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Encyclopedia > Matilda of Scotland

Edith of Scotland, (c.1080-May 1, 1118) was the wife of Henry I of England. She was the daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland and St. Margaret of Scotland. Robert Curthose had stood as godfather at her christening. Events William I of England, in a letter, reminds the Bishop of Rome that the King of England owes him no allegiance. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Events Knights Templar founded Baldwin of Le Bourg succeeds his cousin Baldwin I as king of Jerusalem John II Comnenus succeeds Alexius I as Byzantine emperor Gelasius II succeeds Paschal II as pope Births December 21 - Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury Taira no Kiyomori, Japanese general Deaths January 21 - Pope... Henry I (c. ... King Malcolm III of Scotland (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada), (1031-November 13, 1093) also known as Malcolm Canmore (Malcolm with the large head)Cean Mor meaning Big Head in Gaidhlig, was the eldest son of King Duncan I of Scotland and first king of the House of Dunkeld. ... Saint Margaret of Scotland (circa 1045 - 1093), Edgar Athelings sister, married King Malcolm Canmore. ... Robert (called Curthose for his short squat appearance) (c. ...


When she was about six-years-old Edith and her sister, Mary, were sent to Romsey, where their aunt Christina was abbess. During her stay at Romsey and Wilton, Edith was much sought-after as a bride; she turned down proposals from both William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Alan Rufus, Lord of Richmond. Hermann of Tournai even claims that William Rufus considered marrying her. Map sources for Romsey at grid reference SU3521 Romsey is a small market town 4 miles (6 km) to the north-west of Southampton and 11 miles (18 km) south-west of Winchester in Hampshire, England. ... Wilton is the name of several places in England: Wilton, a place in the county of Cumbria. ... William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. ... William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. ...


After the death of King William Rufus in August 1100, his brother Henry quickly seized the royal treasury and the royal crown. His next task was to marry, and Henry's choice fell on Edith. Because Edith had spent most of her life in a nunnery, there was some controversy over whether or not she had been veiled as a nun. Henry sought permission for the marriage from Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, who returned to England in September 1100 after a long exile. Edith testified to the archbishop that she had never taken holy vows. She insisted that her aunt Christina had veiled her only to protect her "from the lust of the Normans". Edith claimed she had pulled the veil off and stamped on it, and her aunt beat and scolded her most horribly for this. Archbishop Anselm concluded that Edith had never been a nun, and gave his permission for the marriage. For alternate uses, see Number 1100. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109), a widely influential medieval philosopher and theologian, held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... The Normans (adapted from the name Northmen or Norsemen) were a mixture of the indigenous Gauls of France and of the Viking invaders under the leadership of Rollo (Gange Rolf). ...


Edith and Henry seem to have known one another for some time before their marriage -- William of Malmesbury states that Henry had "long been attached" to her, and Orderic Vitalis says that Henry had "long adored" Edith's character. Through her mother she was descended from Edmund II of England; this was very important as Henry wanted to help make himself more popular with the English people and Edith represented the old English dynasty. In their children the Norman and Anglo-Saxon dynasties would be united. William of Malmesbury (c. ... Orderic Vitalis (1075 – c. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Edith and Henry were married on November 11, 1100 at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury. She was crowned as "Matilda", a fashionable Norman name. She and Henry had two children: November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... For alternate uses, see Number 1100. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster (Westminster Abbey), a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English monarchs. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109), a widely influential medieval philosopher and theologian, held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ...

  1. Maud, born February 1102
  2. William Adelin, born 1103

She maintained her court primarily at Westminster, but accompanied her husband in his travels all across England, and in 1106/1107, Edith visited Normandy with Henry. Her court was filled with musicians and poets; she commissioned Turgot to write a biography of her mother, Saint Margaret. She was an active queen, and like her mother was renowned for her devotion to religion and the poor. William of Malmesbury describes her as attending church barefoot at Lent, and washing the feet and kissing the hands of the sick. After her death in 1118 she was remembered by her subjects as "Matilda the Good Queen" and "Matilda of Blessed Memory", and for a time sainthood was sought for her, though she was never canonized. Henry married again four years after her death. Empress Maud (1102 – September 10, 1167) is the title by which Matilda, daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland (herself daughter of Malcolm III Canmore and St. ... William Adelin (1103 – November 25, 1120) was the only legitimate son of Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland. ... Westminster is the area located immediately to the west of the ancient City of London, in the centre of the wider conurbation of London. ... Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ... Saint Margaret of Scotland (circa 1045 - 1093), Edgar Athelings sister, married King Malcolm Canmore. ... William of Malmesbury (c. ... In Western Christianity, Lent is the period preceding the Christian holy day of Easter. ...


Sources

  • Chibnall, Marjorie. The Empress Matilda: Queen Consort, Queen Mother, and Lady of the English, 1992
  • Hollister, Warren C. Henry I, 2001
  • Parsons, John Carmi. Medieval Mothering, 1996
  • Parsons, John Carmi. Medieval Queenship, 1997

  Results from FactBites:
 
Empress Matilda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1007 words)
Empress Matilda (February 1102 – September 10, 1167) is the title by which Matilda, daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England and his wife Matilda of Scotland (herself daughter of Malcolm III Canmore and St.
Matilda is a variant form of the French name "Maud" (or "Maude"); it was used commonly in Latin texts of the time.
Matilda's greatest triumph came in April 1141, when her forces defeated and captured King Stephen, who was made a prisoner and effectively deposed.
Matilda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (263 words)
Matilda (sometimes spelled Mathilda) is a female name, of Teutonic derivation, meaning "mighty warrior." Its most common alternate forms are Maud and Mathilde.
Matilda of Flanders (~1031 - 1083), Queen of England, wife of William I of England
Matilda Plantagenet (1156 - 1189), Duchess of Saxony, daughter of Henry II of England
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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