1995, an imprint of Bongo that published comics for more mature readers,[31] which included three issues of Mary Fleener's Fleener[45] and seven issues of his close friend Gary Panter's Jimbo comics.[46] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Life in Hell is a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening. ... Bill Morrison is an American comic book artist and writer, and co-founder of Bongo Comics (along with Matt Groening and Steve and Cindy Vance). ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... Zongo comics was founded by Simpsons and Futurama creator, Matt Groening and is for older audiences. ... This article is about imprints in publishing. ... Mary Fleener is an underground comics creator from Los Angeles. ... Gary Panter (born 1950 in Oklahoma), known to many as the father of punk comics, is a fine artist and a luminary of the post-underground, new wave comics movement that began with the end of Arcade: The Comics Revue and the initiation of RAW. Overview As an early participant...


Groening is known for his eclectic taste in music.[47] He guest-edited Da Capo Press's Best Music Writing 2003[48] and curated the US All Tomorrow's Parties music festival in 2003.[47][49] He also plays the cowbell in the all-author rock and roll band The Rock Bottom Remainders, whose other members include Dave Barry, Ridley Pearson, Scott Turow, Amy Tan, James McBride, Mitch Albom, Roy Blount Jr., Stephen King, Kathi Goldmark, and Greg Iles.[50] Da Capo Press is a publishing company with offices in New York City and Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... All Tomorrows Parties logo projected at festival. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... The cowbell is a percussion instrument. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Rock Bottom Remainders is a rock & roll band consisting of published writers, most of them both amateur musicians and popular English-language book, magazine, and newspaper authors. ... For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ... Ridley Pearson is a novelist, writing mostly suspense and thrillers. ... A movie adaptation of Turows bestselling book Presumed Innocent was made in 1990. ... Amy Tan (February 19, 1952) is an American writer whose works explore mother-daughter relationships as well as relationships between Chinese American women and their immigrant parents. ... James McBride (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Roy Blount, Jr. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Greg Iles (born 1960) is an American bestselling novelist. ...


Awards

Matt Groening has been nominated for 25 Emmy awards and has won ten: nine for The Simpsons and one for Futurama.[51] Groening received the 2002 National Cartoonist Society Reuben Award, and had been nominated for the same award in 2000.[52] He received a British Comedy Award for "outstanding contribution to comedy" in 2004.[53] An Emmy Award. ... The National Cartoonists Society is an organization of professional cartoonists created in 1946. ... The Reuben Awards, named for Rube Goldberg, are presented each year by the National Cartoonists Society. ... The British Comedy Awards is an annual awards ceremony in the United Kingdom celebrating notable comedians and entertainment performances of the previous year. ...


Personal life

Groening and Deborah Caplan married in 1986[15] and had two sons together, Homer (who goes by Will) and Abe,[35] both of whom Groening occasionally portrays as rabbits in Life in Hell. The couple divorced in 1999 after thirteen years of marriage.[16] Following this, Groening was in a six-year commitment with dating expert Lauren Frances.[54][55]


Groening identifies as an agnostic[56] and has often contributed to funding Democratic Party candidates.[57] Agnosticism (from the Greek a, meaning without, and gnosticism or gnosis, meaning knowledge) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims—particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality—is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


His brother-in-law, by marriage to Matt's sister Lisa, is Craig Bartlett, creator of the animated series Hey Arnold!.[55] Craig Bartlett (b. ... Hey Arnold! is an American animated television series that aired from October 7, 1996 until June 8, 2004 on Nickelodeon. ...


References

  1. ^ Matt Groening at the Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on February 7, 2007
  2. ^ Baker, Jeff. "Groening, rhymes with reigning", The Oregonian, Portland, Oregon: Oregonian Publishing, 2004-03-14, pp. D1. 
  3. ^ a b Matt Groening's Simpsons profile thesimpsons.com. Retrieved on March 4, 2007
  4. ^ a b c Matt Groening Q&A (1993). The Simpsons Archive (June 1993). Retrieved on January 14, 2007.
  5. ^ Dueck, Dora (7 October 2002). "Homer Simpson has Canadian Mennonite roots.". Canadian Mennonite (volume 6, number 19) Retrieved on November 1, 2007. 
  6. ^ Suderman, Dale (15 August 2007). "Hillsboro, Home of the Simpsons.". Hillsboro Free Press Retrieved on November 4, 2007. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f Groth, Gary (April 1991). "Matt Groening". The Comics Journal (141): 78-95. 
  8. ^ Matt Groening at Evergreen. The Evergreen State College. Retrieved on 2007-08-30.
  9. ^ a b c Lloyd, Robert (1999-03-24). Life in the 31st Century. LA Weekly. Retrieved on December 30, 2005.
  10. ^ Groening, Matt (c). Life in HellJanuary 14, 2000, Acme Features Syndicate.
  11. ^ a b c Doherty, Brian (March /April 1999). Matt Groening. Mother Jones. Retrieved on January 14, 2007.
  12. ^ Groening, Matt; Mirkin, David; Scully, Mike; Anderson, Bob. (2005). The Simpsons The Complete Sixth Season DVD commentary for the episode "Two Dozen & One Greyhounds" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  13. ^ a b Sheff, David (June 2007). "Matt Groening". Playboy 54 (6). 
  14. ^ a b c d e Morgenstern, Joe (1990-04-29). "Bart Simpson's Real Father", Los Angeles Times Magazine, 12-18, 20, 22. 
  15. ^ a b c von Busack, Richard (2000-11-02). 'Life' Before Homer. Metroactive. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  16. ^ a b Chocano, Carina (2001-01-30). Matt Groening. Salon. Retrieved on September 4, 2007.
  17. ^ a b c Rabin, Nathan (2006-04-26). Matt Groening. The Onion AV Club. Retrieved on January 14, 2007.
  18. ^ a b McKenna, Kristine (May -June 2001). Matt Groening. My Generation. Retrieved on February 3, 2007.
  19. ^ World Wide WET - early. Wunderland.com. Retrieved on September 4, 2007.
  20. ^ Acme Features Syndicate. Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. Retrieved on 2007-08-30.
  21. ^ Groening, Matt (2001). "My Rock 'n' Roll Life, Part One: So You Want To Snort Derisively", Simpsons Comics Royale. New York: Perennial, 92-93. ISBN 0-060-93378-X. 
  22. ^ a b c d Ortved, John (July 2007). Simpson Family Values. Vanity Fair. Retrieved on September 2, 2007.
  23. ^ Groening, Matt (1994). "Introduction", Love is Hell: Special Ultra Jumbo 10th Anniversary Edition. New York: Pantheon Books. ISBN 0-679-75665-5. 
  24. ^ Kim, John W. (October 1999). Keep 'em Laughing. Scr(i)pt. Retrieved on January 14, 2007.
  25. ^ a b Scott, A.O.. "Homer's Odyssey", The New York Times, 2007-11-04. Retrieved on 2007-09-19. 
  26. ^ Rose, Charlie (Host, Executive producer). (2007, July 30). Charlie Rose:A Conversation About The Simpsons Movie [Television production]. Charlie Rose, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-07-31.
  27. ^ Heintjes, Tom. The David Silverman Interview. Hogan's Alley. Retrieved on January 13, 2007.
  28. ^ Snierson, Dan (2007-07-18). Conan on being left out of "Simpsons Movie". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved on September 4, 2007.
  29. ^ From a radio interview with Groening that aired on the April 22, 1998 edition of Fresh Air on NPR. Link to stream (13 minutes, 21 seconds in)
  30. ^ Groening, Matt; Oakley, Bill;, Weinstein, Josh; Appel, Richard; Cohen, David; Pulido, Rachel; Smith, Yeardley; Reardon, Jim; Silverman, David. (2005). The Simpsons The Complete Seventh Season DVD commentary for the episode "22 Short Films About Springfield" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  31. ^ a b c d Paul, Alan (1995-09-30). Life in Hell. Flux Magazine. Retrieved on December 26, 2005.
  32. ^ Brennan, Judy (1995-03-03). Matt Groening's Reaction to The Critic's First Appearance on The Simpsons. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  33. ^ Fleming, Michael (2006-04-02). Homer going to bat in '07. Variety.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  34. ^ BBC. (2000). The Simpsons: America's First Family (6 minute edit for the season 1 DVD) (DVD). UK: 20th Century Fox.
  35. ^ a b Duncan, Andrew (September 18-24 1999). Matt Groening. Radio Times. Retrieved on September 19, 2007.
  36. ^ Turner, Chris. Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation. ISBN 0-679-31318-4. 
  37. ^ Groening, Matt. (2002). The Simpsons season 2 DVD commentary for the episode "Old Money" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  38. ^ Index to Comic Art Collection: "Gro" to "Groenne". Michigan State University Libraries. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  39. ^ Groening, Matt (2001). "47 Secrets About The Simpsons, A Poem of Sorts, and Some Filler", Simpsons Comics Royale. New York: Perennial, 90-91. ISBN 0-060-93378-X. 
  40. ^ Blake, Joseph (2007-01-06). Painting the town in Portland. The Vancouver Sun. Retrieved on January 13, 2007.
  41. ^ Larry Carroll. "'Simpsons' Trivia, From Swearing Lisa To 'Burns-Sexual' Smithers", MTV, 2007-07-26. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  42. ^ a b Needham, Alex (October 1999). "Nice Planet...We'll Take It!". The Face }issue=33. 
  43. ^ Wallenstein, Andrew (June 22, 2006). "Futurama" gets new life on Comedy Central. Reuters. Retrieved on 2006-10-08.
  44. ^ Groening, Matt (2001). "The Secret Life of Lisa Simpson", Simpsons Comics Royale. New York: Perennial, 128. ISBN 0-060-93378-X. 
  45. ^ Mary Fleener ~ Comic Book Covers URL accessed on September 19, 2007.
  46. ^ Zograf, Aleksandar. Meet The End of The Century With... Gary Panter. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  47. ^ a b Payne, John (2003-11-05). All Tomorrow's Parties Today. LA Weekly. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  48. ^ Dacapo Books URL accessed on September 4, 2007.
  49. ^ All Tomorrow's Parties - Archive URL accessed on September 4, 2007.
  50. ^ Rock Bottom Remainders Official site URL accessed on March 4, 2007
  51. ^ Emmy Awards official siteemmys.org. Retrieved on March 4, 2007
  52. ^ THE OUTSTANDING CARTOONIST OF THE YEAR reuben.org. URL accessed on January 13, 2007
  53. ^ British Comedy Awards britishcomedyawards.com. URL accessed on January 18, 2007
  54. ^ Oberkreser, Lyssa (2006-10-17). Free Panties and Dating Advice. Riptide. Retrieved on January 13, 2007.
  55. ^ a b . URL accessed on January 13, 2007
  56. ^ Allen, Norm. Yes, There Is A Hell. Free Inquiry. Retrieved on February 26, 2007.
  57. ^ Matt Groening's Federal Campaign Contribution Report. Newsmeat.com. Retrieved on July 22, 2007.

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Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Matt Groening
Preceded by
The Simpsons showrunner
(with James L. Brooks and Sam Simon)
Seasons 1 and 2

1989-1991
Succeeded by
Al Jean and Mike Reiss
Persondata
NAME Groening, Matthew Abram
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Groening, Matt
SHORT DESCRIPTION United States cartoonist
DATE OF BIRTH February 15, 1954 (1954-02-15) (age 53)
PLACE OF BIRTH Portland, Oregon
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Matt Groening - MSN Encarta (686 words)
Matt Groening, born in 1954, American cartoonist, creator of the comic strip “Life in Hell” and the animated television series The Simpsons.
Groening was executive producer for The Simpsons in its early years and remains a creative consultant on the show.
Matt Groening was born in Portland, Oregon, and educated at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington.
Matt Groening interviewed (3125 words)
Groening: I like hanging out with these guys as they are really fun, there are writers and animators who have hung in there from the early days, some writers have been there from the beginning.
Groening: Everybody throws in jokes and what is great is that it works, I was brought up to believe that art by committee could never work, but it is great that every step of the way on the show there is a slight improvement in refining the show.
Groening: There was an expansion in the popularity of the show at the very beginning and there were so many deals being made that nobody knew what they were doing and a lot of crazy merchandise got put out on the show.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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