FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) is the highest court in the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The SJC has the distinction of being the oldest continuously functioning appellate court in the Western Hemisphere. The court has traditionally issued highly controversial rulings during its existence. A court is an official, public forum which a sovereign establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... // Definition and linguistics The original phrase common wealth or the common weal is a calque translation of the Latin term res publica (public matters), from which the word republic comes, which was itself used as a synonym for the greek politeia as well as for the republican (i. ... State nickname: Bay State Official languages English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators Edward Kennedy (D), John Kerry (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 25. ... The Geographical Western Hemisphere of Earth highlighted in yellow. ...

Contents


History

The court was established in 1692, as the "Superior Court of Judicature". It is the oldest appellate court in continuous existence in the Western Hemisphere. Its name was changed to the Supreme Judicial Court after the adoption of the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780. The SJC operates under the oldest, still functioning written constitution in the world. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. served on the Supreme Judicial Court prior to serving on the United States Supreme Court. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... The Geographical Western Hemisphere of Earth highlighted in yellow. ... The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the fundamental governing document of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...


Composition

The Court consists of a Chief Justice and six Associate Justices appointed by the Governor of Massachusetts with the consent of the Executive Council. The Justices hold office until the mandatory retirement age of seventy, like all other Massachusetts judges. In many countries, especially common law countries such as Canada and the United States the Chief Justice is the name for the presiding officer on a senior court such as the United States Supreme Court, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme Court of... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Retirement is the status of a worker who has stopped working. ...


The currently serving justices are:

  • Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall
  • Justice John M. Greaney
  • Justice Roderick L. Ireland
  • Justice Francis X. Spina
  • Justice Judith A. Cowin
  • Justice Martha B. Sosman
  • Justice Robert J. Cordy

Margaret H. Marshall is Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. ...

Functions

The seven Justices hear appeals on a broad range of criminal and civil cases between the months of September and May. An appeal is the act or fact of challenging a judicially cognizable and binding judgment to a higher judicial authority. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that punishes criminals for committing offences against the state. ... Civil law has at least three meanings. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... This article is about the month of May. ...


Single Justice sessions are held each week throughout the year for certain motions pertaining to cases on trial or on appeal, bail reviews, bar discipline proceedings, petitions for admission to the bar, and a variety of other statutory proceedings. The Associate Justices sit as Single Justices each month on a rotation schedule.


The full bench renders approximately 200 written decisions each year; the single justices decide a total of approximately 600 cases annually.


In addition to its appellate functions, the SJC is responsible for the general superintendence of the judiciary and of the bar, the creation or approval of rules for the operations of all the state courts, and in certain instances, providing advisory opinions, upon request, to the Governor and General Court on various legal issues. A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... The Massachusetts General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ...


The SJC also has oversight responsibility in varying degrees, according to statutes, with several affiliated agencies of the judicial branch, including the Board of Bar Overseers, the Board of Bar Examiners, the Clients' Security Board, the Commission on Judicial Conduct, the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, the Massachusetts Mental Health Legal Advisors’ Committee, and Correctional Legal Services, Inc.


The SJC is currently located at the John Adams Courthouse, 1 Pemberton Sq., Boston, Massachusetts 02108. Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ...


Landmark Cases

  • Commonwealth v. Hunt (1842) - The Court established that trade unions were not necessarily criminal or conspiring organizations if they did not advocate violence or illegal activities in their attempts to gain recognition through striking. This legalized the existence of non-socialist or non-violent trade organizations, though trade unions would continue to be harassed legally through anti-trust suits and injunctions.
  • Commonwealth v. Jennison (1783) - The Court declared slavery unconstitutional in the state of Massachusetts by allowing slaves to sue their masters for freedom.
  • Rex v. Wemms, et al. (1770) - Six soldiers involved in the Boston Massacre were found not guilty, and two more — the only two proven to have fired — were found guilty of manslaughter.
  • Rex v. Preston (1770) - Captain Thomas Preston, the Officer of the Day during the Boston Massacre, was acquitted when the jury was unable to determine whether he had ordered the troops to fire. The defense counsel in the case was a young attorney named John Adams, later the second President of the United States.

Holding The denial of marriage licenses to same-sex couples violated provisions of the state constitution guaranteeing individual liberty and equality, and was not rationally related to a legitimate state interest. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... Memoirs v. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Professor John Cleland is a consultant researcher from Hull who specialises in cardiology. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Fanny Hill Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, also known as Fanny Hill is a novel by John Cleland. ... Obscenity has several connotations. ... Roberts v. ... Separate but equal was a policy enacted into law throughout the U.S. Southern states during the period of segregation, in which African Americans and Americans of European descent would receive the same services (schools, hospitals, water fountains, bathrooms, etc. ... Holding The separate but equal provision of public accommodations by state governments is constitutional under the Equal Protection Clause. ... This article or section should be merged with board of education A school board (or school committee) is an elected council that helps determine educational policy in a small regional area, such as a city, state, or province. ... Commonwealth v. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... The color red and particularly the red flag are traditional symbols of Socialism. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence) is a set of assumptions about morality, power and conflict that leads its proponents to reject the use of violence in efforts to attain social or political goals. ... Media:Example. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into constitutionality. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... Engraving by Paul Revere The Boston Massacre was an event that occurred on Monday, March 5, 1770 and helped eventually spark the American Revolution. ... Engraving by Paul Revere The Boston Massacre was an event that occurred on Monday, March 5, 1770 and helped eventually spark the American Revolution. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the American head of state and the chief executive of the federal government. ...

External links

  • Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts
  • List of Chief Justices of the Supreme Judicial Court

Resources


  Results from FactBites:
 
Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court - definition of Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in Encyclopedia (579 words)
The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court is the highest court in the United States commonwealth of Massachusetts.
The court was established in 1692 as the "Superior Court of Judicature".
The Court consists of a Chief Justice and six Associate Justices appointed by the Governor of Massachusetts with the consent of the Executive Council.
Encyclopedia: Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (466 words)
Second, Massachusetts marriage laws do not condition receipt of public and private financial benefits to married individuals on a demonstration of financial dependence on each other; the benefits are available to married couples regardless of whether they mingle their finances or actually depend on each other for support.
The “choice” to which the Supreme Court referred was the “choice to marry,” and it concluded that with respect to the institution of marriage, the State had no compelling interest in limiting the choice to marry along racial lines.
Supreme Court cases that have described marriage or the right to marry as "fundamental" have focused primarily on the underlying interest of every individual in procreation, which, historically, could only legally occur within the construct of marriage because sexual intercourse outside of marriage was a criminal act.4 In Skinner v.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m