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Encyclopedia > Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT is a three-letter acronym that can mean: Manipal Institute of Technology, an engineering college in Manipal, Karnataka, India Massachusetts Institute of Technology Maharashtra Institute of Technology Madras Institute of Technology Mapua Institute of Technology methylisothiazolinone, a preservative Murder Investigation Team, a British television program which is a spin...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto "Mens et Manus" (Latin for "Mind and Hand")
Established 1861 (opened 1865)
Type Private
Academic term 4-1-4
Endowment US $9.98 billion [2]
Chancellor Phillip Clay
President Susan Hockfield
Provost L. Rafael Reif
Faculty 998
Undergraduates 4,127
Postgraduates 6,126
Location Cambridge, Mass., USA
Campus Urban, 168 acres (0.7 km²)
Athletics Division III
41 varsity teams
Colors Cardinal Red and Gray           
Mascot Beaver
Nobel laureates 63[1]
Website web.mit.edu

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. MIT has five schools and one college, containing 32 academic departments,[3] with a strong emphasis on scientific and technological research. MIT is one of two private land-grant universities as well as a sea-grant and space-grant university. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Susan Hockfield, a molecular neurobiologist, became the first woman President of MIT on December 6, 2004 Susan Hockfield was announced as MIT’s sixteenth president on August 26, 2004. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... L. Rafael Reif is a professor of Electrical Engineering and the current Provost of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... Gray or grey is a color seen commonly in nature. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links MIT_logo. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ...


MIT was founded by William Barton Rogers in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States. Although based upon German and French polytechnic models of an institute of technology, MIT's founding philosophy of "learning by doing" made it an early pioneer in the use of laboratory instruction,[4] undergraduate research, and progressive architectural styles. As a federally funded research and development center during World War II, MIT scientists developed defense-related technologies that would later become integral to computers, radar, and inertial guidance. After the war, MIT's reputation expanded beyond its core competencies in science and engineering into the social sciences including economics, linguistics, political science, and management. MIT's endowment and annual research expenditures are among the largest of any American university.[5] William Barton Rogers (1804-1882) is best known for incorporating the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1861. ... Apollo 11 launch. ... Institute of Technology is also the name of a vocational school in California. ... Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs) conduct research for the United States Government. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Whirlwind computer was developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... An inertial navigation system measures the position and altitude of a vehicle by measuring the accelerations and rotations applied to the systems inertial frame. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... For other uses, see Management (disambiguation). ...


MIT graduates and faculty are noted for their technical acumen (63 Nobel Laureates, 47 National Medal of Science recipients, and 29 MacArthur Fellows),[6][7] entrepreneurial spirit (a 1997 report claimed that the aggregated revenues of companies founded by MIT affiliates would make it the twenty-fourth largest economy in the world),[8] and irreverence (the popular practice of constructing elaborate pranks, or hacking, often has anti-authoritarian overtones). The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... An MIT hack is defined as a clever, benign, and ethical prank or practical joke at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of MIT

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology was founded in 1861 and has played pivotal roles in the many scientific and technological developments since then. ...

Initial years and vision

MIT's Great Dome and Killian Court.
...a school of industrial science [aiding] the advancement, development and practical application of science in connection with arts, agriculture, manufactures, and commerce.[9]

—Act to Incorporate the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Acts of 1861, Chapter 183 Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (828x680, 80 KB) Killian Court and the Great Dome. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (828x680, 80 KB) Killian Court and the Great Dome. ...

In 1861, The Commonwealth of Massachusetts approved a charter for the incorporation of the "Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston Society of Natural History" submitted by William Barton Rogers. Rogers sought to establish a new form of higher education to address the challenges posed by rapid advances in science and technology during the mid-19th century with which classic institutions were ill-prepared to deal.[10] The Rogers Plan, as it came to be known, was rooted in three principles: the educational value of useful knowledge, the necessity of “learning by doing,” and integrating a professional and liberal arts education at the undergraduate level.[11][12] William Barton Rogers (1804-1882) is best known for incorporating the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1861. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ...


Because open conflict in the Civil War broke out only a few months later, MIT's first classes were held in rented space at the Mercantile Building in downtown Boston in 1865.[13] Construction of the first MIT buildings was completed in Boston's Back Bay in 1866 and MIT would be known as "Boston Tech." During the next half-century, the focus of the science and engineering curriculum drifted towards vocational concerns instead of theoretical programs. Charles William Eliot, the president of Harvard University, repeatedly attempted to merge MIT with Harvard's Lawrence Scientific School over his 30-year tenure: overtures were made as early as 1869[14] with other proposals in 1900 and 1914 ultimately being defeated.[15][16][17][18] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Aerial view of Back Bay, Boston including the Charles River, Prudential Center and John Hancock Tower Back Bay is an officially recognized neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Prof. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Expansion

A plaque of George Eastman, founder of Kodak, in Building 6. His nose is rubbed by students for good luck.
A plaque of George Eastman, founder of Kodak, in Building 6. His nose is rubbed by students for good luck.

The attempted mergers occurred in parallel with MIT's continued expansion beyond the classroom and laboratory space permitted by its Boston campus. President Richard Maclaurin sought to move the campus to a new location when he took office in 1909.[19] An anonymous donor, later revealed to be George Eastman, donated the funds to build a new campus along a mile-long tract of swamp and industrial land on the Cambridge side of the Charles River. In 1916, MIT moved into its handsome new neoclassical campus designed by the noted architect William W. Bosworth which it occupies to this date. The new campus triggered some changes in the stagnating undergraduate curriculum, but in the 1930s President Karl Taylor Compton and Vice-President (effectively Provost) Vannevar Bush drastically reformed the curriculum by re-emphasizing the importance of "pure" sciences like physics and chemistry and reducing the work required in shops and drafting. Despite the difficulties of the Great Depression, the reforms "renewed confidence in the ability of the Institute to develop leadership in science as well as in engineering."[20] The expansion and reforms thus cemented MIT's academic reputation on the eve of World War II by attracting scientists and researchers who would later make significant contributions in the Radiation Laboratory, Instrumentation Laboratory, and other defense-related research programs. Plaque of George Eastman at MIT Photograph taken by Jackson Frakes. ... Plaque of George Eastman at MIT Photograph taken by Jackson Frakes. ... A 1954 U.S. stamp featuring George Eastman. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ... Richard Cockburn Maclaurin (1870 - 1920), was a U.S. educator and physicist. ... A 1954 U.S. stamp featuring George Eastman. ... The neoclassical movement that produced Neoclassical architecture began in the mid-18th century, both as a reaction against the Rococo style of anti-tectonic naturalistic ornament, and an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Karl Taylor Compton (1887-1954) was a prominent American physicist and president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (1930-1948). ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 30, 1974) was an American engineer and science administrator, known for his political role in the development of the atomic bomb, and the idea of the memex—seen as a pioneering concept for the World Wide Web. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Radiation Laboratory or often RadLab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology was in operation from October 1940 until December 31, 1945. ... The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. ...


MIT was drastically changed by its involvement in military research during World War II. Bush was appointed head of the enormous Office of Scientific Research and Development and directed funding to only a select group of universities, including MIT.[21][22] During the war and in the post-war years, this government-sponsored research contributed to a fantastic growth in the size of the Institute's research staff and physical plant as well as placing an increased emphasis on graduate education.[23] In June of 1941, the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) superseded the committee structure [of the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC)]. The OSRD projects gave the United States and Allied troops more powerful and more accurate bombs, more reliable detonators, lighter and more accurate weapons, safer and more... Research funding is a term generally covering any funding for scientific research, in the areas of both hard science and technology, and social science. ...


As the Cold War and Space Race intensified and concerns about the technology gap between the U.S. and the Soviet Union grew more pervasive throughout the 1950s and 1960s, MIT's involvement in the military-industrial complex was a source of pride on campus.[24][25] However, by the late 1960s and early 1970s, intense protests by student and faculty activists (an era now known as "the troubles")[26] against the Vietnam War and MIT's defense research required that the MIT administration to divest itself from what would become the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory and move all classified research off-campus to the Lincoln Laboratory facility. Sputnik 1 The Sputnik crisis was a turn point of the Cold War that began on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet Union launched the Sputnik 1 satellite. ... President Dwight Eisenhower famously referred to the military-industrial complex in his farewell address. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The military funding of science has had a powerful transformative effect on the practice and products of scientific research since the early 20th century. ... The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. ... MIT Lincoln Laboratory, also known as Lincoln Lab, is a federally funded research and development center managed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and funded by the United States Department of Defense. ...


Challenges and controversies

Ellen Swallow Richards, first female student and professor at MIT.
Ellen Swallow Richards, first female student and professor at MIT.

MIT has been nominally coeducational since admitting Ellen Swallow Richards in 1870. (Richards also became the first female member of MIT's faculty, specializing in sanitary chemistry.)[27] Female students, however, remained a tiny minority (numbered in dozens) prior to the completion of the first wing of a women's dormitory, McCormick Hall, in 1963.[28][29] By 1993, 32% of MIT's undergraduates were female and in 2006, the number had increased to near-parity (47.5%).[30] Image File history File links Ellen_S_Richards. ... Image File history File links Ellen_S_Richards. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Ellen Swallow Richards (December 3, 1842 — March 30, 1911) was the foremost female industrial and environmental chemist in the United States in the 1800s, pioneering the field of sanitary engineering and founding the field of home economics. ... Environmental health is the branch of public health that is concerned with all aspects of the natural and built environment that may affect human health. ... Katharine Dexter McCormick (August 27, 1875 – December 28, 1967) was a U.S. biologist, suffragette, philanthropist and, after her husbands death, heir to a substantial part of the McCormick fortune. ...


In 1998, MIT became the first major research university to acknowledge the existence of a systematic bias against female faculty in its School of Science and supported efforts toward corrective measures although the study's methods were controversial.[31][32] A 2003 MIT news release cites various statistics suggesting that the status of women improved during the latter years of President Vest's tenure.[33] Susan Hockfield, a molecular neurobiologist, became MIT's 16th president on December 6, 2004 and is the first woman to hold the post. While the student body has become more balanced in recent years, women are still a distinct minority among faculty. A systemic bias is a bias which is endemic in a system – especially a human system – making it tend to err consistently in a certain direction. ... Susan Hockfield, a molecular neurobiologist, became the first woman President of MIT on December 6, 2004 Susan Hockfield was announced as MIT’s sixteenth president on August 26, 2004. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ...


The 1984 dismissal of David F. Noble, a historian of technology, became a cause celebre about the extent to which academics are granted "freedom of speech" after he published several books and papers critical of MIT's and other research universities' reliance upon financial support from corporations and the military.[34] David F. Noble is a critical historian of technology, science and education. ... Cause c bre is a French phrase, literally meaning famous case, referring to events, frequently famous legal cases, that attract public attention and controversy. ... This article is about the general concept. ...


In 1986, Professor David Baltimore, a Nobel Laureate, became embroiled in an investigation of research misconduct that led to Congressional hearings in 1991. David Baltimore (b. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Scientific misconduct is the violation of the standard codes of scholarly conduct and ethical behavior in professional scientific research. ...


In the late 1980s and early 1990s, many American politicians and business leaders accused MIT and other universities of contributing to a declining economy by transferring taxpayer-funded research and technology to international — especially Japanese — firms that were competing with struggling American businesses.[35] The Scapegoat by William Holman Hunt, 1854. ... The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was an economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ... Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ... // [edit] Introduction [edit] Definition If we were to take snapshots of an economy at different points in time, no two photos would look alike. ...


In 1991, the Justice Department filed an antitrust suit against MIT and the eight Ivy League colleges for holding "Overlap Meetings" to prevent bidding wars over promising students from consuming funds for need-based scholarships. While the Ivy League institutions settled, MIT contested the charges on the grounds that the practice was not anticompetitive because it ensured the availability of aid for the greatest number of students. MIT ultimately prevailed when the Justice Department dropped the case in 1994.[36] The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... John Sherman The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act[1], July 2, 1890, ch. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... DECREE - The judgment or sentence of a court of equity which corresponds to the judgment of a court of law. ...


In 2000, Professor Ted Postol accused the MIT administration of attempting to whitewash potential research misconduct at the Lincoln Lab facility involving a ballistic missile defense test, though a final investigation into the matter has not been completed. Theodore Postol is a Professor of Science, Technology, and International Security at MIT and a prominent critic of the effectiveness of missile defense. ... This article is for the meaning of censorship. ... A payload launch vehicle carrying a prototype exoatmospheric kill vehicle is launched from Meck Island at the Kwajalein Missile Range on Dec. ...


In the late 1990s and early 2000s, a number of student deaths resulted in considerable media attention to MIT's culture and student life.[37] After the alcohol-related death of Scott Krueger in September 1997 as a new member at the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, MIT began requiring all freshmen to live in the dormitory system.[38] The 2000 suicide of MIT undergraduate Elizabeth Shin drew attention to suicides at MIT and created a controversy over whether MIT had an unusually high suicide rate.[39][40] In late 2001 a task force's recommended improvements in student mental health services[41] were implemented, including expanding staff and operating hours at the mental health center.[42] These and later cases were significant as well because they sought to prove the negligence and liability of university administrators in loco parentis.[43] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Elizabeth Shin (1980 - April 14, 2000) was an MIT student who died from burns inflicted by a fire in her dormitory room. ... Mental health is a term used to describe either a level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing or an absence of mental illness. ... The term in loco parentis, Latin for in the place of a parent, refers to the legal responsibility of a person or organization to take on some of the functions and responsibilities of a parent. ...


In April 2007, Dean of Admissions Marilee Jones resigned after she "misrepresented her academic degrees" when she applied to an administrative assistant position in 1979 and never corrected the record despite her subsequent promotions.[44][45] Marilee Jones (born June 12, 1951) is a former dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the co-author of the popular guide to the college admission process, Less Stress, More Success: A New Approach to Guiding Your Teen Through College Admissions and Beyond (American Academy...


Organization

See also: List of Massachusetts Institute of Technology departments and laboratories

MIT is "a university polarized around science, engineering, and the arts."[46] MIT has five schools (Science, Engineering, Architecture and Planning, Management, and Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences) and one college (Whitaker College of Health Sciences and Technology), but no schools of law or medicine.[47] This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology departments and laboratories covers the universitys diverse and interdisciplinary research interest. ... It has been suggested that MIT Biology Department, MIT Chemistry Department, MIT Mathematics Department, MIT Physics Department, Center for Theoretical Physics, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems and Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that MIT Design Advisor, MIT at Lawrence and West Philadelphia Landscape Project be merged into this article or section. ... The MIT Sloan School of Management is one of the five schools of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. It is one of the worlds leading business schools, conducting research and teaching in finance, entrepreneurship, marketing, strategic management, economics, organizational behavior, operations management, supply chain... It has been suggested that MIT Economics Department be merged into this article or section. ... Founded in 1970, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, or HST, is one of the oldest and largest biomedical engineering and physician-scientist training programs in the United States and the longest-standing functional collaboration between Harvard and MIT. [[ |frame|HST]] HSTs unique interdisciplinary educational program...


MIT is governed by a 78-member board of trustees known as the MIT Corporation[48] which approve the budget, degrees, and faculty appointments as well as electing the President.[49] MIT's endowment and other financial assets are managed through a subsidiary MIT Investment Management Company (MITIMCo).[50] The chair of each of MIT's 32 academic departments reports to the dean of that department's school, who in turn reports to the Provost under the President. However, faculty committees assert substantial control over many areas of MIT's curriculum, research, student life, and administrative affairs.[51] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


MIT students refer to both their majors and classes using numbers alone. Majors are numbered in the approximate order of when the department was founded; for example, Civil and Environmental Engineering is Course I, while Nuclear Science & Engineering is Course XXII.[52] Students majoring in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, the most popular department, collectively identify themselves as "Course VI." MIT students use a combination of the department's course number and the number assigned to the class number to identify their subjects; the course which many American universities would designate as "Physics 101" is, at MIT, simply "8.01."[53]


Campus

MIT's 168 acre (0.7 km²) Cambridge campus spans approximately a mile of the Charles River front. The campus is divided roughly in half by Massachusetts Avenue, with most dormitories and student life facilities to the west and most academic buildings to the east. The bridge closest to MIT is the Harvard Bridge, which is marked off in the fanciful unit – the Smoot. The Kendall MBTA Red Line station is located on the far northeastern edge of the campus in Kendall Square. The Cambridge neighborhoods surrounding MIT are a mixture of high tech companies occupying both modern office and rehabilitated industrial buildings as well as socio-economically diverse residential neighborhoods. The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... Massachusetts Avenue is the name shared by several prominent streets in the United States, located in Boston, Massachusetts; Washington, D.C.; and Lawrence, Kansas. ... The Harvard Bridge (also known locally as the MIT bridge or the Mass Ave bridge) is the longest bridge over the Charles River. ... The Harvard Bridge, looking towards Boston The smoot is a nonstandard unit of length created as part of an MIT fraternity prank. ... Kendall/MIT Station, Fall 2004 Kendall/MIT Station is located in Kendall Square at the intersection of Broadway and Main Street, in Cambridge. ... Red Line train of #1 Red Line stock crossing the Charles River on the Longfellow Bridge, towards Boston View of Boston from the Red Line The Red Line is a rapid transit line operated by the MBTA running roughly north-south through Boston, Massachusetts into neighboring communities. ... Kendall Square is a neighborhood in Cambridge, Massachusetts, located at the intersection of Main Street, Broadway, Wadsworth Street, and Third Street (known as Kendall Square). It may also refer to the broad business district that is west of Portland Street, east of Charles River, north of MIT and south of...

Northward view of MIT's campus along the Charles River. Undergraduate dormitories MacGregor House, Burton-Connor House, Baker House, and McCormick Hall, as well as graduate dormitory Ashdown House, can be seen to the west of the Harvard Bridge and Massachusetts Avenue. The Maclaurin buildings and Killian Court can be seen at the center of the image. The Green Building, Walker Memorial, Media Lab, and high-rise offices and laboratories in Kendall Square can be seen to the east.

MIT buildings all have a number (or a number and a letter) designation and most have a name as well.[54] Typically, academic and office buildings are referred to only by number while residence halls are referred to by name. The organization of building numbers roughly corresponds to the order in which the buildings were built and their location relative (north, west, and east) to the original, center cluster of Maclaurin buildings. Many are connected above ground as well as through an extensive network of underground tunnels, providing protection from the Cambridge weather. MIT also owns commercial real estate and research facilities throughout Cambridge and the greater Boston area. MIT's on-campus nuclear reactor is the second largest university-based nuclear reactor in the United States. The high visibility of the reactor's containment building in a densely populated area has caused some controversy,[55] but MIT maintains that it is well-secured.[56] Other notable campus facilities include a pressurized wind tunnel, a towing tank for testing ship and ocean structure designs, and a low-emission cogeneration plant that serves most of the campus electricity and heating requirements. MIT's campus-wide wireless network was completed in the fall of 2005 and consists of nearly 3,000 access points covering 9.4 million square feet of campus.[57] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 133 pixel Image in higher resolution (2475 × 412 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 133 pixel Image in higher resolution (2475 × 412 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... The Harvard Bridge (also known locally as the MIT bridge or the Mass Ave bridge) is the longest bridge over the Charles River. ... Massachusetts Avenue is the name shared by several prominent streets in the United States, located in Boston, Massachusetts; Washington, D.C.; and Lawrence, Kansas. ... Kendall Square is a neighborhood in Cambridge, Massachusetts, located at the intersection of Main Street, Broadway, Wadsworth Street, and Third Street (known as Kendall Square). It may also refer to the broad business district that is west of Portland Street, east of Charles River, north of MIT and south of... The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is currently on the MITR-II design. ... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... NASA wind tunnel with the model of a plane A wind tunnel is a research tool developed to assist with studying the effects of air moving over or around solid objects. ... A ship model basin may be defined as one of two separate yet related entities, namely: a physical basin or tank used to carry out hydrodynamic tests with ship models, for the purpose of designing a new (full sized) ship, or refining the design of a ship to improve the... Cogeneration (also combined heat and power, CHP) is the use of a heat engine or a power station to simultaneously generate both electricity and useful heat. ...

Architecture

The Stata Center houses CSAIL, LIDS, and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
The Stata Center houses CSAIL, LIDS, and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
Frieze on Building 2 dedicated to Newton
Frieze on Building 2 dedicated to Newton

As MIT's school of architecture was the first in the United States,[58] it has a history of commissioning progressive, if stylistically inconsistent, buildings.[59] The first buildings constructed on the Cambridge campus, completed in 1916, are known officially as the Maclaurin buildings after Institute president Richard Maclaurin who oversaw their construction. Designed by William Welles Bosworth, these imposing buildings were built of concrete, a first for a non-industrial — much less university — building in the U.S.[60] The utopian City Beautiful movement greatly influenced Bosworth's design which features the Pantheon-esque Great Dome, housing the Barker Engineering Library, which overlooks Killian Court, where annual Commencement exercises are held. The friezes of the limestone-clad buildings around Killian Court are engraved with the names of important scientists and philosophers. The imposing Building 7 atrium along Massachusetts Avenue is regarded as the entrance to the Infinite Corridor and the rest of the campus. Building 7 (77 Massachusetts Ave. ... A photograph of MITs Stata Center. ... A photograph of MITs Stata Center. ... MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, or CSAIL, is an interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, formed on July 1, 2003 by the merger of MIT Laboratory for Computer Science and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. ... This article is about waste matter. ... Newton Tower at MIT Photograph taken by Jackson Frakes. ... Newton Tower at MIT Photograph taken by Jackson Frakes. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Richard Cockburn Maclaurin (1870 - 1920), was a U.S. educator and physicist. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The City Beautiful movement was a Progressive reform movement in North American architecture and urban planning that flourished in the 1890s and 1900s with the intent of using beautification and monumental grandeur in cities to counteract the perceived moral decay of poverty-stricken urban environments. ... Facade of the Pantheon The Pantheon (Latin Pantheon[1], from Greek Πάνθεον Pantheon, meaning Temple of all the gods) is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to the seven deities of the seven planets in the state religion of Ancient Rome. ... Massachusetts Avenue is the name shared by several prominent streets in the United States, located in Boston, Massachusetts; Washington, D.C.; and Lawrence, Kansas. ... The Infinite Corridor is the hallway, 251 meters (825 feet) long, that runs through the main building of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ...


Alvar Aalto's Baker House (1947), Eero Saarinen's Chapel and Auditorium (1955), and I.M. Pei's Green, Dreyfus, Landau, and Weisner buildings represent high forms of post-war modern architecture. More recent buildings like Frank Gehry's Stata Center (2004), Steven Holl's Simmons Hall (2002), and Charles Correa's Building 46 (2005) are distinctive amongst the Boston area's staid architecture[61] and serve as examples of contemporary campus "starchitecture."[59] These buildings have not always been popularly accepted; the Princeton Review includes MIT in a list of twenty schools whose campuses are "tiny, unsightly, or both." [62] “Aalto” redirects here. ... Saarinens Gateway Arch frames The Old Courthouse, which sits at the heart of the city of Saint Louis, near the rivers edge. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... Frank Owen Gehry (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... Stata Center Building 32 at Night View from a window The Ray and Maria Stata Center is a 430,000-ft² (40,000 m²) academic complex designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Steven Holls design for Simmons Hall of MIT won the Harleston Parker Medal in 2004. ... Simmons Hall. ... Charles Correa (born in Hyderabad, India on September 1, 1930) is an Indian architect, planner, activist, theoretician and a fundamental figure in the world-wide panorama of contemporary architecture. ...


Academics

Student demographics

Minority representation in MIT student body[63][64]
Undergraduate Graduate U.S. Census[65]
African-American 6.3% 1.8% 12.1%
Asian-American 26.4% 11.7% 4.3%
Hispanic-American 11.6% 2.9% 14.5%
Native American 1.3% 0.3% 0.9%
International student 9.2% 39.3% (N/A)

MIT enrolls more graduate students (approximately 6,000 in total) than undergraduates (approximately 4,000). In 2006, women constituted 44 percent of all undergraduates and 30 percent of graduate students. The same year, MIT students represented all 50 states, the District of Columbia, three U.S. Territories, and 113 foreign countries. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... An Asian American is generally defined as a person of Asian ancestry and American citizenship,[2][3][4] although may also be extended to include non-citizen resident Asians as well. ... Hispanics in the United States, or Hispanic Americans, are American citizens or residents of Hispanic ethnicity who identify themselves as having Hispanic Cultural heritage. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... International students are students, usually in early adulthood, who study in foreign schools. ... ... An incorporated territory of the United States is a specific area under the jurisdiction of the United States, over which the United States Congress has determined that the United States Constitution is to be applied to the territorys local government and inhabitants in its entirety (e. ...


The admissions rate for freshmen in 2007 was 11.9% with over 69% of admitted freshmen choosing to enroll. Although graduate admissions are less centralized, they are similarly selective: 19.7% of 16,153 applications were admitted with 61.2% of admitted candidates enrolling.[66]


Undergraduate tuition is $33,400 and graduate tuition is $33,600 per year although 64% of undergraduates receive need-based financial aid and 87% of graduate students are supported by MIT fellowships, research assistantships, or teaching assistantships.[67][68]


Classes

The Infinite Corridor is the primary passageway through campus.

MIT has an extensive core curriculum required of all undergraduates called the General Institute Requirements (GIRs). The science requirement, generally completed during freshman year as prerequisites for classes in science and engineering majors, comprises two semesters of physics classes covering Classical Mechanics and E&M, two semesters of math covering single variable calculus and multivariable calculus, one semester of chemistry, and one semester of biology. Undergraduates are required to take a laboratory class in their major, eight Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) classes (at least three in a concentration and another four unrelated subjects), and non-varsity athletes must also take four physical education classes. In May 2006, a faculty task force recommended that the current GIR system be simplified with changes to the science, HASS, and Institute Lab requirements.[69] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 281 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Infinite Corridor (http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 281 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Infinite Corridor (http://www. ... The Infinite Corridor is the hallway, 251 meters (825 feet) long, that runs through the main building of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Classical mechanics (also called Newtonian mechanics) is used for describing the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, as well as astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars, and galaxies. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... Calculus (from Latin, pebble or little stone) is a branch of mathematics that includes the study of limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series, and constitutes a major part of modern university education. ... Multivariable calculus is the extension of calculus in one variable to calculus in several variables: the functions which are differentiated and integrated involve several variables rather than one variable. ... The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ...


Although the difficulty of MIT coursework has been characterized as "drinking from a fire hose,"[70] the failure rate and freshmen retention rate at MIT are similar to other large research universities.[71] Some of the pressure for first-year undergraduates is lessened by the existence of the "pass/no-record" grading system. In the first (fall) term, freshmen transcripts only report if a class was passed while no external record exists if a class was not passed. In the second (spring) term, passing grades (ABC) appear on the transcript while non-passing grades are again rendered "no-record."


Most classes rely upon a combination of faculty led lectures, graduate student led recitations, weekly problem sets (p-sets), and tests to teach material, though alternative curricula exist, e.g. Experimental Study Group, Concourse, and Terrascope.[72][73] Over time, students compile "bibles," collections of problem set and examination questions and answers used as references for later students. In 1970, the then-Dean of Institute Relations, Benson R. Snyder, published The Hidden Curriculum, arguing that unwritten regulations, like the implicit curricula of the bibles, are often counterproductive; they fool professors into believing that their teaching is effective and students into believing they have learned the material. The Experimental Study Group (ESG) is a learning community at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Hidden Curriculum (1973 edition) The Hidden Curriculum (1970) is a book by Benson R. Snyder, the then-Dean of Institute Relations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ...


Collaborations

An example of cooperation, "The Coop" is the official bookstore of Harvard and MIT[74]
Building 7 (also 77 Massachusetts Avenue) is regarded as the entrance to campus.
Building 7 (also 77 Massachusetts Avenue) is regarded as the entrance to campus.

MIT historically pioneered research collaborations between industry and government.[75][76] Fruitful collaborations with industrialists like Alfred P. Sloan and Thomas Alva Edison led President Compton to establish an Office of Corporate Relations and an Industrial Liaison Program in the 1930s and 1940s that now allows over 600 companies to license research and consult with MIT faculty and researchers.[77] As several MIT leaders served as Presidential scientific advisers since 1940,[78] MIT established a Washington Office in 1991 to continue to lobby for research funding and national science policy.[79] Harvard MIT Co-op Logo Image Copyright © 1990 by the Harvard-MIT Co-op. ... Harvard MIT Co-op Logo Image Copyright © 1990 by the Harvard-MIT Co-op. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (599 × 900 pixel, file size: 850 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from: [1] by: Paul Moody File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (599 × 900 pixel, file size: 850 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from: [1] by: Paul Moody File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Cover of Time Magazine (December 27, 1926) Alfred Pritchard Sloan, Jr. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 - October 18, 1931) was an inventor and businessman who developed many important devices. ... Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ... Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 30, 1974) was an American engineer and science administrator, known for his political role in the development of the atomic bomb, and the idea of the memex—seen as a pioneering concept for the World Wide Web. ... James Rhyne Killian (1904-1988) was the 10th president of MIT from 1948 until 1959. ... Jerome Wiesner (Jerome Bert Wiesner) (May 30, 1915-October 21, 1994) was an educator, a science advisor to U.S. Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy, an advocate for arms control, and a critic of anti-ballistic-missile defense systems. ... // In 1951 President Harry S. Truman established the Science Advisory Committee as part of the Office of Defence Mobilization (ODM). ... This article is about the political effort. ... Science policy is usually considered the art of justifying, managing or prioritizing support of scientific research and development. ...


MIT's proximity[80] to Harvard University has created both a quasi-friendly rivalry ("the other school up the river") as well as a substantial number of research collaborations such as the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Broad Institute, Center for Ultracold Atoms, and Harvard-MIT Data Center.[81][82] In addition, students at the two schools can cross-register without any additional fees, for credits toward their own school's degrees. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... Founded in 1970, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) is one of the oldest and largest biomedical engineering and physician-scientist training programs in the United States and the longest-standing collaboration between Harvard and MIT. From the beginning, HST pioneered a new way of thinking... The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, formerly the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research (WICGR), is a multidisciplinary institution dedicated to fulfilling the potential of genomics for the biomedical sciences. ... The Center for Ultracold Atoms (CUA) is a collaborative research laboratory between MIT and Harvard University. ... Cross-registration in United States higher education is a system allowing students at one university, college, or faculty within a university to take individual courses for credit at another institution or faculty, typically in the same region. ...


MIT has a long-standing cross-registration program with Wellesley College as well as an undergraduate exchange program with the University of Cambridge known as the Cambridge-MIT Institute.[83] MIT has limited cross-registration programs with Boston University, Brandeis University, Tufts University, Massachusetts College of Art, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.[83] For other uses, see Wellesley College (disambiguation). ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The Cambridge-MIT Institute, or CMI, is a partnership between the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... Usen Castle, the most recognized building on campus Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... MassArt, August 2005 Massachusetts College of Art (also known as MassArt) is a publicly funded college of visual and applied art, founded in 1873. ... The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (also known as the Museum School or SMFA) is an undergraduate and graduate college located in Boston, Massachusetts and is dedicated to the visual arts. ...


MIT maintains substantial research and faculty ties with independent research organizations in the Boston-area like the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution as well as international research and educational collaborations through the Singapore-MIT Alliance, MIT-Zaragoza International Logistics Program,[84] MIT-Portugal program [85] and MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI) program.[86] The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. ... Founded in 1984, the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research is a non-profit research and teaching institution located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is a private, nonprofit research and higher education facility dedicated to the study of all aspects of marine science and engineering and to the education of marine researchers. ... Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) was founded in [1998]] as an initiative to develop research talents who can contribute locally to the economy. ... The building of the Ancient Faculty of Medicine and Sciences in Zaragoza, now called Paraninfo. ...


MIT students, faculty, and staff are involved in over 50 educational outreach and public service programs through the MIT Museum, Edgerton Center,[87] and MIT Public Service Center.[88][89] Summer programs like MITES[90] and the Research Science Institute[91] encourage minority and high school students to pursue science and engineering in college. Project Interphase accelerates incoming freshman whose educational backgrounds did not fully prepare them for MIT coursework.[92] MIT Museum, founded in 1971, is the museum of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Families Tetranychidae - Spider mites Eriophyidae - Gall mites Sarcoptidae - Sarcoptic Mange mites The mites and ticks, order Acarina or Acari, belong to the Arachnida and are among the most diverse and successful of all the invertebrate groups, although some way behind the insects. ...


The mass-market magazine Technology Review is published by MIT through a subsidiary company, as is a special edition that also serves as the Institute's official alumni magazine. The MIT Press is a major university press, publishing over 200 books and 40 journals annually emphasizing science and technology as well as arts, architecture, new media, current events, and social issues.[93] Technology Review is an innovation and technology magazine affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ...


Rankings

Barker Library, inside the Great Dome
Barker Library, inside the Great Dome

In the 2008 US News and World Report (USNWR) rankings of national universities, MIT's undergraduate program was #7.[94] The MIT Sloan School of Management is ranked #2 in the nation at the undergraduate level and #4 among MBA programs by USNWR's 2008 rankings.[95][96] MIT has more top-ranked graduate programs than any other university in the 2008 USNWR survey and the School of Engineering has been ranked first among graduate programs since the magazine first released the results of its survey in 1988.[97][98][99] Barker Library at MIT Photograph taken by Jackson Frakes. ... Barker Library at MIT Photograph taken by Jackson Frakes. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The MIT Sloan School of Management is one of the five schools of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. It is one of the worlds leading business schools, conducting research and teaching in finance, entrepreneurship, marketing, strategic management, economics, organizational behavior, operations management, supply chain...


Among other outlets in the world university rankings, MIT is ranked #1 in the Globe by Webometrics,[100] #4 (tied with Yale) among world universities by the THES - QS World University Rankings,[101][102] in the top tier of national research universities by TheCenter for Measuring University Performance,[103] #5 among world universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University's 2006 Annual Rankings of World Universities,[104] and #1 by The Washington Monthly's rankings of social mobility and national service in 2005 and 2006.[105] The National Research Council, in a 1995 study ranking research universities in the US, ranked MIT #1 in "reputation" and #4 in "citations and faculty awards."[106] The science of webometrics (also cybermetrics, web metrics) tries to measure the Internet to get knowledge about number and types of hyperlinks, structure of the World Wide Web and usage patterns. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Times Higher Education Supplement. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ...


MIT also participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN). Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...


Faculty and research

Kismet (robot) was developed to simulate human emotions.

MIT has 998 faculty members, of whom 188 are women and 165 are minorities.[107] Faculty are responsible for lecturing classes, advising both graduate and undergraduate students, and sitting on academic committees, as well as conducting original research. Many faculty members also have founded companies, serve as scientific advisers, or sit on the Board of Directors for corporations. 25 MIT faculty members have won the Nobel Prize.[108] Among current and former faculty members, there are 51 National Medal of Science and Technology recipients,[7] 80 Guggenheim Fellows, 6 Fulbright Scholars, 29 MacArthur Fellows, and 4 Kyoto Prize winners.[109] Faculty members who have made extraordinary contributions to their research field as well as the MIT community are granted appointments as Institute Professors for the remainder of their tenures. This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... . ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 467 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 598 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from: [1] by: [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 467 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 598 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from: [1] by: [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... Kismet now resides at the MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA Kismet is a robot at MIT with auditory, visual and expressive systems intended to participate in human social interaction and to demonstrate simulated human emotion and appearance. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer (that is, someone who works for the company) charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ... The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... The National Medal of Technology is an honor granted by the President of the United States to inventors and innovators that have made significant contributions to the development of new and important technology. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology the title of Institute Professor is given to a small number of members of the faculty with extraordinary records of achievement. ...


For fiscal year 2006, MIT spent $587.5 million on on-campus research.[110] The federal government was the largest source of sponsored research, with the Department of Health and Human Services granting $180.6 million, Department of Defense $86 million, Department of Energy $69.9 million, National Science Foundation $66.7 million, and NASA $32.1 million.[110] MIT employs approximately 3,500 researchers in addition to faculty. In the 2006 academic year, MIT faculty and researchers disclosed 523 inventions, filed 321 patent applications, received 121 patents, and earned $42.3 million in royalties.[111] The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... This article is about the American space agency. ...


Research accomplishments

Strobe photograph taken by an MIT undergraduate in Edgerton's laboratory

In electronics, magnetic core memory, radar, single electron transistors, and inertial guidance controls were invented or substantially developed by MIT researchers. Harold Eugene Edgerton was a pioneer in high speed photography. Claude E. Shannon developed much of modern information theory and discovered the application of Boolean logic to digital circuit design theory. Shadowgraph of bullet in flight I wanted to put some kind of strobe photograph on the Edgerton page. ... Shadowgraph of bullet in flight I wanted to put some kind of strobe photograph on the Edgerton page. ... A 16×16 cm area core memory plane of 128×128 bits, i. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... In physics, a Coulomb blockade, named after Charles-Augustin de Coulomb, is the increased resistance at small bias voltages of an electronic device comprising at least one low-capacitance tunnel junction. ... An inertial navigation system measures the position and altitude of a vehicle by measuring the accelerations and rotations applied to the systems inertial frame. ... Shadowgraph of a . ... Sequence of a race horse galloping. ... Claude Elwood Shannon (April 30, 1916 - February 24, 2001) has been called the father of information theory, and was the founder of practical digital circuit design theory. ... Not to be confused with information technology, information science, or informatics. ... Digital circuits are electric circuits based on a number of discrete voltage levels. ...

The GNU project and free software movement originated at MIT
The GNU project and free software movement originated at MIT

In the domain of computer science, MIT faculty and researchers made fundamental contributions to cybernetics, artificial intelligence, computer languages, machine learning, robotics, and public-key cryptography. Richard Stallman founded the GNU Project while at the AI lab (now CSAIL). Professors Hal Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman wrote the popular Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs textbook and co-founded the Free Software Foundation with Stallman. Tim Berners-Lee established the W3C at MIT in 1994. David D. Clark made fundamental contributions in developing the Internet. Popular technologies like X Window System, Kerberos, Zephyr, and Hesiod were created for Project Athena in the 1980s. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The GNU logo, drawn by Etienne Suvasa The GNU Project was announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. ... The free software movement, also known as the free software philosophy, began in 1983 when Richard Stallman announced the GNU Project. ... Norbert Wiener Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894, Columbia, Missouri – March 18, 1964, Stockholm Sweden) was an American theoretical and applied mathematician. ... Marvin Lee Minsky (born August 9, 1927), sometimes affectionately known as Old Man Minsky, is an American cognitive scientist in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), co-founder of MITs AI laboratory, and author of several texts on AI and philosophy. ... Joseph Weizenbaum. ... Patrick Henry Winston is a computer scientist. ... Rodney Allen Brooks (b. ... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... Richard Matthew Stallman (born March 16, 1953), often abbreviated rms (lower case),[1] is a software freedom activist, hacker,[2] and software developer. ... The GNU logo, drawn by Etienne Suvasa The GNU Project was announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. ... The MIT Artificial intelligence Laboratory was an interdisciplinary research entity at MIT founded in 1959, and one of the most influential and accomplished in the field. ... The Stata Center houses CSAIL and has very unusual architecture. ... Hal Abelson // Harold (Hal) Abelson is the Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the MIT, and a fellow of the IEEE. He holds an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a Ph. ... // Gerald Jay Sussman is the Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). ... Front cover Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (SICP) is a textbook published in 1985 about general computer programming concepts from MIT press written by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professors Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman, with Julie Sussman. ... The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a non-profit corporation founded in October 1985 by Richard Stallman to support the free software movement (free as in freedom), and in particular the GNU project. ... Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a consortium that produces standards—recommendations, as they call them—for the World Wide Web. ... David D. Clark graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966 and received his Ph. ... “X11” redirects here. ... Kerberos is the name of a computer network authentication protocol, which allows individuals communicating over an insecure network to prove their identity to one another in a secure manner, and also a suite of free software published by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) which implements this protocol. ... Created at MIT, as part of Project Athena, Zephyr was designed as an instant messenger protocol and application-suite with a heavy Unix background. ... In computing, the Hesiod name service originated in Project Athena (1983 - 1991). ... Project Athena was a joint project of MIT, Digital Equipment Corporation, and IBM. It was launched in 1983, and research and development ran through June 30, 1991, eight years after it began. ...


MIT physicists have been instrumental in describing subatomic and quantum phenomena like elementary particles, electroweak force, Bose-Einstein condensates, superconductivity, fractional quantum Hall effect, and asymptotic freedom as well as cosmological phenomena like cosmic inflation. Samuel Chao Chung Ting (丁肇中 pinyin: Dīng Zhàozhōng; Wade-Giles: Ting¹ Chao⁴-chung¹) (born January 27, 1936) is a Michigan-born Chinese American physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 1976 for the discovery of the subatomic J particle with Burton Richter. ... Steven Weinberg (born May 3, 1933) is an American physicist. ... Wolfgang Ketterle (born October 21, 1957, in Heidelberg, Germany) is a German physicist and a professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... BCS theory (named for its creators, Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer) successfully explains conventional superconductivity, the ability of certain metals at low temperatures to conduct electricity without resistance. ... The quantum Hall effect is a quantum mechanical version of the Hall effect, observed in two-dimensional systems of electrons subjected to low temperatures and strong magnetic fields, in which the Hall conductance σ takes on the quantized values where e is the elementary charge and h is Plancks... Frank Wilczek (born May 15, 1951) is a Nobel prize winning American physicist. ... Cosmology, from the Greek: κοσμολογία (cosmologia, κόσμος (cosmos) order + λογια (logia) discourse) is the study of the Universe in its totality, and by extension, humanitys place in it. ... Alan Harvey Guth (born February 27, 1947) is a physicist and cosmologist. ...


MIT chemists have discovered number syntheses like metathesis, stereoselective oxidation reactions, synthetic self-replicating molecules, and CFC-ozone reactions. Penicillin and Vitamin A were also first synthesized at MIT. Richard Royce Schrock (born January 4, 1945) was one of the recipients of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his contribution to the metathesis method in organic chemistry. ... Karl Barry Sharpless (born April 28, 1941) is an American chemist renowned for his work on organometallic chemistry. ... Julius Rebek Julius Rebek, Jr. ... Mario Molina (left) with Luis E. Miramontes Mario José Molina Henríquez (born March 19, 1943) was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in elucidating the threat to the Earths ozone layer of chlorofluorocarbon gases (or CFCs). ... For the Japanese rock band, see Penicillin (band). ... Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ...


MIT biologists have been recognized for their discoveries and advances in RNA, protein synthesis, apoptosis, gene splicing and introns, antibody diversity, reverse transcriptase, oncogenes, phage resistance, and neurophysiology. MIT researchers discovered the genetic bases for Lou Gehrig's disease and Huntington's disease. Eric Lander was one of the principal leaders of the Human Genome Project. Ribonucleic acid or RNA is a nucleic acid polymer consisting of nucleotide monomers that plays several important roles in the processes that translate genetic information from deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into protein products; RNA acts as a messenger between DNA and the protein synthesis complexes known as ribosomes, forms vital portions... Har Gobind Khorana (born January 9, 1922) is an American molecular biologist born of Indian Punjabi heritage in British India. ... H. Robert Horvitz is an American biologist best known for his research on the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. ... Phillip Allen Sharp (born 1944), U.S. geneticist and molecular biologist; co-discovered gene splicing; shared the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Richard J. Roberts for the discovery that genes in eukaryotes are not contiguous strings but contain introns, and that the splicing of messenger RNA to... Susumu Tonegawa (利根川 進 Tonegawa Susumu, born September 6, 1939) is a Japanese scientist who won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1987 for his discovery of the genetic principle for generation of antibody diversity. ... David Baltimore (b. ... Category: ... Salvador Edward Luria (August 13, 1912 – February 6, 1991) was an Italian microbiologist whose pioneering work on phages helped open up molecular biology. ... Jerome Ysroael Lettvin is a cognitive scientist and professor Emeritus of Electrical and Bioengineering and Communications Physiology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). ... Motor neurone disease (MND) is a term used to cover a number of illnesses of the motor neurone: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), progressive bulbar palsy (PBP) and progressive lateral sclerosis (PLS). ... Eric Lander Eric Steven Lander (b. ... The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a project undertaken with a goal to understand the genetic make-up of the human species by identifying all the genes in the human genome and mapping how individual genes are sequenced. ...


MIT economists have contributed to the fields of system dynamics, financial engineering, neo-classical growth models, and welfare economics and developed fundamental financial models like the Modigliani-Miller theorem and Black-Scholes equation. Jay Wright Forrester (born 14 July 1918 Climax, Nebraska) is an American pioneer of computer engineering. ... Robert C. Merton (born July 31, 1944), a leading scholar in the field of finance, was one of three men who, in the early 1970s, developed the mathematics of the stock options markets. ... Robert Merton Solow (born August 23, 1924) is an American economist particularly known for his work on the theory of economic growth. ... Paul Anthony Samuelson (born May 15, 1915, in Gary, Indiana) is an American neoclassical economist known for his contributions to many fields of economics, beginning with his general statement of the comparative statics method in his 1947 book Foundations of Economic Analysis. ... Franco Modigliani (June 18, 1918 – September 25, 2003) was an Italian-American economist at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1985. ... Myron S. Scholes (born July 1, 1941) is one of the authors of the famous Black-Scholes equation. ...


Professors Noam Chomsky and Morris Halle are both noted linguists, Professor Henry Jenkins is prominent in the field of media studies, and Professor John Harbison has won a Pulitzer Prize and MacArthur Fellowship for his operatic scores. Avram Noam Chomsky (Hebrew :אברם נועם חומסקי Yiddish: אברם נועם כאמסקי) (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ... Morris Halle, né Pinkowitz, is an American linguist. ... Henry Jenkins III (born June 4, 1958 in Atlanta, Georgia) American Scholar, currently Peter de Florez Professor of Humanities and Co-Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies program with William Uricchio. ... Media Studies is the academic study of the constitution and effects of media. ... John Harbison John Harris Harbison (born December 20, 1938 in Orange, New Jersey) is a composer, best known for his operas and large choral works. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ...


UROP

In 1969, MIT began the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) to enable undergraduates to collaborate directly with faculty members and researchers. The program, founded by Margaret MacVicar, builds upon the MIT philosophy of "learning by doing." Students obtain research projects, colloquially called "UROPs," through postings on the UROP website or by contacting faculty members directly.[112] Over 2,800 undergraduates, 70% of the student body, participate every year for academic credit, pay, or on a volunteer basis.[113] Students often become published, file patent applications, and/or launch start-up companies based upon their experience in UROPs. Margaret MacVicar (1944-1991) was an American physicist and educator. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A patent application is a request pending at a patent office for the grant of a patent for the invention described and claimed by that application. ... A startup company is a company with a limited operating history. ...


Current Initiatives

In 2001, MIT announced that it planned to put all of its course materials online as part of its OpenCourseWare project by 2007. Building upon MIT's leadership in the free software movement, Nicholas Negroponte of the MIT Media Lab started the One Laptop per Child initiative to expand computer education and connectivity to children worldwide. Upon taking office in 2004, President Hockfield launched an Energy Research Council to investigate how MIT can respond to the interdisciplinary challenges of increasing global energy consumption.[114] MIT OpenCourseWare (MIT OCW) is an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to put all of the educational materials from MITs undergraduate- and graduate-level courses online, free and openly available to anyone, anywhere, by the year 2007. ... The free software movement, also known as the free software philosophy, began in 1983 when Richard Stallman announced the GNU Project. ... Nicholas Negroponte Nicholas Negroponte (born 1943) is an architect and computer scientist best known as the founder and Chairman Emeritus of Massachusetts Institute of Technologys Media Lab. ... The building interior near the entrance The MIT Media Lab in the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology engages in education and research in the digital technology used for expression and communication. ... First working prototype of $100 laptop One Laptop Per Child is a non-profit organization set up to oversee the $100 laptop project. ... Energy consumption is a measure of the rate of energy use such as fuels or electricity. ...


Traditions and student activities

Main articles: Traditions and student activities at MIT and MIT class ring
A typical "Brass Rat." The design variation pictured is from the Class of 2007.
A typical "Brass Rat." The design variation pictured is from the Class of 2007.
Music sample:
  • Sons of MIT
    MIT's old Alma Mater, "Sons of MIT", as performed by the MIT Glee Club. Early 20th century recording.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

MIT faculty and students value highly meritocracy and technical proficiency.[115][116] MIT has never awarded an honorary degree nor does it award athletic scholarships, ad eundem degrees, or Latin honors upon graduation.[117] It does, on rare occasions, award honorary professorships; Winston Churchill was so honored in 1949 and Salman Rushdie in 1993.[118] It has been suggested that Tim the Beaver, Time Traveler Convention, MIT Symphony Orchestra, MIT IDEAS Competition, MIT Enterprise Forum, MIT Monarch B, MIT Technology Insider, 6. ... MIT Class of 2007 ring. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Brass_Rat_2007_Finger. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Brass_Rat_2007_Finger. ... The first MIT Brass Rat MITs class ring is crafted each year by a student committee to present a unique yet traditional expression of MIT. It has three main segments: the bezel, containing a beaver (MITs mascot, from which the Rat in Brass Rat is derived), the MIT... Image File history File links SonsOfMIT.ogg‎ Recording of MITs old Alma Mater, Sons of MIT, performed by the MIT Glee Club under the direction of Henry Jackson Warren. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... An ad eundem degree is a courtesy degree awarded by one university or college to an alumnus of another. ... Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... Ahmed Salman Rushdie KBE (Hindi: Urdu: سلمان رشدی; born 19 June 1947) is a British-Indian novelist and essayist. ...


MIT students' passion for their subjects is balanced by the perception that their classes are more rigorous than their "grade inflated" peer institutions[119]— a love-hate relationship embodied by the school's informal motto/initialism IHTFP ("I hate this fucking place," jocularly euphemized as "I have truly found paradise," "Institute has the finest professors," etc.).[120] Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations formed from the initial letter or letters of words, such as NATO and XHTML, and are pronounced in a way that is distinct from the full pronunciation of what the letters stand for. ...


Many MIT students and graduates wear a large, heavy, distinctive class ring known as the "Brass Rat." Originally created in 1929, the ring's official name is the "Standard Technology Ring." The undergraduate ring design (a separate graduate student version exists, as well) varies slightly from year to year to reflect the unique character of the MIT experience for that class, but always features a three-piece design, with the MIT seal and the class year each appearing on a separate face, flanking a large rectangular bezel bearing an image of a beaver. Binomial name Castor canadensis Kuhl, 1820 A taxidermied American Beaver The American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is a large semi-aquatic rodent native to Canada, most of the United States and parts of northern Mexico. ...


Activities

See also: MIT hacks
A fire truck was placed on the Great Dome by hackers on September 11, 2006.
A fire truck was placed on the Great Dome by hackers on September 11, 2006.

MIT has over 380 recognized student activity groups,[121] including a campus radio station, The Tech student newspaper, the "world's largest open-shelf collection of science fiction" in English, model railroad club, a vibrant folk dance scene, weekly screenings of popular films by the Lecture Series Committee, and an annual entrepreneurship competition. The student life and culture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology encompasses hundreds of student activities, organizations, and athletics that contribute to MITs distinct culture. ... An MIT hack is defined as a clever, benign, and ethical prank or practical joke at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 371 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from: http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 371 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from: http://www. ... WMBR is the MIT-run student broadcasting station. ... Front page of The Tech, issue of January 18, 2006 The Tech, first published in 1881, is the oldest and largest campus newspaper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The MIT Science Fiction Society (or MITSFS) is a literary society and library of science fiction and fantasy books and magazines, located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC), a student organization at MIT, is one of the most famous model railroad clubs in the world. ... Tech Squares is a square and round dance club at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The student life and culture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology encompasses hundreds of student activities, organizations, and athletics that contribute to MITs distinct culture. ... The MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition is one of the largest and most famous student business plan competitions in the world. ...


MIT's Independent Activities Period is a four-week long "term" offering hundreds of optional classes, lectures, demonstrations, and other activities throughout the month of January between the Fall and Spring semesters. Some of the most popular recurring IAP activities are the 6.270, 6.370, and MasLab competitions, the annual "mystery hunt", and Charm School. The student life and culture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology encompasses hundreds of student activities, organizations, and athletics that contribute to MITs distinct culture. ... 6. ... The student life and culture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology encompasses hundreds of student activities, organizations, and athletics that contribute to MITs distinct culture. ... The MIT Mystery Hunt is a puzzlehunt competition held each January at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The student life and culture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology encompasses hundreds of student activities, organizations, and athletics that contribute to MITs distinct culture. ...


Many MIT students also engage in "hacking," which encompasses both the physical exploration of areas that are generally off-limits (such as rooftops and steam tunnels), as well as elaborate practical jokes. In 2005, Caltech infiltrators hacked MIT's admitted students weekend (called CPW, for "campus preview weekend") by distributing T-shirts reading "MIT: Because not everyone can get in to Caltech." In 2006, MIT hackers posing as "Howe & Ser Moving Co." responded by stealing Caltech's cannon and placing it prominently on campus during that year's CPW.[122] A mural by Roof & Tunnel Hackers at MIT. Roof and Tunnel Hacking is the unauthorized (generally prohibited and often outright illegal) entry into and exploration of roof and utility tunnel spaces. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ...


Athletics

MIT Sailing Dinghies on the Charles River

MIT's student athletics program offers 41 varsity-level sports, the largest program in the nation.[123][124] They participate in the NCAA's Division III, the New England Women's and Men's Athletic Conference, the New England Football Conference, and NCAA's Division I and Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges (EARC) for crew. They fielded several dominant intercollegiate Tiddlywinks teams through 1980, winning national and world championships.[125] MIT teams have won or placed highly in national championships in pistol, track and field, swimming and diving, cross country, crew, fencing, and water polo. MIT has produced 128 Academic All-Americans, the third largest membership in the country for any division and the highest number of members for Division III.[126] Image File history File links MIT_dinghies. ... Image File history File links MIT_dinghies. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The New England Womens and Mens Athletic Conference (or NEWMAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions are located in the northeastern United States in the States of Connecticut, and Massachusetts. ... The New England Football Conference is an athletic conference which competes in football in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in New England. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Rowing is the oldest intercollegiate sport in the United States. ... // Tiddlywinks is a game played with sets of small, thin discs (called winks) lying on a surface, usually a felt mat. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ...


The Institute's sports teams are called the Engineers, their mascot since 1914 being a beaver, "nature's engineer." Lester Gardner, a member of the Class of 1898, provided the following justification: Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name Castor canadensis Kuhl, 1820 A taxidermied American Beaver The American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is a large semi-aquatic rodent native to Canada, most of the United States and parts of northern Mexico. ...

The beaver not only typifies the Tech, but his habits are particularly our own. The beaver is noted for his engineering and mechanical skills and habits of industry. His habits are nocturnal. He does his best work in the dark.[127]

The standard joke about this is: "The beaver is the engineer of the animal world; the MIT man is the animal of the engineering world."


The Zesiger sports and fitness center (Z-Center) which opened in 2002, significantly expanded the capacity and quality of MIT's athletics, physical education, and recreation offerings to 10 buildings and 26 acres of playing fields. The 124,000 square foot (11,500 m²) facility features an Olympic-class swimming pool, international-scale squash and racketball courts, and a two-story fitness center.[128] The Zesiger Sports and Fitness Center (Z Center) is the central athletics facility at MIT. It is connected to Rockwell Cage, du Pont Gymnasium and the Johnson Athletic Center. ...


Housing

Main article: Housing at MIT
Detail of Baker House façade onto the Charles River.

MIT guarantees four-year, dormitory housing for all undergraduates[129] and provides live-in graduate student tutors and faculty housemasters who have the dual role of both helping students and monitoring them for medical or mental health problems. Students are permitted to select their dorm and floor upon arrival on campus, and as a result diverse communities arise in living groups; the dorms on and east of Massachusetts Avenue are stereotypically more involved in countercultural activities. MIT also has six graduate student dormitories, which house about one-third of the graduate student population.[130] Housing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology may refer to MIT undergraduate dormitories MIT graduate dormitories MIT fraternities and sororities Chronology of MIT dormitories Category: ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2396x1564, 809 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2396x1564, 809 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... The dormitories at MIT are famous in their own right. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ...


MIT has a very active Greek and co-op system. Approximately one-half of MIT male undergraduates and one-third of female undergraduates[131] are affiliated with one of MIT's 36 fraternities, sororities, and independent living groups (FSILGs).[132] Most FSILGs are located across the river in the Back Bay owing to MIT's historic location there, but there are also a few fraternities in MIT's West Campus and in Cambridge. Since 2002, all freshmen are required to live in the dormitory system for the first year before moving into an FSILG. Back Bay is the name of several places and neighborhoods in the world, including: Back Bay, Boston Back Bay, New Brunswick This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Noted alumni

Many of MIT's over 110,000 alumni and alumnae have had considerable success in scientific research, public service, education, and business. 27 MIT alumni have won the Nobel Prize and 37 have been selected as Rhodes Scholars.[133] This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni includes students who studied as undergraduates or graduate students at MITs School of Engineering, School of Science, Sloan School of Management, School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, School of Architecture and Urban Studies, or Whitaker College. ... This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni includes students who studied as undergraduates or graduate students at MITs School of Engineering, School of Science, Sloan School of Management, School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, School of Architecture and Urban Studies, or Whitaker College. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ...


Alumni currently in American politics and public service include Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke, New Hampshire Senator John E. Sununu, U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman, MA-1 Representative John Olver, CA-13 Representative Pete Stark. MIT alumni in international politics include British Foreign Minister David Miliband, former U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan, former Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Ahmed Chalabi, and former Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu. The Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve is the head of the central bank of the United States and one of the more important decision-makers in American economic policies. ... Ben Shalom Bernanke[1] (born December 13, 1953) (pronounced ber-NAN-kee, bÉ™r-nan-kÄ“ or ), is an American economist and current Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve. ... New Hampshire ratified the Constitution on June 21, 1788. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a Republican United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... The United States Secretary of Energy is the head of the United States Department of Energy, concerned as the name suggests, with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Samuel Wright Bodman III, Sc. ... Massachusettss first congressional district is in western and central Massachusetts. ... Rep. ... California congressional districts since 2003. ... Stark delivers his response to President George W. Bushs 2005 State of the Union address. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a governmental cabinet minister who helps form the foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... David Wright Miliband (born 15 July 1965) is a British politician who is the current Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [1] and Member of Parliament for the constituency of South Shields, Tyne and Wear. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to January 1, 2007, serving two five-year terms. ... Ahmed Chalabi Ahmed Abdel Hadi Chalabi,1 (Arabic: احمد الجلبي) (born October 30, 1944) was interim oil minister in Iraq[1] in April-May 2005 and December-January 2006 and deputy prime minister from May 2005 until May 2006. ... The Prime Minister of Israel (Hebrew: ראש הממשלה, Rosh HaMemshala, lit. ...   (Hebrew: בִּנְיָמִין נְתַנְיָהוּ (without niqqud: בנימין נתניהו), Hebrew transliteration written in English: Binyamin Netanyahu, nicknamed Bibi) (born October 21, 1949, Tel Aviv) was the 9th Prime Minister of Israel and is a leading figure in the Likud party. ...


MIT alumni founded or co-founded many notable companies, such as Intel, McDonnell Douglas, Texas Instruments, 3Com, Qualcomm, Bose, Raytheon, Koch Industries, Rockwell International, Genentech, and Campbell Soup. Robert Noyce Robert Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed the Mayor of Silicon Valley, co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel in 1968. ... James Smith McDonnell (April 9, 1899 - August 22, 1980) was an aviation pioneer and founder of McDonnell Aircraft Corporation, later McDonnell Douglas. ... Donald Wills Douglas, Sr. ... Cecil Howard Green (August 6, 1900 – April 11, 2003) was a British-born American geophysicist who trained at the University of British Columbia and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Robert Melancton Metcalfe (born 1946 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American technology pioneer who co-invented Ethernet with David Boggs, founded 3Com and formulated Metcalfes Law. ... Andrew James Viterbi, Ph. ... Amar Gopal Bose (Bengali: অমর গোপাল বসু Ômor Gopal Boshu) (born November 2, 1929) is the chairman and founder of Bose Corporation. ... Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 30, 1974) was an American engineer and science administrator, known for his political role in the development of the atomic bomb, and the idea of the memex—seen as a pioneering concept for the World Wide Web. ... Fred C. Koch born Quanah, Texas (1900-1967) was the father of both David and Charles Koch. ... Willard Rockwell (born 1888 in Massachusetts, United States - died 1978) was a businessman who helped shape and name what eventually became the Rockwell International company. ... Robert A Swanson was the founder of Genentech, one of the leading biotech companies in the country and a pioneer of the industry. ... John Thompson Dorrance (1873-1930) was a U.S. soup businessman, and most signficantly the president of Campbell Soup Company from 1914 to 1930. ...


MIT alumni have also led other prominent institutions of higher education, including the University of California system, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, Carnegie Mellon University, Tufts University, Northeastern University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Tecnológico de Monterrey, and Purdue University. Although not alumni, former Provost Robert A. Brown is President of Boston University, former Provost Mark Wrighton is Chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis, and former Professor David Baltimore was President of Caltech. David S. Saxon (1920—2005) was an American physicist and educator who served as the President of the University of California system as well as the Chairman for the Massachusetts Institute of Technologys Corporation (Board of Trustees). ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ... Dr. William R. Brody is the current President of Johns Hopkins University, a position which he has held since 1996. ... Jared Leigh Cohon is the current President of Carnegie Mellon University. ... Lawrence S. Bacow Lawrence S. Bacow has been president of Tufts University since September 1, 2001. ... Joseph E. Aoun is the seventh president of Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts where he took office on August 15, 2006. ... Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson Shirley Ann Jackson (born August 5, 1946) is an African-American physicist, and 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. ... Eugenio Garza Sada (January 11, 1892 – September 17, 1973) was a Mexican businessman and philanthropist of Jewish descent who is best known for founding the ITESM in 1943. ... Dr. Martin C. Jischke. ... Robert A. Brown is the president of Boston University. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... Mark S. Wrighton, Ph. ... “Washington University” redirects here. ... David Baltimore (b. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ...


More than one third of the United States' manned spaceflights have included MIT-educated astronauts, among them Buzz Aldrin (Sc. D XVI '63), more than any university excluding the United States service academies.[134] Human spaceflight Mercury program Gemini program Apollo program Apollo-Soyuz (Soviet Union partnership) Skylab Space Shuttle Shuttle-Mir Program (Russian partnership) International Space Station (working together with Russia, Canada, ESA, and JAXA along with co-operators, ASI and Brazil) Orion Program Satellite and Robotic space missions Earth Observing Explorer I... This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni includes students who studied as undergraduates or graduate students at MITs School of Engineering, School of Science, Sloan School of Management, School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, School of Architecture and Urban Studies, or Whitaker College. ... Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... The United States Service academies, also known as the United States Military Academies, are federal academies for the undergraduate education and training of commissioned officers for the United States armed forces. ...

References

  1. ^ MIT Nobelists
  2. ^ [1], Boston Globe
  3. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Academic Schools and Departments, Divisions & Sections. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  4. ^ 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, volume 4, p. 292: "[MIT] was a pioneer in introducing as a feature of its original plans laboratory instruction in physics, mechanics, and mining."
  5. ^ TheCenter Research University Data (2005). Retrieved on 2006-12-15.
  6. ^ "Three from MIT win top U.S. science, technology honors", MIT News Office, July 19, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-20. 
  7. ^ a b MIT Office of Provost, Institutional Research. MIT MacArthur Fellows. Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  8. ^ Bank of Boston Economics Department (March 1997). MIT: The Impact of Innovation. Retrieved on 2006-10-04.
  9. ^ Charter of the MIT Corporation. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  10. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Mission and Origins. Retrieved on 2006-07-18.
  11. ^ Lewis, Warren K.; Ronald H. Rornett, C. Richard Soderberg, Julius A. Stratton, John R. Loofbourow, et al (December 1949). Report of the Committee on Educational Survey (Lewis Report). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p. 8. Retrieved on 2006-10-04. 
  12. ^ Barton's philosophy for the institute was for "the teaching, not of the manipulations done only in the workshop, but the inculcation of all the scientific principles which form the basis and explanation of them;" The Founding of MIT, cites (1) Letter, William Barton Rogers to Henry Darwin Rogers, March 13, 1846, William Barton Rogers Papers (MC 1), Institute Archives & Special Collections, MIT Libraries.
  13. ^ Andrews, Elizabeth, Nora Murphy, and Tom Rosko(2004), William Barton Rogers: MIT's Visionary Founder (Charter, laboratory instruction, first classes in Mercantile building)
  14. ^ The history montage at the Kendall/MIT T-stop
  15. ^ National Selection Committee Ballot - Power of the NSC. Retrieved on 23 November, 2005.
  16. ^ "Tech Alumni Holds Reunion. Record attendance, novel features. Cooperative plan with Harvard announced by Pres. Maclaurin. Gov. Walsh Brings Best Wishes of the State.", Boston Daily Globe, 1914-01-11, p. 117. 
    Maclaurin quoted: "in future Harvard agrees to carry out all its work in engineering and mining in the buildings of Technology under the executive control of the president of Technology, and, what is of the first importance, to commit all instruction and the laying down of all courses to the faculty of Technology, after that faculty has been enlarged and strengthened by the addition to its existing members of men of eminence from Harvard's Graduate School of Applied Science."
  17. ^ "Harvard-Tech Merger. Duplication of Work to be Avoided in Future. Instructors Who WIll Hereafter be Members of Both Faculties", Boston Daily Globe, 1914-01-25, p. 47. 
  18. ^ Canceled by a 1917 State Judicial Court decision.Harvard Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
  19. ^ The "New Tech" (2006-09-08). Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  20. ^ Report of the Committee on Educational Survey, page 13
  21. ^ Leslie, Stuart (2004-04-15). The Cold War and American Science: The Military-Industrial-Academic Complex at MIT and Stanford. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-07959-1. 
  22. ^ Zachary, Gregg (1997-09-03). Endless Frontier: Vannevar Bush, Engineer of the American Century. Free Press. ISBN 0-684-82821-9. 
  23. ^ Report of the Committee on Educational Survey, page 13
  24. ^ More Emphasis on Science Vitally Needed to Educate Man for A Confused Civilization (1958-02-14). Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
  25. ^ Iron Birds Caged in Building 7 Lobby: Missiles on Display Here (1958-02-25). Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
  26. ^ "At a critical time in the late 1960s, Johnson stood up to the forces of campus rebellion at MIT. Many university presidents were destroyed by the troubles. Only Edward Levi, University of Chicago president, had comparable success guiding his institution to a position of greater strength and unity after the turmoil." David Warsh (June 1, 1999). A tribute to MIT's Howard Johnson. Boston Globe. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  27. ^ Chemical Heritage Foundation (2005). Ellen Swallow Richards. Chemical Achievers, The Human Face of Chemical Sciences. Retrieved on 2006-11-04.
  28. ^ "In 1959, 158 women were enrolled at MIT." O. Robert Simha (2001). MIT Campus Planning 1960-2000. MIT. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  29. ^ "When Drake arrived on campus 50 years ago, she was one of only 16 women in a class of 1,000."Lauren Clark. MIT Panel "Alumnae Through the Ages" Reflects on Changes for Women. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  30. ^ EECS Women Undergraduate Enrollment Committee (January 3 1995). Chapter 1: Male/Female enrollment patterns in EECS at MIT and other schools. Women Undergraduate Enrollment in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. Retrieved on 2006-12-08.
  31. ^ In 1995, faculty member Nancy Hopkins accused MIT of bias against herself and several of her female colleagues. Hopkins, rather than a third party, investigated her own charges and concluded in 1999 concluded there was "subtle yet pervasive" bias against women at MIT, although no instance of intentional discrimination was found. Despite the study's sealed evidence and its lack of peer review, Vest approved "targeted actions" like the creation of 11 committees and 20% salary increases for women faculty.
    Judith Kleinfeld. MIT Tarnishes Its Reputation with Gender Junk Science. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  32. ^ Kathryn Jean Lopez (April 10, 2001). Feminist Mythology. National Review. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  33. ^ "Over the past decade, the number of women undergraduates increased from 34 percent to 42 percent. Women now outnumber men in 10 undergraduate majors at MIT. The proportion of women graduate students has increased from 20 percent to 29 percent."

    "During Vest's presidency, MIT appointed its first woman department head in the School of Science, its first two minority department heads in the School of Engineering, and its first five women vice presidents."
    Charles Vest to step down from MIT presidency, Has been staunch national advocate for education and research. MIT News Office (2003-12-05). Retrieved on 2006-06-28. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BankBoston was a bank based in Boston, Massachusetts, which was created by the 1996 merger of BayBank and Bank of Boston. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Julius Adams Stratton (1901 - 1994) was a U.S. educator. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences (DEAS) is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University responsible for research, as well as undergraduate and graduate education in applied mathematics, computer science, engineering, and technology. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  34. ^ Professor Sues M.I.T. Over Refusal of Tenure. New York Times (1986-09-10). Retrieved on 2006-10-03.
  35. ^ MIT corporate ties raise concern. The Tech (1990). Retrieved on 2007-03-04.
  36. ^ Settlement allows cooperation on awarding financial-aid. MIT Tech Talk (1994). Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  37. ^ MIT's Inaction Blamed for Contributing to Death of a Freshman. Chronicle of Higher Education (1998-10-06). Retrieved on 2006-10-07.
  38. ^ Levine, Dana (2000-09-15). Institute Will Pay Kruegers $6M for Role in Death. The Tech. Retrieved on 2006-10-04.
  39. ^ "Students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been far more likely to [commit suicide] over the past decade compared to those at 11 other universities with elite science and engineering programs—38 percent more often than the next school, Harvard, and four times more than campuses with the lowest rate.

    "Madelyn Gould, a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, said these patterns showed a 'suicide contagion' at MIT - victim begetting victim in the same small community. 'It appears there's a culture at MIT that has reinforced suicide and jumping as a means of escaping,' said Gould, an authority on suicide and contagion. 'Somehow they've normalized that jumping out a window is OK.'"
    Healy, Patrick. "11 years, 11 suicides—Critics Say Spate of MIT Jumping Deaths Show a 'Contagion'", The Boston Globe, 2001-02-05, pp. A1.  Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  40. ^ "There is considerable debate as to whether a school's selectivity increases the likelihood of student suicide. The latest round of the debate is being played out in Cambridge, Mass., where Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is in the midst of a $27 million wrongful death suit over the death of a troubled sophomore in April 2000. Media reports have painted a portrait of an institution in the midst of a suicide epidemic. In fact, MIT's suicide rate is below the national average if one adjusts figures for the school's overwhelmingly male student body (American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, 2002)"
    Elizabeth Fried Ellen, LICSW (2002). Prevention on Campus. Psychiatric Times. Retrieved on 2006-06-26.
  41. ^ MIT Mental Health Task Force Fact Sheet. MIT New Office (2001-11-14). Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  42. ^ Clay endorses Mental Health Task Force Recommendations. MIT News Office (2001-11-28). Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  43. ^ Who Was Responsible for Elizabeth Shin?. New York Times (2002-04-28). Retrieved on 2006-10-07.
  44. ^ MIT dean of admissions resigns for falsifying resume (2007-04-26). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  45. ^ Dean of admissions resigns. MIT News Office (April 26, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  46. ^ James R. Killian (1949-04-02). The Inaugural Address. Retrieved on 2006-06-02.
  47. ^ The Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technonolgy (HST) offers joint MD, MD-PhD, or Medical Engineering degrees in collaboration with Harvard Medical School.
    Harvard-MIT HST Academics Overview. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  48. ^ MIT Corporation. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  49. ^ A Brief History and Workings of the Corporation. Retrieved on 2006-11-02.
  50. ^ MIT Investment Management Company. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  51. ^ Rafael L. Bras (2004-2005). Reports to the President, Report of the Chair of the Faculty. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  52. ^ MIT Education. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  53. ^ Course numbers are traditionally presented in Roman numerals, e.g. Course XVIII for mathematics. Starting in 2002, the Bulletin (MIT's course catalog) started to use Arabic numerals. Usage outside of the Bulletin varies, both Roman and Arabic numerals being used). This section follows the Bulletin's usage.
  54. ^ MIT Whereis. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  55. ^ ABC News. Loose Nukes: A Special Report. Retrieved on 2007-04-14.
  56. ^ MIT News Office (2005-10-13). MIT Assures Community of Research Reactor Safety. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.
  57. ^ MIT maps wireless users across campus (2005-11-04). Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  58. ^ MIT Architecture: Welcome. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  59. ^ a b Starchitecture on Campus (2004-02-22). Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  60. ^ Jarzombek, Mark (2004), Designing MIT: Bosworth's New Tech, Boston: Northeastern University Press
  61. ^ "Boston isn’t yet fully embracing contemporary architecture... it’s far riskier to put an unapologetically modern building in the historic Back Bay, not far from the neighborhood’s Victorian town houses and Gothic Revival columns."Rachel Strutt (February 11, 2007). Stained Glass?. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  62. ^ " 2007 361 Best College Rankings: Quality of Life: Campus Is Tiny, Unsightly, or Both. Princeton Review (2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-09. It should be noted in this regard that the size of the campus is considerable.
  63. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Enrollments 2006-2007. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  64. ^ MIT Facts 2007: International Students and Scholars. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  65. ^ See Demographics of the United States for references.
  66. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Admission to MIT. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  67. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Graduate Education. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  68. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Tuition and Financial Aid.
  69. ^ Proposed Revisions to GIRs Are Unveiled. Retrieved on 28 June, 2006.
  70. ^ (1986) Leadership and Organizational Culture: New Perspectives on Administrative Theory and Practice. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-01347-6.  p. 59: "In the sixties... Students spoke of their undergraduate experiences as 'drinking from a fire hose.'"
  71. ^ Common Data Set, Enrollment and Persistence. Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  72. ^ Concourse Program at MIT. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  73. ^ Terrascope home page. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  74. ^ The Coop Membership Application (2006)
  75. ^ "MIT for a long time... stood virtually alone as a university that embraced rather than shunned industry."
    (August 8, 1987) "A Survey of New England: A Concentration of Talent". The Economist. 
  76. ^ "The war made necessary the formation of new working coalitions... between these technologists and government officials. These changes were especially noteworthy at MIT."
    Edward B. Roberts (1991). "An Environment for Entrepreneurs", MIT: Shaping the Future. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. ISBN 0262631451. 
  77. ^ MIT ILP - About the ILP. Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  78. ^ Nearly half of all US Presidential science advisors have had ties to the Institute. MIT News Office (May 2, 2001). Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  79. ^ MIT Washington Office. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  80. ^ MIT's Building 7 and Harvard's Johnston Gate, the traditional entrances to each school, are 1.72 miles (2.77 km) apart along Massachusetts Avenue.
  81. ^ Times Higher Education Supplement World Rankings 2005. Retrieved on 2006-10-04. “The US has the world’s top two universities by our reckoning — Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, neighbours on the Charles River.”
  82. ^ Harvard-MIT Data Center. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  83. ^ a b MIT Facts 2007: Educational Partnerships. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  84. ^ MIT-Zaragoza International Logistics Program. Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  85. ^ MIT-Portugal. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
  86. ^ MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives. Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  87. ^ MIT Edgerton Center. Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  88. ^ MIT Public Service Center. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  89. ^ MIT Outreach Database. Retrieved on 2006-10-07.
  90. ^ Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science Program
  91. ^ Research Science Institute
  92. ^ Project Interphase. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  93. ^ History - The MIT Press. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  94. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007: National Universities. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  95. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007: Best Undergraduate Business Programs. U.S. News & World Report.
  96. ^ America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Top Business Schools. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  97. ^ USNWR's Best Graduate Programs in the Sciences. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  98. ^ USNWR's Best Graduate Programs in Engineering. Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  99. ^ MIT grad programs rank highly.
  100. ^ Webometrics Top 3000 World Universities. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  101. ^ Wikipedia's summaries: Top universities overall (worldwide); Top universities worldwide for technology; Top universities worldwide for science
  102. ^ 2006 The Times Higher Educational Supplement ranking of world’s research universities. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  103. ^ The Top American Research Universities: 2006 Annual Report. TheCenter for Measuring University Performance. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  104. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities 2006. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  105. ^ The Washington Monthly College Rankings: National Universities. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  106. ^ Diamond, Nancy and Hugh Davis Graham (1995), How should we rate research universities?
  107. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Faculty and Staff. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  108. ^ 61 MIT-related Nobel Prize winners include faculty, researchers, alumni and staff.
  109. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Faculty and Staff. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  110. ^ a b Brown Book (Annual Report of Sponsored Research). Retrieved on 2006-10-07.
  111. ^ TLO Statistics for Fiscal Year 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-07.
  112. ^ UROP homepage. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  113. ^ MIT Research and Teaching Firsts. Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  114. ^ Energy Research Council homepage. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  115. ^ "We are a meritocracy. We judge each other by our ideas, our creativity and our accomplishments, not by who our families are." Marilee Jones, former Dean of Admissions. MIT freshman application & financial aid information. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  116. ^ "Mathematical approaches to economics have at times been criticized as lacking in practical value. Yet the MIT Economics Department has trained many economists who have played leading roles in government and in the private sector, including the current heads of four central banks: those of Chile, Israel, Italy, and, I might add, the United States."
    Ben S. Bernanke (2006-06-09). 2006 Commencement Speech at MIT. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  117. ^ "MIT's founder, William Barton Rogers, regarded the practice of giving honorary degrees as 'literary almsgiving ... of spurious merit and noisy popularity....' Rogers was a geologist from the University of Virginia who believed in Thomas Jefferson's policy barring honorary degrees at the university, which was founded in 1819.... When Charles M. Vest... was offered the job of president of MIT in 1990, he met with Wiesner, who also had come to MIT from the University of Michigan. Wiesner, in ten words of concise persuasion, cited three worries of university presidents that Vest would not have at MIT—'No big time athletics. No medical school. No honorary degrees.'"
    No honorary degrees is an MIT tradition going back to ... Thomas Jefferson. MIT News Office (2001-06-08). Retrieved on 2006-05-07.
  118. ^ Stevenson, Daniel C.. "Rushdie Stuns Audience 26-100", MIT Tech, 1993-11-30, pp. 1. 
  119. ^ While some statistics suggest that MIT pre-medical or pre-law students have lower average GPAs than graduates from peer schools with the same standardized board scores, a Princeton University study cites MIT granting as many "A"s as Ivy League-level colleges Grade Deflation (August 2004). Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  120. ^ Bauer, M.J.. IHTFP. Retrieved on 2005-11-23.
  121. ^ MIT Association of Student Activities. Retrieved on 2006-11-01.
  122. ^ Howe & Ser Moving Co.. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  123. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Athletics and Recreation. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  124. ^ Varisty Sports fact sheets. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  125. ^ Shapiro, Fred (1972-04-25). MIT's World Champions 7. The Tech. Retrieved on 2006-10-04.
  126. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Athletics and Recreations. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  127. ^ MIT '93 Brass Rat. Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  128. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Athletics and Recreation. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  129. ^ MIT Housing Office (2005-08-25). MIT Undergraduate Housing FAQ:19 Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved on 2006-10-04.
  130. ^ Graduate Housing Guide - Quick Facts.
  131. ^ Consultation Report to Dean Rogers (2003-05-23). Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  132. ^ MIT Facts 2007: Housing. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  133. ^ MIT Office of Institutional Research. Awards and Honors. Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
  134. ^ Notable Alumni. Retrieved on 2006-11-04.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Mark Jarzombek is a US-born author and architectural historian, and (since 1995) Director of the History Theory Criticism Section of the Department of Architecture at MIT, Cambridge MA, USA. Jarzombek received his architectural training at the ETH Zurich, where he graduated in 1980. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 57 percent of its population living in places more than 100 miles away from the ocean (2003). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Front page of The Tech, issue of January 18, 2006 The Tech, first published in 1881, is the oldest and largest campus newspaper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as the first newspaper to be published online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

See the bibliography maintained by MIT's Institute Archives & Special Collections
  • Leslie, Stuart W. (1994). The Cold War and American Science: The Military-Industrial-Academic Complex at MIT and Stanford. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-07959-1. 
  • Mitchell, William J. (2007). Imagining MIT: Designing a Campus for the Twenty-First Century. The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-13479-8. 
  • Snyder, Benson R. (1973). The Hidden Curriculum. The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-69043-0. 
  • Peterson, T. F. (2003). Nightwork: A History of Hacks and Pranks at MIT. The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-66137-9. 
  • Prescott, Samuel C. (1954). When M.I.T. Was "Boston Tech", 1861-1916. Technology Press. ISBN 978-0-262-66139-3. 
  • Jarzombek, Mark (2003). Designing MIT: Bosworth's New Tech. Northeastern University Press. ISBN 1-55553-619-0. 
  • Simha, O. Robert (2003). MIT Campus Planning,: An Annotated Chronology. The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-69294-6. 

MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Julius Adams Stratton (1901 - 1994) was a U.S. educator. ... MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Samuel Cate Prescott (April 5, 1872-March 19, 1962) was an American food scientist and microbiologist who was involved in the development of food safety, food science, public health, and industrial microbiology. ... Mark Jarzombek is a US-born author and architectural historian, and (since 1995) Director of the History Theory Criticism Section of the Department of Architecture at MIT, Cambridge MA, USA. Jarzombek received his architectural training at the ETH Zurich, where he graduated in 1980. ... MIT Press Books The MIT Press is a university publisher affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • MIT, official web site
  • MyMIT, admissions web site
  • MIT Alumni Association

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Publications

  • MIT OpenCourseWare, Free online publication of nearly all MIT course materials
  • The Tech, student newspaper, the world's first newspaper on the web
  • Tech Talk, MIT's official newspaper
  • Technology Review, mass market technology and alumni magazine
  • MIT Press, university press & publisher
  • MIT World video streams of public lectures and symposia

Maps

  • MIT Maps
  • Early Maps of both the Boston and Cambridge Campuses maintained by MIT's Institute Archives & Special Collections
  • Maps and aerial photos for 42°21′35″N 71°05′32″W / 42.35982, -71.09211Coordinates: 42°21′35″N 71°05′32″W / 42.35982, -71.09211
    • Maps from WikiMapia, Google Maps, Live Search Maps, Yahoo! Maps, or MapQuest
    • Topographic maps from TopoZone or TerraServer-USA

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