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Encyclopedia > Mast (sailing)
mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast
Grand Turk

The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. Larger ships have several masts, with the size and configuration depending on the style of ship. Download high resolution version (960x1280, 537 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (960x1280, 537 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Grand Turk, at anchor in Oostende, Belgium The Grand Turk is a three-masted 6th rate frigate, well known as the from the TV series Hornblower (and also as the French ship Papillon). ... A sail is a surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind; basically it is a vertically oriented wing. ...


Until the 20th century, a ship's masts would be wooden spars, originally constructed from a single straight tree trunk. As ship sizes increased, taller masts were constructed by lashing up to three spars together. This article is about the convenience store. ...


A ship's masts are named from bow to stern (front to back): A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ...

  • Fore-mast - the first mast, or the mast fore of the main-mast.
    • Sections: Fore-mast lower — Fore topmast — Fore topgallant mast
 
  • Main-mast - the tallest mast, usually located near the centre of the ship.
    • Sections: Main-mast lower — Main topmast — Main topgallant mast
 
  • Mizzen-mast - the third mast, or the mast immediately aft of the main-mast. Typically shorter than the fore-mast.
    • Sections: Mizzen-mast lower — Mizzen topmast — Mizzen topgallant mast
 
  • Jigger-mast - the fourth mast, although ships with four or more masts were uncommon, or the aftmost mast where it is smallest on vessels of less than four masts.
    • Sections: Jigger-mast lower — Jigger topmast — Jigger topgallant mast
 

Mast names for other vessels generally follow this naming.


Many ships would also have bowsprit at an angle closer to the horizontal extending forward of the prow. Bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, showing the dolphin striker, the use of chain for the bobstays, and three furled jibs. ...

Main topgallant mast of Balclutha
Main topgallant mast of Balclutha

Most types of ship with two masts would have a main-mast and a smaller mizzen-mast, the exception being the two masted schooner which has a fore-mast and main-mast. On a two-masted vessel with the mainmast forward and a much smaller second mast, such as a ketch, or particularly a yawl, the terms mizzen and jigger are synonymous. Download high resolution version (1100x1147, 116 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1100x1147, 116 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Balclutha at her mooring Balclutha is a steel-hulled squared rigged sailing ship, built in 1886. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner is a type of sailing ship characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... A yawl is a two-masted sailing craft similar to a sloop or cutter but with an additional mizzen mast well aft of the main mast, often right on the transom. ...


Some two-masted schooners have masts of identical size, but the aftmost is still referred to as the main-mast, and normally has the larger course. Schooners have been built with up to seven masts in all, with several six-masted examples. In sailing, a course sail is the principal sail on a mast. ...


On square rigged vessels, each mast carries several horizontal yardarms from which the individual sails are hung, see also rigging. Square rig is a generic type of sailing vessel in which the main horizontal spars are perpendicular to the keel of the ship. ... A yardarm (often shortened to just yard) is a horizontal spar on a mast from which square sails are rigged. ... A sail is a surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind; basically it is a vertically oriented wing. ... This article is about the rigging of ships, and is based on the detailed article in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, now in the public domain. ...


Modern masts

Although sailing ships had been superseded by engine powered ships in the 19th century, recreational sailing ships and yachts continue to be designed and constructed. In the 1930s aluminium masts were introduced on large J-class yachts. Aluminium has considerable advantages over wooden masts, being lighter, stronger and impervious to rot. Also aluminium mast could be extruded as a single piece for the entire height as the mast. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events and trends The 1930s were spent struggling for a solution to the global depression. ... During the 1930s J-class yachts were built to race in the Americas Cup. ...


After the Second World War, extruded aluminium masts became common on all dinghies and smaller yachts. Higher performance yachts would use tapered aluminium masts, constructed by removing a triangular strip of aluminium along the length of the mast and then closing and welding the gap. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ...


From the mid 1990s racing yachts introduced the use of carbon fibre and other composite materials to construct masts with even better strength to weight ratios. Carbon fibre masts could also be constructed with more precisely engineered aerodynamic profiles. // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... Carbon fiber composite is a strong, light and very expensive material. ... Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineering materials made from two or more components. ...


See also


A sail is a surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind; basically it is a vertically oriented wing. ... This article is about the convenience store. ... This article is about the rigging of ships, and is based on the detailed article in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, now in the public domain. ... In sailing, a course sail is the principal sail on a mast. ... A driver is a kind of sail used on some sailboats. ... In sailing, an extra is a sail that is not part of the working sail plan. ... A genoa (pronounced like the city, or as jenny) is a type of large jib-sail used on bermuda rigged craft, commonly the single-masted sloop and twin-masted yawl, less frequently on a ketch. ... A gennaker is a downwind sail that can be described as a cross between a genoa and a spinnaker. ... See also: Jib (television) A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ... A lateen (from Latin) is a triangular sail set on a long yard mounted at an angle on the mast, and running in a fore-and-aft direction. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... A spanker is either of two kinds of sail. ... A spinnaker is a special type of sail that is designed specifically for sailing downwind (with the wind behind the boat). ... A staysail is a fore-and-aft rigged sail whose luff is affixed to a stay running forward (and most often but not always downwards) from a mast to the deck, the bowsprit or to another mast. ... USS Monongahela with a full set of studding sails set A studding sail or studsail is a sail used to increase the sail area of a square rigged vessel in light winds. ... A spanker is either of two kinds of sail. ... On a square rigged sailing vessel, a topgallant sail is the square-rigged sail or sails immediately above the topsail or topsails. ... A topsail is a sail set above another sail; on square-rigged vessels further sails may be set above topsails. ... A small fore-and-aft sail hoisted abaft the foremast and mainmast in a storm to keep a ships bow to the wind. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... diagram showing the names of the parts of a sail The lower edge of a triangular sail is called the foot of the sail, while the upper point is known as the head. ... The term plastics covers a range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic condensation or polymerization products that can be molded or extruded into objects or films or fibers. ... Kevlar, also known as super steel crapTwaron and poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide, is a synthetic fibre that is five times stronger than steel, weight for weight. ... The boom is a spar usually made of aluminum or wood which provides support to the foot of the mainsail. ... Bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, showing the dolphin striker, the use of chain for the bobstays, and three furled jibs. ... In sailing, a gaff is the upper spar used to control a fore-and-aft sail set aft of the mast, such as a mainsail. ... The word truck is used in various different ways in different varieties of English. ... A spinnaker pole is a spar used in sailboats (both dinghys and yachts) to help support and control a variety of headsails, particularly the spinnaker. ... The fore royal yard on the Prince William. ... On a sailing vessel, a backstay is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling forewards. ... In sailing, a block is a pulley or a number of pulleys enclosed in sheaves so as to be fixed to the end of a line or to a spar or surface. ... A boom vang is an item of rigging in a sail-powered vessel (usually small ones, but it is sometimes found on larger ones as well). ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... This article is about the sailing term. ... The downhaul is a line (or rope) which is part of the rigging on a sailboat; it applies downward force on a spar or sail. ... On a sailing vessel, a forestay is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling backwards. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub ... A guy is a term for a line (rope) attached to and intended to control the end of a spar on a sailboat. ... In sailing, a halyard is a line (rope) that is used to hoist (pull up) a sail or a yard to which a sail has been attached (bent on). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Anatomy In anatomy, the throat is the part of the neck anterior to the vertebral column. ... One of the most dangerous things that can happen on a sailing boat, apart from falling overboard, is for someone to get caught up in the uncontrolled gybe of a sail. ... Running rigging is the term for the rigging of a sailing vessel that is used for raising, lowering and controlling the sails - as opposed to the standing rigging, which supports the mast and other spars. ... On a sailing boat, the standing rigging is that collection of lines which are fixed. ... In sailing, a sheet is a line attached to the clew of a sail, and is the main control used in trimming the sail. ... On a sailboat, the shrouds are pieces of standing rigging which hold the mast up from side to side. ... On a sailing ship, stay mouse refers to the bulge in a part of the standing rigging called a stay. ... Stays are the heavy ropes on sailing vessels that run from the masts to the hull. ... Anatomy In anatomy, the throat is the part of the neck anterior to the vertebral column. ... Traditional wooden cutter beating. ... This article is about the rigging of ships, and is based on the detailed article in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, now in the public domain. ... A sail-plan is a formal set of drawings, usually prepared by a marine architect. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
SAILING OUTRIGGER FOR SMALL WATERCRAFT - Patent 3777690 (1520 words)
A sailing outrigger as set forth in claim 1 including a rudder operable from the watercraft but carried by said float, whereby the watercraft is stabilized and rigged for sailing without loss of onboard space and accommodations.
The sail is hoisted by means of the halyard 65 and controlled by the mainsheet 67 which has one end fastened to the after end of the raised plank 69.
The shape and size of the sailing outrigger and its location, beamwise and lengthwise, in relation to the watercraft are important among the several factors that determine the overall performance and stability achieved.
Revisiting a Mast-Aft Sailing Rig (2259 words)
Fore to aft sails must be retained for their windward ability, and the single-masted rig would be preferred for its simplicity.
A staysail was then rigged between the masts in place of the mainsail, and the boat regained 1 knot of speed while retaining its decreased leeway.
It's sail area would have to be even larger to match our rig's effective sail area, when you factor in the inefficiency of the sloop's mainsail.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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