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Encyclopedia > Match Game
The Match Game
Match Game
Match Game 7"x"
Match Game PM

Match Game logo from 1978-1982.
Format Game Show
Created by Frank Wayne
Starring Gene Rayburn (1962–69, 1973-82 & 1983-84)
Ross Shafer (1990–91)
Michael Burger (1998–99)
Ricki Lake (GameShow Marathon in 2006)
Along with many regular celebrity panelists
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
Production
Running time 30 Minutes
Production
company(s)
Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions (1962-1969; 1973-1982)
Mark Goodson Productions (1983-1984; 1990-1991; 1998-1999)
Celebrity Productions, Inc. (1973-1982)
The Match Game Company (1973-1982)
Orion Television (1983-1984)
The MG Company (1990-1991)
Distributor Jim Victory Television (1975-1982)
Pearson Television (1998-1999)
Broadcast
Original channel NBC (1962–69 & 1983–84)
CBS (1973-79)
ABC (1990–91)
Syndicated (1975–81, weekly), (1979–82, daily and 1985-86 in reruns) & (1998–99, weekdays)
Original run December 31, 1962July 23, 1999

Match Game, also called The Match Game, was an American television game show, most often hosted by Gene Rayburn. The show featured celebrities and contestants answering fill-in-the-blank questions. The most famous versions of the 1970s and 1980s, starting with Match Game '73, were remembered for their bawdy and sometimes rowdy humor and involved contestants trying to match six celebrities. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 702 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1032 × 881 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The logo was edited from the MATCH GAME DVD Set and was remade with the extended E and no lightbulbs by me. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... Ross Shafer (born December 10, 1954 in McMinnville, Oregon, USA) is a comedian and television host turned motivational and customer service speaker/trainer, based in Carlsbad, California. ... Michael Burger crack baby (born June 10, 1957 in Long Beach, California) is an American television personality. ... This article is about the person. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... FremantleMedia (formerly All-American Television and Pearson Television) is a division of RTL Group which holds the rights to the Goodson/Todman game show library which includes such classic game shows as The Price is Right, Match Game, Ive Got a Secret, and Family Feud, as well as non... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ...

Contents

Game play

This section describes game play in the 1973-82 version of the program. For game play in other versions, see "Broadcast history" below.


Game play of the main Match Game

Two contestants, including a returning champion, competed. The champion was seated in the upstage (red circle) seat and the challenger was seated in the downstage (green triangle) seat. On Match Game PM and the daily syndicated version, a coin toss was held backstage to determine the positions. The object was to match the answers of as many of the six celebrity panelists as possible on fill-in-the-blank statements. Match Game PM was an American television game show where contestants tried to match a panel of six celebrities in answering fill-in-the-blank questions. ...


The main game was played in two rounds. The challenger was given a choice of two statements labeled either "A" or "B." Rayburn then read the statement. While the contestant pondered an answer, the six celebrities wrote their answers on index cards. After they finished, the contestant was polled for an answer. Rayburn then asked each celebrity — one at a time, beginning with #1 in the upper left hand corner — to respond. An index card is a piece of heavy paper stock, cut to a standard size and often used for recording individual items of information that can then be easily rearranged and filed. ...


While early questions were similar to the NBC version (e.g., "Name a type of muffin" and "Every morning, John puts _________ on his cereal"), the questions quickly became funnier. Comedy writer Dick DeBartolo, who had participated in the 1960s Match Game, now contributed broader and saucier questions for host Rayburn. Frequently, the statements were written with bawdy, double-entendre answers in mind. A classic example: "Did you catch a glimpse of that girl on the corner? She has the world's biggest _________." Dick DeBartolo (morphing into Alfred E. Neuman) Dick DeBartolo is one of the most prolific writers of satire for Mad Magazine. ...


Frequently, the audience responded appropriately as Rayburn critiqued the contestant's answer (for the "world's biggest" question, Rayburn might show disdain to an answer such as "fingers" or "bag", and compliment an answer such as "rear end" or "boobs," often also commenting on the audience's approving or disapproving response). The audience usually would groan or boo when a contestant gave a bad answer, whereas they would cheer and applaud in approval of a good answer. There were a handful of potential answers that were prohibited, the most notable being any synonym for genitalia. // Sexual slang is any slang term which makes reference to sex, the sexual organs, or matters closely related to them. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis...

Seen here in 1975, Gene Rayburn greets two contestants and several million Americans.
Seen here in 1975, Gene Rayburn greets two contestants and several million Americans.

The contestant earned one point for each celebrity who wrote down the same answer (or reasonably similar as determined by the judges; for example, "rear end" could be matched by "bottom", "behind," "derrière", "fannie," "hiney," etc.) up to a maximum of six points for matching everyone. After play was completed on one contestant's question, Rayburn read the statement on the other card for the opponent and play was identical. Image File history File links GeneRayburnandContestants. ... Image File history File links GeneRayburnandContestants. ...


Popular questions featured "Dumb Dora" or her male counterpart, "Dumb Donald." These questions would often begin, "Dumb Dora/Donald is/was so dumb..." or "Dumb Dora/Donald is/was REALLY dumb." To this, the audience would respond en masse, "How dumb IS/WAS he/she?" Then Rayburn would finish the question. Other common subjects of questions were Superman/Lois Lane, King Kong/Fay Wray, panelists on the show (most commonly Brett Somers), politicians, and Howard Cosell. Rayburn always played the action for laughs, and he frequently tried to read certain questions in character; for example, he would recite questions involving a made-up character named "Old Man Periwinkle," or "102-year-old Mr. Periwinkle," in a weak, quavering voice. Charles Nelson Reilly, one of the regular panelists and one who was often involved with directing Broadway plays, would often make remarks regarding Rayburn's acting such as "I like when you act" and "That was mediocre" when Rayburn did a voice like this; this tended to draw a big laugh from the audiences. Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ...


Whichever player was ahead in points after Round 1 always began Round 2. This rule ensured that both players would be able to play 2 meaningful questions. (Without this rule, a player who had only answered one question could be ahead of another player who had played both his questions, rendering the final question moot.) Only celebrities that a contestant did not match could play this second round. On Match Game PM and the daily syndicated version from 1979-1982, whoever led after a round got to choose a question first in the next round.


The second round questions were generally easier and were usually puns that had a "definitive" answer (for instance, "Did you hear about the new religious group of dentists? They call themselves the Holy _____.", where the definitive answer would be "Molars"), whereas the first round usually had a number of possible answers. This was to help trailing contestants pick up points quickly. For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ...


On Match Game PM, a third round was added after the first season as the games proved to be too short to fill the half-hour. Again, the only celebrities who played were those who did not match that contestant in previous rounds.


Tie-breaker rounds

If the players had the same score at the end of "regulation," the scores were reset to 0-0. On PM (or on the daytime show, if a tie was still not broken after two tie-breaker rounds), a time-saving variant of the tie-breaker was used that reversed the game play. The contestants would write their answers first on a card in secret, then the celebrities were canvassed to give their answers. The first celebrity response to match a contestant's answer gave that contestant the victory; if there were still no match (which was rare), the round was replayed with a new question. On the CBS version, the tie-breaker went on until there was a clear winner. If it came to the sudden-death tie-breaker, only the final question (the one that ultimately broke the tie) was kept and aired.


The CBS daytime version had returning champions and the show "straddled"--that was, episodes often began and ended with games in progress.


On the CBS daytime show, champions could stay until defeated or reached the network's limit of $25,000. Originally, that was the maximum earning for any champion, but the rule was later changed so that while champions were still retired after exceeding the $25,000 limit, they got to keep everything up to $35,000. During the six year run of Match Game on CBS, this only happened one time, and during the later "Star Wheel" bonus round era of the show.


On the daily '79-82 syndicated version, two contestants would play two matches against each other, and then both were retired. The show was timed out so that two new contestants appeared each Monday; this was necessary as the tapes of the show were shipped between stations, and weeks could not be aired in any discernible order (a common syndication practice at the time, known as "bicycling"). If a Friday show ran short, audience members sometimes got to play the game; this occurred on only three occasions.


Episodes of Match Game PM were self-contained, with two new contestants each week. Match Game PM was an American television game show where contestants tried to match a panel of six celebrities in answering fill-in-the-blank questions. ...


Super-Match

The winner of the game went on to play the Super Match, which consisted of the Audience Match and the Head-To-Head Match segments, for additional money. On the CBS version, the winner of the game won $100.


Audience Match

A two to four word fill-in-the-blank phrase was given, and it was up to the contestant to choose the most common response based on a studio audience survey. After consulting with three celebrities on the panel for help, the contestant chose an answer. The answers were then revealed; the most popular answer in the survey was worth $500, the second-most popular $250, and the third most popular $100. If a contestant failed to match any of the three answers, the bonus round ended. Two Audience Matches were played on Match Game PM.

A contestant playing the Audience Match of the Super-Match.
A contestant playing the Audience Match of the Super-Match.

Image File history File links RayburnSuperMatchGame. ... Image File history File links RayburnSuperMatchGame. ...

Head-To-Head Match

The contestant then had the opportunity to win 10 times what he or she won in the Audience Match by matching another fill-in-the-blank response with a celebrity panelist of his or her choice (therefore, $5,000, $2,500 or $1,000). In order to win the money, the contestant had to match his or her chosen celebrity's response exactly; this meant that multiple forms of the same word, e.g. singular or plural, were usually accepted whereas synonyms were not. If successful, he/she won the money accumulated in both parts of the round. Thus, a maximum of $5,600 ($100 won for winning the match) could be won on the daytime version, or $10,600 when the Star Wheel was instituted.


Richard Dawson was the most frequently chosen celebrity in the 1970s version. His knack for matching contestants was so great that producers tried to discourage contestants from repeatedly choosing him, even before the introduction of the Star Wheel; a short-lived rule in 1975 stipulated that a returning champion could not choose the same celebrity again for the Head-to-Head Match, but this only lasted six weeks. Richard Dawson (born November 20, 1932) is a British-born American actor, comedian, game show panelist and host. ...


The Star Wheel

The "Star Wheel" was introduced in 1978 and was used until the show ended in 1982. Contestants spun the wheel to determine which celebrity they played with in the Head-To-Head Match, and could double their potential winnings if the wheel landed on one of the gold stars under each celebrity's name. The wheel was added to prevent people from constantly choosing Richard Dawson, though ironically, the first time it was used, it landed on Richard nonetheless, leading fellow star Charles Nelson Reilly to refer to it on that episode as "the famed and fixed star wheel." The "Star Wheel" was also used in the 1990 version of the show. Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ...


Broadcast history

The Match Game (1962-69, NBC)

An all-star episode of The Match Game from 1964. From left: Bennett Cerf, Henry Morgan, Robert Q. Lewis, Joan Fontaine, Betty White, and Peggy Cass.
An all-star episode of The Match Game from 1964. From left: Bennett Cerf, Henry Morgan, Robert Q. Lewis, Joan Fontaine, Betty White, and Peggy Cass.

The original version of The Match Game, created by longtime Goodson-Todman staffer Frank Wayne, premiered December 31, 1962, continuing through September 26, 1969 on NBC for 1,760 episodes. The program aired at 4 p.m. Eastern/3 p.m. Central. Only 11 episodes of The Match Game are reported to survive,[1] the pilot episode (which was recorded) and ten kinescope recordings; the show was originally broadcast live from New York, and most episodes were not recorded for posterity. Download high resolution version (1110x663, 37 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: IAR-93 ... Download high resolution version (1110x663, 37 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: IAR-93 ... Bennett Cerf photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Bennett Alfred Cerf (May 25, 1898 - August 27, 1971) was a publisher and co-founder of Random House, also known for his own compilations of jokes and puns, for regular personal appearances lecturing across the United States, and for his television appearances... Admiral Sir Henry Morgan (Hari Morgan in Welsh), (ca. ... Robert Q. Lewis (April 5, 1921 – December 11, 1991) was an American radio and television personality, game show host, and actor. ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ... Betty White (born January 17, 1922) is an Emmy Award-winning American film and television actress with a career spanning sixty years, sometimes referred to as The First Lady of Television and Americas Sweetheart. ... Mary Margaret (Peggy) Cass (May 21, 1924 - March 8, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated actress, comedian, game show panelist, and announcer. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... This article is about the television network. ... Kinescope (IPA: ) originally referred to the cathode ray tube used in television monitors. ...


For most of its life, the original series of The Match Game was aired live from New York on NBC during the late afternoons, and was a solid if unspectacular hit for the network at the time. Like its successor, this version was hosted by Gene Rayburn and announced by Johnny Olson. Because it was live, sometimes one of NBC's New York staff announcers, such as Don Pardo or Wayne Howell, would fill in for Olson when he could not attend a broadcast. New York, New York redirects here. ... This article is about the television network. ... Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... John Leonard Johnny Olson (May 22, 1910 – October 12, 1985) was an American radio personality and television announcer, most notable for announcing 32 game shows from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions, from the late 1950s through the mid 1980s. ... Dominick George Don Pardo (born February 22, 1918 in Westfield, Massachusetts) is a legendary American radio and television announcer. ... Wayne Howell (died July 8, 1993) was a voice-over announcer for the NBC television network from the 1950s through the 1980s. ...


The gameplay of The Match Game bore little resemblance to its more famous descendant. Two three-person teams (one celebrity and two contestants) attempted to match answers to simple fill-in-the-blank questions, like "To a millionaire, ______ dollars is nothing," or "Name something you can open and shut." Two matching answers earned $25 for the team, and if all three answers matched, the team earned $50. The winning team moved on to a bonus round, the "audience match," and would guess the answers to a recent audience survey ("We asked 100 women, 'How much money should you spend for a hat?'"). Each teammate would think of an answer they felt was given most frequently by the audience, with each match being worth $50; thus, the top possible payout was $450.


Questions on this show were far less risqué than on its 1970s incarnation; most were simple open-ended questions, such as "Name a kind of flower" or "What is the first thing you do when you wake up?" This question format would later be used on Family Feud, which in a very real sense was a Match Game spinoff. Also, these types of questions were common during the early weeks of Match Game 73 revival on CBS-TV in 1973. On March 27, 1967, the show added a "Telephone Match" game, wherein a home viewer and a studio audience member attempted to match a simple fill-in-the-blank question similar to the 70s series' Head-to-Head Match. A successful match won a jackpot which started at $500 and increased by $100 per day until won. This article is about the American game show. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


The original 1960s version consistently won its 4:00pm time slot on NBC. After the network suddenly canceled its most popular game shows in 1969 in a major daytime programming overhaul, it was replaced with Letters to Laugh-In at a time when The Match Game was still doing well in the ratings. The Match Game finished third among all network daytime game shows for the 1963-1964 and 1967-1968 seasons (in the latter, behind two other NBC series that would enjoy long runs, Jeopardy! and Hollywood Squares), its highest season rating. Letters to Laugh-In was a daytime game show that aired on NBC from September 29, 1969 to December 26, 1969. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Match Game (1973-79, CBS)

In the summer of 1973, Mark Goodson and Bill Todman resurrected the show as Match Game '73 for CBS, with Rayburn returning as host (Goodson and Todman also resurrected the current version of The Price is Right from a 50s-60s version). The title would be updated with the year for the next six years. This version saw two solo contestants attempting to match the answers given by a six-celebrity panel. Richard Dawson was the first regular panelist. Due to intense coverage of the Watergate hearings, the network delayed the start one week from its slated date of June 25 to July 2. Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ... Bill Todman (July 31, 1916-July 29, 1979) was an American television producer born in New York City. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... Richard Dawson (born November 20, 1932) is a British-born American actor, comedian, game show panelist and host. ... Watergate redirects here. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first week's panelists, in seating order, were Michael Landon, Vicki Lawrence, Jack Klugman, Jo Ann Pflug, Richard Dawson, and Anita Gillette. Rayburn reassured viewers of the first CBS show that it was their longtime standby, modernized. "This is your old favorite, updated with more action, more money. and as you can see, more celebrities," he said. Michael Landon (October 31, 1936 - July 1, 1991) was an American actor, writer, director, and producer, who starred in three popular NBC TV series that spanned three decades. ... Vicki Lawrence (born Vicki Ann Axelrad on March 26, 1949, in Inglewood, California, USA) is an Emmy Award-winning actress and also an American comedian and singer. ... Jack Klugman (b. ... Jo Ann Pflug (born May 2, 1947 in Atlanta, Georgia)and raised in Winter Park, Florida is an American motion picture and television actress. ... Richard Dawson (born November 20, 1932) is a British-born American actor, comedian, game show panelist and host. ... Anita Gillette (Born August 16, 1936), is a Tony nominated American actress. ...


The first few weeks of the show was somewhat different from what it would become a few months later. At first, some (although not all) of the questions fit into the more bland and perfunctory mold of the previous version. In addition, the regular panelists were somewhat different as well, with frequent appearances by people such as Jack Klugman, Arlene Francis, Bert Convy (who would later be selected as a host for the 1990 revival before being diagnosed with a brain tumor that eventually took his life) and Steve Allen (who was host of The Tonight Show when Rayburn served as announcer). Jack Klugman (b. ... Arlene Francis (born Arline Francis Kazanjian October 20, 1907 - May 31, 2001) was an American actress, radio talk show host and game show panelist of Armenian and Greek descent. ... Bernard Whalen Bert Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host and panelist, actor and singer known for his tenure as the host for Tattletales, Super Password, and Win, Lose or Draw. ... Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian, and writer who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


However, the turning point came with the question "Johnny always put butter on his _____." The (perhaps unintentional) double entendre marked a turning point in the questions on the show. (The GSN documentary on the show has writer DeBartolo saying the question was first used in the 1960s version.) Soon, the tone of Rayburn's questions changed notably, leaving behind the staid topics of The Match Game for more risqué, schticky, and double-entendre-laden humor. Famous celebrity panelists Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly began as guest panelists on the program (Somers at the request of Jack Klugman; the two were married at the time and Klugman felt she would make a nice fit on the program). The chemistry between the two prompted Goodson-Todman and CBS to hire them as regular panelists, the positions that Somers would hold until the syndicated version ended in 1982 and Reilly would continue through two revivals until 1991 (with a brief break in 1974-75, when Gary Burghoff, Nipsey Russell, and the equally flamboyant Rip Taylor took his chair). In one episode, Reilly was late for taping and Mark Goodson filled in for him for the first few minutes; in another, announcer Johnny Olson did the same. A double entendre is a figure of speech similar to the pun, in which a spoken phrase can be understood in either of two ways. ... The Game Show Network (GSN) is an American cable television and direct broadcast satellite channel dedicated to game shows and interactive television games. ... A schtick (or shtick) is an expression which refers to a comic theme or gimmick. ... Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Gary Burghoff as Walter Radar OReilly. ... Julius Nipsey Russell (September 15, 1918 – October 2, 2005)[1] was an African-American comedian, best known today for his many appearances as a guest panelist on game shows from the 1960s through the 1990s, especially Match Game, Password, Hollywood Squares, To Tell the Truth and Pyramid. ... Rip Taylor (born Charles Elmer Taylor, Jr. ... Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ... John Leonard Johnny Olson (May 22, 1910 – October 12, 1985) was an American radio personality and television announcer, most notable for announcing 32 game shows from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions, from the late 1950s through the mid 1980s. ...


The CBS/syndicated version was produced by veteran Goodson-Todman producer Ira Skutch. Aside from being involved with the writing of some of the questions, Skutch also acted as on-stage judge. The CBS/syndicated version was directed by Marc Breslow, and Robert Sherman acted as associate producer and head writer.

When CBS revamped The Match Game in 1973, with more of a focus on risqué humor, ratings more than doubled in comparison with the NBC incarnation. Within eleven weeks, Match Game '73 was the most watched program on daytime television. By the summer of 1974, it grew into an absolute phenomenon with high school students and housewives, scoring remarkable ratings among the 12-34 year old age demographic. The best ratings this version of Match Game saw were in the 1975-1976 season when it drew an outstanding 12.5 rating with a 15 share, higher numbers than that of some primetime series; this was due in part to the fact that it had been paired with The Price Is Right, a hit in its own right, during this time. It surpassed records as the most popular daytime program ever with an astounding record of 11 million daily viewers, one that held until the "Luke and Laura" supercouple storyline gripped viewers on ABC's General Hospital some years later. Image File history File links 1977regularsrayburnshot. ... Image File history File links 1977regularsrayburnshot. ... Richard Dawson (born November 20, 1932) is a British-born American actor, comedian, game show panelist and host. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ... Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ... Luke and Laura Spencer, 2006 Luke Spencer and Laura Webber Spencer are fictional characters and the signature supercouple on the American soap opera General Hospital. ... Luke and Lauras record-breaking wedding, November 16, 1981 on the daytime drama General Hospital. ... For other uses, see General Hospital (disambiguation). ...


Every New Year's Eve, the two-digit year designation in the Match Game sign was updated to reflect the coming of the new year, resulting in a New Year's party between the cast and the audience. This lasted until 1979, before CBS canceled the show. For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see New Year (disambiguation). ...


On September 8, 1975, a weekly nighttime edition called Match Game PM premiered in syndication on local stations (mainly ABC affiliates). In 1976, the show's success -- and celebrity panelist Richard Dawson's popularity -- prompted Goodson-Todman to develop a new show for ABC entitled Family Feud, with Dawson emceeing. This show became a major hit in its own right, eventually exceeding the parent program. Family Feud was said to be based on Dawson's expertise on Match Game's "Audience Match". is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... An affiliate is an entity with a relationship with a peer or a larger entity. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... This article is about the American game show. ... This article is about the American game show. ...


Meanwhile, the daytime version of Match Game kept its high standing in the ratings, despite a short-lived move ahead one half-hour during summer and fall 1975. In late 1977, however, CBS made a fatal mistake regarding the show's time slot. Impressed with the ratings boon that resulted when The Price Is Right and Match Game were paired in afternoons, CBS soon realized that in the morning slot that Price had left behind, they had a ratings crisis. Thus, CBS decided move Match Game along with Price back to the morning time slot. However, because much of Match Game's audience was composed of students who were in school at that time of day, ratings began to sag and eventually freefall; many of these students did not return. As a result, Family Feud quickly supplanted Match Game as television's highest-rated game show.


CBS "corrected" the time change (in a sense) in April 1978 with a move that did even more damage: moving Match Game to the 4:00 p.m. "death slot," a slot that by this time many local stations were preempting in favor of local or syndicated programming. Also in 1978, CBS rebuilt the Match Game set from the original bright orange to a new set with blue and white colors, as well as revamping the logo from the curved letters to a straight-line lettering it would use for the rest of the run. This was mainly for convenience; with a new Match Game set and sign, a whole new sign no longer had to be built each year as had been done previously. Instead an attachment, designating the year, was simply taken off the end of the revamped Match Game 78 sign and replaced with a new one numbered 79 on New Year's Day 1979. (An alternate attachment was used for Match Game PM.) The rules were also slightly changed at this time, with the abandonment of the "pick a star" for the Head-to-Head Match and the adoption of the "Star Wheel." While the show's top prize nearly doubled (partially to counter the high inflation of the era) and the new feature allowed more celebrities the chance to participate in the end game, it also eliminated what effectively was Richard Dawson's "spotlight" feature. Dawson, increasingly unhappy with his role on Match Game and more strongly committed to Family Feud by that time, left the show in the summer of 1978, a few short weeks after the revamp. This article is about the American game show. ...

Gene Rayburn and a happy contestant in 1979.
Gene Rayburn and a happy contestant in 1979.

After significant ratings drops in the "death slot" (falling behind Feud, Price, and NBC's Wheel of Fortune to fall out of the top three game shows in 1979 for the first time in the CBS run), CBS aired its 1,445th and final Match Game on April 20, 1979. This article is about the now-defunct daytime edition of the U.S. game show . ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


Reruns

Reruns of this version of Match Game currently air on GSN. Match Game '7x airs weekdays at 1:30PM Eastern during GSN Live and the daily syndicated version airs weekends at 11:00AM Eastern. Match Game PM was last seen on the network in 2007 in a weekend afternoon time slot. GSN redirects here. ...


(The) Match Game (1979-82, syndication)

Enough interest in the show as a daytime program prompted Goodson and Jim Victory Television, syndicator of the still-airing weekly nighttime version, to resume daily production. Match Game, now without a year attached to the title and referred to occasionally on air as "The Match Game," returned on September 10, 1979. is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


From 1979 to 1981, Bill Daily, Dick Martin, Richard Paul, and Bob Barker were among the male semi-regulars who filled Dawson's old spot on the panel. McLean Stevenson became a regular during the show's final season, although he did appear occasionally during the 1980-1981 season. Bill Daily is an American comedian and comic actor, and a veteran of many television sitcoms, born in Des Moines, Iowa, August 30, 1928. ... Dick Martin (born January 30, 1922 in Battle Creek, Michigan) is an American comedian. ... Richard Paul (June 6, 1940-December 25, 1998), is an American actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... McLean Stevenson (November 14, 1927 – February 15, 1996) (full name Edgar McLean Stevenson, Jr. ...


The show primarily held the same format as the 1978 version of the show. However, the $100 prize for advancing to the Super Match was dropped, and instead of returning champions, two contestants each played two games against each other, then were both replaced by two new contestants, regardless of the outcome of the games.


Also, the fee plugs which had aired in the middle of the show on the CBS version were featured during the closing credits. The ticket plugs were now shown on every episode. Each ticket plug had two people's faces merged into one image by putting a man's face on a woman's head, putting a mustache on a woman's face, or putting a pair of red lips on a man's face or simply putting two halves of the faces together. The 1990 ABC version used a similar sequence to introduce the stars.


Match Game PM, which by this point ran only in markets where the weekday version did not air, aired its 230th and final episode at the end of the 1980-81 season, and the daytime syndicated show's 525th and final episode aired on September 10, 1982. is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour (1983–84, NBC)

In 1983, producer Mark Goodson teamed up with Orion Television, who had recently acquired the rights to Hollywood Squares, and NBC to create The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour. Rayburn, after a year as a morning show host in New York, agreed to return as host. However, few of the regular Squares cast appeared on this version. Jon Bauman served as the lone regular panelist on this version, and the two swapped seats for Hollywood Squares, with Bauman serving as host and Rayburn as the lower lefthand square. Gene Wood served as announcer. The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour was a short-lived American television game show that combined two long-running game shows of the 1960s and 1970s — Match Game and Hollywood Squares — into an hour-long format. ... Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the television network. ... The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour was a short-lived American television game show that combined two long-running game shows of the 1960s and 1970s — Match Game and Hollywood Squares — into an hour-long format. ... Bowzer redirects here. ... Eugene Edward (Gene) Wood (October 20, 1925 – May 21, 2004), was an American television personality, known primarily for his work in game shows. ...


These rules were roughly the same as those of Match Game PM, with both contestants given three chances apiece to match each panelist once. The major difference was in the tie-breaker. Four possible answers to a Super Match-like statement (example: "_____, New Jersey") were secretly shown to the contestants (examples: "Atlantic City," "Hoboken," "Newark," "Trenton"). They each chose one by number. The host then polled the celebrities for verbal responses. The first panelist to give an answer selected by one of the contestants won the game for that contestant. The winner of the Match Game segment played the returning champion in the Hollywood Squares segment with the eventual winner of Squares playing the Super Match. The Audience Match featured payoffs of $1,000, $500 and $250, while non-matching players were given $100. For the Head-to-Head Match, the contestant picked a celebrity, who revealed a hidden number (10, 20, 30); that number was multiplied by the contestant's Audience Match winnings to determine the grand prize ($30,000 was the top possible amount). Champions remained on the program for up to five days unless defeated. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour ran from October 1983 to July 1984. All episodes are presumed to be intact, but because of the cross-ownership (CBS Television Distribution currently owns the rights to Hollywood Squares, which at the time of MGHS was owned by Orion Television; Fremantle Media owns Match Game) and possibly also due to Rayburn's displeasure over how the show turned out, The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour has never been rerun on any network. CBS Television Distribution is a United States and Global television distribution company, a merger of the television distribution arms of CBS Paramount Domestic Television, CBS Paramount International Television and King World. ... Orion Pictures Corporation was an American movie production company, formed in 1978 as a joint venture between Warner Bros. ... FremantleMedia (formerly All-American Television and Pearson Television) is a division of RTL Group which holds the rights to the Goodson/Todman game show library which includes such classic game shows as The Price is Right, Match Game, Ive Got a Secret, and Family Feud, as well as non...


Match Game (1990-91, ABC)

The Match Game '90 logo
The Match Game '90 logo
Ross Shafer (far left) addresses the panel, which includes Bill Kirchenbauer (top left), Charles Nelson Reilly (top right) and Sally Struthers (bottom left).
Ross Shafer (far left) addresses the panel, which includes Bill Kirchenbauer (top left), Charles Nelson Reilly (top right) and Sally Struthers (bottom left).

In 1989, ABC, who had not carried a daytime game show since Bargain Hunters in 1987, decided to revive Match Game. The producers (including Jonathan Goodson, who took over the show at this time) selected Bert Convy, a former Match Game panelist in the early days of the program, as host, to make up for the fact that his previous show, Super Password, had recently been canceled. Convy would film several episodes (later classified as pilots) for the show; however, in April 1990 Convy was diagnosed with what would be a terminal brain tumor, and thus could not serve as host as originally planned. Rayburn (who had just finished hosting what would be his last show, The Movie Masters) reportedly expressed an interest in returning to the show, and his name was considered, but producers once again declined. Ross Shafer, a comedian and former talk show host, took over. Charles Nelson Reilly returned as a regular panelist, and Brett Somers served as a guest panelist in several episodes. Vicki Lawrence, Sally Struthers, Brad Garrett and Ronn Lucas were among the semi-regulars for this version of the show. Gene Wood returned as announcer. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Image249. ... Image File history File links Image249. ... Ross Shafer (born December 10, 1954 in McMinnville, Oregon, USA) is a comedian and television host turned motivational and customer service speaker/trainer, based in Carlsbad, California. ... Dude is a faggot. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Bargain Hunters was a short lived game show on ABC in 1987, hosted by the late Peter Tomarken of Press Your Luck fame. ... Jonathan Goodson (born 1945 in Los Angeles, California) is an American television producer who specializes in game shows. ... Bernard Whalen Bert Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host and panelist, actor and singer known for his tenure as the host for Tattletales, Super Password, and Win, Lose or Draw. ... Password Plus and Super Password were American game shows that were revivals of the original CBS and ABC game show Password (1961-67; 1971-1975). ... The Movie Masters was a short-lived American television game show which ran from 1989 to 1990. ... Ross Shafer (born December 10, 1954 in McMinnville, Oregon, USA) is a comedian and television host turned motivational and customer service speaker/trainer, based in Carlsbad, California. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ... Vicki Lawrence (born Vicki Ann Axelrad on March 26, 1949, in Inglewood, California, USA) is an Emmy Award-winning actress and also an American comedian and singer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Brad Garrett (born April 14, 1960) is an American television/voice actor and stand-up comedian. ... Ronn Lucas is a ventriloquist and stand-up comedian. ... Eugene Edward (Gene) Wood (October 20, 1925 – May 21, 2004), was an American television personality, known primarily for his work in game shows. ...


On the version, matches were worth money instead of points. Each match during the two Match Game rounds was worth $50. All panelists played both questions for each player, whether or not they matched in the first round.


After each round of questions, contestants were given a chance to build their scores further by playing a new round called "Match-Up!" with one panelist of their choice, similar to the Head-To-Head Match rules from 1973-78. This was a rapid-fire series of Super Match-style questions, with two possible answers given; the contestant chose one secretly, and the panelist picked the one s/he felt the contestant picked. This process continued until time expired. The first Match-Up! round was played for 30 seconds at $50 per match, while the second lasted 45 seconds for $100 per match. Whomever had the most money at the end of the second Match-Up! round won the game and kept the money; the loser went away with only parting gifts.


The Super Match was played identically to the 1978–82 version of the round (with a green arrow spinning around the Star Wheel instead of the actual wheel spinning and two red dots on each star's space as "double" spaces). Originally, the payoffs of $500–$250–$100 for the Audience Match were identical to the CBS version's payoff structure, with 'no match' giving the contestant the right to play for $500/$1,000 in the Super Match. After a few weeks it changed to $500–$300–$200 for each Audience Match answer, or $1,000/$2,000 in the Super Match if unsuccessful.


Due to many ABC stations in major markets carrying news at noon, the show got few clearances, the ones it got being mostly in smaller markets without noon newscasts, and was canceled one year after its premiere. A proposed move to another network (rumored to be CBS) for the 1991-92 season had been announced on the season finale but never materialized. It has the distinction of being ABC's last daytime game show to date.


All episodes of this version of the show are believed to be intact. GSN aired this version as recently as 2004.


Match Game (1998–99, syndication)

A pilot was shot in 1997 for a revised version of the show, to be called Match Game 2, with Charlene Tilton (a panelist on the 1979-82 version) to host. It featured gameplay routines unheard of in the history of the show: Actress Charlene Tilton was born December 1, 1958 in San Diego, California, USA. She has had a varied career, with many roles, beginning with a small part as Bambi in Freaky Friday. ...

  • Instead of the celebrities writing down answers and contestants providing them verbally, MG2 switched the roles around, similar to the tiebreaker in Match Game PM.
  • In the Super Match, the Head-To-Head Match was thrown out and a "Panel Poll" took its place. In the "Panel Poll," each celebrity was given a choice of three adjectives, and the contestant had to guess who picked what at $100 per match. (In the Audience Match, instead of having the third, second and most popular answers worth money, they were worth multiples of the contestant's earnings: the third most popular would double the "Panel Poll" winnings, the second most popular would multiply it by 4, and the most popular would multiply it by 5 for a top prize of only $2,500.)
    Many elements of the pilot, such as a change from a six-celebrity panel to a five-celebrity panel, were kept in for a second pilot shot a year later (with Michael Burger as host), which would eventually lead to the 1998 revival.
The Match Game '98 logo
The Match Game '98 logo

Michael Burger eventually ended up serving as host of this version, and Paul Boland served as announcer. The only personnel connections to previous versions of Match Game was Vicki Lawrence, who was a regular on this version and also served as a frequent panelist on both the 1970s version and the 1990 version, and Nell Carter, who had appeared on the final episode of the 1991 version. Both Carter and Lawrence were regulars on this version. Reilly and Somers did not make any appearances in this version; Reilly's chair was filled by Judy Tenuta, who was almost universally disliked. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Michael Burger crack baby (born June 10, 1957 in Long Beach, California) is an American television personality. ... Paul Boland is a singer/impressionist who also was a one-time game show announcer for the 1998 version of Match Game. ... Vicki Lawrence (born Vicki Ann Axelrad on March 26, 1949, in Inglewood, California, USA) is an Emmy Award-winning actress and also an American comedian and singer. ... Nell Carter (September 13, 1948 – January 23, 2003) was an American singer and film, stage, and television actress. ... Judy Tenuta (born November 7, 1956) is a comedienne. ...


This incarnation of Match Game was played with rules nearly identical to that of Match Game 73, including its $5,000 top prize, with a few minor exceptions. The show featured a panel of only five celebrities, instead of the usual six. Questions in this version were not labeled A or B, but instead, titles with puns were a clue as to the content (à la Win Ben Stein's Money). Each match was worth one point in Round One and two points in Round Two. As on the 1990–91 version, all five panelists played each round regardless of whether they matched a player on the first question. After two rounds, the highest scorer played the Super-Match Game, which was played identically to its 1973-78 incarnation, even matching the top prize of $5,000. If no match was made in the Audience Match portion of the Super-Match Game, the contestant played for $500 in the Head-To-Head Match. Win Ben Steins Money logo Win Ben Steins Money was an American television game show that ran from July 28, 1997 to May 8, 2003 on Comedy Central. ...


This version was noted for its sometimes over-the-top risqué humor of the celebrities and contestants. For instance, the prohibition on answers such as genitalia was no longer existent. On many episodes, answers that were deemed inappropriate for daytime TV were edited out with a "cuckoo" dubbed over the audible answer and a "CENSORED" graphic over the answer card and sometimes the person's mouth.


While Burger generally received positive reviews for his hosting, the show was mostly panned. Its humor was seen to have crossed the line from risqué into the out-and-out dirty, and so many stations pushed it into the late night slots. Its low budget was also a focal point for criticism (especially since other Match Game versions offered prizes well in excess of $10,000 in an era when purchasing power was roughly twice that of 1998).


This version lasted a year and was canceled in 1999; it has never been rerun, though brief clips have been seen on various game-show blooper specials.


Match Game (2008-, TBS)

In March 2008, TBS announced that a new version of Match Game, produced by FremantleMedia North America, would be part of the network's development slate for the fall 2008 season. According to The Hollywood Reporter, TBS claims this will be "the network's biggest foray into game shows" since the network's short-lived attempt in 2006 with the Endemol USA-produced Midnight Money Madness.[2] According to a report on TVgameshows.net (and confirmed by Variety), the series is expected to follow in the footsteps of the 1998 revival by crossing into the overtly raunchy; as a result, the show is designated for the network's late night television schedule. On June 19, 2008, two pilot episodes were taped at Studio 33 at CBS Television City in Los Angeles (where the 1973 and 1998 versions were taped). The new version features the same set used in the early years of the 1970s version as well as the same music cues from that era. The new version is hosted by Andrew Daly and comedienne Sarah Silverman and comedian Norm MacDonald have been confirmed as celebrity panelists. [3][4] The acronym TBS may refer to: Broadcasting networks: Turner Broadcasting System, an international media company whose assets include the TBS cable network Tokyo Broadcasting System, a TV station in Tokyo, Japan TBS Radio & Communications, a radio station in Tokyo founded by the above Taiwan Broadcasting System Other: Tablespoon Taking Back... FremantleMedia (formerly All-American Television and Pearson Television) is a division of RTL Group which holds the rights to the Goodson/Todman game show library which includes such classic game shows as The Price is Right, Match Game, Ive Got a Secret, and Family Feud, as well as non... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Television City redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Andrew Daly (born April 15, 1971) is an American actor, writer, and comedian who is best known for his character Dick Pepperfield in the 2008 film Semi-Pro starring Will Ferrell. ... Sarah Kate Silverman (born December 1, 1970) is an American comedian, writer, and actor. ... Norm MacDonald Norman Gene MacDonald (born October 17, 1963) is a bilingual Canadian actor and comedian. ...


If the new revival makes it to broadcast prior to the start of 2010, it will become one of only ten game shows to have been produced and aired in five consecutive decades (in this case, the 1960s through 2000s).[5] 2010 (MMX) will be a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the decade of 2000-2009. ...


Other revivals

Plans were in place in the fall of 1985 to re-launch Match Game as a stand-alone series, in conjunction with the revival of The Nighttime Price Is Right. Rayburn was once again to serve as host, but producers believed that he was too old and was becoming uncooperative; he had recently been dismissed from Break the Bank after 13 weeks due to production feuds similar to those he had on The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour. Thus the project was abandoned, and Match Game reruns aired in lieu of new episodes. This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ... The Match Game part of the MG-HS logo in the intro, displayed on a then-state-of-the-art video wall. ...


Vanity Fair and TVgameshows.net reported in May 2004 a pilot for a remake of Match Game called What the Blank! It was taped for FOX, and hosted by Fred Willard for air during the summer 2004 "off" season. It was said that the game was apparently an incorporation of 21st-Century elements into the classic game and also, a feature was added that people from along the streets would be able to participate for matching with contestants and celebrities in Street Smarts-style. FOX abruptly canceled the series before the show made it to air; the status of any episodes produced is unknown. Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... This article is about the animal. ... Fred Willard (born September 18[1]) is an American comedian and character actor, known for his improvisational comedy skills. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


On June 22, 2006, Match Game was the sixth of seven classic game shows featured in CBS's month-long Gameshow Marathon, hosted by Ricki Lake. The contestants were Kathy Najimy and Lance Bass. The game was played as the second of two "semi-final" games in the tournament, with panelists Betty White, George Foreman, Kathy Griffin, Bruce Vilanch, Adam Carolla, and Adrianne Curry. Lake used the same signature long thin Sony ECM-51 telescoping microphone Rayburn used during the CBS version. In this episode, Najimy won the game, scoring five matches to Bass's three. The format was essentially that of Match Game PM, except that in the Super-Match Game, the Head-To-Head Match was played for 50 times the amount won in the two Audience Matches. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gameshow Marathon is an American television program, based on the UKs television program of the same name. ... This article is about the person. ... Kathy Ann Najimy (born February 6, 1957) is an American actress, best known as Olive Massery on the television series Veronicas Closet, Sister Mary Patrick in Sister Act and the voice of Peggy Hill on the animated television series King of the Hill. ... James Lance Bass (born May 4, 1979), known as Lance Bass (pronounced ), is an American pop singer, actor, film and television producer, and author. ... Betty White (born January 17, 1922) is an Emmy Award-winning American film and television actress with a career spanning sixty years, sometimes referred to as The First Lady of Television and Americas Sweetheart. ... George Edward Foreman (born January 10, 1949) is an American two-time World Heavyweight Boxing Champion. ... Kathy Griffin (born November 4, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning American stand-up comedian, producer, actress, and gay icon. ... Bruce Vilanch (born November 23, 1948) is an American comedy writer who caught the public eye when he became a wisecracking regular on the revamped Hollywood Squares with Whoopi Goldberg. ... Adam Carolla (born May 27, 1964) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American comedian, comedy writer, radio personality, television personality and actor. ... Adrianne Marie Curry (born August 6, 1982 in Joliet, Illinois) is an American Top Model and reality television star. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ...


Series legacy

The program's simple "fill in the blank" question format has spawned numerous imitators, and radio shows across the country have used the format for call-in contests.


Among television series and films that have paid homage to Match Game include fellow Goodson-Todman series The Price is Right (in a 2007 showcase), Family Guy (twice), Private Parts (with Howard Stern as Rayburn and Robin Quivers as Somers), Mystery Science Theatre 3000, Craig Kilborn's The Daily Show and Late Late Show (in his "Five Questions" segment), The Simpsons, and Saturday Night Live (most recently on May 10, 2008 as a game show titled "It's A Match" which used the Match Game 7x/PM theme with a different arrangement). This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ... Host Drew Carey next to the Showcase set. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Private Parts, a 1997 movie about Howard Stern. ... This article is a biography of Howard Stern as an individual; for information regarding his radio show see The Howard Stern Show. ... Robin Ophelia Quivers (born August 8, 1952) is an American talk show host and Howard Sterns primary co-host on his morning radio show. ... From left to right, Crow T. Robot, Joel Robinson, and Tom Servo. ... Craig Kilborn (born August 24, 1962) is an American comedian and former talk show host. ... The Daily Show is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... The Late Late Show is an American late-night television talk and variety show on CBS. It immediately follows The Late Show with David Letterman and is produced by Lettermans Worldwide Pants Incorporated in CBS Television City, next to the studio of the game program The Price Is Right. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... SNL redirects here. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Today, the 1973-1982 incarnation is shown in reruns daily on Game Show Network and is the network's "Greatest Game Show of All Time". Virtually all episodes of this version are still extant, although some reportedly are not shown due to celebrities's refusals of clearances.[6] On November 26, 2006, GSN broadcast an hour-long documentary on Match Game titled The Real Match Game Story: Behind The Blanks, featuring rarely seen footage of the 1960s version, many odd or memorable moments from the main 1973-82 series, and interviews with Rayburn, Somers, Dawson, DeBartolo, producer Ira Skutch, and others involved in the show's production. GSN redirects here. ... The 50 Greatest Game Shows of All-Time is a series on GSN airing from July 18, 2006 through August 31, 2006, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 10 PM Eastern Time. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Presently, Richard Dawson is the only surviving regular personality from the 1970s version of the show; announcer Johnny Olson died in 1985, host Gene Rayburn died in 1999, and Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly both died in 2007. Most of the semi-regulars, however, are still alive.


Hosts, announcers and celebrity panelists

Hosts Gene Rayburn (1962–1984 versions), Ross Shafer (1990–1991 version), Michael Burger (1998–1999 version) Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... Ross Shafer (born December 10, 1954 in McMinnville, Oregon, USA) is a comedian and television host turned motivational and customer service speaker/trainer, based in Carlsbad, California. ... Michael Burger crack baby (born June 10, 1957 in Long Beach, California) is an American television personality. ...


Announcers Johnny Olson (1962-1982 versions), Don Pardo, Wayne Howell (substitute announcers, 1962-1969 version), Gene Wood (1983-1991 versions), Paul Boland (1998-1999 version) John Leonard Johnny Olson (May 22, 1910 – October 12, 1985) was an American radio personality and television announcer, most notable for announcing 32 game shows from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions, from the late 1950s through the mid 1980s. ... Dominick George Don Pardo (born February 22, 1918 in Westfield, Massachusetts) is a legendary American radio and television announcer. ... Wayne Howell (died July 8, 1993) was a voice-over announcer for the NBC television network from the 1950s through the 1980s. ... Eugene Edward (Gene) Wood (October 20, 1925 – May 21, 2004), was an American television personality, known primarily for his work in game shows. ... Paul Boland is a singer/impressionist who also was a one-time game show announcer for the 1998 version of Match Game. ...


Early panelists (1962-1964) Carmel Quinn, Peggy Cass, Peter Lind Hayes, Bennett Cerf, Henry Morgan, Robert Q. Lewis, Joan Fontaine, Betty White, Orson Bean and Jayne Mansfield Carmel Quinn (born in Dublin, Ireland) is a American entertainer, who has appeared on stage in Broadway, television, and film since coming to America in the 1950s. ... Mary Margaret (Peggy) Cass (May 21, 1924 - March 8, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated actress, comedian, game show panelist, and announcer. ... Peter Lind Hayes (June 25, 1915 – April 21, 1998) was an American vaudeville entertainer, songwriter, and film and television actor. ... Bennett Cerf photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Bennett Alfred Cerf (May 25, 1898 - August 27, 1971) was a publisher and co-founder of Random House, also known for his own compilations of jokes and puns, for regular personal appearances lecturing across the United States, and for his television appearances... Henry Morgan (March 31, 1915 - May 19, 1994), born in New York City, was a comedian best remembered for having been a regular panelist on the CBS game show Ive Got a Secret. ... Robert Q. Lewis (April 5, 1921 – December 11, 1991) was an American radio and television personality, game show host, and actor. ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ... Betty White (born January 17, 1922) is an Emmy Award-winning American film and television actress with a career spanning sixty years, sometimes referred to as The First Lady of Television and Americas Sweetheart. ... Bean on The Match Game Orson Bean (born July 22, 1928) is an American film, television, and stage actor, as well as an author. ... Jayne Mansfield (born Vera Jayne Palmer; April 19, 1933—29 June 1967) was an American actress working both on Broadway and in Hollywood. ...


Regular panelists (1973–1982) Charles Nelson Reilly, Brett Somers, Richard Dawson (until 1978), McLean Stevenson (1981-1982) Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ... Richard Dawson (born November 20, 1932) is a British-born American actor, comedian, game show panelist and host. ... McLean Stevenson (November 14, 1927 – February 15, 1996) (full name Edgar McLean Stevenson, Jr. ...


Regular panelists (1983–1984) Jon "Bowzer" Bauman Sha Na Na Sha Na Na was a rock and roll/comedy group from New York City, who performed covers of doo wop hits from the 1950s, simultaneously reviving and sending up the music, as well as 1950s New York street culture, in their performances. ...


Regular panelists (1990–1991) Charles Nelson Reilly Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ...


Regular panelists (1998-1999) Nell Carter, Vicki Lawrence, Judy Tenuta Nell Carter (September 13, 1948 – January 23, 2003) was an American singer and film, stage, and television actress. ... Vicki Lawrence (born Vicki Ann Axelrad on March 26, 1949, in Inglewood, California, USA) is an Emmy Award-winning actress and also an American comedian and singer. ... Judy Tenuta (born November 7, 1956) is a comedienne. ...


Semi-regulars (1973–1982) Steve Allen, Patty Duke Astin, Orson Bean, Joyce Bulifant, Gary Burghoff, Bill Daily, Patti Deutsch, David Doyle, Fannie Flagg, Eva Gabor, Arte Johnson, Elaine Joyce, Lee Meriwether, Scoey Mitchell, Mary Ann Mobley, Richard Paul, Jo Ann Pflug, Nipsey Russell, Avery Schreiber, Debralee Scott, Connie Stevens, Marcia Wallace, Betty White, Mary Wickes Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian, and writer who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... Patty Duke (born December 14, 1946) is an actress of the stage and screen. ... Bean on The Match Game Orson Bean (born July 22, 1928) is an American film, television, and stage actor, as well as an author. ... Bulifant in a Match Game appearance. ... Gary Burghoff as Walter Radar OReilly. ... Bill Daily is an American comedian and comic actor, and a veteran of many television sitcoms, born in Des Moines, Iowa, August 30, 1928. ... Patti Deutsch (b. ... David Fitzgerald Doyle (December 1, 1929 - February 26, 1997), was an American actor, and brother of theatre actress Mary Doyle. ... Fannie Flagg (born September 21, 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American author and actress. ... For other persons named Gabor, see Gabor (disambiguation). ... Arte Johnson (born January 20, 1929), full name Arthur Stanton Eric Johnson, is a comedic actor. ... Elaine Joyce (born December 19, 1945, Kansas City, Missouri) is an American actress. ... Lee Ann Meriwether (born May 27, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is Miss America 1955, and an American actress, appearing in movies, soap operas, game shows and television. ... Mary Ann Mobley (born February 17, 1939 in Brandon, Mississippi) was Miss America in 1959, and later appeared in movies, including two with Elvis Presley; and on such television shows as Fantasy Island and The Love Boat. ... Richard Paul (June 6, 1940-December 25, 1998), is an American actor. ... Jo Ann Pflug (born May 2, 1947 in Atlanta, Georgia)and raised in Winter Park, Florida is an American motion picture and television actress. ... Julius Nipsey Russell (September 15, 1918 – October 2, 2005)[1] was an African-American comedian, best known today for his many appearances as a guest panelist on game shows from the 1960s through the 1990s, especially Match Game, Password, Hollywood Squares, To Tell the Truth and Pyramid. ... Avery Schreiber (April 9, 1935 - January 7, 2002) was an American comedian. ... Debralee Scott (April 2, 1953 – April 5, 2005) was an American actress best known for her role on the soap opera spoof Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman as the title characters trampy younger and prettier sister, Cathy Shumway. ... Connie Stevens Connie Stevens (born August 8, 1938) is an American actress and singer. ... Marcia Wallace (right of image) in Thats My Bush Marcia Wallace (born November 1, 1942) is an Emmy-winning actress from Creston, Iowa. ... Betty White (born January 17, 1922) is an Emmy Award-winning American film and television actress with a career spanning sixty years, sometimes referred to as The First Lady of Television and Americas Sweetheart. ... Mary Wickes guest-starring in the television series Zorro (1957-1959) as Dolores Bastinado Mary Wickes, born Mary Isabelle Wickenhauser, (June 13, 1910 - October 22, 1995) was an American film and television actress. ...


Other panelists (1973-1982) Jack Albertson, Morey Amsterdam, Bill Anderson (country music), Ed Asner, Bob Barker, Rona Barrett, Jaime Lyn Bauer, Joey Bishop, Charlie Brill, Tom Bosley, Bart Braverman, Richard Deacon (actor), Dr. Joyce Brothers, Jack Carter, Bert Convy, Jamie Lee Curtis, Clifton Davis, Ann Elder, Cass Elliot, Gail Fisher, Melinda Fee, John Forsythe, Arlene Francis, Don Galloway, Lynda Day George, Stu Gilliam, Ronny Graham,Shecky Greene, Dwayne Hickman, Jackie Joseph, George Kennedy, Sarah Kennedy, Sheldon Leonard, Allen Ludden, Kukla and Ollie, Bill Macy,Mitzi McCall, Lee Meredith, Ethel Merman, Scoey Mitchell, Louisa Moritz, Karen Morrow, Jack Narz, Leslie Nielsen, Johnny Olson, Buck Owens, Robert Pine, Lynn Redgrave, Madlyn Rhue, Esther Rolle, Isabel Sanford, William Shatner, Suzanne Somers, Connie Stevens, Kaye Stevens, Charlene Tilton, Robert Urich, Jimmie Walker, Jo Anne Worley Jonathan George Jack Albertson (June 16, 1907 – November 25, 1981) was an Academy Award, Emmy Award and Tony Award-winning American character actor, dating back to vaudeville. ... Morey Amsterdam (December 14, 1908 – October 27, 1996) was a veteran American television actor and comedian, renowned for his large, ready supply of jokes. ... James William Anderson III (born November 1, 1937 in Columbia, South Carolina) is an American country music singer and songwriter, nicknamed Whisperin Bill. He also wrote the country standard Once A Day for Connie Smith. ... Edward Asner (born November 15, 1929) is an American actor known for his Emmy-winning role as Lou Grant on The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and later continued in a spinoff series, Lou Grant. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Rona Barrett (born October 8, 1936) is an American gossip columnist and businesswoman. ... Jaime Lyn Bauer (born Norma Marvhne Bauer on March 9, 1949 in Phoenix, Arizona) is an American soap opera actress. ... Joey Bishop (February 3, 1918 â€“ October 17, 2007) was perhaps best remembered as being a member of the Rat Pack with Frank Sinatra, Peter Lawford, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. ... Mitzi McCall and Charlie Brill, 1964 Charlie Brill is an American actor. ... Thomas Edward Bosley (born October 1, 1927) is an American actor. ... Bart Braverman (born February 1, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is a actor who is well know for guest starring on many shows. ... Richard Deacon (May 14, 1921 - August 8, 1984), born in Philadelphia, was a television and motion picture actor. ... Doctor Joyce Brothers was born in 1928, and is one of the leading family psychologists and advice columnists, publishing a daily syndicated newspaper column since 1960. ... Jack Carter (born 24 June 1923) is a standup comedian, actor and host. ... Bernard Whalen Bert Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host and panelist, actor and singer known for his tenure as the host for Tattletales, Super Password, and Win, Lose or Draw. ... Jamie Lee Curtis (born November 22, 1958) is an American film actress and an author of childrens books. ... Clifton Davis (born October 4, 1945) is an American actor who has appeared on television shows such as Thats My Mama (on which he had the lead role) in the 1970s and on Amen in the 1980s. ... Cass Elliot (September 19, 1941 – July 29, 1974), born Ellen Naomi Cohen, was a noted American singer, best remembered as Mama Cass of the pop quartet The Mamas & the Papas. ... Gail Fisher (born August 18, 1935 in Orange, New Jersey; died December 2, 2000 in Culver City, California) was an African American actress, best known for her role as secretary Peggy Fair on the television detective series Mannix, which she played from 1968 through 1975. ... John Forsythe (born January 29, 1918 in Penns Grove, New Jersey), is an American stage, television and character actor who starred in three television series that spanned three decades such as single playboy father Bentley Gregg in the 1950s sitcom, Bachelor Father (1957 – 1962), as the unseen millionaire Charles Townsend... Arlene Francis (born Arline Francis Kazanjian October 20, 1907 - May 31, 2001) was an American actress, radio talk show host and game show panelist of Armenian and Greek descent. ... Don Galloway (born July 27, 1937 in Brooksville, Kentucky) is a American actor. ... Lynda Day George (b. ... This article should belong in one or more categories, in addition to being in a stub category. ... Shecky Greene (born Sheldon Greenfield, April 8, 1926), is a stand-up comedian who was best known for his live performances in the Catskills and on television in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Dwayne Hickman (born May 18, 1934) is an American actor and television executive. ... Jackie Joseph (born November 7, 1934 in Los Angeles, California) is an American character actress, voice artist, and writer best known for portraying the film characters of: Audrey Fulquard on The Little Shop of Horrors, Sheila Futterman in both Gremlins films, and providing the voice of Melody Valentine in the... George Harris Kennedy, Jr. ... Sarah Kennedy was an American actress appearing in many popular television shows during the 1970s. ... Sheldon Leonard (February 22, 1907 – January 10, 1997) was a pioneering American film and television producer, director, writer, and actor. ... Allen Ludden (October 5, 1918 – June 9, 1981) was an American television presenter and game show host. ... Kukla, Fran and Ollie was an early television show using puppets, originally created for children but soon watched by more adults than children. ... Bill Macy (born May 18, 1922 in Revere, Massachusetts) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of Walter Findlay, Bea Arthurs long-suffering husband on the television sitcom Maude. ... Mitzi McCall is an American actress married to actor Charlie Brill. ... Lee Meredith (born October 22, 1947) is an American actress. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a American star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice, often hailed by critics as The Grande Dame of the Broadway stage. // Merman was born Ethel Agnes Zimmermann in her maternal grandmothers house at 359 4th... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Karen Morrow (born December 15, 1936 in Chicago) has had a long and varied career as a singer-actress specializing in musical theater. ... Jack Narz (born November 13, 1922, in Louisville, Kentucky), the elder brother of game show legend Tom Kennedy (Jim Narz) and the brother-in-law of another game show legend, the late Bill Cullen, is an American television announcer and game show host in his own right, who eluded the... Leslie William Nielsen OC (born February 11, 1926) is a Canadian born American comedian and actor. ... John Leonard Johnny Olson (May 22, 1910 – October 12, 1985) was an American radio personality and television announcer, most notable for announcing 32 game shows from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions, from the late 1950s through the mid 1980s. ... Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ... Robert Pine (b. ... Lynn Rachel Redgrave OBE (born 8 March 1943 in London) is an English actress born into the famous acting Redgrave family. ... Madlyn Rhue (born October 3, 1935 in Washington, D.C., USA; died December 16, 2003 in Woodland Hills, California), was an American character actress. ... Esther Rolle (November 8, 1920–November 17, 1998) was an American actress. ... Isabel Sanford (born as Eloise Gwendolyn Sanford August 29, 1917 – July 9, 2004) was an American actress most famous for her role as Louise Weezie Jefferson on the CBS television sitcoms All in the Family (1971-1975) and The Jeffersons (1975-1985). ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... Suzanne Somers (born October 16, 1946) is an American actress, author, and businesswoman. ... Connie Stevens Connie Stevens (born August 8, 1938) is an American actress and singer. ... Kaye Stevens (born July 21, 1933 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as Catherine Stevens) is an actress/singer who appeared frequently on the television game show Match Game as a panelist. ... Actress Charlene Tilton was born December 1, 1958 in San Diego, California, USA. She has had a varied career, with many roles, beginning with a small part as Bambi in Freaky Friday. ... Robert Urich (December 19, 1946 – April 16, 2002) was an Emmy-winning actor, best known for playing private investigators on the television series Spenser: For Hire (1985-1988) and Vega$ (1978-1981). ... For other persons named James Walker, see James Walker (disambiguation). ... Jo Anne Worley Jo Anne Worley (born on September 6, 1937) is an American actress. ...


Semi-regulars (1983–1984) Charles Nelson Reilly, Fannie Flagg, Bill Daily Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Fannie Flagg (born September 21, 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American author and actress. ... Bill Daily is an American comedian and comic actor, and a veteran of many television sitcoms, born in Des Moines, Iowa, August 30, 1928. ...


Semi-regulars (1990–1991): Bill Kirchenbauer, Vicki Lawrence, Brad Garrett, Sally Struthers, Ronn Lucas with various dummies (Scorch, Billy Boy & Chuck Roast) Dude is a faggot. ... Vicki Lawrence (born Vicki Ann Axelrad on March 26, 1949, in Inglewood, California, USA) is an Emmy Award-winning actress and also an American comedian and singer. ... Brad Garrett (born April 14, 1960) is an American television/voice actor and stand-up comedian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ronn Lucas is a ventriloquist and stand-up comedian. ...


Other panelists (1990-1991): Brett Somers Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ...


Semi-regulars (1998–1999) George Hamilton George Hamilton may refer to: George Hamilton (actor) (born 1939) His father, a bandleader George Hamilton, IV (born 1937), country music performer George Hamilton, 1st Earl of Orkney (1666-1737) George Hamilton (commentator), gaffe-prone football (soccer) commentator. ...


Other panelists (1998-1999) Rondell Sheridan, Coolio Rondell Sheridan (born August 15, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois) is an African-American comedian and actor, best known for his current six-year portrayal of Victor Baxter, the goofy-yet-smart father of a psychic teenager, in the Disney Channel sitcoms Thats So Raven and Cory In the House... This article is about the hip hop artist. ...


NOTE: Starting with the top left corner as #1 (which was always a rotating or guest male panelist and was usually the first panelist polled for his/her answer), Somers regularly occupied #2 (top middle), Reilly #3 (top right); as did Burghoff during Reilly's absence, a rotating or guest female panelist occupied #4 (bottom left; in later versions, Bauman and Struthers occupied this slot), Dawson (later Daily and Stevenson) #5 (bottom middle), and #6 (bottom right) featured a rotation of Fannie Flagg, Betty White, Joyce Bulifant, Patti Deutsch, Debralee Scott, Joanne Worley & Marcia Wallace.


Music

Match Game has had several theme songs throughout its 35+ years. For the 1962 version (and continuing to 1967), the instrumental version of A Swingin' Safari by Bert Kaempfert was used as the theme. From 1967 to 1969, a new theme composed by Score Productions was adopted. Album cover of Bert Kaempferts A Swingin Safari A Swingin Safari is an instrumental composed by Bert Kaempfert in 1962. ... Bert Kaempfert (born Berthold Kämpfert; October 16, 1923 - June 21, 1980) was a German orchestra leader and songwriter. ... Score Productions is an American musical production company specializing in background music and themes for television programs. ...


With the launch of Match Game '73, Goodson-Todman once again turned to Score Productions for a music package. A new theme was composed with a memorable "funk" guitar intro that grew to become one of the most famous game show themes of the 1970s. There are also alternate versions of the theme -- one shorter and one with bongos. The 1970s music package also contained the show's "think cues," i.e. cues used when the panel wrote down their answers, as well as two separate Head-to-Head Match cues, the ticket plug/consolation prize cue and a separate "burlesque" music cue. The 1973 theme is currently heard on The MJ Morning Show. For other uses, see Burlesque (disambiguation). ... The MJ Morning Show is a morning radio show that broadcasts out of 93. ...


In keeping with the zany atmosphere, the music supervisors would also use other notable musical works to add to humorous situations. Among the non-Score Productions music heard on occasion were the "burlesque" music ("The Stripper"), "There's No Business Like Show Business," "When the Saints Go Marching In", "Alexander's Ragtime Band," "Stars and Stripes Forever", and the Bee Gees' "Stayin' Alive". "Auld Lang Syne" was played on every New Year's Eve show from 1973 until 1979. The Stripper is an instrumental composed by David Rose and recorded in 1962. ... Perhaps one of the most famous, and recognizable, show-tunes ever is Theres No Business Like Show Business. This Irving Berlin marvel was written for Annie Get Your Gun and has two reprises within the show. ... When the Saints Go Marching In, so well-known that it is often referred to as The Saints, is a United States gospel hymn that has taken on certain aspects of folk music. ... Alexanders Ragtime Band is the name of a song by Irving Berlin. ... The Stars and Stripes Forever is a patriotic American march. ... The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb — that became one of the most successful musical acts of the 20th century. ... Stayin Alive is a song by The Bee Gees, released as a single in 1977. ... Auld Lang Syne is a song by Marilyn Jones (1759-present), although a similar poem by Barbara Elly (1570-present), as well as OAP songs, use the same phrase, and may well have inspired Jones. ...


The music for the Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour was composed by Edd Kalehoff. None of the music used from the 1970s version was used in this revival. The main theme song and several of its cue versions are still used on The Price is Right. Edward Woodley Edd Kalehoff is a music composer who specializes in compositions for television. ...


For the 1990 revival, Score Productions re-orchestrated the 1970s theme with more modern instruments. The think cues were also re-done, but stayed the same throughout; and one "Super Match" cue was penned. A new, simple opening cue was composed, but this cue was not used as a think cue.


The 1998 revival used music from Score Productions, but this theme was more of a spoof of the 1970s theme than a re-recording. However, the music paid tribute to the 1970s version by having the having a re-recording of the "funk" guitar think cue in its opening and the original serving as the show's first think theme.


Related products

Home versions

Main article: Match Game (Home Game)

Milton Bradley created all the home versions of the show from the 60s and 70s versions. Six editions were created for the 60s show, differing from the series in scoring and bonus game format. The more popular 70s version had three editions, the first two consisting of generally straightforward questions; the third edition better reflected the show's change into a comedy-driven game. In addition, Endless Games released a DVD edition of the game in 2007. They have already released DVD editions of The Price is Right, Password and The Newlywed Game.[7] Match Game is the classic home game version based on the TV version of the same name from the 60s and 70s, published by Milton Bradley from 1963 through 1978. ... For the Oakland Athletics outfielder, see Milton Bradley (baseball player) The Milton Bradley Company is an American game company established by Milton Bradley in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1860. ... Endless Games is a games manufacturer founded in 1996. ... This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ... Password was an American television game show produced by Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Internet versions

After success with the online version of Family Feud, Uproar.com released a single-player version of MG. However, as of September 30, 2006, Uproar.com shut down, no longer offering games or content of any kind. This article is about the American game show. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


GSN offered an interactive version of the game on their website that allows users to play along with episodes of the show as they air. However, as of January 1, 2007, only those shows airing between 7 PM and 10 PM are interactive; Match Game is not among these. GSN redirects here. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


DVD editions

A "Best of" DVD of the 1970s edition was released on November 21, 2006. This "best of" set consists of four DVDs with thirty original episodes including prize plugs and ticket plugs. The set includes a selection of notable episodes along with random episodes from throughout the run. Notable episodes include the first CBS Daytime episode (incorrectly referred to as the pilot episode), Kirstie Alley's appearances before she became an actress as well as a young Jamie Lee Curtis on the panel (also notable for Gene destroying the doors in the intro), the 1962 NBC pilot, the last syndicated episode, a female contestant responding to a question with an answer "boobs", the lower tier impersonating the upper tier, Gene striking the cue card holder as well as fighting with a camera, the "School Riot" episode, and Brett and Charles' first appearances on the panel. A condensed one-disc "Dumb Dora Edition" was released in March 2007. is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kirstie Louise Alley (born January 12, 1951 in Wichita, Kansas) is an American actress best known for her role in the TV show Cheers. ... Jamie Lee Curtis (born November 22, 1958) is an American film actress and an author of childrens books. ...


Slot machine

Match Game has been incorporated into a casino slot machine. This version features five simulated reels and a simulation of Rayburn as the host. It recreates the 1973–1982 version of the show, with Reilly, Somers, Jimmie Walker, Rip Taylor, Vicki Lawrence and Morgan Fairchild as the celebrity players. The slot machine's bonus rounds are faithful to the original game format--one round is adapted from the main game, the second from the "Super-Match" bonus round. (Morgan Fairchild never appeared as a panelist on the Rayburn version of Match Game.) For other persons named James Walker, see James Walker (disambiguation). ... Rip Taylor (born Charles Elmer Taylor, Jr. ... Vicki Lawrence (born Vicki Ann Axelrad on March 26, 1949, in Inglewood, California, USA) is an Emmy Award-winning actress and also an American comedian and singer. ... Morgan Fairchild (born February 3, 1950) is an American actress. ...


Versions outside the United States Of America

In the United Kingdom, it was known as Blankety Blank and was presented by Terry Wogan, Les Dawson and Lily Savage. Blankety Blank was a British game show based on the American game show Match Game. ... Sir Michael Terence Wogan, KBE DL (born August 3rd 1938, in Limerick, County Limerick, Republic of Ireland), more commonly known as Terry Wogan, is a radio and television broadcaster who has worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom (UK) for most of his career. ... Les Dawson (2 February 1931, Collyhurst, Manchester, Lancashire - 10 June 1993) was a popular English comedian, known for his deadpan style and curmudgeonly persona, and famous for jokes about his mother-in-law and wife. ... Lily Savage is a drag act performed by comedian Paul OGrady. ...


In Australia, two versions existed. The original 1960s The Match Game was imitated, with the same name, hosted by Michael McCarthy. The second, more commonly known version, based upon the 1970s version, is known as Blankety Blanks, presented by Graham Kennedy, which was a ratings hit for the 0-10 Network in 1977-78. (This show is not to be confused with an unrelated American show by the same name, appearing on ABC and hosted by Bill Cullen.) Like many Australian game shows during the 1970s-1990s, the 1977-78 Kennedy version was remarkably similar to the American show, right down to the set, "spinning box" opening and "Get ready to match the stars!" tagline. The signature music from the American version was not used, however. A later version appeared on the Nine Network in 1985, hosted by Daryl Somers, and again in 1996 hosted by Shane Bourne. Blankety Blanks was a popular Australian game show hosted by Graham Kennedy on Network Ten. ... Graham Cyril Kennedy, AO (15 February 1934 – 25 May 2005) was an Australian radio, television and film performer, often called The King of Australian television. ... Network Ten, or Channel Ten, is one of Australias three major commercial television networks. ... Blankety Blanks was an American game show that aired on ABC from April 21, 1975 to June 27, 1975 hosted by legendary game show emcee Bill Cullen. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... William Bill Lawrence Frances Cullen (February 18, 1920 – July 7, 1990), was an Emmy Award-winning American radio and television personality. ... The Nine Network, or Channel Nine, is an Australian television network based in Willoughby, a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney. ... This article is about the year. ... Daryl Paul Somers OAM (born Daryl Schultz August 6, 1951 in Geelong, Victoria, Australia), sometimes referred to as Dazza or Dags, is an Australian television personality. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... {Infobox Australian Actor |Name = Shane Bourne |Img = ThankGod_060417022752350_wideweb__300x450. ...


The Netherlands also had its own version during the mid-1980s. It had the same title as the UK version. Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...


In Germany, Match Game had a 150-episode run as Punkt, Punkt, Punkt (Dot, Dot, Dot - an allusion to an ellipsis) in the early 1990s on satellite and cable network Sat.1. The show was hosted by Mike Krüger. This article is about the punctuation symbol. ... Sat. ...


In Mexico, the game was called Espacio en Blanco (Blank Space) and was hosted by Mauricio Barcelata. The show had a 40-episode run in 2006.


In Turkey, the game was called Şansını Dene and aired in the early 1990s on Show TV. The show was hosted by Mehmet Ali Erbil. Show TV is a nation-wide television channel in Turkey. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ The Match Game. The Match Game Website. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  2. ^ Silverman in for 'Match Game'; Norm MacDonald, Rashida Jones also in TBS redo. Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  3. ^ Silverman, MacDonald spark to Match Game redo. Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved on 2008-06-19.
  4. ^ TV FUNHOUSE’s Robert Smigel Utilizing Norm Macdonald & Sarah Silverman To Revive MATCH GAME??. Aint-it-cool-news.com. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  5. ^ The other nine are The Price Is Right (1956-present), To Tell the Truth (1956-2002), Let's Make a Deal (1963-2002), Jeopardy! (1964-present), Hollywood Squares (1966-2004), The Dating Game (1966-2000), The Newlywed Game (1966-2000), Concentration (1958-91), and Truth or Consequences (1941-88).
  6. ^ Match Game PM. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  7. ^ New Stuff. Endless Games. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
Preceded by
Loretta Young
4:00 p.m. EST, NBC
12/31/1962-9/26/1969
Succeeded by
Letters to Laugh-In
Preceded by
Hollywood's Talking
3:30 p.m. EST, CBS
7/2/1973-8/15/1975
Succeeded by
Tattletales
Preceded by
The Price is Right
3:00 p.m. EST, CBS
8/18-11/28/1975
Succeeded by
All in the Family
Preceded by
Tattletales
3:30 p.m. EST, CBS
12/1/1975-11/4/1977
Succeeded by
All in the Family
Preceded by
The Price is Right
11:00 a.m. EST, CBS
11/7-12/16/1977
Succeeded by
Tattletales
Preceded by
Tattletales
4:00 p.m. EST, CBS
12/19/1977-4/20/1979
Succeeded by
Love of Life
Preceded by
Perfect Strangers
12:30 p.m. EST, ABC
7/16/1990-7/12/1991
Succeeded by
The Home Show

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... To Tell the Truth is also the title of Charles Robert Jenkins autobiography To Tell the Truth is an American television game show created by Bob Stewart[1] and produced by Goodson-Todman Productions that has been aired intermittently in various formats since 1956, hosted by various television personalities. ... Lets Make a Deal is a television game show which aired in various encarnations in the United States. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Dating Game was an ABC television show that first aired on December 20, 1965 and was the first of many shows created and packaged by Chuck Barris from the 1960s through the 1980s. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Concentration was a TV game show based on the childrens memory game of the same name. ... Action Comics #127 (December 1948), featuring Superman appearing on the show with Ralph Edwards Truth or Consequences was an American quiz show, originally hosted on radio by Ralph Edwards from 1940 to 1957, and later on television by Edwards himself from 1950 to 1951, Jack Bailey from 1954 to 1955... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Loretta Young in 1935 Loretta Young (January 6, 1913 – August 12, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Letters to Laugh-In was a daytime game show that aired on NBC from September 29, 1969 to December 26, 1969. ... Hollywoods Talking was a short lived American Game Show produced by Jack Barry and Dan Enright and ran from March 26th, 1973 to June 22nd, 1973 on CBS. It was hosted by famed The New Treasure Hunt host Geoff Edwards. ... Tattletales was a game show which first aired on the CBS daytime schedule on February 18, 1974. ... This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ... For other uses, see All in the Family (disambiguation). ... Tattletales was a game show which first aired on the CBS daytime schedule on February 18, 1974. ... For other uses, see All in the Family (disambiguation). ... This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ... Tattletales was a game show which first aired on the CBS daytime schedule on February 18, 1974. ... Tattletales was a game show which first aired on the CBS daytime schedule on February 18, 1974. ... Love of Life was an American soap opera which aired on CBS from September 24, 1951 to February 1, 1980. ... The title Perfect Strangers has been used by many artists over the years. ...

External links

For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cabinet Magazine Online - The Match Game (1785 words)
Matches that were knocked down were “wounded” and given a stripe.
The lower part of the match was for fl wound stripes.
Fresh matches were introduced to replace those killed, and the wounded were returned to duty in every new game.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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